Jasypt integration for Spring boot
Latest commit 8b61e28 Sep 25, 2018

README.md

jasypt-spring-boot

Jasypt integration for Spring boot 1.4.X , 1.5.X and 2.0.X

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Jasypt Spring Boot provides Encryption support for property sources in Spring Boot Applications.
There are 3 ways to integrate jasypt-spring-boot in your project:

  • Simply adding the starter jar jasypt-spring-boot-starter to your classpath if using @SpringBootApplication or @EnableAutoConfiguration will enable encryptable properties across the entire Spring Environment
  • Adding jasypt-spring-boot to your classpath and adding @EnableEncryptableProperties to your main Configuration class to enable encryptable properties across the entire Spring Environment
  • Adding jasypt-spring-boot to your classpath and declaring individual encryptable property sources with @EncrytablePropertySource

What's new?

Update 7/17/2018: Version 2.1.0 Release Including Filters
Update 3/17/2018: Version 2.0.0 has been released supporting Spring Boot 2.0.X.RELEASE. SemVer adopted.
Update 7/18/2015: jasypt-spring-boot is now in Maven Central!

What to do First?

Use one of the following 3 methods (briefly explained above):

  1. Simply add the starter jar dependency to your project if your Spring Boot application uses @SpringBootApplication or @EnableAutoConfiguration and encryptable properties will be enabled across the entire Spring Environment (This means any system property, environment property, command line argument, application.properties, yaml properties, and any other custom property sources can contain encrypted properties):

    <dependency>
            <groupId>com.github.ulisesbocchio</groupId>
            <artifactId>jasypt-spring-boot-starter</artifactId>
            <version>2.1.0</version>
    </dependency>
  2. IF you don't use @SpringBootApplication or @EnableAutoConfiguration Auto Configuration annotations then add this dependency to your project:

    <dependency>
            <groupId>com.github.ulisesbocchio</groupId>
            <artifactId>jasypt-spring-boot</artifactId>
            <version>2.1.0</version>
    </dependency>

    And then add @EnableEncryptableProperties to you Configuration class. For instance:

    @Configuration
    @EnableEncryptableProperties
    public class MyApplication {
        ...
    }

And encryptable properties will be enabled across the entire Spring Environment (This means any system property, environment property, command line argument, application.properties, yaml properties, and any other custom property sources can contain encrypted properties)

  1. IF you don't use @SpringBootApplication or @EnableAutoConfiguration Auto Configuration annotations and you don't want to enable encryptable properties across the entire Spring Environment, there's a third option. First add the following dependency to your project:

    <dependency>
            <groupId>com.github.ulisesbocchio</groupId>
            <artifactId>jasypt-spring-boot</artifactId>
            <version>2.0.0</version>
    </dependency>

    And then add as many @EncryptablePropertySource annotations as you want in your Configuration files. Just like you do with Spring's @PropertySource annotation. For instance:

    @Configuration
    @EncryptablePropertySource(name = "EncryptedProperties", value = "classpath:encrypted.properties")
    public class MyApplication {
    	...
    }

Conveniently, there's also a @EncryptablePropertySources annotation that one could use to group annotations of type @EncryptablePropertySource like this:

	@Configuration
	@EncryptablePropertySources({@EncryptablePropertySource("classpath:encrypted.properties"),
	                             @EncryptablePropertySource("classpath:encrypted2.properties")})
	public class MyApplication {
		...
	}

Also, note that as of version 1.8, @EncryptablePropertySource supports YAML files

Custom Environment

As of version 1.7 1.15, a 4th method of enabling encryptable properties exists for some special cases. A custom ConfigurableEnvironment class is provided: EncryptableEnvironment StandardEncryptableEnvironment and StandardEncryptableServletEnvironment that can be used with SpringApplicationBuilder to define the custom environment this way:

new SpringApplicationBuilder()
    .environment(new StandardEncryptableEnvironment())
    .sources(YourApplicationClass.class).run(args);

This method would only require using a dependency for jasypt-spring-boot. Notice that EncryptableEnvironment is just a wrapper, so you have to provide the actual Environment implementation, in this case StandardServletEnvironment. No starter jar dependency is required. This method is useful for early access of encrypted properties on bootstrap. While not required in most scenarios could be useful when customizing Spring Boot's init behavior or integrating with certain capabilities that are configured very early, such as Logging configuration. For a concrete example, this method of enabling encryptable properties is the only one that works with Spring Properties replacement in logback-spring.xml files, using the springProperty tag. For instance:

<springProperty name="user" source="db.user"/>
<springProperty name="password" source="db.password"/>
<appender name="db" class="ch.qos.logback.classic.db.DBAppender">
    <connectionSource
        class="ch.qos.logback.core.db.DriverManagerConnectionSource">
        <driverClass>org.postgresql.Driver</driverClass>
        <url>jdbc:postgresql://localhost:5432/simple</url>
        <user>${user}</user>
        <password>${password}</password>
    </connectionSource>
</appender>

This mechanism could be used for instance (as shown) to initialize Database Logging Appender that require sensitive credentials to be passed. Alternatively, if a custom StringEncryptor is needed to be provided, a second constructor EncryptableEnvironment(ConfigurableEnvironment, StringEncryptor) is available for that purpose.

How everything Works?

This will trigger some configuration to be loaded that basically does 2 things:

  1. It registers a Spring post processor that decorates all PropertySource objects contained in the Spring Environment so they are "encryption aware" and detect when properties are encrypted following jasypt's property convention.
  2. It defines a default StringEncryptor that can be configured through regular properties, system properties, or command line arguments.

Where do I put my encrypted properties?

When using METHODS 1 and 2 you can define encrypted properties in any of the PropertySource contained in the Environment. For instance, using the @PropertySource annotation:

    @SpringBootApplication
    @EnableEncryptableProperties
    @PropertySource(name="EncryptedProperties", value = "classpath:encrypted.properties")
    public class MyApplication {
        ...
    }

And your encrypted.properties file would look something like this:

	secret.property=ENC(nrmZtkF7T0kjG/VodDvBw93Ct8EgjCA+)

Now when you do environment.getProperty("secret.property") or use @Value("${secret.property}") what you get is the decrypted version of secret.property.
When using METHOD 3 (@EncryptablePropertySource) then you can access the encrypted properties the same way, the only difference is that you must put the properties in the resource that was declared within the @EncryptablePropertySource annotation so that the properties can be decrypted properly.

Encryption Configuration

Jasypt uses an StringEncryptor to decrypt properties. For all 3 methods, if no custom StringEncryptor (see the Custom Encryptor section for details) is found in the Spring Context, one is created automatically that can be configured through the following properties (System, properties file, command line arguments, environment variable, etc.):

KeyRequiredDefault Value
jasypt.encryptor.passwordTrue -
jasypt.encryptor.algorithmFalsePBEWithMD5AndDES
jasypt.encryptor.keyObtentionIterationsFalse1000
jasypt.encryptor.poolSizeFalse1
jasypt.encryptor.providerNameFalseSunJCE
jasypt.encryptor.providerClassNameFalsenull
jasypt.encryptor.saltGeneratorClassnameFalseorg.jasypt.salt.RandomSaltGenerator
jasypt.encryptor.stringOutputTypeFalsebase64
jasypt.encryptor.proxyPropertySourcesFalsefalse

The only property required is the encryption password, the rest could be left to use default values. While all this properties could be declared in a properties file, the encryptor password should not be stored in a property file, it should rather be passed as system property, command line argument, or environment variable and as far as its name is jasypt.encryptor.password it'll work.

The last property, jasypt.encryptor.proxyPropertySources is used to indicate jasyp-spring-boot how property values are going to be intercepted for decryption. The default value, false uses custom wrapper implementations of PropertySource, EnumerablePropertySource, and MapPropertySource. When true is specified for this property, the interception mechanism will use CGLib proxies on each specific PropertySource implementation. This may be useful on some scenarios where the type of the original PropertySource must be preserved.

Use you own Custom Encryptor

For custom configuration of the encryptor and the source of the encryptor password you can always define your own StringEncryptor bean in your Spring Context, and the default encryptor will be ignored. For instance:

    @Bean("jasyptStringEncryptor")
    public StringEncryptor stringEncryptor() {
        PooledPBEStringEncryptor encryptor = new PooledPBEStringEncryptor();
        SimpleStringPBEConfig config = new SimpleStringPBEConfig();
        config.setPassword("password");
        config.setAlgorithm("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
        config.setKeyObtentionIterations("1000");
        config.setPoolSize("1");
        config.setProviderName("SunJCE");
        config.setSaltGeneratorClassName("org.jasypt.salt.RandomSaltGenerator");
        config.setStringOutputType("base64");
        encryptor.setConfig(config);
        return encryptor;
    }

Notice that the bean name is required, as jasypt-spring-boot detects custom String Encyptors by name as of version 1.5. The default bean name is:

jasyptStringEncryptor

But one can also override this by defining property:

jasypt.encryptor.bean

So for instance, if you define jasypt.encryptor.bean=encryptorBean then you would define your custom encryptor with that name:

    @Bean("encryptorBean")
    public StringEncryptor stringEncryptor() {
        ...
    }

Custom Property Detector, Prefix, Suffix and/or Resolver

As of jasypt-spring-boot-1.10 there are new extensions points. EncryptablePropertySource now uses EncryptablePropertyResolver to resolve all properties:

public interface EncryptablePropertyResolver {
    String resolvePropertyValue(String value);
}

Implementations of this interface are responsible of both detecting and decrypting properties. The default implementation, DefaultPropertyResolver uses the before mentioned StringEncryptor and a new EncryptablePropertyDetector.

Provide a Custom EncryptablePropertyDetector

You can override the default implementation by providing a Bean of type EncryptablePropertyDetector with name encryptablePropertyDetector or if you wanna provide your own bean name, override property jasypt.encryptor.property.detector-bean and specify the name you wanna give the bean. When providing this, you'll be responsible for detecting encrypted properties. Example:

private static class MyEncryptablePropertyDetector implements EncryptablePropertyDetector {
    @Override
    public boolean isEncrypted(String value) {
        if (value != null) {
            return value.startsWith("ENC@");
        }
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public String unwrapEncryptedValue(String value) {
        return value.substring("ENC@".length());
    }
}
@Bean(name = "encryptablePropertyDetector")
    public EncryptablePropertyDetector encryptablePropertyDetector() {
        return new MyEncryptablePropertyDetector();
    }

Provide a Custom Encrypted Property prefix and suffix

If all you want to do is to have different prefix/suffix for encrypted properties, you can keep using all the default implementations and just override the following properties in application.properties (or application.yml):

jasypt:
  encryptor:
    property:
      prefix: "ENC@["
      suffix: "]"

Provide a Custom EncryptablePropertyResolver

You can override the default implementation by providing a Bean of type EncryptablePropertyResolver with name encryptablePropertyResolver or if you wanna provide your own bean name, override property jasypt.encryptor.property.resolver-bean and specify the name you wanna give the bean. When providing this, you'll be responsible for detecting and decrypting encrypted properties. Example:

    class MyEncryptablePropertyResolver implements EncryptablePropertyResolver {
    
    
        private final PooledPBEStringEncryptor encryptor;
    
        public MyEncryptablePropertyResolver(char[] password) {
            this.encryptor = new PooledPBEStringEncryptor();
            SimpleStringPBEConfig config = new SimpleStringPBEConfig();
            config.setPasswordCharArray(password);
            config.setAlgorithm("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
            config.setKeyObtentionIterations("1000");
            config.setPoolSize(1);
            config.setProviderName("SunJCE");
            config.setSaltGeneratorClassName("org.jasypt.salt.RandomSaltGenerator");
            config.setStringOutputType("base64");
            encryptor.setConfig(config);
        }
    
        @Override
        public String resolvePropertyValue(String value) {
            if (value != null && value.startsWith("{cipher}")) {
                return encryptor.decrypt(value.substring("{cipher}".length()));
            }
            return value;
        }
    }
@Bean(name="encryptablePropertyResolver")
    EncryptablePropertyResolver encryptablePropertyResolver(@Value("${jasypt.encryptor.password}") String password) {
        return new MyEncryptablePropertyResolver(password.toCharArray());
    }

Notice that by overriding EncryptablePropertyResolver, any other configuration or overrides you may have for prefixes, suffixes, EncryptablePropertyDetector and StringEncryptor will stop working since the Default resolver is what uses them. You'd have to wire all that stuff yourself. Fortunately, you don't have to override this bean in most cases, the previous options should suffice.

But as you can see in the implementation, the detection and decryption of the encrypted properties are internal to MyEncryptablePropertyResolver

Using Filters

jasypt-spring-boot:2.1.0 introduces a new feature to specify property filters. The filter is part of the EncryptablePropertyResolver API and allows you to determine which properties or property sources to contemplate for decryption. This is, before even examining the actual property value to search for, or try to, decrypt it. For instance, by default, all properties which name start with jasypt.encryptor are excluded from examination. This is to avoid circular dependencies at load time when the library beans are configured.

DefaultPropertyFilter properties

By default, the DefaultPropertyResolver uses DefaultPropertyFilter, which allows you to specify the following string pattern lists:

  • jasypt.encryptor.property.filter.include-sources: Specify the property sources name patterns to be included for decryption
  • jasypt.encryptor.property.filter.exclude-sources: Specify the property sources name patterns to be EXCLUDED for decryption
  • jasypt.encryptor.property.filter.include-names: Specify the property name patterns to be included for decryption
  • jasypt.encryptor.property.filter.exclude-names: Specify the property name patterns to be EXCLUDED for decryption

Provide a custom EncrpytablePropertyFilter

You can override the default implementation by providing a Bean of type EncryptablePropertyFilter with name encryptablePropertyFilter or if you wanna provide your own bean name, override property jasypt.encryptor.property.filter-bean and specify the name you wanna give the bean. When providing this, you'll be responsible for detecting properties and/or property sources you want to contemplate for decryption. Example:

    class MyEncryptablePropertyFilter implements EncryptablePropertyFilter {
    
        public boolean shouldInclude(PropertySource<?> source, String name) {
            return name.startsWith('encrypted.');
        }
    }
@Bean(name="encryptablePropertyFilter")
    EncryptablePropertyFilter encryptablePropertyFilter() {
        return new MyEncryptablePropertyFilter();
    }

Notice that for this mechanism to work, you should not provide a custom EncryptablePropertyResolver and use the default resolver instead. If you provide custom resolver, you are responsible for the entire process of detecting and decrypting properties.

Demo App

The jasypt-spring-boot-demo-samples repo contains working Spring Boot app examples. The main jasypt-spring-boot-demo Demo app explicitly sets a System property with the encryption password before the app runs. To have a little more realistic scenario try removing the line where the system property is set, build the app with maven, and the run:

	java -jar target/jasypt-spring-boot-demo-0.0.1-SNAPSHOT.jar --jasypt.encryptor.password=password

And you'll be passing the encryption password as a command line argument. Run it like this:

	java -Djasypt.encryptor.password=password -jar target/jasypt-spring-boot-demo-0.0.1-SNAPSHOT.jar

And you'll be passing the encryption password as a System property.

If you need to pass this property as an Environment Variable you can accomplish this by creating application.properties or application.yml and adding:

jasypt.encryptor.password=${JASYPT_ENCRYPTOR_PASSWORD:}

or in YAML

jasypt:
    encryptor:
        password: ${JASYPT_ENCRYPTOR_PASSWORD:}

basically what this does is to define the jasypt.encryptor.password property pointing to a different property JASYPT_ENCRYPTOR_PASSWORD that you can set with an Environment Variable, and you can also override via System Properties. This technique can also be used to translate property name/values for any other library you need. This is also available in the Demo app. So you can run the Demo app like this:

JASYPT_ENCRYPTOR_PASSWORD=password java -jar target/jasypt-spring-boot-demo-1.5-SNAPSHOT.jar

Note: When using Gradle as build tool, processResources task fails because of '$' character, to solve this you just need to scape this variable like this '$'.

Other Demo Apps

While jasypt-spring-boot-demo is a comprehensive Demo that showcases all possible ways to encrypt/decrypt properties, there are other multiple Demos that demo isolated scenarios.

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