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The Low Level Tsugi Library for Java
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src Remove LTI 2.0, follow Sakai fixes Aug 16, 2019
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LICENSE SAK-30308 - Rename basiclti-util to tsugi-util Feb 3, 2016
NOTICE SAK-30308 - Rename basiclti-util to tsugi-util Feb 3, 2016
README.md Rev to 0.4-SNAPSHOT Jul 25, 2019
compare.sh Add missing file. Update comparison script Jul 25, 2019
maven.xml
pom.xml Remove LTI 2.0, follow Sakai fixes Aug 16, 2019

README.md

What is it?

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Tsugi-util contains a set of utility classes to aid in the development of BasicLTI consumers and providers. They deal with much of the heavy lifting and make the process more opaque to the developer.

This code originated in the Sakai project as "basiclti-util" - it was always designed to be "Sakai-free" and many Java projects used that Sakai artifact. As of May, 2017 - this is pulled into the Tsugi project for future maintenance and development as it is really the "level-1" of the Tsugi Java application stack.

This new independent repo for this artifact makes much more sense for non-Sakai Java projects. This also allows a simpler way to contribute new code and bug fixes to this library.

Compiling a Local Copy

There are 'deploy to SonaType' instructions below. But if you want to compile and develop locally, use this command:

mvn clean compile install

Running Unit Tests

Use the command

mvn test

Bringing in Changes from Sakai

This code also lives (for now) in the Sakai. To compare the trees, run:

bash compare.sh

It will issue some cp commands to bring the two trees up to date. Alternatively you can just delete the contents of the src folder here and copy the contents of the basiclti-tsugi/src/ folder into this folder and let git figure out what changed.

Using tsugi-util in your application

You can add the following to your pom.xml:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.tsugi</groupId>
    <artifactId>tsugi-java</artifactId>
    <version>0.4-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
   <groupId>org.tsugi</groupId>
   <artifactId>tsugi-util</artifactId>
   <version>0.4-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

If you need to enable snapshot downloading add the following to your pom.xml:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>sonatype-nexus-snapshots</id>
        <name>Sonatype Nexus Snapshots</name>
        <url> https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots </url>
        <releases>
            <enabled>false</enabled>
        </releases>
        <snapshots>
            <enabled>true</enabled>
        </snapshots>
    </repository>
</repositories>

This way when maven sees a SNAPSHOT version, it can find where to download it from.

You can see this all in action in the Tsugi Java Servlet:

https://github.com/tsugiproject/tsugi-java-servlet

Generating a local copy of the javadocs

If you want to work on or view the java docs, use the following commands:

mvn javadoc:javadoc
open apidocs/index.html

Releasing tsugi-util to Sonatype

Here is a sample ~/.m2/settings.xml:

<settings>
  <servers>
    <server>
      <id>ossrh</id>
      <username>drchuck</username>
      <password>?secret!</password>
    </server>
  </servers>
<profiles>
  <profile>
     <id>allow-snapshots</id>
        <activation><activeByDefault>true</activeByDefault></activation>
     <repositories>
       <repository>
         <id>snapshots-repo</id>
         <url>https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots</url>
         <releases><enabled>false</enabled></releases>
         <snapshots><enabled>true</enabled></snapshots>
       </repository>
     </repositories>
   </profile>
</profiles>
</settings>

Once you have settings set up,

mvn -DperformRelease=true clean javadoc:jar compile install deploy -Dgpg.passphrase=Whatever
mvf clean #afterwards

Check results of the deploy at:

https://oss.sonatype.org/#nexus-search;quick~tsugi-util

After a while the files migrate to:

https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots/org/tsugi/

Doing A Numbered Release

git checkout -b 0.3.x
change pom.xml version 0.3.1
mvn clean javadoc:jar compile install deploy -Dgpg.passphrase=Whatever
git commit -a
git push --set-upstream origin 0.3.x

git checkout master
change pom.xml version 0.4-SNAPSHOT
mvn clean javadoc:jar compile install deploy -Dgpg.passphrase=Whatever
git commit -a
git push

Check results of the deploy at:

https://oss.sonatype.org/#nexus-search;quick~tsugi-util

After a while the files migrate to:

https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/snapshots/org/tsugi/

Key Making Notes

m-c02m92uxfd57:tsugi-util csev$ gpg --gen-key
gpg (GnuPG/MacGPG2) 2.0.30; Copyright (C) 2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

Please select what kind of key you want:
(1) RSA and RSA (default)
(2) DSA and Elgamal
(3) DSA (sign only)
(4) RSA (sign only)
Your selection? 1
RSA keys may be between 1024 and 4096 bits long.
What keysize do you want? (2048) 
Requested keysize is 2048 bits   
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
     0 = key does not expire
  <n>  = key expires in n days
  <n>w = key expires in n weeks
  <n>m = key expires in n months
  <n>y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 0
Key does not expire at all
Is this correct? (y/N) y

GnuPG needs to construct a user ID to identify your key.

Real name: Charles Severance
Email address: drchuck@gmail.com
Comment: For Sonatype           
You selected this USER-ID:
"Charles Severance (For Sonatype) <drchuck@gmail.com>"

Change (N)ame, (C)omment, (E)mail or (O)kay/(Q)uit? O
You need a Passphrase to protect your secret key.    

We need to generate a lot of random bytes. It is a good idea to perform
some other action (type on the keyboard, move the mouse, utilize the
disks) during the prime generation; this gives the random number
generator a better chance to gain enough entropy.
We need to generate a lot of random bytes. It is a good idea to perform
some other action (type on the keyboard, move the mouse, utilize the
disks) during the prime generation; this gives the random number
generator a better chance to gain enough entropy.
gpg: key BCDACC58 marked as ultimately trusted
public and secret key created and signed.

gpg: checking the trustdb
gpg: 3 marginal(s) needed, 1 complete(s) needed, PGP trust model
gpg: depth: 0  valid:   3  signed:   0  trust: 0-, 0q, 0n, 0m, 0f, 3u
gpg: next trustdb check due at 2018-08-19
pub   2048R/BCDACC58 2016-07-26
  Key fingerprint = 0A6A FE01 ...
uid       [ultimate] Charles Severance (For Sonatype) <drchuck@gmail.com>
sub   2048R/9B8D98F2 2016-07-26

m-c02m92uxfd57:tsugi-util csev$ gpg --keyserver hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net --send-keys BCDACC58
gpg: sending key BCDACC58 to hkp server pool.sks-keyservers.net
You can’t perform that action at this time.