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README.md
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README.md

I first learned Python in 2006 during high school. Unfortunately, I chose the 'easiest' way learning it. I was just quickly scanning a Python beginner's book and enjoying the thoughts like "wow Python is so convenient and has so much more features than C and C++", without bothering to write a single line of Python code.

Of course I learned completely nothing about Python at that time, perhaps except the idea "Python seems like a good idea".

In college, I learned a little bit more about Python as well as various other languages and technologies. By the end of my freshman year, I was so proud and excited when I made $800 (my first small fortune, yay!) by working overnight to add features to a commercial Django website.

But I was not a good Python programmer. I was simply depended on Googling (thanks to the amazing Django documentations!), trial-and-error (thanks to Python the dynamic language letting me do it easily and quickly), and the client's lack of ability to judge my code quality.

Now, more than one year later, I've became a better programmer and learned many new things, some in easy ways and some in hard ways. But the most important thing I've learned may be: learn programming in hard way IS ALWAYS the best and easiest way, if you really want is 'to learn' rather than 'to get things done and move on', as you don't need to learn things over and over, as you can really grasp the harder, deeper, more interesting and more beautiful things in it.

So here I am. I'm going to re-learn Python, following Zed Shaw's Learn Python The Hard Way.

Tianyi Cui

Oct 26 2010