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/* This file contains the definitions and documentation for the
machine modes used in the GNU compiler.
Copyright (C) 1987, 1992, 1994, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005,
2007, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This file is part of GCC.
GCC is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under
the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free
Software Foundation; either version 3, or (at your option) any later
version.
GCC is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY
WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License
for more details.
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
along with GCC; see the file COPYING3. If not see
<http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>. */
/* This file defines all the MACHINE MODES used by GCC.
A machine mode specifies a size and format of data
at the machine level.
Each RTL expression has a machine mode.
At the syntax tree level, each ..._TYPE and each ..._DECL node
has a machine mode which describes data of that type or the
data of the variable declared. */
/* This file is included by the genmodes program. Its text is the
body of a function. Do not rely on this, it will change in the
future.
The following statements can be used in this file -- all have
the form of a C macro call. In their arguments:
A CLASS argument must be one of the constants defined in
mode-classes.def, less the leading MODE_ prefix; some statements
that take CLASS arguments have restrictions on which classes are
acceptable. For instance, INT.
A MODE argument must be the printable name of a machine mode,
without quotation marks or trailing "mode". For instance, SI.
A PRECISION, BYTESIZE, or COUNT argument must be a positive integer
constant.
A FORMAT argument must be one of the real_mode_format structures
declared in real.h, or else a literal 0. Do not put a leading &
on the argument.
An EXPR argument must be a syntactically valid C expression.
If an EXPR contains commas, you may need to write an extra pair of
parentheses around it, so it appears to be a single argument to the
statement.
This file defines only those modes which are of use on almost all
machines. Other modes can be defined in the target-specific
mode definition file, config/ARCH/ARCH-modes.def.
Order matters in this file in so far as statements which refer to
other modes must appear after the modes they refer to. However,
statements which do not refer to other modes may appear in any
order.
RANDOM_MODE (MODE);
declares MODE to be of class RANDOM.
CC_MODE (MODE);
declares MODE to be of class CC.
INT_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE);
declares MODE to be of class INT and BYTESIZE bytes wide.
All of the bits of its representation are significant.
FRACTIONAL_INT_MODE (MODE, PRECISION, BYTESIZE);
declares MODE to be of class INT, BYTESIZE bytes wide in
storage, but with only PRECISION significant bits.
FLOAT_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE, FORMAT);
declares MODE to be of class FLOAT and BYTESIZE bytes wide,
using floating point format FORMAT.
All of the bits of its representation are significant.
FRACTIONAL_FLOAT_MODE (MODE, PRECISION, BYTESIZE, FORMAT);
declares MODE to be of class FLOAT, BYTESIZE bytes wide in
storage, but with only PRECISION significant bits, using
floating point format FORMAT.
DECIMAL_FLOAT_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE, FORMAT);
declares MODE to be of class DECIMAL_FLOAT and BYTESIZE bytes
wide. All of the bits of its representation are significant.
FRACTIONAL_DECIMAL_FLOAT_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE, FORMAT);
declares MODE to be of class DECIMAL_FLOAT and BYTESIZE bytes
wide. All of the bits of its representation are significant.
FRACT_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE, FBIT);
declares MODE to be of class FRACT and BYTESIZE bytes wide
with FBIT fractional bits. There may be padding bits.
UFRACT_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE, FBIT);
declares MODE to be of class UFRACT and BYTESIZE bytes wide
with FBIT fractional bits. There may be padding bits.
ACCUM_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE, IBIT, FBIT);
declares MODE to be of class ACCUM and BYTESIZE bytes wide
with IBIT integral bits and FBIT fractional bits.
There may be padding bits.
UACCUM_MODE (MODE, BYTESIZE, IBIT, FBIT);
declares MODE to be of class UACCUM and BYTESIZE bytes wide
with IBIT integral bits and FBIT fractional bits.
There may be padding bits.
RESET_FLOAT_FORMAT (MODE, FORMAT);
changes the format of MODE, which must be class FLOAT,
to FORMAT. Use in an ARCH-modes.def to reset the format
of one of the float modes defined in this file.
PARTIAL_INT_MODE (MODE);
declares a mode of class PARTIAL_INT with the same size as
MODE (which must be an INT mode). The name of the new mode
is made by prefixing a P to the name MODE. This statement
may grow a PRECISION argument in the future.
VECTOR_MODE (CLASS, MODE, COUNT);
Declare a vector mode whose component mode is MODE (of class
CLASS) with COUNT components. CLASS must be INT or FLOAT.
The name of the vector mode takes the form VnX where n is
COUNT in decimal and X is MODE.
VECTOR_MODES (CLASS, WIDTH);
For all modes presently declared in class CLASS, construct
corresponding vector modes having width WIDTH. Modes whose
byte sizes do not evenly divide WIDTH are ignored, as are
modes that would produce vector modes with only one component,
and modes smaller than one byte (if CLASS is INT) or smaller
than two bytes (if CLASS is FLOAT). CLASS must be INT or
FLOAT. The names follow the same rule as VECTOR_MODE uses.
COMPLEX_MODES (CLASS);
For all modes presently declared in class CLASS, construct
corresponding complex modes. Modes smaller than one byte
are ignored. For FLOAT modes, the names are derived by
replacing the 'F' in the mode name with a 'C'. (It is an
error if there is no 'F'. For INT modes, the names are
derived by prefixing a C to the name.
ADJUST_BYTESIZE (MODE, EXPR);
ADJUST_ALIGNMENT (MODE, EXPR);
ADJUST_FLOAT_FORMAT (MODE, EXPR);
ADJUST_IBIT (MODE, EXPR);
ADJUST_FBIT (MODE, EXPR);
Arrange for the byte size, alignment, floating point format, ibit,
or fbit of MODE to be adjustable at run time. EXPR will be executed
once after processing all command line options, and should
evaluate to the desired byte size, alignment, format, ibit or fbit.
Unlike a FORMAT argument, if you are adjusting a float format
you must put an & in front of the name of each format structure.
Note: If a mode is ever made which is more than 255 bytes wide,
machmode.h and genmodes.c will have to be changed to allocate
more space for the mode_size and mode_alignment arrays. */
/* VOIDmode is used when no mode needs to be specified,
as for example on CONST_INT RTL expressions. */
RANDOM_MODE (VOID);
/* BLKmode is used for structures, arrays, etc.
that fit no more specific mode. */
RANDOM_MODE (BLK);
/* Single bit mode used for booleans. */
FRACTIONAL_INT_MODE (BI, 1, 1);
/* Basic integer modes. We go up to TI in generic code (128 bits).
The name OI is reserved for a 256-bit type (needed by some back ends).
FIXME TI shouldn't be generically available either. */
INT_MODE (QI, 1);
INT_MODE (HI, 2);
INT_MODE (SI, 4);
INT_MODE (DI, 8);
INT_MODE (TI, 16);
/* No partial integer modes are defined by default. */
/* Basic floating point modes. SF and DF are the only modes provided
by default. The names QF, HF, XF, and TF are reserved for targets
that need 1-word, 2-word, 80-bit, or 128-bit float types respectively.
These are the IEEE mappings. They can be overridden with
RESET_FLOAT_FORMAT or at runtime (in TARGET_OPTION_OVERRIDE). */
FLOAT_MODE (SF, 4, ieee_single_format);
FLOAT_MODE (DF, 8, ieee_double_format);
/* Basic CC modes.
FIXME define this only for targets that need it. */
CC_MODE (CC);
/* Fixed-point modes. */
FRACT_MODE (QQ, 1, 7); /* s.7 */
FRACT_MODE (HQ, 2, 15); /* s.15 */
FRACT_MODE (SQ, 4, 31); /* s.31 */
FRACT_MODE (DQ, 8, 63); /* s.63 */
FRACT_MODE (TQ, 16, 127); /* s.127 */
UFRACT_MODE (UQQ, 1, 8); /* .8 */
UFRACT_MODE (UHQ, 2, 16); /* .16 */
UFRACT_MODE (USQ, 4, 32); /* .32 */
UFRACT_MODE (UDQ, 8, 64); /* .64 */
UFRACT_MODE (UTQ, 16, 128); /* .128 */
ACCUM_MODE (HA, 2, 8, 7); /* s8.7 */
ACCUM_MODE (SA, 4, 16, 15); /* s16.15 */
ACCUM_MODE (DA, 8, 32, 31); /* s32.31 */
ACCUM_MODE (TA, 16, 64, 63); /* s64.63 */
UACCUM_MODE (UHA, 2, 8, 8); /* 8.8 */
UACCUM_MODE (USA, 4, 16, 16); /* 16.16 */
UACCUM_MODE (UDA, 8, 32, 32); /* 32.32 */
UACCUM_MODE (UTA, 16, 64, 64); /* 64.64 */
/* Allow the target to specify additional modes of various kinds. */
#if HAVE_EXTRA_MODES
# include EXTRA_MODES_FILE
#endif
/* Complex modes. */
COMPLEX_MODES (INT);
COMPLEX_MODES (FLOAT);
/* Decimal floating point modes. */
DECIMAL_FLOAT_MODE (SD, 4, decimal_single_format);
DECIMAL_FLOAT_MODE (DD, 8, decimal_double_format);
DECIMAL_FLOAT_MODE (TD, 16, decimal_quad_format);
/* The symbol Pmode stands for one of the above machine modes (usually SImode).
The tm.h file specifies which one. It is not a distinct mode. */
/*
Local variables:
mode:c
version-control: t
End:
*/
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