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Merge pull request #34 from johnkpaul/add_johnkpaul_proposals

Add John K. Paul's proposals
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33 proposal/async-javascript_johnkpaul.md
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+Asynchronous Javascript - callbacks are so old school
+========================
+
+* Speaker : John K. Paul
+* Available : Nov 8 and 9
+* Duration : 45-60 mins based on need
+
+Description
+-----------
+
+Javascript developers can't get enough of callbacks. It's been our tried and true workhorse when dealing with asynchronous code since the dawn of ajax. With the advent of nodejs, we've taken things to the extreme. Now, if we want to make a database query, respond to a web server request, or make a rest call to a web service, we need deeply nested callbacks in order to achieve what we need. In time, this phenomenon becomes the pyramid of doom, where we need 500 character of horizontal screen width to read all of our code.
+
+The issue here isn't that we are using asynchronous code, but rather that we aren't using the best design pattern for the job. I'd like to talk through a relatively new paradigm for control flow in javascript, the promise. Using this technique, you can develop an much more straightforward asynchronous javascript application. Not only is it a way to remove the need for callbacks, but it opens a door to new design possibilities, without the complexity of continuation passing style. Rather than passing all of our callbacks as arguments, we will take a higher level, and more functional approach, by creating a system that expects promise objects to eventually produce data, and we manipulate that data expecting that it will exist in the future.
+
+Note to organizers:
+This will be an evolution of a talk at the 2012 Pittsburgh Tech Fest which you can view here:
+https://vimeo.com/49946885
+
+Speaker Bio
+-----------
+
+![johnkpaul](https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/eee585a10c1d7c4f1f30e28077ffa720?size=256)
+
+John K. Paul is the VP of Engineering at Avagen Ventures and former lead front end software engineer at TheLadders.com. He is a contributor to numerous open source projects including learn.jquery.com. He has spoken to various startups around NYC about front end development, and scalable engineering practices, in particular, unit testing javascript. Additionally, he has taught Javascript and jQuery fundamentals to teams throughout the NYC area.
+
+Links
+-----
+
+* Blog: http://johnkpaul.tumblr.com
+* Github: http://github.com/johnkpaul
+* Twitter: http://twitter.com/johnkpaul
+* Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/johnkpaul
+* SpeakerRate: http://speakerrate.com/speakers/110621-john-k-paul
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38 proposal/the-real-bad-parts_johnkpaul.md
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+Javascript - The Real Bad Parts
+========================
+
+* Speaker : John K. Paul
+* Available : Nov 8 and 9
+* Duration : 45-60 mins based on need
+
+Description
+-----------
+
+Douglas Crockford's book "Javascript: The Good Parts," is one of the best selling javascript books of all time and is only 176 pages long. For most developers, there's an tacit belief that the rest of Javascript falls under "bad," especially when comparing that to the 900 pages of "Javascript: The Definitive Guide" There are websites dedicated to these list of language mis-features and anti-patterns, and dozens of blog posts about how to avoid the "bad" in your own code.
+
+I don't think that these most of these things are actually "bad". In their day to day, developers don't need to worry about all of these smaller issues. Chances are, a javascript developer has encountered these difficult issues, learned the solution, and then immediately absorbed the concepts.
+
+I'm going to explain to you, the real "bad" parts of the language. These are at least three javascript language features that are the most likely to trip up a javascript developer. Once you innately understand these three issues, you will become significantly more productive in javascript, and will be a lot less confused when reading through large javascript code bases.
+
+I'll be walking you through at least three concepts within javascript language semantics:
+1. What on earth does "this" mean, and in what context does its meaning change?
+2. How does prototypical inheritance work?
+3. What is hosting? Why do I care what a function expression or function declaration is?
+
+[Blog post that I wrote about the subject](http://johnkpaul.tumblr.com/post/20720951024/javascript-only-three-bad-parts)
+
+Speaker Bio
+-----------
+
+![johnkpaul](https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/eee585a10c1d7c4f1f30e28077ffa720?size=256)
+
+John K. Paul is the VP of Engineering at Avagen Ventures and former lead front end software engineer at TheLadders.com. He is a contributor to numerous open source projects including learn.jquery.com. He has spoken to various startups around NYC about front end development, and scalable engineering practices, in particular, unit testing javascript. Additionally, he has taught Javascript and jQuery fundamentals to teams throughout the NYC area.
+
+Links
+-----
+
+* Blog: http://johnkpaul.tumblr.com
+* Github: http://github.com/johnkpaul
+* Twitter: http://twitter.com/johnkpaul
+* Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/johnkpaul
+* SpeakerRate: http://speakerrate.com/speakers/110621-john-k-paul
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