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Report: Automation and Artificial Intelligence: How machines are affecting people and places

Dave Touretzky edited this page Mar 16, 2019 · 1 revision

Report: Automation and Artificial Intelligence: How machines are affecting people and places

  • Title: Automation and Artificial Intelligence: How machines are affecting people and places
  • Authors: Mark Muro, Robert Maxim, and Jacob Whiton, with contributions from Ian Hathaway
  • Publisher: The Brookings Institution
  • Date: January 2019
  • Length: 108 pages
  • Web site: The Brooking Institution: Automation and Artificial Intelligence

Summary

At first, technologists issued dystopian alarms about the power of automation and artificial intelligence (AI) to destroy jobs. Then came a correction, with a wave of reassurances. Now, the discourse appears to be arriving at a more complicated understanding, suggesting that automation will bring neither apocalypse nor utopia, but instead both benefits and stress alike. Such is the ambiguous and sometimes disembodied nature of the “future of work” discussion.

Hence the analysis presented here. Intended to bring often-inscrutable trends down to earth, the following report develops both backward and forward-looking analyses of the impacts of automation over the years 1980 to 2016 and 2016 to 2030 to assess past and upcoming trends as they affect both people and communities in the United States.

The report focuses on areas of potential occupational change rather than net employment losses or gains. Special attention is applied to digging beneath national top-line statistics to explore industry, geographical, and demographic variations. Finally, the report concludes by suggesting a comprehensive response framework for national and state-local policymakers.

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