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Fixed several typos

- s/pusing/pushing/g
- replaced "github" with "origin" because of better fit in context
- s/seperate/separate/g
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1 parent 86d1d30 commit 708a0fe5aa23e3d211519a0b2c5a1be94d1b9024 @timbogit committed Oct 9, 2011
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
## Interactive Rebasing ##
You can also rebase interactively. This is often used to re-write your
-own commit objects before pusing them somewhere. It is an easy way to
+own commit objects before pushing them somewhere. It is an easy way to
split, merge or re-order commits before sharing them with others. You
can also use it to clean up commits you've pulled from someone when
applying them locally.
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ since the last time you have pushed (or merged from the origin repository).
To see what commits those are beforehand, you can run log this way:
- $ git log github/master..
+ $ git log origin/master..
Once you run the 'rebase -i' command, you will be thrown into your editor
of choice with something that looks like this:
@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ Then you will have to create a single commit message from this:
This reverts commit fc62e5543b195f18391886b9f663d5a7eca38e84.
-Once you have edited that down into once commit message and exit the editor,
+Once you have edited that down into one single commit message and exit the editor,
the commit will be saved with your new message.
If 'edit' is specified, it will do the same thing, but then pause before
@@ -106,7 +106,7 @@ that commit:
And then when you get to the command line, you revert that commit and create
two (or more) new ones. Lets say 21d80a5 modified two files, file1 and file2,
-and you wanted to split them into seperate commits. You could do this after
+and you wanted to split them into separate commits. You could do this after
the rebase dropped you to the command line :
$ git reset HEAD^
@@ -82,7 +82,7 @@ If you type '5' or 'p' in the menu, git will show you your diff patch by patch
(or hunk by hunk) and ask if you want to stage each one. That way you can
actually stage for a commit a part of a file edit. If you've edited a file
and want to only commit part of it and not an unfinished part, or commit
-documentation or whitespace changes seperate from substantive changes, you can
+documentation or whitespace changes separate from substantive changes, you can
use 'git add -i' to do so relatively easily.
Here I've staged some changes to the book_index_template.html file, but not all
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ however they have ssh authentication setup.
### Multiple User Access using Gitosis ###
-If you don't want to setup seperate accounts for every user, you can use
+If you don't want to setup separate accounts for every user, you can use
a tool called Gitosis. In gitosis, there is an authorized_keys file that
contains the public keys of everyone authorized to access the repository,
and then everyone uses the 'git' user to do pushes and pulls.
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ packed objects.
### Loose Objects ###
Loose objects are the simpler format. It is simply the compressed data stored
-in a single file on disk. Every object written to a seperate file.
+in a single file on disk. Every object written to a separate file.
If the sha of your object is <code>ab04d884140f7b0cf8bbf86d6883869f16a46f65</code>,
then the file will be stored in the following path:
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ implementation of object storage:
### Packed Objects ###
The other format for object storage is the packfile. Since Git stores each
-version of each file as a seperate object, it can get pretty inefficient.
+version of each file as a separate object, it can get pretty inefficient.
Imagine having a file several thousand lines long and changing a single line.
Git will store the second file in it's entirety, which is a great big waste
of space.
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ with a given byte can be found to avoid 8 iterations of the binary
search).
In version 1, the offsets and shas are in the same space, where in version two,
-there are seperate tables
+there are separate tables
for the shas, crc checksums and offsets. At the end of both files are
checksum shas for both the index file and the packfile it references.

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