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README.md

Tonatona

Build Status Hackage Stackage LTS Stackage Nightly

tonatona

Any PRs are welcome, even for documentation fixes. (The main author of this library is not an English native.)

What is Tonatona?

Tonatona is a framework for any type of applications. It handles lots of boring tasks that are needed for real-world development such as reading in values defined in environment variables, setting up logging, sending emails, accessing databases, etc.

Tonatona can also be used with your favorite web framework as a glue. Tonatona does not provide the core functionalities of web applicationsわかってないかもしれません), such as routing, request parsing, response building, etc. Instead, you can use plugins like tonatona-servant, tonatona-spock, or tonatona-yesod to work with your favorite web framework.

Tonatona provides a plugin architecture so that anyone can add plugins implementing arbitrary functionality. This repository contains many standard plugins that are helpful when writing Haskell applications.

Goals for Tonatona

The most important goal of Tonatona is to make development speed fast and maintenance cost low.

In the Haskell community, you often hear things like, "Haskell makes it easy to maintain applications, but it takes a lot of time to create completely new, production-ready applications."

Tonatona's goal is to change this to "Haskell is great to maintain big applications, AND it is super-easy to create completely new, production-ready applications!"

Tonatona achieves this goal by providing a plugin-based architecture. There are many production-ready plugins to use in your own code. In order to start using a new plugin, often all you have to do is just import it! No need to specify configuration from within your application.

How to use Tonatona

Using Tonatona is relatively simple. It requires declaring a few datatypes, as well as instances for classes provided by Tonatona.

This section describes how to do this, using our stack template for tonatona.

A quick sample

First, let's create a new tonatona project with stack new command:

$ stack new sample-app https://raw.githubusercontent.com/tonatona-project/tonatona/master/tonatona.hsfiles

This will create a new project named "sample-app".

Let’s start by just looking at all the code in sample-app/src/TonaApp/Main.hs.

module TonaApp.Main (app) where

import Tonalude

import Tonatona (HasConfig(..), HasParser(..))
import qualified Tonatona.Logger as TonaLogger



-- App


app :: RIO Config ()
app = do
  -- Tonatona.Logger plugin enables to use logger functions without any configurations.
  TonaLogger.logInfo $ display ("This is a skeleton for tonatona project" :: Text)
  TonaLogger.logDebug $ display ("This is a debug message" :: Text)



-- Config


data Config = Config
  { tonaLogger :: TonaLogger.Config
  -- , anotherPlugin :: TonaAnotherPlugin.Config
  -- , yetAnotherPlugin :: TonaYetAnotherPlugin.Config
  }


instance HasConfig Config TonaLogger.Config where
  config = tonaLogger


instance HasParser Config where
  parser = Config
      <$> parser
      -- <*> parser
      -- <*> parser

As you can see import part, tonatona is supposed to be used with Tonalude as an alternative to Prelude.

import Tonalude

import Tonatona (HasConfig(..), HasParser(..))
import qualified Tonatona.Logger as TonaLogger

The main function named app has type of RIO Config (), instead of just IO (). The Tonalude module and plugin modules (e.g., Tonatona.Logger) provides bunch of convenient functions to be used in RIO Config monad.

app :: RIO Config ()
app = do
  -- Tonatona.Logger plugin enables to use logger functions without any configurations.
  TonaLogger.logInfo $ display ("This is a skeleton for tonatona project" :: Text)
  TonaLogger.logDebug $ display ("This is a debug message" :: Text)

One of the amazing thing here is that there are no configurations about logging behaviour. The only thing you have to do is just write a little bit of boilerplate code.

data Config = Config
  { tonaLogger :: TonaLogger.Config
  -- , anotherPlugin :: TonaAnotherPlugin.Config
  -- , yetAnotherPlugin :: TonaYetAnotherPlugin.Config
  }


instance HasConfig Config TonaLogger.Config where
  config = tonaLogger


instance HasParser Config where
  parser = Config
      <$> parser
      -- <*> parser
      -- <*> parser

As comment implies, there are no dificulties to use other plugins. Just add boilerplate codes. It's all!

OK. It's time to compile it.

$ stack install --pedantic

So, let's see how it works.

$ stack exec sample-app
2018-11-18 21:15:09.594168: [info] This is a skeleton for tonatona project
@(src/TonaApp/Main.hs:16:3)
2018-11-18 21:15:09.594783: [debug] This is a debug message
@(src/TonaApp/Main.hs:17:3)

Wow, It actually works! But wait, it seems too verbose to run on production servers. Let's tell "sample-app" to act as production mode.

$ ENV=Production stack exec sample-app
This is a skeleton for tonatona project

Of course, all available environment variables and command line options can be displayed:

$ stack exec sample-app -- --help
Application deployment mode to run
    Default: Development
    Type: DeployMode
    Command line option: --env
    Environment variable: ENV

Make the operation more talkative
    Default: False
    Type: Bool
    Command line option: --verbose
    Environment variable: VERBOSE
...
...

This amazing feature is also provided by tonatona-logger plugin. It is the power of plugin-based architecture tonatona provides.

Adding new plugin

First, we need to add new plugin to use in dependencies of package.yaml. In this example, we use tonatona-persistent-sqlite plugin.

dependencies:
  - base >= 4.7 && < 5
  # `persistent` and `persistent-template` are also needed to
  # actually use `tonatona-persistent-sqlite`.
  - persistent
  - persistent-template
  - tonalude
  - tonatona
  - tonatona-logger
  # new plugin to add
  - tonatona-persistent-sqlite

Next, you need to add new field to Config.

import qualified Tonatona.Persist.Sqlite as TonaDb

data Config = Config
  { tonaLogger :: TonaLogger.Config
  , tonaDb :: TonaDb.Config
  }

Note that you have to import Tonatona.Persist.Sqlite module that tonatona-persistent-sqlite exposes.

Your Config data type will contain configuration values that can be read in on the command line or through environment variables. For instance, TonaDb.Config will contain the connection string for the SQLite database. By default, this can be passed on the command line as --db-conn-string or as an environment variable as DB_CONN_STRING. We will see this be used later.

Your Config data type should generally contain Tona*.Config data types, as well as any of your own configuration options you would like to pick up from the environment.

Tonatona needs to be told how to parse your Config data type from the available command line flags and environment variables. The HasParser class is used for this. The following is a simple example of this, for when your Config just contains Tona*.Config data types:

instance HasParser Config where
  parser = Config
      <$> parser
      <*> parser

Tonatona also requires a little bit of boilerplate code. You must help Tonatona figure out how to get the TonaDb.Config from your Config. This is done with the TonaDb.HasConfig class. This code should be very simple to write:

instance HasConfig Config TonaDb.Config where
  config = tonaDb

Now that we have all the easy code working, it is time to actually write your application!

First, we need to create a table definition. The following creates a table to hold blog posts. It will have 3 columns: id, author_name, and contents.

Creating a table definition is a requirement for using persistent, which is what tonatona-persistent-sqlite is using internally. This is not a requirement for Tonatona in general, just the tonatona-persistent-sqlite package.

{-# LANGUAGE QuasiQuotes #-}
{-# LANGUAGE TemplateHaskell #-}

import Database.Persist.TH (mkMigrate, mkPersist, persistLowerCase, share, sqlSettings)


$(share
  [mkPersist sqlSettings, mkMigrate "migrateAll"]
  [persistLowerCase|
    BlogPost
      authorName Text
      contents   Text

      deriving Show
    |]
 )

Next, do some DB operations in app function:

import Database.Persist (insert_)

app :: RIO Config ()
app = do
  -- Tonatona.Logger plugin enables to use logger functions without any configurations.
  TonaLogger.logInfo $ display ("This is a skeleton for tonatona project" :: Text)
  TonaLogger.logDebug $ display ("Migrating DB..." :: Text)
  TonaDb.runMigrate migrateAll
  TonaLogger.logDebug $ display ("Running DB query..." :: Text)
  TonaDb.run $ do
    -- By using 'lift', any plugins are available in @TonaDb.run@.
    lift $
      TonaLogger.logInfo $ display $
        ("This log is called inside of `TonaDb.run`" :: Text)
    insert_ $ BlogPost "Mr. Foo Bar" "This is an example blog post"
  TonaLogger.logInfo $ display ("Successfully inserted a blog post!" :: Text)

A summary of the steps you need to take is as follows:

  1. Create a Config data type for your application. If you want to use multiple plugins, just have your data types hold multiple Tona*.Config.

  2. Create a HasParser instance for your Config data type.

  3. Create a Tona*.HasConfig instance for each of the plugins you are using.

  4. Actually write your application using the RIO Config () monad.

Available Plugins

Tonatona has many plugins available. Here are the plugins provided in this repository.

Additional Features

Tonatona has the additional general features that apply to every plugin:

  • Make the end-user write a little boilerplate code up front in order to provide ease-of-use when writing their own business logic.

  • End users should be able to use many plugins without any configuration code or setup code. Plugins should be configured to get configuration options from environment variables, command line flags, etc. Plugins should be configured with reasonable defaults.

Contributing

Information about contributing new plugins can be found in CONTRIBUTING.md.

In general, new plugins will be accepted to Tonatona if they are widely useful. For instance, a plugin adding support for a widely used database library will probably be accepted, while a plugin adding support for a proprietary library not widely used will probably not be accepted.

If your plugin is not accepted into this repository, you are free to support it as a third-party repository, release it on Hackage, etc. If you are using Tonatona in a larger project, you will probably end up creating a few of your own plugins!

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