Ruby ASCII Table Generator, simple and feature rich.
Ruby
Latest commit 8493194 Mar 14, 2017 @nateberkopec nateberkopec committed on GitHub Merge pull request #83 from kubakrzempek/master
Add styles to disable top and bottom borders

README.rdoc

Terminal Table

Description

Terminal Table is a fast and simple, yet feature rich ASCII table generator written in Ruby.

Installation

$ gem install terminal-table

Usage

Basics

To use Terminal Table:

require 'terminal-table'

To generate a table, provide an array of arrays (which are interpreted as rows):

rows = []
rows << ['One', 1]
rows << ['Two', 2]
rows << ['Three', 3]
table = Terminal::Table.new :rows => rows

# > puts table
#
# +-------+---+
# | One   | 1 |
# | Two   | 2 |
# | Three | 3 |
# +-------+---+

The constructor can also be given a block which is either yielded the Table object or instance evaluated:

table = Terminal::Table.new do |t|
  t.rows = rows
end

table = Terminal::Table.new do
  self.rows = rows
end

Adding rows one by one:

table = Terminal::Table.new do |t|
  t << ['One', 1]
  t.add_row ['Two', 2]
end

To add separators between rows:

table = Terminal::Table.new do |t|
  t << ['One', 1]
  t << :separator
  t.add_row ['Two', 2]
  t.add_separator
  t.add_row ['Three', 3]
end

# > puts table
#
# +-------+---+
# | One   | 1 |
# +-------+---+
# | Two   | 2 |
# +-------+---+
# | Three | 3 |
# +-------+---+

Cells can handle multiline content:

table = Terminal::Table.new do |t|
  t << ['One', 1]
  t << :separator
  t.add_row ["Two\nDouble", 2]
  t.add_separator
  t.add_row ['Three', 3]
end

# > puts table
#
# +--------+---+
# | One    | 1 |
# +--------+---+
# | Two    | 2 |
# | Double |   |
# +--------+---+
# | Three  | 3 |
# +--------+---+

Head

To add a head to the table:

table = Terminal::Table.new :headings => ['Word', 'Number'], :rows => rows

# > puts table
#
# +-------+--------+
# | Word  | Number |
# +-------+--------+
# | One   | 1      |
# | Two   | 2      |
# | Three | 3      |
# +-------+--------+

Title

To add a title to the table:

table = Terminal::Table.new :title => "Cheatsheet", :headings => ['Word', 'Number'], :rows => rows

# > puts table
#
# +------------+--------+
# |     Cheatsheet      |
# +------------+--------+
# | Word       | Number |
# +------------+--------+
# | One        | 1      |
# | Two        | 2      |
# | Three      | 3      |
# +------------+--------+

Alignment

To align the second column to the right:

table.align_column(1, :right)

# > puts table
#
# +-------+--------+
# | Word  | Number |
# +-------+--------+
# | One   |      1 |
# | Two   |      2 |
# | Three |      3 |
# +-------+--------+

To align an individual cell, you specify the cell value in a hash along the alignment:

table << ["Four", {:value => 4.0, :alignment => :center}]

# > puts table
#
# +-------+--------+
# | Word  | Number |
# +-------+--------+
# | One   |      1 |
# | Two   |      2 |
# | Three |      3 |
# | Four  |  4.0   |
# +-------+--------+

Style

To specify style options:

table = Terminal::Table.new :headings => ['Word', 'Number'], :rows => rows, :style => {:width => 80}

# > puts table
#
# +--------------------------------------+---------------------------------------+
# | Word                                 | Number                                |
# +--------------------------------------+---------------------------------------+
# | One                                  | 1                                     |
# | Two                                  | 2                                     |
# | Three                                | 3                                     |
# +--------------------------------------+---------------------------------------+

And change styles on the fly:

table.style = {:width => 40, :padding_left => 3, :border_x => "=", :border_i => "x"}

# > puts table
#
# x====================x=================x
# |               Cheatsheet             |
# x====================x=================x
# |   Word             |   Number        |
# x====================x=================x
# |   One              |   1             |
# |   Two              |   2             |
# |   Three            |   3             |
# x====================x=================x

You can also use styles to add a separator after every row:

table = Terminal::Table.new do |t|
  t.add_row [1, 'One']
  t.add_row [2, 'Two']
  t.add_row [3, 'Three']
  t.style = {:all_separators => true}
end

# > puts table
#
# +---+-------+
# | 1 | One   |
# +---+-------+
# | 2 | Two   |
# +---+-------+
# | 3 | Three |
# +---+-------+

You can also use styles to disable top and bottom borders of the table

table = Terminal::Table.new do |t|
  t.headings = ['id', 'name']
  t.rows = [[1, 'One'], [2, 'Two'], [3, 'Three']]
  t.style = { :border_top => false, :border_bottom => false }
end

# > puts table
# | id | name  |
# +----+-------+
# | 1  | One   |
# | 2  | Two   |
# | 3  | Three |

To change the default style options:

Terminal::Table::Style.defaults = {:width => 80}

All Table objects created afterwards will inherit these defaults.

Constructor options and setter methods

Valid options for the constructor are :rows, :headings, :style and :title - and all options can also be set on the created table object by their setter method:

table = Terminal::Table.new
table.title = "Cheatsheet"
table.headings = ['Word', 'Number']
table.rows = rows
table.style = {:width => 40}

More examples

For more examples, please see the examples/examples.rb file included in the source distribution.

Author

TJ Holowaychuk <tj@vision-media.ca>