.NET tool for showing the state of a build server via a web browser. Intended for use on a monitor on a wall.
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README.md

README.md

What is it?

Muro is a .NET build monitoring tool that is accessible via a web browser. Use it on a large monitor where the project team sits to provide visibility on the status of builds on your continuous integration server.

Why do this?

Why not? I've toyed with a couple of different tools, written in Scala and Ruby but I wanted a .NET version to tie in with the other tools I've been working on, NUSB and Ojo.

Surely this exists?

If it does, Google is having trouble finding it at of the 18th of September 2011. I've used greenscreen.rb (Ruby) and BigVisibleWall (Scala) but wanted a .NET version to tie in with the parsing library I'd written, Burro.

How do I use this?

Pre-requisites

I've built Muro as a .NET 4 project, so the runtime will need to be installed.

Installation

Simplest way to get started is to grab the installer from HERE which is the latest I've bothered to produce. Or, if you're feeling up for it, grab the whole lot and build it yourself. The dependencies are managed by NuGet, and for the moment it's a .NET 4 project, although it's quite possible it will work on earlier versions of the framework.

Configuration

On startup, Muro will look for a configuration file in the installed directory called "muro.yml". If one isn't present, it will create one with a sample configuration and close. You may supply the full path to an alternative config file as an argument to the service. Here is an example config:

 # Configuration file for Muro build monitoring tool
 -
   servertype: CruiseControl
   url: http://10.1.1.2:8153/go/cctray.xml
   username: 
   password: 
   pipelines:
     -
       name: "Trunk :: spec"

At this point in time it's the standard Burro configuration. Check that project for details. It will only read the configuration file on startup, so if you make any changes to the file, you will need to restart the service to pick them up. Running Muro

The intention is to run Muro as a Windows service which is how it is installed. It can also run as a standalone file just by running the executable. If any errors occur when running it, they will appear in the Windows Event log. Usage

Fire up a web browser, and browse to port 4567. Make the browser full screen and you'll have a monitor over your monitored builds.

Limitations

The types of build servers supported are again limited by whatever Burro is capable of, and as such check that project for what you can use. It currently only works correctly in Firefox, Chrome and Safari. I'll get around to fixing IE later, for the moment just install a real browser. It currently uses a simple timed refresh. If Muro is stopped at any point, the browser will need to be refreshed.