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README.markdown

Welcome to Triq -- Trifork QuickCheck for Erlang

Travis-CI Build Status GitLab-CI Build Status

This is a fork of Triq that is being run under the ZeroMQ Collaberation rules, http://rfc.zeromq.org/spec:22 with the one exception being that it is under the apache licence

Triq (pronounced "Trick Check") is a free alternative to QuviQ eqc. Triq's API is modelled closely after eqc, so I recommend their tutorials and slides for an introduction to QuickCheck. Notice that QuviQ eqc has many features not found in triq, but it is open source licensed under the Apache license. For instance, eqc has features for reporting, management, probably a much better shrinking mechanism, cool C integration, and professional support.

Using Triq

Installation via package manager

To use triq, you can add it as a project dependency and let your package manager of choice handle it:

rebar.config: {triq, "1.*"}

erlang.mk: DEPS = triq

mix.exs: {:triq, "~> 1.*"}

Installation from source into $ERL_LIBS

If you want to make triq available globally, you can install it from source into your Erlang installation by adding it in one of your $ERL_LIBS paths. So, it's either somewhere like /usr/local/lib/lib/erlang/lib or $HOME/.erl.

You can either download a tagged release from https://github.com/triqng/triq/releases and extract that or clone the git repo https://github.com/triqng/triq in the target directory. Once that's done, cd into the directory and run ./rebar compile or just make.

Now, if you start erl, you should be able to call functions from the triq module.

$ erl
1> code:which(triq).
"/usr/local/lib/erlang/lib/triq/ebin/triq.beam"
2>

Writing properties with Triq

To write properties with triq, include the header file:

-include_lib("triq/include/triq.hrl").

And you're ready to write property tests. An example property could be:

prop_append() ->
    ?FORALL({Xs,Ys},{list(int()),list(int())},
            lists:reverse(Xs++Ys)
            ==
            lists:reverse(Ys) ++ lists:reverse(Xs)).

To test this property, run triq:check/1, thus:

1> triq:check(prop_append()).
......................................................................
..............................
Ran 100 tests
true
2>

If the test fails, it will try to shrink the result; here is an example:

prop_delete() ->
    ?FORALL(L,list(int()),
        ?IMPLIES(L /= [],
            ?FORALL(I,elements(L),
                ?WHENFAIL(io:format("L=~p, I=~p~n", [L,I]),
                          not lists:member(I,lists:delete(I,L)))))).

Which runs like this:

1> triq:check(triq_tests:prop_delete()).
x....Failed!
L=[4,5,5], I=5

Failed after 5 tests with false
Simplified:
        L = [0,0]
        I = 0
false
2>

You can get the values used for the failing test with counterexample, and reuse the same test values with check/2:

3> A = triq:counterexample(triq_tests:xprop_delete()).
x.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxFailed!
L=[3,2,1,1,1], I=1

Failed after 101 tests with false
Simplified:
	L = [0,0]
	I = 0
[[0,0],0]
4> A.
[[0,0],0]
5> triq:check(triq_tests:xprop_delete(), A).
Failed!
L=[0,0], I=0

Failed after 1 tests with false
Simplified:
	L = [0,0]
	I = 0
false
6>

Modules compiled with the triq.hrl header, auto-export all functions named prop_*, and have a function added called check/0 which runs triq:check/1 on all the properties in the module.

1> mymodule:check().

You can also instruct triq to generate EUnit integration functions which allow the module to be treated like an ordinary EUnit tests module. This avoids the need for triq or generic qc support in your build/test tool of choice. To achieve that, just make sure to include the attribute -triq(eunit). in the module. So, the initial triq.hrl include would turn into this:

-include_lib("triq/include/triq.hrl").
-triq(eunit).

Good luck!