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"text": "VOIV O1 LXIII----N 0 20.620.\nCO BIG HARBOR TIEUP-\nRBI TRA TION \"ACCEPTED.\ntut Independent Towing Companies\nWill Lay Off 150 Craft.\n'\u00a7 Th* general tieup of craft in New-York Har\nbor that has been threatened for the last two or\nireA days will not take place to-day. A con\nference was held yesterday afternoon between\n\"re preservatives of the New-York Central. th\u00ab\nI>high Valley, the New- York, New-Haven and\nKarl ford, the Erie, the Baltimore and Ohio, the\n,'T;E Island, and the New-Jersey Central rail\n\"roads. and representatives of their engineers\nr.t Local No. 33. Marine Engineers' Benefit\n\"Association, through which the demand for\nlie her wages and shorter hours was submitted,\nhe representatives met at the office of W. G.\nEesler. the general manager of the Central Rail\n[road of Jersey, No. 143 Llberty-st. It\nJm-as announced by Mr. Besler afterward that\n.the offer to arbitrate the wages and conditions\n'of service of the engineers had been accepted.\nLouis L. Beinier. president of the association\nXtf the engineers, added that, except for those\nn the tugs controlled by independent own\ners, who yesterday refused to arbitrate, none\nI'of the engineers would try to tie up traffic In\nthe harbor to-day. The conference -was carried\n[en apparently in the best of spirit, for Mr.\n*inier, after it bad adjourned, thanked the\n-railroad official?, which included W. 11. Bald\nwin, of the Long Island Railroad, and H. C. Da\n3*al and W. B. Pollock, of the New- York Cen\ntral Railroad, for the courteous treatment given.\nThe offer of the New- York Central Id regard to\n'arbitration was that one person should bo se\nicted by each side, these in case of a disagree\nment to select a third. The terms and hours\nagreed on were to be binding on both, sides from\nlay 1. So far as could be learned last night.\nno arbitrators were selected. It was understood\n.that May 15 had been selected as the limit for\njthe arrangement for arbitration.\n* The New- York. New-Haven and Hartford\nRailroad conceded the demands of Its engineers\nplying on Long Island Sound, according to Mr.\nernier. The engineers of the boats that move\nthe immigrants had their demands granted yes\nterday. As the ferryboats were not involved,\npractically the only craft tied up to-day will be\none hundred and fifty tugs owned by indepen\ndent towing companies, and the vessels of the\nCornhill Towing Company, which were laid up\nyesterday.\nThe independent towing companies Intend to\nfight. A meeting of the Association for the\nProtection of Commerce of the Port of New-\nYork was held in the Produce Exchange yester\nday. About one hundred owners of tow boats\nand steamers were present. H. L. Joyce, vice\npresident of the association, said afterward:\nWe have simply reaffirmed cur action of the last\nmeeting; that is, we do not recognize the union.\nbut are willing to treat with all our engineers as\nindividuals. Secondly, we are willing in some ir\nbunofts to advance the salaries of engineers, but\nwill not, under any circumstances, adopt the sched\nule asked by the engineers, particularly the over\ntime schedule. Rather than grant the schedule\nasked by the union and recognize it as an or\nt,-2uilzation we will, in cases where we cannot en\ngage non-union engineers, tie up the boats.\nA great many concerns will tie up their boats.\nThe Old Dominion Line, the Cornell rowing Com\npany, the Packer Dredging Company and almost\neve*7 individual owner will tie up 60 per ctht of\ntheir boats. That will delay the malls and bring\nabout peneral distress.\nWe have also decided to engage counsel and pee\n!f we cannot prosecute these marine engineers\nunder the- federal statute. Section 4.443. It Is In tho\nKevised Statutes, under the. heading. \"Revocation\nof Officers' Licenses lor Refusing to Serve.\" Un\nder that we may proceed against the individual\nengineer.\nPreparations were made last night to lay up\nmost of the towboats not owned by the rail\nroads, and the outfits of the wrecking com\npanies. The Cornell company, which operates\nabout fifty boats, p;. : d off its men yesterday\nand announced that it would lay up Its boats.\nThe Old Dominion company laid up some of its\ntugs and lighters. An attempt will be made\nby the companies to operate part of their fleets\nwith non-union men. Of the fleet of eight boats\nowned by F. B. Dalzel! & Co.. three, the J. Fred\nLohman. the E. T. Dai/^-:i and the C. P. Ray\nmood will be in commission. In the engine\nn orn of one of these boats will be W. F. Dal\n7<Y a member of the firm, who Is a license^\nengineer Captain Allison Friers, manager oT\nthe Commercial Towboai Company, will to-day\nsteer the tug Unity, with the tug T'mon. of the\nf company, in tow to Newburg. and tie the\nt>oat up there. He expects to have a non-union\nengineer in the eiigrine room.\nThe tying up of the Ura bo \\*t will chiefly affect\n-he movements of steam--. | and incoming san-\ni ve .-~=cpis I- is custo na. \u25a0 to use tugs to\nassist \"steamships to dock. Among the steal -\nships which are expected I* * to-day is u\u00bbe\nDeutscbland. Usually eight or ten tug* are em\nployed :n setting her alongside her pier\nF B Dalx\u00ab U said laFt night regarding the situ\nation- -The position of the engineers employed\nby the railroads and that of those employed ny\nus is not identical. The railroad men have\nFteadv work and regular hours. The railroads\nere n'\"t dependent oa th* tides. Th- floats sire\nnot tied -i;. for hours waiting for *la< R tld*\u00ab. -*\nnui-sar*. There are many hours arsM \u2022 our men\nhay nothing to do bat read the ra.\u00abr. Hie\nrailroad engineers *Sc L -!<J Ret more. Th. v are\nsteadily busy. We t A<\\ stand *^ \"fag\" cost.\nbut not the demand In regard to Me l.fWrs.\nThis to the more imr-ot.ant pi-* Th f . J '/' !t\nrhaTes hi New- York Hi - ; -or already are higher\nthan in many other ports, end if it w. rf pat tjK\nthe\" advantageous !ocat!o.; of *\u2022\u25a0 port trn\u00ab!<\nwould be turned elsewhere.\"\nThe Civic Federation and th\u00bb State Board n*\nMediation and Arbitration offered th< ir OSTVh c\u00ab\nfn the independent tow boat owners yesterday,\nhut these will not hr aerated at Present. Lasf\ni~Vi Local No 33. Association of Siarin- En\nl ln\u00a3\u00ab iSd a meeting, .'.nd after a ton*\nfndorVed the agreement ,o arbitrate n\u00bbde X\"\nIts r *********\nPOI ANH- POLAND! POLAND.'::\nEoUled at' the Famous Poland Spnng*. Me.-Advt.\nI me PERFECT DIXIXO CAR\nI * ,he trains of the Pennsylvania Railroad\nI c^loand\nRatn and much colder to-dmy.\nSaturday fair.\nPALACE OF LIBERAL ARTS, IN WHICH THE DEDICATORY, CEREMONIES WERE HELD YESTERDAY.\nFRESrDEXT ROOSEVELT.\n(Copyright: 1908: By Rock-wood.)\nRUSSIA IN TO STAY.\nTHE FEELING IX LONDON.\nOnly Force Can Turn Her Out of\nManch iiria \u2014 Personal Notes.\n{Special to The New-York Tribune by Trench Cable.)\n<C<\u00bbpyrisht: 1903: By The Tribune Association.)\nLondon, May.l. 1 a. m.\u2014 The discussion In\nParliament yesterday afternoon failed to throw\nany light on the Manchuria question. Lord\nLsnsdowne in the upper chamber and Lord Cran\nborne in the lower house said the British Gov\nernment had received authoritative information\nconfirming; the news of Russia's: disclaimer, but\nthese official statements pave little satisfaction.\nThe impression is gaining: ground that nothing\nshort of *orce will turn Russia out of Man\nchuria. If England. America, and Japan exert\nsufficient diplomatic pressure. Russia will with\ndraw her demands for the present, hut the com\nplete Russifioation of Manchuria can only be a\nquestion of time. The situation Is undoubtedly\ngTave. Still, war is unlikely so far as England\nis concerned. The Lion has not yet recovered\nfrom the wounds which he received in South\nAfrica, and he naturally is anxious to avoid a\nserious quarrel with th\u00ab Bear Just now.\nIt is reported from Brus^ls that besides the\n$1*500.000 for the construction of a Palace of\nPeace at The Hague, Mr. Carnegie has? given\n$2001,000 for the organization of an international\nlibrary on diplomacy and international law. The\nlibrary will be attached to the Palace, which will\nprobably be built on the site on which the resi\ndence of th* Grand Duke of Weimar is now\nstanding.\nFollowing an idea originated by Sir Gilbert\nParker, there will be held in London in the\nfirst week of July an allied colonial universities\ndinner. anl on the previous day a conference\nwill be held when subjects of interest and im\nportance to university life in all parts of the\nKing's dominions will be discussed.\nMr. Brodiick, who, as head of the War Office,\nis responsible for the operations in Somaliland,\nlast night announced their practical abandon\nment at a presumably early date. It is now\nknown ti.it the War Office Is in possession of\nconfidential reports which make any campaign,\nin that district, unless with very large forces, an\nimpossibility.\nThere is no improvement In the health of Car\ndinal Vaughan, and it is very unlikely that he\n\u2022will be able again to resume active duty.\nI. W. F.\nRIOTOUS STUDENTS.\nSerious Outbreak at the University\nof Havana.\n\\.-~ CABLE TO THE TRIBTNF.. ]\n(Copyright- 11KC: By The Tribune Association.*\nHavana. April 30.\u2014 The law students of the\nUniversity of Havana became riotous to-day\nbecause (he date of the examinations was\nchanged '!< \u2022 September to June. The students\nrefused several days ago to attend their classes\ntill the. order was changed. To-da; live stu\ndents entered the classroom with the professors.\nThe rest of the students tried to persuade them\nto return. When the five refused the others be\ngan stoninc the doors \u00abrid windows of the build\ni-d i>e\u00bbn L-anuza Wt iS room to entreat the\nMttdcnti to desist. A Btone knocked him down.\n\u25a0vh*. \u00a3?..-'K'nts the*, stones at the windows of\nIbe university, breaks: nearly all of tfc* -^d\ndestroying Kvenil valuable *1 paintings or. the\n\u2022,!!\u2022< This afternoon they paraded before the\npalace where a commission waited on President\nI'ahna'for the purpose of protesting against the\nchanged 'late of the examinations.\nPOLAND! POLAND:! POLAND::!\nPoland Water, first smog nature'\" remedies - , .vr \u2022\nBILLY WHISKERS.\nt-w iM.nhtnrraDliv of a Co.it. A Jolly Btory\nfor bov\u00df Hid sirle now running in THK SUNDAY\nTRIBUNE. is* .are <\u25a0\" read it next Sunday.-lAdvt.\nNEW- YORK. FRIDAY, 31 AY 1, 1903.- FOURTEEN PAGES.-^t.S^S.,,\u2122.\nTHE OLD DAYS WERE GREAT BECAUSE\nTHE MEJ WHO LIVED 171 THEM HAD\nMIGHTY QrAIJTIESi AM) WE MUST MAKE\nTHE NEW DAYS GREAT BT SHOWING\nTHESE SAME QUALITIES. WE MUST I\\SIST\nt7POX OOtTRAGH AST\u00bb RESOLUTION, UPOX\nHARDIHOOD, TENACITY AND FERTILITY IN\nRESOURCES? WE MUST INSIST UPON THE\nSTRONG, VIRILE VIRTUES, AND WE MUST\nINSIST NO LESS UPON THE VIRTUES OF\nSELF-RESTRAINT, - SELF-MASTERY, RE\nGARD FOR THE RIGHTS OF OTHERS WE\nMUST SHOW OUR ABHORRENCE OF CRUEI\nTV, BRUTALITY AXD CORRUPTION*. IN PUII\nLIO AND PRIVATE LIFE ALIKE.\nIF WE COME SHORT IN ANY OF THESE\nQUALITIES WE SHALL MEASURABLY FAIL\u00bb\nAND IF, AS I BELIEVE WE SURELY\nSHALL, WE DEVELOP THESE QUALITIES IN\nTHE FUTURE TO AN EVEN GREATER DE\nGREE THAN IN THE PAST. THEN IV THE\nCENTURY NOW BEGINNING WE SHALL\nMAKES OF THIS REPUBLIC THE FREEST\nAND MOST ORDERLY. THE MOST JUST AXD\nMOST MIGHTY NATION -WHICH HAS EVER\nCOME FORTH FROM THE WOMB OF TIME.\u2014\n(President Roosevelt.\nFAIR BUILDINGS DEDICATED.\nPRESIDENT ROOSEVELT AND EX-PRESIDENT CLEVE\nLAND MAKE THE PRINCIPAL ADDRESSES.\nI4n Imposing Military and Civic Demonstration in Honor of the Louis\niana Purchase Exposition.\nThe buildings of the Louisiana Purchase. Exposition at St. Louis were dedicated yes\nterday afternoon with ceremonies which, although marred hv disagreeable weath?r, were\nimpressive. The principal addresses were made hv President Roosevelt and ex- President\nCleveland. There was a long military and civic parade in the morning, with Adjutant\nGenera] Corbin as grand marshal, and the exercises closed with a display of fireworks in\nthe evening. The city was crowded with visitors from all parts of the country.\nPRESIDENT'S SPEECH.\nHoic the Policy of Expansion Has\nBuili Up a Great Nation.\nSt. Louis. April 3O. \u2014 The dedicatory address\ndelivered by President Roosevelt follows:\nMr. President. Ladies and Gentlemen: At\nihe outset of my address let me recall to\nthe minds of my hearers that the ttuli upon\nwhich we stand, before it was ours, was suc\ncessively the possession of two mighty empires,\nSpain and France, whose sons made a. deathless\nrecord of heroism in the early annals of the New\nWorld. No history of the Western country can\nbe written without paying heed to the wonderful\npart played therein in the early da>s by the\nsoldiers, missionaries, explorers and traders.\nwho did their work for the honor of the proud\nbanners of Frame and Castile. While the set\ntlers of English speaking stock and those of\nDutch, German and Scandinavian origin who\nwen- associated with them were still clinging\nclose to the Eastern seaboard, the pioneers of\nSpain and of France had penetrated deep into\nthe hitherto unknown wilderness of the West,\nand had wandered far and wide within the boun\ndaries of what is now our mighty country. The\nvery cities themselves\u2014 St. Louis, Xew-Orleans.\nSanta Fe\u2014 bear witness by their titles to\nthe nationalties of their founders. It was\nnot until the Revolution had begun that the\nEnglish speaking settlers pushed west across\nthe Alleghanie.s and not until a century ago\nthat they entered In to possess the land upon\nwhich we now stand.\nWe have met here to-day to commemorate the\nhundredth anni' ersary of the event which more\nthan any ether, after the foundation of the gov\nernment and always excepting its preserva\ntion, determined 'he character of our national\nlife \u2014 determined that we should he a great ex\npanding nation instead of relatively \u25a0 small and\nStationary one.\nTHE BEGINNINGS OF EXPANSION.\nOf course it was not with the Louisiana Pur\nchase that our career of expansion began. In\nthe middle of the Revolutionary War the Illi\nnois reg-ion. including the present States of Illi\nnois and Indiana, was added to our domain by\nforce of arms, a? a sequel to the adventurous\nexpedition of (Jeorpe Rogers Clarke and his fron\ntier riflemen. Later the treaties of Jay and\nPlnrkney materially extended our real boun\ndaries to the west. Hut none of these events\nwas of fo striking a character as to fix the\npopular imagination. Th^ old thirteen colonies\nhad always claimed that their rights stretched\nwestward to the Mississippi, and vague and un\nreal though these claims were until made good\nby conquest, settlement and diplomacy, they\nstill served to give the impression that the ear\nliest westward movements of our people were\nlittle more than the filling !n of already existing\nnational boundaries.\nrun ther.- could be no illusion about the\nacquisition of the vast territory beyond the Mis\nsissippi, stretching westward to the Pa.-itic.\nwhich in that day wis known as Louisiana.\nThis immense region was admittedly the terri\ntory of a foreign power, of a European king\ndom None of our people had ever laid claim\nto a foot of it. lis acquisition could in DO sense\nbe treated as rounding out any existing claims.\nWhen we acquired it we made evident once for\nall that consciously and of set purpose we had\nembarked on a career of expansion, that we ha i\ntaken our place among those daring and hardy\nnations who risk much, with the. hope and de\n*:re of winning high position among the great\npower* of the earth. As is so often the case in\nnature the law of development of a living or-\n\u00ab ontinurcl on necon.l PUR 1 \"'\nm MILES IN M HOURS.\nThe new \"20th Century Limited\" of the New York\nCentral and Lake Shore does this everyday, and\nEffects a great saving to the busy man who travels\nbetween the East and Weai.-AdvL\nWE MAT WELL RECALI. TH THESB SUR\nROUNDINGS THE WONDERFUL MEASURE OS*\nPROPHECY'S FT^FH. WITHIN THB\nSPA\u00bb OF A SHORT CEMTUH.T, THE BPIRITP,\nTHE PATRIOTISM AND THE CIVTO VIBTTBI\nOF AMERICANS WHO LIVED A HUNDRED\nYEARS AGO. AND GOD'S OVERRULING OF\nTHE WRATH OF MAN AND HZJ DEVIOUS\nWAYS FOR THE BLESSING OF OUR NATION.\nWE ARE ALL PROUD OF OCR AMERICAN\nCITIZENSHIP. LET US LEAVE THIS PLACE\nWITH THIS FEELING STIMULATED BY THIS\nSENTIMENTS BORN OF THE OCCASION. LET\nUS APPRECIATE MORE KEENLY THAN\nEVER HOW VITALLY NECESSARY IT IS TO\nOUR COUNTRY'S WEAL THAT EVERY ONE\nWITHIX ITS CITIZENSHIP SHOULD BE\nCLEAN MINDED IN POLITICAL AIM AND AS\nPI RATIOS, SINCERE AND HONEST IN HIS\nCONCEPTION OF OUR COUNTRY'S MISSION.\nAND AROUSED TO HIGHER AND MORE RE\nSPONSIVE PATRIOTISM BY THE REFLEC\nTION THAT IT IS A SOLEMN THING TO DE\nLONG TO A PEOPLE FAVORED OF GOD\u2014 (Ex-\nPresident Cleveland.\nDEDICATION A SUCCESS.\nThe Parade and the Exercises in the\nLiberal Arts Building.\nfI?Y TEIKOHAI-H TO TTIF TRIBTWE. 1\nSt. Louis, April 3\u00ab>. \u2014 Starting -with a glittering\nand imposing military display, followed by im\npressive dedicatory exercises and eloping with a\ndisplay of fireworks, the first of the three days\nof the dedication ceremonies of the Louisiana\nPurchase Exposition was a great success. The\nweather was raw and cold, the buildings were in\na crude and unfinished condition, and the trans\nportation facilities were inadequate, but despite\nall this it was a day of enthusiasm and display.\nThere were possibly not more than twenty\nthousand strangers in the city, aside from the\nofficial representatives of the United States and\nvarious State and foreign governments, and the\ntroops. President Roosevelt, ex-President\nCleveland, Cardinal Gibbons, Bishop Potter and\nthe governors of a score of States took, part\nin the ceremonies.\nThere were about fifteen thousand troops !n\nthe line of parade. Adjutant General Corbin.\nan imposing military figure, created a great deal\nof interest as grand marshal. The troops were\nthe pick of the regulars and the State militia.\nGovernor Odell rode at the head of the New-\nYork troops. It was remarked everywhere that\nNew- York had the finest body of State troops in\nthe parade, and there was cheering from start\nto finish for Governor <><i<Hl and his splendid\nescort.\nThe police arrangements were inadequate.\nPresident Roosevelt, on arriving at the review\ning stand, literally had to fight his way through\nthe crowd to the reviewing box. All through\nthe ceremony he was Jostled and crowded by\nan eager mob. which seemed to be unrestricted.\nAfter the parade he and his little handful of an\nescort had to push their way through the crowd\nto the Liberal Arts Building, where the dedi\ncatory ceremonies were held. In that building\nno pathway had been cleared for him. and he\npushed, crowded and elbowed his way 'to the\nplatform. Many people commented on this and\nwondered why the President of the United\nStates was subjected to danger and annoyance.\nThe ceremonies in the big Libeial Arts Build\ning were Impressive. David R. Francis intro\nduced Thomas H. Carter as president of the\nday. and the invocation was delivered by Car\ndinal Gibbons, who, In his rich robes and red\ncap, made a striking picture. Before the cere\nmonies began he chatted genially with Bishop\nPotter, while President Roosevelt and ex-Presi\ndent Cleveland carried on an animated conversa\ntion. When President Roosevelt was intro\nduced he was greeted by a roof-lifting cheer\nfrom the throats of the eighteen thousand per\nsons gathered in the enormous hall. So large\nwas the building and so great the crowd that\nonly a few could hear him. while in the far\nbackground many could hardly see him. Re\nalizing this, the President, instead of standing\non the regular platform, sprang nimbly on\nthe desk where the gavel rested. From this\nelevation he began his speech amid uproarious\napproval of this attempt to give every one a\nchance to see him. He closed amid thunders\nof applause, which was more a personal compli\nment than approval of his speech, for the noise\nand disorder were so great that less than one\nthird of those in the hall distinctly heard a\nword he said. Ex-President Cleveland was en\nthusiastically welcomed and cheered to the echo\nas he concluded. Bishop Potter pronounced the\nbenediction. \u25a0 \\\nThe fireworks display to-night was gorgeous,\nand fully thirty thousand people witnessed it.\n/\nEX-PRESTDENT CKOVEK CLEVE\n(Copyright: 1908: By Rrwrkwocxl.)\nDOCKS DEVERT'S THEME.\nXOXE LEFT FOR IXTH.\nSays Candidate Will Make Tam\nmany \"Tickle 1U Whiskers.\"\nWilliam S. Devery paid his respects to Charles\nF. Murphy, leader of Tammany Hall, and Mr.\nMurphy's associates in characteristic fashion\nat a meeting attended by his election district\ncaptains last night at Eighth-aye. and Twenty\nthird-st. He charged Murphy with parcelling\nout th\" city piers among his friends, so that\nwhen the people of the IXth District had use\nfor a pier none was to be had.\nThe \"Chief\" said that the Tammany leaders\nhad sent him word that they v/ould concede\nthat he had made a formal demand for recog\nnition as executive member from the IXth. and\nthis. Mr. Devery paid, made It unnecessary for\nhim personally to lead his band of IXth District\nSpartans to the Wigwam to-night.\n\"We might as well be gentlemanly about It.\"'\nsaid Devery. \"Inasmuch as they admit that I\nhave made my demand, as the court's decision\nindicated I should, I won't try to go over there\nto-morrow night to disturb their little organi\nzation.\"\nDevery\"B phalanx. 214 strong, will be there,\nhowever, and will make a demand when the roll\nis called for recognition for Devery as leader si\nthe IXth. It is the intention of the Murphy\nmen to ignore the IXth District in the calling of\nthe roll. Dr. W. J. Stewart, Peter J. Garvey.\nGeorge W. Gibbons. Wallace B. Hunter and\nFrank Sullivan were appointed a committee to\ntak\u00bb charge of the delegation at the Wigwam\nto-night and see that when the roll is called a\ndemand is made for the recognition of Devery.\n\"I went to Commissioner Hawkes down at the\nDock Department the other day,\" said Devery.\n\"to see if I could get a pier or bulkhead for the\nuse of the people of this district. I met a gentle\nrran\u2014 Murphy\u2014 at the Dock Department and\nhe told me that he would like to give me the use\nof the pier, but it was not in his power to do so.\nI learned on further inquiry that the reason\nwhy I couldn't get a pier or bulkhead was be\ncause 'Charlie' Murphy had given the one be\ntween Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth sts. to\nhis friend Eagan, whoever Eagan Is. That's\nwhy the people of this district will not have a\ni dock there this summer. Murphy's got it. and\nno wonder we won't get it. Gaffney & Co. and\nMr. Murphy are grabbing everything along the\ndocks. Xaughton & Co. and Mr. McMahon and\nMr Murphy are grabbing everything In the way\n! of asphalt contaacts, and Plunkltt & Co.\nare grabbing everything that's left. Little\n\u2022Dannie* McMahon and 'Charlie.' Murphy\nand his friend with the split name. Mr.\nCram, are grabbing everything that's not\nnailed down. I see by the papers that\nMurphy and old man McLaughlln have fixed\nthings up bo that Manhattan will take the\nMayor and Brooklyn will take the Controller.\nThis reminds me of the old game of Forty-five,\nwhere you robbed the king and robbed the ace.\nBut these gentlemen forget that the five fingers\nis the best trump in the deck. Those five fingers\n(stretching out his own) will take hold of the\nbacks of the recks of those gentlemen and wipe\nthem in the dust. I don't believe it is advisable.\nas the gentleman suggested, to go into every\nAssembly district and hold indignation meetings\nto stir the people up. The newspapers will take\ncare of that. By the middle of summer the\npapers will have a candidate in the field against\nTammany Hall that will make many's the\ngentleman over there tickle their whisker*.\"\nFrank Sullivan said that when the voters\nregistered their wills at the primaries no party\nboss should be able to override their rights.\nGeorge W. Gibbons said that he knew that the\nDevery men would be thrown out. ,\n\"If the Democratic party is going to lose\nnext fall let the responsibility fall where it :\nbelongs.\" said Gibbons.\nJohn B McGoldrick mM: Ther\u00bb I* a gen\ntleman three thousand miles from here who has\ncot into the habit of thinking of our- people\nabout as some of his neighbors\"* ancestors\nthought of our people l.;<> years ago. Only he\neoes them one better. He not only believes in\ntaxation without representation but he believes\nIn government without representation.\" Wai- {\nlace B. Hunter and Joseph Neuman also spoke.\n\u00ab\nPoland: poland:: Poland:::\nGreatest Natural Medicinal Water Known.\u2014 Advt. ,\nAT S:4i TO-NIGHT\nand even- night there Is a fast train to Buffalo via\nI sekawSsa Railroad. New Pullman sleepers,\nTickets '\u00ab2> and 1.183 Broadway.-AdvL ; 1\nPRICE THREE CENTS.\nFOREST FIRES RAGING.\nHOTELS TUREATEXED.\n\"Adirondack Cottages Also in Dangei{\n\u2014 Great Damage Likely. j\nPlattatrarr. N. T April 30.\u2014 forest fire*!\nin the Adirondacks have gained great headway*\nto-day on account of the high wind, in spite or,\nheroic efforts to check them. Nothing but *\nheavy rain will save the woods In many places\nfrom being seriously damaged. Telephone an\u00abt\ntelesrrarph wires are down and few details are at\nhand to-night, bat enough is known to make It\ncertain that the \u2022worst forest fires in years ar<s\nraging. At Dannemora a, close watch is being;\nkept that the State prison buildings shall not b\u00ab\ndamaged.\nAt Lyon Mountain the Chateaugay Or 1 an !\nIron Company to-day shut down ail its mtnesq\nand rushed the men by special train to Standlah^\nwhere the fires have already burned large qnan-^\ntites of pulp and charcoal wood. At Piumadore^\nManley's Kilns and South Inlet hundreds. prob-J\nably thousands, of cords of pulp wood have beertj\ndestroyed, and at Plutnadore tbre\u00ab dwelling\nhouses have also been burned.\nAt Loon Lake the summer hotel, the Loom,\nLake House, owned by F. W. Chase, is la'\nserious danger. At Lake Placid the Whit\u00ab Far*\nInn. one of the largest hotels there. Is entirely?\nsurrounded by forest <rea. and unless rain\ncomes to-night It cannot be saved. The .-<->\u25ba\u25a0\u2022\ntage owned by Charles Burt. near the Whit*\nFace Inn. is now on flre. Proprietors of sum*\nrr.er hotels all through the Adirondack* nay*\nappealed to the railroads for assistance. an\u00abs\nthe response has been prompt. Every available\nman on both the New- York Central and th\u00ab\nDelaware and Hudson roads has been rresi\u00bb*'f|\nirto service. Two hundred men ar<\u00bb now Kat-\u00bb\nfling with the flames. Amons? th* other \u00ab*ot-\u00bb\ntages in the vicinity ar\u00bb those of Georsr* H\u00ab\nDaniels, general passenger agent of the New*\nYork Central, and H. B. Aunhincloss.\nThe weather is warm and sultry, and thli^\ntogether with the dense smok\u00bb and intense h\u00bbat\u00bb,\nmakes the work of fighting the flames unusually^\ndifficult and disagreeable.\nTh*\u00bb Hurd sau:r:il!. at Tupr-r Lake, which* i\u00dfj\nthe time it was erected, about twelve years agn. t\nwas the largest in the United Sta'.^s. caug^O.\nfire to-night. and was destroyed, throwing two**\nhundred men out of employment. The entlr\u00ab|\npopulation of Tupper Lake is fighting the flames^\nThe contractors on the Chateaugay Railroad!\nhave sent a pan? of men to the Loon. Lake Hotelj\nin the hope of savinsr it.\nThe top of Stregis Mountain can be seen ablaze\nwith forest fires, bat none of the woods owned ,\nby the Paul Smith's Hotel Company have caught\nfire yet. At McCollom's and Mountain View;\ngangs of men are fighting 1 the fires In the sur~.\nronndlnsj woods to protect the hotels.\nA telegram from Malone at 9 p. m. says it I*)\nalmost impossible to breathe, the village is \u00bb\u2022;\nfilled with smoke, and fires can be seen raging in!\nall directions. There are no Immediate signs og|\nrain.\nGlens Falls. N. T. April \u2014 A forest flr^\nstarted yesterday near the site of Fort CJate^\nsouth of Lake George, and to-day nearly a thou^.\nsand acres hid been burned over. A large fore*,\nof men from Lak-\u00bb George are flghtins it. ar.-^|\nhave it now under control.\nWatertown. N. V . April 30.\u2014 Newton Falls, me\nvillage at the terminus of the Carthage and]\nAdirondack Railroad, is threatened with de-^\nstruction by a forest flre. which has been ragtag\nfor a number of days. The Carthage Fire De-\u00bb,\npartment warn called upon this afternoon, ant*},\nsixty men. with apparatus, went to the rescud\nof th\" village. 4\nPACIFIC CABLE OPENING^\nPresident and Governor Taft Likely\nto Exchange Messages on July 4.\nWashington. April \"The first message\nover the Pacific cable will probably be \u2022*\u00bb\nchanged between President Roosevelt and Gar*\nernor Taft on the morning of the Fourth os)\nJuly.\"\nThis announcement was made here to-day bj|\nGeorge C. Ward, the vice-president of the Postal\nTelegraph Company, which will operate the ne\u00ab\nall American lire, and is the first authoritative\nstatement of the early completion of tea great\nproject. The first link from San Francisco to\nHonolulu has now been in successful operation\nfor several months, without any si the inter-,\nruptions which hampered earlier and muck\nshorter lengths of submarine cables.\n\"I am here to confei with the naval official*\nupon a few minor matters Incidental to l**m\ncompletion of the line and the. landing place in\nthe Philippines,'* said Mr. Ward to-day. \"Th\u00ab\ncable steamers are now actively engaged be\ntween Honolulu and Midway Island, on th way\nto Guam, and between Guam and Manila, .lay\ning their cables as rapidly as possible. Within\ntwo months from to-day the various stations\nwill be fully manned and In. readiness for busi\nness. We are confident of celebrating th\u00bb\nFourth by sending messages over the who!*\nroute.\"\nMr Ward returned to New-York this aft?r\u00ab\u00ab,\nnoon.\nPoland: poland:: Poland:::\nPurest Natural Spring Wat K:;own.- Advt.\nTHE PROBLEM SOLVED.\nA straight line is the shortest distance b\u00bb\u00bbw*\u00abs\u00bb\ntwo point*. The Pennsylvania Railroad is th\u00ab uh9t\\\nline b*ts\u00bb\u00ab-rn New York and Chicago.\u2014 Advt.\nBILLT WHISKERa\nThe Autobiography of a Ooat. AJolly ' rj\nfor boys and girls, now running In THE Si N V r\nTRIBUNE. B\u00ab sure to read it next Sunday -v*\u00bbvt^",
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"text": "2\nPRESIDENTS SPEECH.\nC ontlnoeri from flr\u00bbt pus*.\nersnism showed Itself in its actual working* to\nbe wiser than the wisdom of the wisest,\nPUSHING THE FRONTIER WESTWARD.\nThis work of expansion was by far the\ngreatest work of our people during the years\nthat intervened between the adoption of the\nConstitution and the outbreak of the Civil War.\nThere were other questions of real moment ana\nImportance, and there were many which at the\ntime seemed such to those engaged in answer\nlnp them; but the trreatest feat of our fore\nfathers of those generations was the deed of the\nmen who. with pack train or wagon train, on\nhorseback, on foot or by boat upon the waters,\nposhed the frontier ever westward across the\ncontinent.\nNever before .had the world seen the kind ot\nnational expansion which gave our people all\nthat part of the American continent lying west\nof the thirteen original States, the greatest\nlandmark in which was the Louisiana Purchase.\nOur triumph in this process of expansion was\nIndispolubly bound up with the success of our\npeculiar kind of federal government; and this\nsuccess has been so complete that because or\nIts very completeness we now sometimes fall to\nappreciate not only the all Importance but the\ntremendous difficulty of the problem with which\nour nation was originally faced.\nWhen our forefathers Joined to call into being\nthis nation they undertook a task for which\nthere was but little encouraging precedent.\nThe development of civilization from the ear\nliest period seemed to show the truth of two\npropositions: In the/ first place. It had always\nproved exceedingly difficult to secure both free\ndom and strength in any government; and in\nthe second place, it had always proved well\nnigh impossible for a nation to expand without\neither breaking up or becoming a centralized\nTyranny.\nTHE LESSONS OF HISTORY.\nWith the success of our effort to combine a\nstrong and efficient national union, able to put\ndown disorder at home and to maintain our\nhonor and interest abroad. I have not now to\ndeaL This success was signal and all-impor\ntant, but it was by no means unprecedented in\nthe same sense that our type of expansion was\nunprecedented. The history of Rome and of\n\u00abJreece illustrates very well the two types of ex\npansion which had taken place in ancient time\nand which had been universally accepted as the\nonh- possible types up to the period when as a\nnation we ourselves began to take possession\nof this continent. The Grecian states performed\nremarkable feats of colonization, but each\ncolony, as soon as created, became entirely In\ndependent of the mother state, and in after\n>ears was almost as art to prove its enemy as,\nits friend. Local self-government, local in\ndependence, was secured, but only by the ab\nsolute sacrifice of anything resembling national\nunity. In consequence, the Greek world, for all\nits wonderful brilliancy and the extraordinary\nartistic, literary and philosophical development\nwhich has made all mankind its debtor for the\nages, was yet wholly unable to withstand a for\nmidable foreign foe, save spasmodically. As\n\u00abo<jri as powerful, permanent empires arose on\nits outskirts the Greek States in the neighbor\nhood of such empires fell under their sway.\nNational power and greatness were completely\nsacrificed to local liberty.\nWith Rome the exact opposite occurred. The\nImperial city rose to absolute dominion over all\nthe peoples of Italy and then expanded her rule\nover the entire U\u00bblI T worM by a process\nwhich kept the natiou strong and united, but\npave no room whatever for local liberty and\nself-government* All other cities and countries\n\u25a0were subject to Rome. In consequence this\nyxeat and masterful race of warriors, rulers,\nroad builders and administrator stamped their\nIndelible impress upon all the after life of our\nrace, and yet let an overeentralization eat out\nthe vitals cf their empire until it became an\n\u00bb-n ply shell; so that wh;n the barbarians came\nthey \"destroyed only what had already become\n\u25a0worthless to the world.\nTHE AMERICAN KIND OF EXPANSION.\nThe underlying viciousness of each type of\nexpansion was plain enough and the remedy\nnow seems simple enough. But when the fathers\nof the republic first formulated the Co\u2014\ntution imc 4\u20144 \u2014 which we live this remedy was\nuntried and in one could foretell how it would\nwork. They themselves began the experiment\nalmost immediately by adding new States to\nthe original thirteen. Excellent people in the\nEast viewed this initial expansion of the coun\ntry with great alarm. Exactly as during the\nryionial period many good people In the mother\ncountry thought it highly important that set\ntlers should be kept out of the Ohio Valley In\nthe interest of the fur companies, so. after we\nbad become a nation many good people on the\nAtlantic Coast felt grave apprehension lest they\nmight somehow be hurt by the westward growth\nof the nation. These good people shook th-\nheads over the formation of States in the fertile\nOhio Valley, which no* forms part of the heart\nof our nation, and they declared that the de\nstruction of the republic had been accomplished\nT.hen through the Louisiana Purchase, we ac\nquired nearly half of what is now that same re\npublic's present territory. Nor was their reeling\nlll\u2014 llsiisl Only the adventurous and the far\nseeing can be expected heartily to welcome the\nprocess of expansion, for the nation that ex\npands is a nation which is entering upon a great\ncareer and with preatness there must of nec\nsity come perils which daunt all save the most\nFf.ut expanded by carving the wilderness into\n\u25a0VVe expanded by carving the wilderness into\nTerritories, and out of these Territories build\nlnTnew States when once they had received\npermanent settlers a sufficient number of our\nown people. Being a practical nation, we have\nnever tried to force on any section of our new\nterritory an unsuitable form of government\nmerely 'because it was suitable for another sec\ntion under different conditions. Of the territory\ntowered by the Louisiana Purchase a portion\n\u2022was given statehood within A. few years. An\nother portion has not been admitted to state\nhood, although a century has elapsed\u2014 although\nl doubtless it soon will be. In each case we\nI showed the practical governmental genius of our\n' race by devising methods suitable to meet the\nactual existing ueeds; not by insisting upon Che\nApplication of some abstract shibboleth to all\n.our new possessions alike, no matter how in\ncongruous this application might sometimes be.\nBUILDING UP NEW STATES.\nOver by far the major part of the territory,\nhowever.\" our people spread in such numbers\nduring the course of the nineteenth century that\n\u2022vve were able to build up State after State, each\n\u2022with exactly the same complete local indepen\ndence in all matters affecting purely its own do\nmestic interests as in any of the original thirteen\nStates\u2014 each owing the same absolute fealty to\nthe Union of all the States which each of the\noriginal thirteen States also owes\u2014 and finally\neach having the same proportional right to its\nFhare in shaping and directing the common pol\nicy of the Union which is possessed by any other\nState, whether of the original thirteen or not.\nThis process now seems to -us part of the\nnatural order of things, but it was wholly un\nknown until our own : ople devised it. It seems\nto us a mr- matter of course, a matter of ele\nmentary right and justice, that in the delibera\ntions of the national representative bodies the\nrepresentatives of a State which came into the\nUnion but yesterday stand on a footing of exact\nend entire equality with those of the common\nwealths whose sons once signed the Declaration\nof Independence. But this way of looking at\nthe mutter is purely modern, and in its origin\npurely American. \"When Washington, during bis\nPresidency, saw new States come into the Union\non a. footing of complete equality with the old.\nevery European nation which had colonies still\nadministered them as dependencies, and every\nother m *her country treated the colonist not\nas a -governing equal but as a subject.\nThe process which we began has since been\nFor the selection of Sterling\nSilver\nWEDDING\nGIFTS\nthe Gorham stock offers the full\nest possible opportunities for\nchoice in both large and small\npieces.\nThe newest designs in Hand\nwrought ATHENIC and MAR\nTELE arc notable alike for indi\nvidual beauty of design and finish\nand for the fact that they are not\nto be had in duplicate.\nThe GORHAM CO.\nSilversmiths and Goldsmiths\n\" Broadway and Nineteenth Street\n21-23 Maiden Lane. New York\nONE OF THE! SET PIECES AT THE DEDICATION FIREWOSKS.\nThe old Cablldo, or Town House. New-Orleans, In which the transfer of tho Louisiana Territory took place, on December 20. ISCS.\nfollowed by all the great peoples who were capa\nble both of expansion and of self-government,\nand now the world accepts it as the natural\nprocess, as the rule; but a century and a quar\nter ago it was not merely exceptional; it was\nunknown.\nSIGNIFICANCE OF THE MOVEMENT.\nThis, then, is the great historic significance\nof the movement of continental expansion in\nwhich the Louisiana Purchase was the most\nstriking single achievement It stands out in\nmarked relief even among the feats of a na\ntion of pioneers, a nation whose people have\nfrom ths beginning been picked out by a proc\ness of natural selection from among the most\nenterprising individuals of the nations of West\nern Europe. The acquisition of the territory is\na credit to the broad and farsighted statesman\nship of the great statesman to whom it was\nimmediately due, and, above all. to the ag\ngressive and ma.st3rfui character of the hardy\npioneer folk to whose restless energy these\nstatesmen gave expression and direction, whom\nthey followed rather than led.\nThe history of the land comprised within the\nlimits of the Purchase is an epitome of the en\ntire history of our people. Within these limits\nwe have gradually built up State after. State\nuntil now they many times over surpass in\nwealth, in population and in many sided de\nvelopment the original thirteen States as they\nwere when their delegates met in the Conti\nnental Congress. The people of these States have\nshown themselves mighty in war with their fel\nlow man, and mighty in strength to tame the\nrugged wilderness. They could not thus have\nconquered the forest and the prairie, the moun\ntain and the desert, had they cot possessed the\ngreat fighting virtues, the qualities which enable\na people to overcome the forces of hostile men\nand hostile nature. On the other hand, they\ncould not have used aright their conquest had\nthey not, in addition, possessed the qualities of\nself-mastery and self-restraint, the power of\nacting in combination with their fellows, the\npower of yielding obedience to the law and of\nbuilding up an orderly civilization. Courage and\nhardihood are indispensable virtues In a peo\nple; but the people which possesses no others\ncan never rise high in the scale either of power\nor of culture. Great peoples must have in addi\ntion the governmental capacity which comes\nonly when individuals fully recognize their duties\nto one another and to the whole body politic,\nand are able to join together in feats of con\nstructive statesmanship and of honest and ef\nfective administration.\nTHE OLD VIRTUES STILL NEEDED.\nThe o!d pioneer days are gone, with their\nroughness and their hardship, their incredible\ntoil and their wild, half savage romance. But\nthe need for the pioneer virtues remains the\nsame as ever. The peculiar frontier conditions\nhave vanished: but the manliness and stalwart\nhardihood of the frontiersmen can be given even\nfreer scope under the conditions surrounding the\ncomplex Industrialism of the present day. In\nthis great region acquired for our people under\nthe Presidency of Jefferson, this region, stretch\ning from the Gulf to the Canadian border, from\nthe Mississippi to the Rockies, the material and\nsocial progress has been so vast that alike for\nweal and for woe its people now share the op\nportunities and bear the burdens common to the\nentire civilised world. The problems before us\nare fundamentally the same, east and west of\nthe Mississippi, in the new States and in the\nold, and exactly the same qualities are required\nfor their successful solution.\nWe meet here to-day to commemorate a great\nevent, an event which marks an era ill states\nmanship no less than In pioneering It Is fitting\nthat we should pay our homage in words; but\nwe must in honor make our words good by\ndeeds. We have every right to take a just pride\nin the great deeds of our forefathers; but we\nshow ourselves unworthy to be their descend\nants if we make what they did an excuse for\ncur lying supine Instead of an incentive to the\neffort to show ourselves by our acts worthy of\nthem. In the administration of city, State and\nnation. In the management of our home life\nand the conduct of our business and social re\nlation?, we are bound to show certain high and\nline qualities, of character under penalty of see\ning the whole heart of our civilization eaten out\nwhile the body still lives.\nWe Justly pride ourselves on our marvellous\nmaterial prosperity, and such prosperity must\nexist in order to establish a foundation upon\nwhich a higher life can be built; but unless we\ndo in very fact build this higher life thereon, the\nmaterial prosperity itself will go for but very\nlittle. Now. in UM3, In the altered conditions,\nwe must meet the changed and changing prob\nlems with the spirit shown by the men who in\nISO 3 and In the subsequent years gained, ex\nplored, conquered and settled this vast terri\ntory, then a desert, now filled with thriving and\npopulous States.\nA LOOK INTO THE FUTURE.\nThe old days were great because the. men who\nlived in them had mighty qualities; and we\nmust make the new days great by showing these\nsame qualities. We must insist upon courage\nand resolution, upon hardihood, tenacity and\nfertility in resource; we must insist upon the\nstrong: virile virtues, and we must insist no less\nupon the virtues of self-restraint, self-mastery,\nregard for the rights of others; we must show\nour abhorrence of cruelty, brutality and corrup\ntion, in public and In private life alike.\nIf we come short in any of these qualities we\nshall measurably fall, and if, as I believe we\nsurely shall, we develop these qualities in the\nfuture to an even greater degree than in the\npast, then in the century now beginning we\nfhall make of this republic the freest and most\norderly, the most just and most mighty nation\nwhich has ever come forth from the womb of\ntime.\nCLEVELA XD'S A DURESS.\nThe Louisiana Purchase and Its\nMomentous Consequences.\nSt. Louis. April SO.\u2014 The address delivered by tx-\nPresldent Cleveland at the World's Fair dedication\nceremonies follows:\nMr. President and Ladies and Gentlemen\u2014 The\n\u25a0mm nisi of this occasion is greatly en\nhanced by reason of an atmosphere of prophecy's\nfulfilment which surrounds it The thought is in\nour minds that v.. are amid awe Inspiring sur\nroundings, wh\u00abre we may see arid fee! things fore\ntold a century ago. We are here in recognition of\nthe one hundredth anniversary of an event which\ndoubted the area of the young American nation,\nand dedicated a new and wide domain to Ameri\ncan progress and achievement. The treaty whose\ncompletion w- to-day commemorate was itself a\nprophecy 01 o1o 1 r youthful nation's mighty growth\nar.d development. At its birth prophets In waiting\nJoyously foretold the. happiness which Its future\npromised H\u00bb who was the chief actor for the\nUnited States In Us negotiation, a\u00bb he slimed the\nperfected Instrument, thus de-tared Its effect and\nfar reaching consequence i \"Th\u00ab Instrument which\niffEW-YOKK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MAY 1. 1903.\nwe have Just signed will cause no blood to be shed.\nIt prepares ages of happiness for Innumerable\ngenerations of human creatures. The Mississippi\nand the Missouri will Bee them succeed one anotner\n\u2014truly worthy of the regard and care of Providence\nin the bosom of equality under just laws\u2014\nfrom the errors of superstition and the scourges of\nbad government.\" He who represented the nation\nwith whom we negotiated, when he afterward gave\nto the world his account of the transaction, de\nclared: \"The consequences of the cession of Louis\niana will extend to the most distant posterity. X\ninterests vast regions that will become by their\ncivilization ar.d power the rivals of Europe before\nanother century commences.\" and. warmed to en\nthusiasm by the developments already In view, and\ngreater ones promised, he added: \"Who can con\ntemplate without vivid emotions this spectacle of\nthe happiness of the present generation and the\ncertain pledges of the prosperity of numberless\ngenerations that will follow? At these magnificent\nprospects the heart beats with joy in the breasts of\nthose who were permitted to see the dawn of these\nbright days, and who are assured that so many\nhappy presages will be accomplished.\"\nThere was another prophet, greater than all\nprophet and priest\u2014 v.ho, higher up the mount\nthan others, heard more distinctly the voice of\ndestiny, whose heart and soul were full of proph\necy, and whose every faculty was tense and strong\nas* he wrought for our nation's advancement and\nfor the peace and contentment of his fellow-coun\ntrymen. From the fulness of gratitude and joy he\nthus wrote to one who had assisted In the con\nsummation of this great treaty: \"For myself and\nmy country, I thank you for the aid you have\ngiven in it; and I congratulate you on having lived\nto give these aids in a transaction replete with\nblessings to unborn millions of men, and which\nwill mark the face of a portion of the globe a* ex\ntensive as that which now composes the United\nStates of America,\" and when, as President, he\ngave notice in a message to Congress of the actual\noccupancy by the government of its new acquisi\ntion, he happily presaged the future, and gave as\nsurance of his complete faith and confidence in the\nbeneficent result of our nation's extension in these\nword*' \"On this important acquisition, so favorable\nto th\u00ab immediate Interests of our Western citizens,\nso auspicious to the peace and security of the na\ntion in general, which adds to our country terri\ntories fo extensive and fertile, and to our citizens\nnew brethren to partake of the blessings of freedom\nand self-government. I offer to Congress and our\ncountry my sincere congratulations.\"\nALL PROPHECIES EXCEEDED.\nOur prophets do not live forever. They are not\nhere to see how stupendously the growth and de\nvelopment of the American nation on the domain\nnewly acquired in their day have during a short\ncentiirv outrun their anticipations and predictions.\nAlmost within the limits of the territory gained\nby the Louisiana Purchase we have already carved\nout twelve great States\u2014 leaving still a large resi\ndue whose occupants are even now loudly clamor\ning' for Statehood. Instead of the live thousand\nwhite settlers who occupied this domain In ISO 3, it\nnow contains fifteen millions of Industrious, enter\nprising, intelligent Americans, constituting about\none-fifth of the population of all our States; and\nthese are defiantly contesting for premiership in\nwealth and material success with the oldest of our\nStates, and are their equals in every phase of ad\nvanced Intelligence and refined civilization.\nThe States which composed the Lnion v.hen Its\npossessions were so greatly extended have silica\nthat time seen the centre of the nation popula\ntion carried more than five hundred miles west\nward by the swift and constant current of settle\nment toward this new domain, and the citizens of\nthose States have seen flocking thither ' new breth\nren to partake of the blessings of freedom and self\ngovernment\" in multitudes greater than even Jet\nferson would have dared to foretell.\nI shall not enter the field of statistics for the\npurpose of giving details of the development ol the\nterritory acquired under the treaty we commemo\nrate I have referred to such development In some\nof its general features, by way of suggesting how\ndistinctly the century just ended gives assurance of\na ftartling and superabundant final fulfilment or.\nthe prophecies of its beginning.\nITS SUPREME IMPORTANCE.\nThe supreme importance of the Louisiana Pur\nchase and its value as a national accomplishment,\nwhen seen in the Incidents of its short history and\nin the light of its prestnt and prospective effects\nand Judged solely by its palpable and Independent\nmerits, cannot be better characterized than by the\nadoption of the following language from the pen of\na brilliant American historian: \"The annexation of\nLouisiana was an event so portentous as to defy\nmeasurement. It gave a new face to politics, and\nranked in historical importance next to the Dec\nlaration of Independence and the adoption of the\nConstitution\u2014events, of which it was the logical\noutcome. But as a matter of diplomacy it was\nunparalleled, because it cost almost nothing.\"\nHow lining on every ground it is that the cen\ntennial of this stupendous event should be joyously\nand appropriately celebrated, and that it should be\ncelebrated here, in the most populous of the States\ncreated from the territory which the Louisiana\nPurchase gave to us! And how in keeping it is with\nthe character of this acquisition, and with its pur\nposd and mission, that our celebration should not\nwaste itself on the pomp and pageantry that be\nlong to the fiumphs and spoils of war or to the\nrapacious dispossessions of ruthless conquest!\nEvery feature of our celebrr.tion should remind us\nthat we memorialize a peaceful acquisition of ter\nritory for truly American uses and purposes; and\nwe should rejoice not only because this acquisition\nimmediately gave peace and contentment to the\nspirited and determined American settlers, who de\nmanded an outlet of trade to the sea. but also be\ncause it provided homes and means of livelihood\nfor th\" millions of new Americans whose coming\ntread fell upon the ears of the expectant fathers of\nthe Republic, and whoso stout hearts and brawny\narms wrought the miracles which our celebration\nshould Interpret.\nWe are here at this hour to dedicate beautiful\nand stately edifices to the purpose of our com\nmemoration. But as we do this let us remember\nthat the soil whereon we stand was a century ago\ndedicated to the genius of American industry and\nthrift. For every reason nothing could be more\nappropriate as an important part of the centen\nnial commemoration we have undertaken than the\ngathering together on this spot of the things that\nare characteristic of American effort, and which\ntell the story of American achievement: and how\nhappily will this be supplemented and crowned by\nthe generous, magnanimous and instructive con\ntributions from other and elder lands, which,\nstanding side by side with our exhibits, shall mani\nfest the high and friendly regard our republic has\ngained among the governments of the earth, and\nshall demonstrate how greatly advancing civiliza\ntion has fostered and stimulated the brotherhood\nof nations.\nAX HISTORICAL. REVIEW.\nI cannot, however, rid myself of the feeling that\nthe inspiration and value attending euch an ex\nposition may be anticipated and increased if on\nthis dedicatory occasion we promote appropriate\nreflections by a retrospection of some of the inci\ndents which accompanied the event we celebrate.\nWe ail know that long before the negotiation\nof the treaty of 1803 our government had a keen\nappreciation of the importance to American set\ntlers In the valley of the Mississippi of an arrange\nment permitting their products to be deposited and\nexported at the entrance of that river to the sea.\nIt will be remembered that this need of our set\ntlers had been met In a limited and not altogether\nsecure manner by a treaty with Spain allowing\nsuch deposits and exports to be (node at the city\nof New-Orleans. This privilege was entirely with\ndrawn in October, 1802. the territory appurtenant\nto such privilege having been In tie mean time\ntransferred to Franco. The situation thus created\nwas extremely delicate. There was presented to\nthe government, on the one band, the injury to\nWestern settlers through the loss of their trading\noutlet, and, on the other, the perplexing question\nof affording them relief by means of diplomatic\nagreement or In some other method. The abandon\nment of our settlers to their disheartening fate\nwas of course, not contemplated.\nIt cannot be denied that the conditions plainly\npointed to cautious and deliberate negotiations as\nthe .'. a v of prudence and eafet) It very noon be\ncame apparent, however, that delay and too much\ndeliberation did not suit the temper and spirit of\nsturdy Americans chafing under a sense of wrong:\nand convinced that they were entitled to prompt aa\ntlat'ince. The inhabitant* of our territory bound*\nIng on the east side of the Mississippi. In a memo\nrial addressed to the President, Senate and House\nof Representatives, after reciting their discouraging\ncondition and expressing their faith In the govern\nment's disposition to extend the necessary a.a,\nclosed their memorial with these significant words:\n\"And so far as may depend on ourselves we\ntender to our country our lives and fortunes in sup\nport of such measures as Congress may deem neces\nsary to vindicate the honor and protect the in-er\nesta of the United States.\" The settlers in the\n\"States west of the Alleghany Mountains also, in\na memorial to the government clearly indicating\ntheir Impatience and readiness for extreme action,\ndeclared that prompt and decisive measures we\"9\nnecessary, and referred to tne maxim that pro\ntection and allegiance are reciprocal as *\u00a3'\"\u00a3 par\nticularly applicable to their situation. They con\ncluded 'their statement with these solemn words:\n\"Without interfering in the measures that have\nbeen adopted to bring about the amicable arrange\nment of a difference which has grown out of the\ngratuitous violation of a solemn treaty, they desire\nthat the United States may explicitly understand\nthat their condition is critical, that the delay _ of a\nsingle season would be ruinous to their country,\nI and that an Imperious necessity may consequently\n1 oblige them, if they receive no aid. to adopt them-\nI selves the measures that may appear to them\ncalculated to protect their commerce, even though\nthose measures should produce consequences un\nfavorable to the harmony of the Confederacy.\nThese representations emphasized the apprehen\nsion of those charged with governmental affairs\nthat the course of deliberate caution and waiting\nwhich up to that time had appeared to be the only\none permissible might be Insufficient to meet the\nsituation, and that, whatever the result might be\n! a more pronounced position and more urgent action\n' would be entered upon. President Jefferson wrote\nto a friend on February 1. 1808: -Our circumstances\nare so imperious as to admit of no delay as to our\n\u25a0 course and the use of the Mississippi so indispensa\nj ble that we cannot hesitate one moment to hazard\nour existence for its maintenance.\" .He appointed\n! an additional envoy to co-operate with our repre\n! sentative already at the French capital. in an at\ntempt to obtain a concession that would cure the\ndifficulty, and in a communication to him, after re\nferring to the excitement caused by the withdrawal\nI of the right of deposit, he thus characterized the\ncondition which he believed confronted the nation.\n\"On the event of this mission depends the future\ndestinies of this republic. If we cannot by a pur\n! chase of the country insure to ourselves a course\nof perpetual peace and friendship with all nations,\nthen, as war cannot be distant. it behooves us im\nmediately to be preparing for that course\u2014 though\nn \u00b0T l haye e \"nof recited these details for the purpose\nof claiming that this accelerated speed and ad-\nI vanced position on the part of our government had\nI any important effect in hastening final results. i\nhave thought it not amis?, however, to call at-\nI tention to the fact that a century ago the people\n' of this country were not seeking to gain govern\ni mental benefit by clandestine approach and cun\nning pretence, but were apt to plainly present\ntheir wants or grievances, and to openly demand\n! such consideration and care from the general gov\nernment as was their due under the mandate of\npopular rule, and that in making their demands\nthey relied on the mutual obligations of the re\nlationship between the governed and those invest\ned with authority, and invoked the reciprocity in\npolitical duty which enjoins that for the people\nobedience and support of government, there sh;iil\nbe given in exchange by the government to the\npeople defence of their personal rights and the as\nsurance that in safety and peace they shall surely\nreap the fruits of their enterprise and labor. It\nmay also be well to note the efficacy of the people\ncall upon the government in those early days and\nhow quickly the response came, not by yielding\nto temporary gusts of popular whim and caprice,\nnot by conferring benefits on the few at the ex\npense of the many, but by a quick observation or\nthe fact that the withdrawal of certain rignttul\nprivileges by another nation from American settlers\nhad caused them distress, and by a prompt deter\nmination to relieve their distress even if the un\nwelcome visage of war frowned in oppo&.t.on.\nJEFFERSON'S CHANGE OF COURSE.\nAnother incident which It seems to me we may\nrecall to-day with profit and satisfaction grew out\nof the conduct of the President when the Treaty\nof lm.i3 had been formulated and was returned to\nhim for ratification and final completion. He was.\nas is well known, originally quite firm la his belief\nthat the Constitution as. it stood did not authorize\nsuch an extension of our limits by purchase as\nthe treaty for the acquisition of the Louisiana Ter\nritory contemplated. Holding this opinion, and at\nthe sfime time confronted with the clear conviction\nthat the treaty with all Its stupendous advantages\ncould not be allowed to fail without positive peril,\nif not to our national life, at least to Its most\nvital object and aspiration, his perplexity was in\ncreased by the receipt of an authoritative intima\ntion that any delay in final action on the treaty\nmight open the way to a recession on the part of\nFrance. In these circumstances, not daring to\nrisk the delay of an amendment to the Constitu\ntion prior to such final action, he proposed recon\nciling inconsistency with duty by procuring a con\nfirmation of the treaty by the Senate and com\npassing its unquestionable validation by a subse\nquent constitutional amendment.\nIn view of the conclusive settlement eince that\ntime of this constitutional Question by every\nbranch of the government against Mr. Jefferson's\noriginal opinion and in favor of the nation's power\nto acquire territory as was done under the treaty\nof ISO 3. and considering the fact that we have since\nthat time immensely increased our area by the ac\nquisition not only of neighboring territory, but of\ndistant islands of the sea separated by thousands\nof miles from our home domain, we may be in\nclined to think lightly of President Jefferson's\nscruples concerning the acquisition of lands not\nonly next adjacent to us, but Indispensably neces\nsary to our peace and development.\nThere were wise men near our President in 1803\nwho differed with him touching the nation's power\nto acquire new territory under the original provi\nsions of the constitution, and these men did not\nfail to make known their dissent. Moreover, In\nthe Senate, to which the treaty was submitted for\nconfirmation, there was an able discussion of its\nconstitutional validity and effectiveness. The judg\nment of that body on this phase of the subject was\nemphatically declared when out of thirty-one votes\ntwenty-four were cast In favor of confirmation. An\namendment to the constitution was afterward pre\nsented to Congress, but its first appearance was\nits last. It does not appear that the President in\nterested himself in its fate, and it died at the\nmoment of its Introduction.\nWhile in this day and generation we may wonder\nat the doubts which so perplexed Jefferson in ISO 3\nand at his estimate of the limitations of our funda\nmental law, and may be startled when we reflect\nthat if they had been allowed to control his action\nwe might have lost the greatest national oppor\ntunity which has been presented to our people\nsince the adoption of the constitution, we cannot\nfall at the same time to be profoundly grateful\nthat these doubts and this estimate were those of\na man sincere enough and patriotic enough to lis\nten to wise and able counsellors and to give his\ncountry the benefit of his admission of the fallibil\nity of his judgment.\nThomas Jefferson never furnished better evidence\nof his greatness than when, just before the submis\nsion of the treaty to the Senate, he wrote to a dis\ntinguished Senator who differed with him on this\nquestion: \"I confess that I think it important In\nthe present r ase to set an example against broad\nconstruction by appealing for new power to the\npeople If however, our friends shall think dif\nferent!'.- certainly I sh\u00bb.'l acquiesce with satisfac\ntion\u2014confiding that th rood sense of our country\nwill correct the evil of construction when it shall\nproduce ill effects.\"\nA recent writer on American diplomacy, who is\nnot suspected of partiality for Jeffersonian polltl\ni >\\ doctrine. Rave in strong and graceful t<rms a\nrood reason for our gratitude to-day, when in re\nferring to this subject be wrote: \"It was fortunate\nfor the future of America that we had at th\u00ab\u00bb head\nof affairs \u25a0 man of such broad views of our\ncountry's future. A Imp able President, with the\nsame view entertained by Jefferson as to the con\nstitutionality of th\" measure, would have put asMs\nthe opportunity. Jefferson put aside his prec0n\n,..\u00ab.,.,! views as' to tbo fundamental law. or subordi\nnated them 'to the wii: of the nation, and wel\ncomed the opportunity to open up the continent to\nthe expansion of American democracy ana free\nInstitutions.\" \u201e _ _ M\nAY \u2022 are glad at ttil\u00ab hour that Jefferson was\nwrong in his adverse construction of the con\nstitution, and glad that he was liberal minded\nenough to see that he might be wrong. And yet\nmay we not profitably pause. here long enough to\ncontrast In our thoughts the careful and reverent\nmanner in which the restrictions of our funda\nmental law were scrutinized a hundred years ago.\nwith the tendency often 3een in later times to\nflippantly attempt the adjustment of our constitu\ntion to the purposes of interest and convenience.\nHAND OF PROVIDENCE RECOGNIZED.\nIn conclusion. 1 ho,->\u00ab I may be permitted to sug\ngest that our thoughts ami surroundings on this\noccasion should lead us to humble recognition or\nthe Providence of God in all that has made us a\ngreat nation. From our beginning as a people our\ncourse has been marked by occurrences and inci\ndent*, bo striking, so sgnlficant and so constant.\nthat only superstitious dulness or Intellectual\nblindness will place them to the credit of luck or\nIn the midst of our rejoicing to-day It Is pe\nculiarly fitting that we recall with soberness and\nmeekness some of the happenings in connection\nwith the (Treat event we celebrate which Impres\nsively Illustrate the interposition of Divine Fro^l\ndence in our behalf. XV\" sought from a nation\nruled by one whose ambition was boundless and\nwhose scheme for aggrandizement knew neither the\nobligations of public morality nor the restraints of\ngood faith the free navigation of the Mississippi\nRiver and such Insignificant territory as would\nmake such navigation useful. While our efforts\ntoward th\u00ab accomplishment of this slight result lan\nrulshed and we were fast assuming a hopeless con\ndition, the autocrat of France suddenly commanded\none or his ministers to enter into negotiations with\nour waiting and dispirited representative^., and\nexclaimed: f I renounce Louisiana. It Is not only\nNew-Orleans I cede. It Is the whole colony, wltn\n\u00b0litr was V on!y nineteen days thereafter that the\ntreaty transferring to us the magnificent domain\ncomprised within the Louisiana Purchase was con\n\u00b0i Tnia L astonishing change In our prospects, which\ndissipated the fears and apprehensions of our gov\nernment and revived the promise of our perpetuity\nend happy destiny, came at the moment that Bona\nparte was organizing a force to occupy the Louisi\nana Territory in the prosecution of colonial oc\neupatloErind. development which, if consummated\nwould probably have closed the door even to the\nslight acquisition which we originally sought. The\nFrench colony of San Domingo was. however, a\nprime factor in this scheme of occupation, and It\nwasT essential to Its success that thin colony and\nLouisiana should both be included and \u25a0*>\u00ab uld sup\nplement each other. A serious revolt then raging\nfn San Domingo delaying \u00bb\u00ab>cee\u00abnKS. th^5 >cc r CcC c\ntlon of Louisiana was postponed until tWa revolt\nshould be overcome. The troops sent from nc \u00ab\nto accomplish this apparently -asy \u00ab*\u00bb* \u00abE so\nstubbornly resisted by hundreds of thousands of\nfreed blacks, fighting \u25a0*\u00bb\u00bb\u00ab* iheir re-ens^e\nment. and they suffered so terribly f rom climate\nconditions and deadly fever that c \u00a3\nof twenty-five thousand soldiers, many \u00b0i wn\u00b0m,\nwere Intended for the subsequent occupation of\nLoufsiaSia. Bonaparte's plan for the occupation of\nboth colonies miscarried. This and\nthe conception of new schemes of war and con\nquest by the restless dictator of France, and Ms\nneed of money to carry out these schemes > \u2122\u00a3\ncontrolling- circumstances In leading turn to throw\nIn our lap the entire Louisiana Territory None <M\nthese circumstances were within our JF\u00b0curement\nor knowledge: but who shall say that God was not\naccomplishing His designs in our behalf smld th\u00ab\nturmoil and distressing scenes of \u00ab*\" **\"\". \u00bb\"? ' '\n.....I.') And how can it be said that there was no\nProviVenc^fn the unexpected,\neessM fiirht for continued freedom on the Dan or\nthe negroes of San Dom n*o. or in the j atal P e^_\nlence that vied with bloody warfare In the de\nstruction of the army of \u25a0 \u00fcb J u \u00bbJ lon - h \u00b0I JS \u2666\u00a3!\nfever of war and aggression which heated tne\nblood of Bonaparte, all combining to turn .him\naway from- the occupation of the u ; s ' a J?* out of\ntory? All these things, so remote and so farou .or\nour eight, pointed with the c oerclon tt^ a *ilteh^|!\nto the decree of God to a consummation which re\nstored to our people peace and contentment and\nsecured to our nation extension a.id development\nthe wonderful measure of prophecy's fuimmeni\npatriotism and th\u00ab civic virtue of A\"*!^ 8 ,?.?*\nlived a hundred years a&o. and God s o\\er.uling ot\nthe wrath of man and His devious ways for the\nbl^aVe O^H Ur pr?u t d'of our American citizenship.\nLet us leave this place with this deling stimu\nlated by the sentiments born of the occasion Let\nus appreciate more keenly than ever how vitally\nnecessary it is to our country's weal that every one\nwithin Its citizenship should be ciean minded in\npolitical aim and aspiration, sincere and honest\nIn his conception of our country's mission and\naroused to higher and more responsive patriotism\nby the reflection that It Is a solemn thins to De\nlong to a people favored cf God.\nDEDICATORY EXERCISES.\nPrayer, Addresses. Music and\nBenediction.\nSt. Louis. April 30.\u2014 The dedicatory exercises\nof the Louisiana Purchase Exposition began in\nthe Liberal Arta Building at -:25 p. m.. when\nPresident Francis called the assemblage to or\nder. He introduced Cardinal Gibbons, who de\nlivered the following invocation:\nWe pray Thee, O God of might, wisdom and\njustice through Whom authority is rightly ad\nministered, laws are enacted, and judgment de\ncreed assist with Thy Holy Spirit or counsel and\nfortitude the President of these United States,\nthat his administration may be conducted in\nrighteousness and be eminently useful to Thy\npeople over whom he presides, by encouraging \u2122\u00bb\nrespect for virtue and religion, by a faithful ex\necution of the laws in justice and mercy, *>na by\nrestraining vice and immorality.\nLet the light of Thy Divine wisdom direct the\ndeliberations of Congress, and shine rorth in all\ntheir proceedings and laws framed for our rule\nand government, so that they may tend to tha\npreservation of peace, the promo' ion of national\nhappiness the increase of industry, sobriety and\nuseful knowledge, and may perpetuate to ua t!ia\nblessings of equal liberty.\nWe pray for His Kxcellency the Governor of\nthis State, for the members oi the legislature, for\nall juiigv3. magistrates and other otflct: * who are\nappointed to guard our political welfare, that\nthey may be enabled by Thy powerful protection\nto discharge the duties of their respective sta\ntions with honesty and ability.\nWe pray for the president and directors of the\nLouisiana Purchase Exposition, that their ardu\nous labors may be crowned with success and may\nredound to the greater growth and development\nof this flourishing city on the banks of the Father\nof Waters.\nMay this vast territory which was peacefully\nacquired a hundred years ago be for all time to\ncome the tranquil and happy abode of millions of\nenlightened, God rearing and industrious people\nengaged in the various pursuits ami avocations of\nlife. As tliia new domain was added to our pet\nsession without sanguinary strife, so may its\nsoil never be stalr.ed by bloodshed in any foreign\nor domestic warfare.\nMay this comnif moraMve exposition, to which\nthe famiiy of nations art generously contributing\ntheir treasures of art and industry, hind together\nthe governments of the earth in closer ties of fel\nlowship and good will and of social and com\nmercial intercourse. May It hasten the dawn of\nthe reign of the Prini-e o: Teace, when national\nconflicts will be adjusted, not by hostile armies,\nbut by permanent courts of arbitration.\nMay this international exhibition, inaugurated in\nthe Interests of peace and commerce, help to break\ndown the wall? of dissension, of Jealousy and preju\ndice that divide race from race, nation from na\ntion and people from people, by proclaiming aloud\nthe sublime Gospel truth that we are all children\nof the same God. brothers and sisters of i: 1\nLord Jesus Christ, and that we are all it-^'ring to\na glorious inheritance in the everlasting Kingdom\nof the common Father.\nMR. CARTER INTRODUCED.\nEx-Senator Thomas H. Carter, of the national\ncommission, who acted as president of the day,\nwas then Introduced. He spoke as follows:\nOne hundred years ago to-day the government of\nthe United States acquired sovereignty over the\nvast territory of the Mississippi Valley, which\nhas since been known to the geographical nomen\nclature of the world as \"the Louisiana Purchase.\"'\nBeyond the river the boundaries and the resources\nof the territory were ill defined and but vaguely\ncomprehended. The purchase price of J15.*\u00bb3.0i\u00ab\u00bb\nwas pronounced exorbitant, the free navigation of\nthe Mississippi being the only part of the property\ndeemed worthy of serious consideration. The trans\naction was regarded by many as a violation of the\nConstitution and a menace to our form of govern\nroent. The grave doubts of President Jefferson\nwere only resolved into action by his patriotic de\nsire for national supremacy over the river and his\nprophetic faith In the possibilities of the mysteri\nous country beyond It. The revelations of a cen\ntury have most amply justified his faith.\nWhen the treaty of cession was concluded Presi\ndent Jefferson represented less than six millions of\npeople During these ceremonies President Roose\nvelt the Executive of over eighty millions of free\nmen, will dedicate the buildings. The magical story\nof local development puts to shame the creations of\nfiction. The contented and prosperous inhabitants\nof the Louisiana Purchase to-day substantially equal\nin numbers three times the total population of the\nUnited States Sn 18M The conquest of space, for\nests streams and deserts anil the founding of cities\nand States In waste places within this territory\nmark an advance unsurpassed In the history of\nhuman endeavor.\nIn conformity with a special act of Congress, the\nPresident has invited all the nations to co-operate\nwith us in properly commemorating the masterful\nachievements of a century In this new country. It\nIs fitting that the celebration should be interna\ntional, for you will In vain attempt to name a\ncivilised country whose sons and daughters have\nnot contributed to the glorious triumphs of peace\nrecorded here. In vain will you seek a more cos\nmopolitan and at the same time a mire homo\ngeneous population than th.it of the Louisiana Ter\nritory. The purchase, facilitated by the exigencies\nof European war and made in a season of darkness\nand peril, has proved a boon not only to the grantor\nand the grantee, but to humanity at large, for here\nthe nations have commingled and the brotherhood\nof man has become a demonstrated possibility.\nAs a means of giving expression to the universal\nappreciation of wnat has been accomplished for\nhumanity within this field during the century, the\nLouisiana Purchase Exposition was orgi-:iize<l\nunder the authority of an act of Congress. W'th\nthe aid of the United States Government and the\ncity of St. Louis. th\u00bb exposition company.\nthrough Its officers, ac^nts and employes, has\nerected the majestic bulldltics whose massive pro\nportion! and classical outlines excite the wonder\nami admiration of the vast multitude assembled\nwithin and about their walls.\nTo every one present Is accorded the privilege of\nassisting in the dedication of these buildings to\ntheir intended us* Th* President of tb\u00ab United\nStates honors as by belnsr here to extend v. ._...\nIngs and to voice the approving sentiments \u00a3 'Si\ncountrymen. \"\u00ab*\u00bbi\u00bb ot m\nMoved by a broad and generous spirit, the nation.\nof the earth, from the empire of most ine^n!\norigin to the republic of twentieth century . r*atttaT\ndignify the occasion by th* prim if of th-!r \u00ab\ncredited representatives. Our home folks fremTn\nthe States. Territories and districts betoken *,\ntheir numbers and enthusiasm th*\u00bb interest c' th\nbody of the p. .. I\u00bb in ih* exposition and th* ml*\nhistoric event It is Intended to commemorate *\nIn the name of the national rotnmixKion '<\u00bb>\u00bb<.\u00ab\ned by Congress to provide for the dedication c\u00ab-el\nmonies. I extend to you all a cordial welcome m*<*\nan responsive to this Inspiring scene of peace' mZji\ngenerous feellr\u00abr I call upon the choru3 to favor ci\nwith Pe*thoven's Creation hymn. w\nThoso bent Informed will, hv unanimous \u201e-.\nylehl to the Hen. David R. Francis, president oftkl\ncompany, the his! eat measure of praise for th-\u00bb or\naaatsatloii of th<- exposition and the construction\nof the buildlnjrw he will now present to th* Prwi\ndent of th\u00ab United States for dedication.\nPRESENTATION OF THE BUILDING*.\nAfter the singing of \"The Heavens Proclaim\ning,\" by the chorus of two thousand voices.\nPresident Francis delivered the following ad.\ndress, presenting the buildings of the fair:\nThe people of the: Louisiana Purchase ar\u00bb proad\nof their membership in the Federal Union. They\nare grateful for the. benefits that have flowed frost\na life under the enduring- Institutions former by th\u00ab\nfounders or th\u00ab republic. They congratulate their\nbrethren on the position our country occupies\namong the nation* of the earth, and felicitate them\nselves on the part they have performed toward\nraising it to Its present prestige and power.\nThey felt it a patriotic duty fittingly to conuneci.\nznorate the completion of the first century of their\nconnection with the American Republic and th\u00ab\nrounding out of an Important epoch In the Ufa of\nthe republic In the discharge of that duty this\nexposition was conceived. The inhabitants of th\nfourteen States and two Territories comprised wltJj.\nin the Purchase selected St. Louis as the sceae of\nthe celebration. The people of thU city, grateful\nfor the honor conferred, promptly accepted it a cd\ncheerfully assumed the immense responst: 1:\nentailed.\nThe century just closed, unequalled as It was !-\u00bb\nevery line of progress, furnished no more strllcir.j\nevidence of the advance of civilization than th-*\ndevelopment of the Louisiana Territory. A cele\nbration in such ac age and in such a country, to\nhe fit. should be upon a scale in keeping with tfc*\nbest and highest, and should be planned upon linn\nbroad enough to take in every people and every\nclime. A scheme so ambitious in th* Inception\nnaturally had comparatively few advocates ar.l\nencountered many antagonists and more douSters.\nIt could not be accomplished without the recogni\ntion and the aid of the general government which\nfor a time it seemed Impossible to enlist. It was\ndecided that t>\u00bbr amount required to launch an\nundertaking so comprehensive should ?^\u00ab\u00bb the sarc*\nas that paid for the empire which Jefferson pur\nchased \u2014 JI3.COO.C\"*}. The Congress ssli to St. Lou!*.\n\"When you have secured two-thirds of that sun\nwe will provide the remaining third.\" The condi\ntions were accepted and fulfilled.\nAfter three years of struggle the \u00bbmew\u00ab had fc\u00aber\u00bb\nsecured\u2014 first step accomplished. Two year*\nhave since elapsed. During that period the work\nhas been pushed in every State and Territory and,\npossession of the United States and in every civil\nized country on th* earth. The disappointment*\nexperienced and the obstacle* encountered hay\u00ab\nbut served to spur to renewed effort those whr\u00bb\nfrom the Inception of the movement had determined,\nto carry it to a successful consummation.\nThe further encouragement from the general gov\nernment m the provision for its own exhibit, th*\nco-operation of the forty-one States and Terri\ntories and possessions of th- United States, th*\npledged participation of thirty-two foreign coun\ntries. are the results of vigorous domestic and.\nforeign exploitation. That and what yon behoH\nhere to-day in physical shape we submit as th*\nproduct of \"five years of labor, nearly four of which\nwere devoted to propaganda and appeal and or\nganization.\nThe plan and scope, comprehensive as they w\u00abr\u00ab\nin the beginning, have never been diminished at\nany stage of tbe progress; rather. hay\u00bb they been\nampliflad and enlarged. St. Louis with an \u00bb-v^r\nwidening sense of responsibility and an ever grow\ning 1 appreciation of the opportunity, has up to this\nmoment risen to the full measure of the duty as\nsumed. Th\u00ab management of the Exposition has\nnever despaired, but with a realizing sense sf th*\nmighty task It has undertaken, and mindful of\nthe limitations of human capabilities, with single\nness of purpose and with personal sacrifice for\nwhich it neither asks nor deserves credit, has\nstriven to meet the expectations of those who**\ntrust it holds.\nThe Exposition Company makes Its acknowledg\nments to those faithful and efficient officials who**\nIntelligent service* have contributed so much,\ntoward bringing the enterprise to its present stage.\nThe company expresses its obligation to the artist*\nand artisans who hare reared these graceful and\nmajestic structures and who?e labors have been in\nspired more by pride in the end to b\u00ab achiered\nthan by the hope of material reward.\nThe universal exposition of 1904. when the dat\u00bb\nof the opening rolls around, one year from to-day,\nwill, with its buildings completed. its exhibits In\nstalled, be thoroughly prepared tr> receive the mill\nions of visitors who will enter Its gates.\nThe distinguished assemblage which honors us\nwith Its presence to-day can come nearer forming\nan adequate conception of the scope of the worlc\nby personal Inspection than through, the writing*\nor Illustrations of authors and designers, however\ngreat their talent may be.\nTo the President of the United States, to the ac\ncomplished representatives of foreign countries, to\nth\u00a9 chief executives of th\u00ab sovereign States, to\nthe Senators and Representatives of the national\nCongress, to the great concourse of vt*i:ors her*\ncongregated, we extend greeting. If you are pleased\n\u25a0with what has been accomplished your approval is\nabundant reward for the labor we have performed.\nWe bear in mind and trust you do not overtook\nthat this celebration is of no State, of no section,\nbut of the entire country. It is our hop\u00a9 and our\nexpectation that every section and every common\nwealth, and. in fact, every community, will cherish\na proprietary interest and lend helpful aid to thi.\u00bb\nworthy undertaking, to the end that It may prov\u00bb\nas nearly as may be commensurate with the coun\ntry and the century whow achievements and ad-\nThe lease expires to-day on that\nwinter- weight suit of yours. ...\nTime for a new one.\n\"Warm Weather Clothes.\nStylish, well-HtUng.\nBest assortment of\nSerges, Cheviots and Flannels.\nEverything Man or Boy Wears.\nSmith, Gray & Co.\nBroadway at 31st St.\nBrooklyn: Broadway at Bedford Aye\u00ab\nFulton St. at FJatbttsh Aye.\nAfter this date our manufacturing department\nwill b<? at Norwalk. Conn., where a lar<e. up\nto-date mill has been built. Salesrooms as here\ntofore.\nJOSEPH LOTH & CO..\n*'Fa.ir &nd Square\" Ribbons.\n65 Greene Street,\nMay 1. 1903. New York Otr.\n| \"Marching On\" j\nI JANUARY, 17%. :\n1 FEBRUARY, 20%. \u2666\nI March, 22%. t\nI April, 29%. I\nX The above percentages represent \u2666\u25a0\nX the gains in sales of the \u25ba\ni Daily and Sunday \u2666\n! TRIBUNE^\nX in the respective months of tr [\n\u2666 1903 as compared with 1902. jj j\nX \"Full in and join the procession.\"* j",
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"text": "_-\u201e,-\u2022 M is designed to commemorate. The\n** '\" - ! ful Dlcture whose outlines you now behold\n-SFSTLtZSI the simile of the chief designer, when\nfSjleted compose a \u00ab*\u00b0ng that will reverberate\n\u25a0 r AY? d now\" &r President, It ts my pleasing privi\nirceand high honor to present to you for dodlca\ni, ( h\u00ab buildings of the Louisiana Purchase Expo\nt?\u00abon. May a high standard of citizenship and a\n\u00a3-nader humanity and the mission of the country\nwhose worthy representative you are be sustained\nndfostorfd and promoted by the uses to which\nSL structures are devoted! May the happiness\nrf \"'mankind be ad vane* d and broadened by the\nlofty purposes that inspired this undertaking 1 and\n{coved our own and our sister countries to unite In\nits accomplishment!\nPresident Roosevelt was greeted by tre\nmendous cheering when he arose to deliver the\ndedication address. He spoke of the policy of\nexpansion and how this nation had been built\nup by It.\nFollowing the President's address the chorus\nBane \"Unfold. Ye Portals.\"\nEx-Senator Carter than Introduced ex-Presi\ndent Grovel Cleveland, who spoke on the Louisi\nana Purchase and its significance.\nBENEDICTION BY BISHOP POTTER.\nThe exercises were closed by the following\nbenediction delivered by Bishop Potter of New-\nYork:\nMay the blessing of the Lord God Almighty,\nwithout Whom all our labor is hut vain, rest upon\nthis work and ail who are ot shall be engaged in it.\nMay He take these buildintrs under His gracious\nkeeping and crown this great undertaking with His\nenduring favor, making it the school of truth and\nbeauty, and so a revelation of His Infinite mind\nworking in and through the mind of mar,. And to\nHim be glory and honor and power, now an.l al\ntrays. The Lord bless us and keep us; the Lord\nMM His face to shine upon us and be gracious\nbnto us: the Lord lift up the light of His counte\nr.anr* upen us and give to us and to all the people\nof this land peace, purity and prosperity, both now\nand foreverroore. Amen.\n{The addresses of President Roosevelt and ex-\nPresident Cleveland will be found In full in other\ncolumns,]\nWEATHER A HAXDICAP.\nCold, and High Wind Made Every\nOne Uncomfortable.\n(By The Associated Presto\nft Louis, April 30.\u2014 one circumstance\nvhich marred the dedication ceremonies to-day\nwas the weather. It would be difficult to imag\nine a more disagreeable day. The wind blew\nfiercely from the west, sending great clouds of\ndust into the faces of the troops, and at times\nto nearly blinding the President that It was\nalmost Impossible for him to see across the\nstreet.\nAdded to the discomfort of the wind and dust\nwas a temperature which sought for the mar-\nIWW and generally reached It. The women.\n\u25a0who. on the strength of the warm weather of\nyesterday, came !n summer dresses to the re\nviewing stand, suffered keenly, and, except for\nthe thoughtfulness of officers commanding the\nguard, who provided blankets for them, many\nwould have been compelled to leave the place.\nPresident Rooseveit and ex-Presidtnt Cleveland\nregained in the reviewing ttand. exposed to the\njry wind, until the end of the parade, although\ntheir faces were blue and their limbs stiffened\nby the cold.\nConditions in the Liberal Arts Building, where\nthe dedication ceremonies were held, were little\nbetter. There was no wind, but there were\nmanifold draughts, which, added to the damp\nness inseparable from newly erected buildings,\npecdaeaf a. penetrating chill that was uncom\nfortable to a degree. The effect of this was\nevident In all the speeches, as the speakers, be\nginning their addresses In clear tones, were,\n\u25a0? ithout exception, hoarse when they finished.\nEAD LUNCHEON UNDER DIFFICULTIES.\nThe parade, which took place in the morn\ning, was somewhat longer in passing the Presi\ndent than had been expected, and he was fifteen\nminutes behind schedule time when he was es\ncorted by the committee into the Liberal Arts\nBuiMinc. In order to arrive even as early as\ntim he was compelled to take his noonday meal\nunder somewhat uncomfortable circumstances.\nAt the hinrftenn which he took after the pa\nrade, he was shoved helter-skelter by half the\npeople who had been in the grandstand. The\nfood /as placed on a rectangular counter, and\nthe Presidert, like everybody da\u00ab, helped him\nself. The crowd was dense when the President.\nwith Secret Service men and Adjutant General\nCorbin. acting as \"interference,\" forced his way\nto the -ounter. He was so closely pressed that\n\u25a0when he attempted to move his arm, his elbow\ndiscurbed a cup of coffee field by Genera! Cor\nti .. With some difficulty the officers forced the\ncrowd to allow the President elbow room, but\nthey would allow him nothing more. This ma\nnoeuvre forced the Adjutant General out of the\nrarje of the sandwiches, but th\u00ab President de\nvoted one band to parsing fooi to his escort\nwhile the other was used for his own advantage.\nOwing to his advantageous position, the Presi\ndent soon felt called upon to help out other\nfriends, and he was kept busy passing plates,\nwhich service he performed with alacrity and\ncheerfulness. Probably one-quarter >* the peo\nple who filled the tent were present merely to\nsee the Chief Executive of the nation eating at\nthe democratic level or a clerk In a quick lunch\nrestaurant.\nSome of the diplomatists and a number of\nother guests mounted the reviewing stand, to\nfind that there were no chairs for them. It\ndeveloped that the chairs had been appropriated\nby unofficial guest? who arrived early on the\nscene. With some difficulty other chairs were\nsecured, but they were little used, as the visit\nors found they cculd keep of the chill more\neffectually by standirfg.\nThe important ceremonies in the Liberal Arts\nBuilding were handled with all possible dis\npatch. Early in the exercises word was brought\nto ex-Senatcr Carter, the president of the day.\nchat some portions of the hall were becoming\ndangerously congested, and he was asked to\navoid delays as far as possible. He did so and\nthe programme was carried rut rapidly. Of all\nthe speakers President Roosevelt alone was\nable to make his voice carry more than fifty feet\nfrom the stage. By far the largest part of the\naudience could hear nothing, and thousands of\npeople in the rear of the hall were constantly\nmoving about and producing a muffled roar that\nwould have baffled a fog horn. .\nPRESIDENT IN HIGH SPIRITS.\nWhen the President rose to speak he was\ncheered to the echo. He bowed again and again,\nsuggesting by bis manner that quiet be restored.\nFinally he mounted the broad railing in front of\nthe rostrum where he could be seen from every\npart of the hall, and again motioned for silence.\nThere was everything but silence, and President\nFrancis suggested that he proceed with his\nspeech and Quiet would follow. President Roose\nvelt laughed and shook his head. Taking ad\nvantage of a lull, he called: \"Now, you, my fel\nlow citizens, give me all the chance you can,\nfor I need It.\"\nThe chance was given and the President be\ngan his address, A burst of applause greeted\nhis statement that the Dutch had done great\nthings for the country In Us infancy, and the\n*\nJ. United. **\u00a3*/v\n/^ \u2014 \"*N. 0\nEstablish* / k> Worms, a. Eh.\nITSfi. I ,^Wt. / Germany.\nIxbine\n**\u00bb flDoselle nines\nSOLE OWNERS OF THE !\nLiter AUMiLCH.CLOi&rEKs gff\nand other reaowncd vineyards. *C\nj^ For teli 1 Ijt Wciir;- cr.ltris. \u00ab^ -5\nPresident laughed in a manner which plainly\nsaid, \"That n.eans my ancestors.\"\nWhile President Francis and ex-Senator Car\nter were speaking there were brief intervals of\nsunshine, and the crowd cheered loudly as the\nbrightness came Once, while waiting for the\napplause whicfc greeted a portion of his speech\nto subside, the President turned to President\nFrancis and es-Senator Carter, saying, as he\nalluded to the applause \"That wasn't due to the\nsun.\" The same thing happened for the second\ntime In a few minutes, and he again remarked,\n\"That's the sun again.\"\nSo many people were standing on their chairs,\nand those behind them made so much noise in\nconsequence, that at one time the President was\ncompelled to halt In his re narks to say: \"Won't\nyou sit down? If you do the people behind you\nwill see better.\" And as they granted his re\nquest he added. \"Thank you.\" Another out\nburst of applause, which was long continued,\nafter he had spoken about fifteen minutes,\ncaused him to laugh and remark to President\nFrancis. \"Now they think I'm done,\" and when\nthe applause died away he went on with his\nspeech.\nDespite the thousands who were crowded Into\none section of the grounds there was only one\naccident, and that a slight one. E. J. Stirling, a\nprivate soldier from Eimira. N\\ V., while run\nning tripped over a wire ar.d cut his scalp. The\nwound wts dressed at the hospital on the\nground, and after a few hours\" rest the soldier\nrejoined his company. The majority of the\nsoldiers, militiamen and regulars alike, who\nspent the night in the buildings, caught colds,\nbat with the exception of seven cases of ton\nsilitis which developed, only ordinary treatment\nwas required Tne tonsilitis patients were sent\nto one of the city hospitals.\nTHE FIREWORKS DISPLAY.\nThousands of people occupied an immense\ngrandstand near the administration building in\nthe evening to witness the display of fireworks.\nThe display was delayed until the appearance of\nthe President, when a great battery of 15-inch\naerial bombs was exploded in a saiute wnic-n\nwas almost deafening. From this beginning\nfor nearly two hours the air was a scinUllant\nscreen of fla-hing color. The night was made\nbrilliant with various colored lights framed in\nappropriate devices. The spectacle closed with\nthe printing in letters of fire of the woras,\n\"Farewell Until 19<>4.\"\nThe Chinese Ambassador was an especially\npleased spectator. President Roosevelt re\ntrained for some time before going to his pri\nvate car.\nTHOUSANDS IN PARADE.\nRegulars and National Guardsmen\nLed by General Corbin.\nSt Louis April 30.\u2014 The great military parade\nwas held this morning, and it proved to be all its\npromoters could wish. Adjutant General Corbin\nwas the grand marshal. At the head of the col\numn which moved at 10:30 o'clock, rode a detach\nment of police, and behind them camo carriages\ncontaining the guests. In the first carriage -were\nPresident Roosevelt, ex-President Cleveland, and\nDavid K. Francis, president of the Exposition\nCompany. Behind them came the members of the\nCabinet the diplomats and other visitors. The\nline of march was west on Llndell Boulevard from\nIts intersection with Grand-aye.. along the main\ndrive of Forest Park to the entrance to the Ex\nposition grounds, where the column halted and\nstood at rest while the President and guests took\ntheir places on the reviewing stand.\nFirst of all came the Marine Band, playing \"Hall\nto the Chief.\" General Corbin then rode by. fol\nlowed by his personal staff of twelve aids, all offi\ncers of the United States Army, with the exception\nS?i SuSMnt Colonel H. J. Foster, of the Britisn\nArmy Major General John C. Bates headed the\nfir=t division of the United States Army. The sec\nondbrigade\"was under Brigadier General Frederick\nDroi:low\\ngD ro i :low\\ng the regulars came the National Guard\nreVr-enis Th division was commanded by Major\nreTif4S Charles F.-Roe, of New-York. After the\ng-neral an* thlrteen'men.bers.of his staff came\nGovernor Chamberlain of Connecticut and \u00abaffar.d\nrnvrr-nnr O6f\\\\ of New-York and staff. me men\no' the National Guard were led by a provisional\nraiment of three battalions from New-York unto\nCoione! p M Welch: a division of the New-YorS\nNaval Militia, under Lieutenant E M Harmaiaml\na squadron of cavalry, under jiajor C. H. bridge-\nTn\"e parody ended at 1:45. As soon as It had\npassed President Roosevelt re-entered his carriage,\nl- A . ac arfven to a tent erected near th? Liberal\nArts Building, where he took .luncheon and re\nmained until it was time \"tor rim to attend the\ndedication ceremonies.\nTHE PROGRAMME FOR TO-DAY.\nAddresses \"by the French Ambassador and\nthe Spanish Minister.\n-\u2022 Louis, April 80.\u2014 Following is the programme\nfor to-morrow. International Day:\n10-30 a. m.\u2014The members of the Diplomatic Corps\nthe lepWntatives of foreign governments to the\nexposition and ether official guests will assemble at\n\u2022he St. T cv's Cub ant* be hence conducted by mili\ntary\"., scort to the Liberal Arts Building\n\u0084/ <y r L_?Tne assembly wili be called to order\nh^Corw^n i Snenc r. chairman of the Committee\non C^tag \"es of the exposition. The ceremonies\nwill be as follows: -; , \u201e\nInvocation by the Rev. Carl Swenson. . , . . _\nIntroduction of the Hon. John M. Thurston. of\nthe National Commission, presicent of tne \u2022 day.\nr-,--,rrL' 'o the representatives of forf-ign gov\nernments by the Hon. David R. Francis, president\nMusic United States Marine Band.\ny \u00a3< D y United States Marine Band.\nAddress by the French Ambassador. N. Jean A.\na \"* T \u25a0 *^s' s t\"3 ncl\nA \"Hallelujah Chorus\" from \"The Messiah.'\"\n\\\"<lress by the Spanish Minister. Sefior Don\nEmflio Cc Ojeda.\nBenediction by the Rev. Samuel J. Nichols.\nCentennial salute of one hundred guns.\nS p. m.\u2014 Fireworks at Administration Building.\nPRESIDENT LEAVES ST. LOTJIS.\nKansas City Will Be His Next Stopping\nPlace.\n\u00a3t- Louis. April 30.\u2014 From the dining room in\nthe Hal! of Congresses President Roosevelt and\nhis party were hurriedly escorted through the\ncanopied passageway which stretched across\nthe ground to the Administration Building, and\npassed into President Francis's private office,\nfrom the windows of which they witnessed the\nfireworks President Roosevelt denied that a\nCabinet meeting will be held in Kansas City.\nas has been rumored. When the Postofflce in\nvestigation was mentioned L. declined to dis\ncuss the matter further than to say that the In\nvestigation would be rigid and thorough.\nAfter spending almost an hour viewing the\nfireworks, the President's party prepared to\nleave the city and resume the Journey westward,\nwith Kansas City as the first stopping point.\nIn order to avoid a crowd arrangements were\nmade to have the President train waiting on\nthe Missouri Pacific tracks at Howard Station.\nmore than a mile southwest from the Fair\nGrounds. After a few moments spent in taking\nle.ive of the World's Pair officials and others\nwho took part in the ceremonies of the day.\nPresident Roosevelt, surrounded by Secret Ser\nvice men. was escorted from the Administration\nBuilding to his carriage. He was accompanied\nby Secretary Root, who will travel as far as\nTor.*ka Kan., with him. President Butler of\nColumbia University also will accompany him\nfor =orne distance. As the President's carriage\nStarted to leave the grounds the multitude of\npeople gave him a long and hearty farewell\ncheer, in acknowledgment of which he rose and\nbowed, and did not resume his seat until his\nvehicle had disappeared in the darkness.\nNEW DIRECTORS FOR YERKES'S ROADS.\nLondon. April SO.-At a meeting of the director.,\nof Charles T Yerkea's railroads this afternoon the\nnames of James Speyer. Thomas Jefferson Coolldge.\nt a Ri,,r r *ora'rd Fresnel Loree, Richard A. Me-\nCuMy Lnd Jamet H Hyde were added to the di\nrector?.: i.\nDELIVERIES OF WAX STOPPED.\nLondon April 30. -Telegrams from Edinburgh say\nthe Scottish agents of the Standard Oil Company\nhave received cabled Instruction* to stop all order 8\nfor future livery of wax. Coming on top of the\nPLAGUE MORTALITY IN INDIA.\nERffil SI XtfSSSS. $IBrtt\"1 Brtt \"\nXEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE 1 . FRIDAY. MAY 1. 1003.\nAMERICAN TRADE.\nHorc It May Be Maintained and In\ncreased in Manchuria.\nWashington. April 30.\u2014 How the commercial\ninterests of the United States in Manchuria may\nbe safeguarded against future international\ncomplications and our trade In that country\nmaintained and increased is told In a report re\nceived to-day at the State Department from\nUnited States Consul Miller, at New-Chwang.\nHe says Russia in the end will practically dom\ninate the commercial and Industrial affairs of\nManchuria unless other countries have in every\nway equal facilities. American trade in Man\nchuria to-day consists principally of cotton\ngoods, kerosene and flour, and is largely in ex\ncess of that of any other '-ountry- It Is esti\nmated that our exports to Manchuria will equal\n8,000.000 taels, or 35 per cent of all foreign im\nports. In order that this commercial supremacy\nmay be maintained. Consul Miller has made the\nfollowing recommendations to the department:\nFirst\u2014 Establishment by American manu\nfacturers of an expert agent in Manchuria who\nshall sell direct to native firms instead of to\nShanghai and Hong Kong.\nSecond-That the Washington Government\nurge the opening of all Manchuria to the trade\nof the world, \"as free to us as to Russia or any\nother country.\" jj^j * rt\nThird\u2014 That a new consul general be added to\nthe American consular service, its head to be\nknown as the United States Consul General for\nManchuria.\n\"If these things are not done,\" Mr. Miller\ncontinues, \"it is very clear to my mind that the\nentire mining interests of Manchuria, together\nwith whatever trade is desired by Russian mer\nchants, will be entirely in their hand*. Rus\nsian merchants are already strong in the kero\nsene trade, and are laying plans to capture the\nflour and cotton goods trade. Russia has a\ncommissioner of the rank of consul general In\nManchuria having great influence with the pres\nent Chinese officials Russian banks are do.ng\nbusiness In all the principal cities end \"i-se\nbanks have a commercial branch buying and\nselling merchandise. Russian subjects are build\ning flour mills, factories and meat Pack-5 house,\nand opening mines throughout Manchuria, white\nsome of our citizens complain that they are not\npermitted the same privileges. The comm '\ndepartment of the Russo-Chinese Bank doing\nbusiness in all the interior cities of Manila\nwhile our citizens are P r^ nibl ! ed .\u00b0 t^, aC C on d uion\ness :fe =5 KuKS\nfacturers to Imitate American made gooos ana\nb \u2122f\u00abms,,l is of the opinion that Man C h\u00abria.\nMongolia and Siberia are destined soon to \"'\ncome enormous grain growing districts\nImports into Manchuria have Increases in me\nllililiil\u00a7i\niiiiSil\nBRITISH ANXIETY ALLAYED.\nInformed That Russia Has No New Designs\non Manchuria.\nLondon, April So.-Lord Cranborne, the Under\nForeign Secretary, replying to a number of\nquestions in the Hous* of Commons to-day, said\ncommunications on the subject of Manchuria\nwere stili proceeding between the powers con\ncerned His majesty's government, however,\nhad received from a trustworthy source con\nfirmation of the statement that Russia had an\nnounced that she had no knowledge of the re\nported convention, and that she disclaimed any\nintention of seeking exclusive privileges or de\nparting from her previous assurances regarding\nManchuria,\nAnswering a suggestion that the government\nshould propose that Russia refer the Manchu\nr'an Persian and similar differences to The\nHague arbitration tribunti. Premier Balfour\nsail that, while desirous of using to the utmost\nthe advantages offered by The Hague tribunal,\nthe government d:d not think that the questions\npending between Great Britain and Russia, could\nbe usefully submitted thereto.\nLOTJBET BACK IN FRANCE.\nAdmiral Cotton Among Those Who Wel\ncomed Home the President.\nMarseilles, April 30.\u2014 The Jeanne d'Arc, with\nPresident Loubet on board, was sighted twenty\nnines off Marseilles at 2 o'clock this afternoon.\nShe approached the port slowly, saluted by the\nland batteries ar.d the American ships of war in\nthe harbor. As the Jeanne d'Arc entered the\nroadstead Admiral Cottcn proceeded In a steam\nlaunch alongside the French cruiser. He was\nmet at the rail by the captain of the vessel, who\npresented the American admiral to M. Loubet.\nAdmiral Cotton greeted the President and ex\npressed the affectionate sentiments of President\nRoosevelt and the American people toward ihe\ngovernment and people of France. The Presi\ndent cordially returned Admiral Cotton's greet\ning, and asked the admiral to assure Ptesident\nRoosevelt that France entertains the most\ncordial sentiments for the United States. The\nship's band then played -The Star Spangled\nBanner,\" the Jeanne d'Arc fired an admiral's\nsalute, the American ships answered the salute,\nthe French sailors cheered America^ and the\nYankee tars replied with cheers fo- France.\nLatc-r President Loubet landed and took a\ntrain for Paris, where he will arrive at 7 o'clock\nto-morrow morning.\nThe French people appeared surprised at the\nsmall size of the visiting United States vessels,\nand the American officers explained that the\nships did not form a fleet or even a squudron,\nbut only a small force cruising in the Mediter\nranean.\nKILLED THREE HUNDRED JEWS.\nHorrible Brutalities of the Mob at Kis\ncheneff.\nVienna, April 30.\u2014 Private letters received here\nfrom Czernowitz ?ay over three hundred per\nsons were killed during the recent anti-Semitic\nriots at Kischeneff. capital of Bessarabia.\nHorrible brutalities are reported to have oc\ncurred. Ma.iy women and children were vic\ntims of the mob, which included even the better\nclasses r.f the inhabitants. Some of the victims\nwere thrown from windows to the pavement.\nThe rioters also pillaged and defiled the syna\ngogues and killed the caretakers. What the\nlooters of houses were unable to carry off the>\nsaturated with paraffin and burned. The dam\nage done to property la . .nimated at several\nmillion rubles. The Jews who escaped from\nKischenefT are seeking refuge at Odessa and\nelsewhere.\nCOPYRIGHT CASES ARGUED.\nJustice Holmes Hears One Relating to \"The\nProfessor at the Breakfast Table.\"\nWashington. April SO.-The United States Supreme\nCourt to-day heard arguments in two cases brought\nby a firm. of Boston publishers against other pub\nlishers involving the Copyright law. One of the\ncases related to \"The Professor at the Breakfast\nTable.\" Oliver Wendell Holmes, father of Jus\ntice Holmes, ore of the members of the court sit\nting in the case.\nSEVEN KILLED IN ELECTION RIOT.\nMadrid. April 30.\u2014 The publication of the result\nof the recent elections led to ft riot at Inflate, n.\nthe province of Ovledo. The electors tri*<l to force\ntheir way Into the Council House; the gendarmes\nprevented them, and a conflict resulted. In which\nsever, persons were killed. Including a lieutenant\nof gendarmes and several were wounded.\nKING AND POPE.\nWhat Was Talked of at Their\nVatican Interview.\n(Special to The New-York Tribune by French Cabl\u00ab.)\n(Copyright: IW3: By The Tribune Association.)\nRome. April 30. \u2014 Now begin to be known the\nparticulars of yesterday'? conversation between\nKing Edward and the Pope. Leo represented\nto the King how important are the Catholic In\nterests throughout the British Empire, how nu%\nrr.erous are the Catholics, amounting to about\ntwelve million, and how much easier it would\nbe to settle with reciprocal satisfaction many\nquestions arising in King Edward's dominions\nIf England had some kind of representative at\nthe Vatican. King Edward answered that he\nwould give the matter his attention, but tried\nto change the conversation, although papers\nwere presented to him supporting Leo's conten\ntion as to the new International Intercourse ar\nranged between King Edward and King Victor\nEmmanuel.\nZING EDWAED LEAVES ROME.\nTremendous Farewell Demonstration by the\nKoman Populace.\nRome. April 30.\u2014 King Edward left Rome to-day\nfor Paris amid a tremendous farewell demonstra\ntion. The streets were crowded, and the windows\nand balconies were filled with people. Detach menta\nof troops kept back the crowds and permitted the\npassage of the procession. The Quirinal Plaza Just\nprevious to the King's departure presented a\nscene of great animation, owing to the continuous\nmovement of troops and carriages. The King\nwith great ceremony bid farewell to Queen Helena,\nwho was surrounded by the members of her house\nhold. As Klnj; Edward and King Victor Emmanuel\nleft the Quirinal a pretty toujh was given to the\nspectacle by the Prliicess Yolarida. eldest daughter\nof the King and Queen of Italy, who Is about two\nyears old. kissing her hand from a window of the\npalace, and calling out in English: \"Papa! Papa!\nGood by! Goodby!\"\nThe little princess waved her handkerchief until\nthe two sovereigns were out of sight.\nAt the railroad station there was a large gather-\nIng of distinguished personages. King- Edward was\nspecially cordial In his reply to the greetings of\nPremier ZanarcJelli ard Prince Colonna. the Mayor\nof Rome, thanking them for the reception accorded\nhim by the people of Rome, which, he said, had\nbeen really magnificent. To the Premier the King\nadded that be hoped the friendship of Great Britain\nand Italy would ever Increase. King Edward\nshook hands most affably with the royal princes.\nJust before the tr. in left King Edward embraced\nand kissed King Victor Bramanuel several times.\nand as the British, sovereign stepped on board his\ncar the King of Italy asked to be remembered to\nQueen Alexandra. As the train slowly moved out\nof the station King Edward shook hands with\nKing Victor Emmanuel who said: \"Au revolr.\"\nto which King Edward replied: \"A blentot.\"\nTHE KAISER STARTS FOR HOME.\nBuckeburgr. Schaumburg--Lippe, April 30. \u2014\nEmperor William left here for Rome at 11\no'clock to-night. His majesty will be joined by\nField Marshal Count yon Waldersee at Han\nover.\nBLEW UP A BANK.\nBombs Thrown Around Promiscu\nously in Saloniccu\nSalonica, April 30. \u2014 The Ottoman Bank here\nwas destroyed by dynamite to-day. The Turk\nish postofflce and other buildings were also at\ntacked, resulting In a panic, during which two\nmen were killed and two persons were Injured.\nA detachment of two thousand additional troops\nhas s-.nce arrived here from Smyrna- Quiet is\nrestored.\nThe attack on the bank was carried out by\ntwo bands of men. Ore of them attacked the\nguard on duty at the bank and the other hurled\nthe bombs. It is thought that the strong room\nresisted the explosions. Several of the men who\ntook part in the attack have been arrested.\nIn addition to the two bands which attacked\nthe bark, a number of men drove through the\nprincipal streets of the city throwing: bombs\ninto the cafes A bomb was thrown into the\nrailroad station and some locomotives were\ndamaged.\nThe destruction of the French steamer\nGuadalquivir by an explosion while leaving this\nport on Tuesday wa= evidently caused by a\nbomb. A Bulgarian has been arrested in con\nnection with the outrage.\nIn an encounter with Turkish troops yester\nday at Nevrokop, European Turkey, eighteen\nBulgarians were killed and fourteen were made\nprisoners. There was also a serious encounter\nnear PJurnnbala, where a band of over one hun\ndred insurgents wad annihilated.\nLondon, April 3D.\u2014 The attack on the Ottoman\nBa-uk at Salonica has an ominous parallel In\nthe Armenian raid upon the Ottoman Bank at\nConstantinople on August L' 6, 1896, which pro\nvoked the Moslem massacre of Armenians on\nthe following day. The supposed object of the\npicsent attack is to provoke Turkish reprisals\nand European intervention. Accordnig to the\naccount furnished by the Ottoman Embassy in\nParis, that the bank was burned, having been\nset afire at the same moment that agitators In\ncarriages threw bombs at the building. The em\nj bassy dec-lares there is no doubt that these agi\ni tators were Bulgarian revolutionists. Two of\nthem were killed and three others have been\ncaptured. A soldier and another man also were\ni killed. There were no deaths among the em\nployes of the bank. The instigator of the out\nrage is a Bulgarian schoolmaster named Yorghi.\nwho reached Salonica by sea. After the outrage\nI he boarded a train for Uskub. He was arrested\nen route, however, returned to Salonica, and\nwill be brought to Justice.\nVienna. April 30.\u2014 The \"New Frele Presse\"\nsays the fighting (reported from Sofia, Bulgaria,\nyesterday) between Turkish troops and a large\nband of insurgents on the right bank of the\nRiver Struma, in the district of Dschuma, or\nDzumaja, near the frontier of Bulgaria, in\nMacedonia, occurred last Tuesd ly. The insur\ngents lost eighty-three men killed and the Turks\nhad thirteen killed or wounded.\nVienna. April oO\u2014 Telegrams received here\nfrom Sofia declare that the Mitylene Bank, at\nSalcnica. also has been burned.\nENGINEERS MOBBED IN CHINA.\nUnited States Gunboat Callao Was Sent to\nTheir Assistance.\nPeking, April 30-The United States Consul\nat Canton hae notified Minister Conner that a\nmob recently attacked a party of American en\ngineers at work on the Canton-Hankow Rail\nroad. The United States gunboat Callao was\ndispatched to the nearest point up the river to\naid the engineers.\nMr Conger has requested fhe Chinese Foreign\nOffice to investigate the matter, and instruct the\nViceroy to give the engineer* protection.\nShanghai, April 30. \u2014 The China-American De\nvelopment Company at Cantor, reports that a\nparty of five Americans ar.d tive Japanese has\nbeen attacked at Yuan-Ten, sixty miles from\nCanton, on the North River. The m<?n took\nr-fuce in a teirple, where they barricaded them\nselres The Chinese authorities are dispatching\ntroops to the scene of trouble.\nCZAR LENIENT TO ASSASSIN.\nAsk 3 That Ibraham's Sentence Be Penal\nServitude for Life.\nConstantinople,* April :iK -The Czar hf.n re\nquested thai the sentence of death passed upon\nIbrahatri. the Albanian s^ntinei who recently\nassassinated M. Stcherbira. the Russian Consul\nax- Mitrovitza, be commuted to penal servitude\nfor life.\nPol Roger <& Co.\nChampagne\nDRY SPECIAL.\nBRUT SPECIAL vl \u00bb<-<* 1893.\nOn Sale at thm leading Restaurants. Club* and LV mm Merchants'.\nANTHONY OECHS. 51 Warren St.. N V,.\nSole J*sent, U. S.\nPEST&\u00a9\n>>ggs\u00ab o\nShirt Waists and Guimpes\nFor Girls of All Ages.\nOur showing of dainty nezu Spring styles is Urger *nd\nmore attractive than any previous season.\nIt is well to remember that we make garments only in\nthe exact proportions for Girls and Children, and in the most\ndesirable materials.\nme very dainty display of hand-rutde and hard- finished\nimported Paris garments, cut from our own patterns and es\npecially designed for us, is impossible of duplication outside\nthis store.\n60-62 West 23d Street.\n.\u2014,. \u2014 , -\n*^et\u00bb V\u00b0 v d \u00b0 drinfc dn \" n * Tri -bl, -\nW\u00ab ffn\u00bbrante\u00bb tfca-t it is apore. \u00abB\u00bb<ltilt\u00abrmtod\u00dfT\u00bb. IO T\u00aba\u00ab old. weed by \u00ab\u00bb\u2022.\notaxtlficiallj. AT ALL HliM-UAM DFAXiKs.\n?HITE, HtN TZ 4 CO., Phii- and N. V.. Scie P-opnetors. E->T A^ . > rt.-- 3 LOT.\n\u00bbft! 33! C / V\\r*\u00ab use an action system that pracfcca:.y uesiro>\u00bb\nUiJUDLE V frictionai effects, the \"balance\" is perfect, and a\nREPEATING < responsiveness and rapid.ty of repetition \u00bb obtained\niftTiftlt / that no other pUnojJOssesses.\nACT) UN* ' A Musical History free with catalogue.\n\u2022\"Ask lor cur special terms to those who prefer makinz partial payments\ntf ifA\u00dff BOOMS *igw*r a sr4i?f NEW YORK\nMEN PULL AMBULANCE.\nA Horse Runs Away and Crashes\nThrough Plate Glass Window.\nWhile responding to a call for an ambulance\nsent to St. Vincent's Hospital from No. M\nGreenwich-aye. yesterday. Dr. Canfleld \u00abd\nCharles Lorman. the driver, had an exciting ex\nperience with a horse new to the ambulance\nbusiness. . ...\nThe ambulance was within a few doors of the\nhouse where the call came from, the horse .going\nat a good speed, when suddenly it took the bit\n\u00a3 Us teeth and ran away. Lonnan did hi 3 best\nby seesawing at the reins to stop the animal,\nbut only succeeded in turning its head toward\nthe pavement. Then the runaway dashed up t\u00bbe\ncurb across the sidewalk and ran its head and\nshoulders through a heavy PW|g\u00ab *J\u00abgJ\nh itgftS^S^S*\nSSSSZ h tS?dSS \u00a3? tnrdoctor was hurt.\nii&i l^ assnsass\nPrife! I cSk. thirty-two years old in an alco\nhol 1\u00ab coma. After he had inspected the Patient\nr>r Canfleld returned to the ambulance and toU\nI o'rman to take the horse back to the hc-spi^l-\nThen he celled for volunteers to puii the am\nbulance Some thirty men and boys responded\nand h^ched themsel/es to the shafts, or pushed,\nwhile Dr. Canfleld and his patient rode to K.\nVincent's in the ambulance.\nBIG INCREASE IN IMMIGRATION.\nNearly Twenty Thousand More Last Month\nthan in April, 1902.\nThe total immigration for the month of April\nwas 32 774. as against 73.6*7 for the mor.fn of Apr.l\niav> The total immigration for the four months Of\n19<X'.. BMB. .\nDIVINITY STUDENTS IN CHINATOWN.\nYale Men See Opium Joint, Eat Chop Suey\u2014\nSleep at Mills Hotel.\nChinatown had a surprise party last night, and\nfor once \"Chuck\" Connors was r.ot In it. Forty\nnli - seniom from the Divtr.itv School, in charge\nof ' prole**\" William B. Bailey, swooped down\nupon the - .'\u25a0\u2022 end \" the Bowery, after bavins\nsupped a: IB* Mills Hotel Id bleeckrr-st. They\nwent through the Bismarck seven cent lodging\nhouse, and frasfJ there through the Salvation Army\nHotel, by way of comparison.\nWith one of the waidmen from the Sixth Pre\ncinct aa pilot, the students then m\u00ab a section of\na play at the- Chinese The Are In Pell-st. going\nfrom there M i\u00abS Jos* house on the top floor of a\nMott-st. tenement ho<ip-. While there they each\nbought a pair c; ChineHe slippers, some peacock\nfans, amulets and otfct-r trinkets. A visit to an\nopium Joint in Peli-st. followed. Then they went\nto a sailors' dancehouse In Doyers-st.. where \"The\nPalme\" were aung tor them by an \"artist. '* A\nsupper of chop sucy in a Chinese restaurant wound\nun the evening tour of inspection, when they all\nKent to the Mills Hotel, where rooms had been en\ngaged for them.\nThe students belong to the Social Science De\npartment of Yale. They have come to study some\n*: the social ooadiUuns oi a grtat city. Wttn\nthey arrived yesterday morning they *-ere ftret\ntaken to the Morgue, then to Bellevue Hospital.\nthence by the steamer Thomas 3. lirenrar. to IJlack\nwell's and Randall's Islands. While at the peni\ntentiary they were '-shown all the details ox '.he\nA cheerful glass, a pretty lass.\nA friend sincere and true.\nBlooming health, good store of\n>' \u2022s'llth.\nAttend on me ajp.d you.\"\nTiffany & Co/s\nParis and\nLondon Houses\nalways extend to visitors the\nsame welcome and attention\nthat is offered at the New York\nestablishment. Visitors can\nleisurely examine objects of in\nterest without being urged to\npurchase.\nParis, Avenue de f Opera* 36 his,\nLondon, 22 1 -221 A Regent Su V.\nBy Special Appointment GoH *ni Silve*>\nsmiths to H. M. Kin? Edward VII *ti\nH. M. Queen Alexandra.\nUNION SQUARE\nNEW YORK.\nCAHPET\ntOK \u00bb(\u00bb ) KArt\u00ab\nUntied* a\u00bb-m-<Ute. (:\u00abuipt\u00ab\u00ab\u00abl Air I \u00bb\u2022\u00ab\u25a0\nWork done promptl* \u00abnd w\u00bb\u00bbn \u00bbrot\u00bbl\u00bb\u00ab\u00ab\nWill wnd r'3re*ent*tl*v \u00bba r\u00ab<:it**t\n\u2122? r^32B 7 TH AVL\nTe'ep^ione %\u00a3f o\u00a3,o I Aft\u00ab\nH32-33tn. l\u00b1Jj NEAR 28th ST.\nT. 85. STEWART.\nour dining car* are known far and\nwide for their excellence; the dainties\nof the season at al! tines, on all day\ntrains and some others a la carte only.\nlehigh valley railroad of e\u00a9ur\u00bbe.\nFlint's Fine Furniture.\nAn exceptional array of Summer\nNovelties. Factory prices.\n45 West 23d St.\nBertillon *ystesv. A Yale nan was j>hoio\u00abr*\u00bbo\u00ab\u00abi\nand measured according to Use \u2022yat\u00aba. \u201e_,,_\nTo-day the \u00abtud\u00abnt3 will visit U>e ~w!\u00bb\u00abr9i'\nSettlement, the Educational Allianea, St. Bartholo\nmew's Parish House and Ellis Island.\n3",
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"text": "\u00a3\n31 S. R. CASE SUMMED UP.\nDECJSIOX TOMORKOJV.\nTolbnt J. Taylor Denies Kecnc Sent\nReports to \"World.\"\nIn KunnniEtr up his arguments in th\u00bb Amnry-Vw\n-Jtina HbeJ suit yesterday Jain^ W. Osborne^ coun\nf\u00bbl for Amory. it.-rated his charts of crime In\nthe manarinF of the Metropolitan Street Railway\nCompany, and offered a thinly veiled challenge to\n3M\u00abtnct Attorney Jerome to take a* this .eatur^\n\u0084f the cm* fcr most rigid inspection. He declared\nih\u00abi before AtnAry took any steps in hie crusaoe\nhe confuted Mr. Jerome, who was fully ware of\nboth civil and criminal proceeding which Amory\nThis DeLsncey W\u00abU '\"P 6l \" o^\nJuried, and there was a s=h*rp wrangle between the\nl\u00bbo lawyers Bar a moment.\nTalbot .1. Taylor, son-in-law of James R. Keene\n\u00abM The chief \u25a0IHIII yesterday. He wa\u00bb put on\nthe stand to show -how the Telchmann and Herti\u00a9\nreports found their way from Ms safe to -The New-\nYork World/ - The last he. knew of them, he\n*z\\a they w^re ostensibly on their way to Mr\nKecn^ with a m\u00ab=s\u00abi s or. Mr. Koeno asserted\nthat he never received them. As to th\u00ab messen\nffr M r Taylor was icrmtly 'gnorant. Incidental\nfa Mr Taylor testlfiod \u25a0\u2022 \u25a0\u2022 how he furnished\nwiritlons of war for Drayton and Amory. and\nunder examination fron. Mr. Osbome eaid that\nh\u00bb was short of M.lror- IRn wher. the Hertle \u00bbnd\nTHchaiann report* were published: that he was\nMill short, and that Mr. K---e was al?o short\np. bout two thousand share?.\n\u2022Better not do any more *>\"* that line,\nobserved Mr. Nicflll to his opponent\n\"No. I think m Mai an undertaker if I do.\n\u2022lausrhed Mr Osbome.\nTwo thousand shares. Mr Taylor explained later.\n\u2022was a mere bagatelle for Mr. Keene. while the\nentire -shortage\" of his office, his customer? and\nMl broker?, some 6.W share*, was insignificant.\nGeneral Benjamin F. Tracy, of counsel for Mr.\nrr y: r. said that neither Mr. Taylor nor Mr.\nKeeae cared about the publication of the Hertle\n\u00abnd TeichTnann ' report c.\n\u2022 Mr. Keene refused to have anything to <3o with\nthe whole affair.\" he continued. Mr Taylor ob\ntained these reports to protect his own interests.\n3le knew of this action for almost a year, but\n*nppressed his knowledge. He suppressed these\nreports until the gossip In Wall Street became\nj-revaJent and the stories of the District Attorney's\ninvestigation leaked out. Tnen he showed them to\n*ncn as were interested.\"\nThe District Attorney 4 ? library, where the hear!n\u00bb\n\u2022was held, was thronged yesterday mornin*. In\nthe assenblage were most or the people whose\nnames ha .\u2022\u00ab\u00bb figured in the case and half a dozen\n\u25a0women, among them Mrs. Nicoll and Mrs. Barlow.\nAs Talbot J. Taylor was not there at 10 o'clock\nSir. Amory was put on the stand, and testified that\n\u2022\u25a0\u2022hen he swore the other day that he had not\nrevised any one to sell Metropolitan, he had no\nrecollection of his letter to Hazard, in which he\npaid \"I see no objection to selling the stock\nFhort.\" He also said that he had advised Moult on\n1o submit the Amory-Hazard correspondence to the\n\u00abour*.\n\\bo-at this time Talbot J. Taylor, wearing a laree\ncarnation, came into the room. General Tracy on\none side and Wheeler H. Peckham. his personal\n\u25a0rouns\u20acl. on the other. After consultation by the\nlawyers he began his testimony, under examination\n\"by Mr. Nicoll.\nO \u2014Hew much did you pay Drayton for disburse\nment to Ajaory in April or Ma:- A.-Two thousand\n:r.<ired dollars. .\u00ab<\u00ab\u2022-\nHow nwch in a!! did you ray Drayton in BO?\n\\ \u2014Four thousand four hundred dollars.\nQ\u2014 How did you pay him? A\u2014 ln cash-some per-\nKtnally. some by nay cashier. _\nQ \u2014 How much did you pay Amory- A.\u2014 Two\nthousand dollars. It. was paid by the cashier.\nQ\u2014 Did you pay any other persons money Iti con\nnection with the Metropolitan Investigation . A\n1 paid Hertl? $\u00abv\u00bb and Fef\u00abhnan \u00ab/\u00ab>) and his ex-\nXensos.\nH<- paid Amon' in instalments, he said, according\nto tb\u00ab asreetaent mad\u00ab la April. 1902. through Mr.\nTTayton. Amory was rot present at this agree\nment but was probably aware oC^t To Drayton\nwas paid 52.500. and SaOO a month until September\n:;. at which time. Mr. Taylor said. be had all the\nreports, nf reeded no more information. He. then\n>ad Hertle's preliminary and final reports In his\nfate, and showed their, to Mr. Keene when he re\n111 111 from Europe i: October. Pevera! times they\n-were shown to Mr. Keene. each time being received\nr*ra:n by Mr. Taylor.\nMr. BRaiN object here was to show that Mr.\nKeene cat the reports sad pave them to \"The\n\"World.\" 1\nMr Tsyler ha.d also shown them to Mr. Worm\n*\"V. and. after Che Wdll Street gossip that they\nvere in the District Attorney'? hands, he showed\nthem to reveral customers. Including \u25a0 Mr. Ash-\nT.-^l!, a broker. Th? questioning went on:\nr. \u2014How loaf were these reports on exhibition\u2014\nv, to Merca 28. when \"The }T*ral<J statement\nWti\u00ab published? A\u2014 No\n<3-^lsrch 1? A.\u2014 T\u00abs.\n<$.\u2014 March 19? A.\u2014 l think not.\nMarch was A\u2014l think noi \u20141 don't rerall.\nS -What was the last day- A -I ijn*t recafl.\nQ.-Were they stolen? A.-I don claim it- I wa\u00bb\nIn Edward Lauterbach's rtfice. when I gut a tele\nphone mesE\u00a3?e thai ther- v.as a messenger at my\nofflr\" who wanted the reports for a customer.\no PTbat customer? A \u2014James R. Keen*.\nq \u2014What directions did you give? A\u2014 T toM\nihem to give the n-.*\u00bbssenger the reports.\no_oo you know the Bec\u00dfSgnger? A\u2014 No.\nQ\u2014 Did\" you Be* Keene that day A.\u2014 Yes. Its\nnever discussed them with him until yesterday,\nwhen he said he could net recall ever having re\n<-\u00bbived th\u00bb-m. __ . ,\no \u2014Do you know by wh3t method X- sen'5 en' dropped\n\u2022\u00bbb\u00ab-ra en \"Eakins des-k? A.\u2014 T don't know anything\nr.bout their route there.\nRegarding Hi going short on Metropolitan, his\ntestimony \u00ab\u2022\u2022 as follows, he readtnc flsnire^ from\na typewritten document.\n<\"\u00bb-Yo-J sold no more stock until the report pot\nout that the matter was in tbe hands of the Dis\ntrict Attorney? A\u2014 No. Then I went short. There\n\u2022a-a\u00ab never more than four thousand shares In my\noffice \"l sold five hundred shares on a \"tip\" from\njnv\" broker. Mr. Norton. 1 began to go short from\nF-bruary 35. and Kept selling to March SO. Th\u00ab\np'iks were February -'\u25a0 -v \" share*; February 3fi.\n- \u00ab\u00ab\u2022 Marc! 3 300; March 5 \u2666.\u00ab\u00bb: March I 3.^^:\nMarch\" M 2 ;\u2022\u25a0\u00bb\u25a0. March 11. \u00ab.\u00ab\u00bb; March 12. 3.600. and\nihe other eales to March SO were Id lots of 3.700,\nr.\u00abB \u25a0V' \u00bbnd J.S^O. These transactions, of course.\n\u2022sn\u00ab-iuc>d the tales for myself and my customers.\nV \u2014 TV*, Mr. K\u00ab*ne short? A\u2014 Hi never was\nV>rt ov<r 2.W9 cr -.. v *'' shar\u00ab-s. I'm not htdfng any\n-\nSir. -ICJcoJI\" Then formally moved for Mr. Vree-\nIssMTw discharge, a-sertirp that the alleged libel\n\u2022was true, and was published for justifiable ends.\nV^cause it was Vreeiand's duty to answer an a,t\ntark of Jnrolver.cy on the corporation of which he\n\u2022was the h\u00aba<s. Mr. TCJcoll charged Amory with be-\nJnc tlis author of the attack on Metropolitan, and.\n\u2022through his confederate?, paining the publication\nof the Hertle and Teichraann reports. The reports.\nMr. NJcoll said, were traced from Mr. Taylor's safe\nthrough Mr. Ket-ne to Mr. Eakin's desk.\n\"We V~har|re that Amory and his confederates got\nDp these attack* for the purpo.-e of raiding the.\nstocks and bearing the market,\" declared Mr.\nNicoll. who gay\u00ab his version of th' \"strike suit\"\n\u25a0with lireker. \"the most fuitable associate Amory\n\u00ab-o-jl6 fcavt- four.i.\" as receiver; \"Amory. himself\nrot a stockholder, as lieutenant mlBMa, to run\nMM whole, busiest.\" and \"Phllbin\u2014 ah. Philbin was\nto be <-ounsel to the receiver That was \u25a0 rich\nrivim. Counsel to the receiver would bring 6uits to\nrecover the PUMMH believed to be stolen, and if\nhs recovered a 10 per c\u00bb-nt fe\u00ab wouid not be \u00abn\nr*-ai\u00abonabJe. and Mr. Philbin would got 53.000.000.' 1\nIn the testimony which contradicted the letter to\nHa\u00abrd be cbarge\") Amor;.- with \"perjur?\" of the\nrankest decree.\"\nMr Osborne said that he would be willing to rest\nMs whole cam* on fh\u00bb de<-if-ion of the Ccurt of\nAppeals, which paid that every statement must he\nproved from beginning to end. The accountants\nha<s made their reports from sworn statements to\nNOTICE TO THE PUBLIC.\n! n i,rr!,.i,i- 1,000 .Mil*- Refund Tickets.\n\u2022 \u00abojm*r.'!ne June Ist. IMS. IXTRRCIIA.\\GBABLE\nI,<HKI !\u00bbIILl; RKKl.\\n TIGKKTS will be placed on\nMle. limited to on* rear from date of Issue, good only for\ntxanKp'*rt\u00bbtlon of the o*n\u00ab-r. with ucual free allowance of\nlift It*. r>t l\u00bb8(rEae\u00ab. Offer any c\" the following Ilnee:\nBALTIMORE A OHIO R. ft. <B*-tween all joints\nKi>t \u00bb-i Ohio Stiver ux.a between Pituburitn and Kan*\nAlso to and from points on Philadelphia & Rradlnr\nli-\\ and Cea'ra.! B. B. of New tmmtf between Phtta\n\".etp*-'.t and New-T*\"* \u2022\n\u00ab HOAPEAKE A OHIO RV. {East of and lncJud\ntCK Huatir \u00a3!&!\u2022-)\nDELAWARE. LACKAWAX.VA & WE\u00abTF.H\\\nn. it.\n\u00bb\"Bli: H. H. 'Eaet cf and )r-l-i<sr\u00bb Jamestown and\n- , \u2022 \u25a0 asMaj \u25a0\n\u2022 ; i-w.n v i i.r> it. b.\nPIIWSVIjVA^'A It. R.\nTrJ*W ticket* will he \u00bb>o!d at rat*, \u00abjf $SO.OO earn, eubject\nm refund of *10.*0 \u00abn surrender of cover \"\u25a0> Trunk Lt\u00dfea\n\u25a0*Jl!\u00bb*ce Ticket a :r-\u00abu. 143 Liberty Street. New York, at\nJ.-\u00ab- time within f\" month? from date of purchase.\n\"TM* form cf ticket wtJl be Issued In deference to r\u00bb\n<\u00bb\u2022*\u2022\u2022 at liuraer&u* p\u00bbixoii\u00bb of the lice* In u.Lere\u00bbt d*alrinir\n\" \"~ Tlrfcet rood over irerat lines !mte*d of havine \u00ab\u25a0>\nih\u00abE\u00ab-lve\u00ab \u00ab* m preterit with a. eeparat* ticket\nVI tsr>i Mm they desire to us*.\niiuu it principal \u00abt\u00abi*TO\u00ab of the railroad, z.mme<i\n, to\u00a3 ?\"wlll V' nS-SeMrtrt. en Ml* and rive jll farther\n?t&rm\u00dftJ\u00abm ttftHitif then th\u00ab\u00bb may be retired.\nth\u00ab Railroad Commissioners, \"documents Mr Nicoll\nconceded to be true.\" He. continued:\nAs to the, etrike \"suit, conceive a man going to\nJerome with guHt in his heart and a crime in his\nbrain, plotting a strike suit. Such a man would\nbe a candidate for the insane asylum\nAmory has not grown rich out of this: instead,\nhis house has a .mortgages. The main batt\u00bbe was to\nb\u00ab Id the District Attorneys office, and therefore\nAmory could not have contemplated that the at\ntack could be withdrawn after the information had\nreached Mr. Jerome. Then ho only became as a fly\non the great criminal wheel which is grinding\ndownstairs. If Amory was desirous of being bo\"\"? 1 ' 1\noff he would have consulted with one of thcilet\nropolttan lawyer*, and could hay\u00ab? got $200,000 tor\nhis information. Y\u00abs, he could have made a. fortune\nthat way. but he\" was an honest man. \u2022 nd he law\nthe Information. before another honest man, Will\niam Tray. Jerom*. a man without a price, ami\nthen the wheels were set In motion, and the inquiry\n!p still gclng or. .\n'Now. I know another man. I worked under him\nwhen he was District -Attorney, and I know what\nwould h\u00dfnpen to Metropolitan directors if Oel>in\ncey Nicoll were now attorney. Hr would tell me\nmake a most rigid Investigation, and 1 wish \u2666\u25a0>\n\u25a0ay that In Mr. Jerome we have an equally high\nclass District Attorney, now making an investiga\ntion of this road.\nMagistrate Barlow then adjourned proceedings\nuntil to-morrow at 12 m.. in the magistrate's court,\nwhen he will give his decision.\nWIVES LONG PURSUIT.\nShe Chases Husband Who Had\nTaken 80y\u2014 2,000. Join Her.\nAfter being chased twenty blocks last night\nby his wife, she carrying their little girl and he\ntheir \u2022 boy, John V.'ilmuth was locked up at\nNewark. His wife and the children were con\nsigned to the hospital room of the police sta\ntion. They had been living at. No. 42 Centre\n6t., but, owing to some differences, they parted\nand Mrs. \"VVilmuth went to the home of a friend\nin Harrison, just across the river.\nWilmuth went there last evening and found\nhis boy. He grabbed him and started for New\nark by the Bridge-st. bridge. Mrs. Wilmuth\nwas told at once. She grabbed the girl and\nstarted in pursuit. like husband had about\ncrossed the bridge over the Fassaic. Others\nJoined in the pursuit, which continued through\nBridge-st.. and Broad-st.. Newark. Pome of the\npursuers began to throw stones at the fleeing\nman. and he was hit several times, but not\nhurt. He swung the boy in front of him to\nshield him. When Wilmuth reached Broad and\nMarket eta- fully two thousand persons were\nrushing in from all sides. Several policemen\napr eared and made the arrest.\nSCATTERS MANY. BILLS.\nCrated Foil Man Who Th rotes\nAway Money.\nJohn McDonald, of No. .\".TO Xewark-ave., Jer\nsey City, and Michael Harrow, of Newark, were\narrested on a charge of disorderly conduct last\nnight at Twenty-fifth-st. and Sixth-aye.\nThe men had been in the Alhambra. at Twen\nty-fourth-st. and Sixth-aye. They left there\nabout 9 o'clock, and began throwing pennies and\nnickels to the newsboys. A crowd of yelling\nhoys followed the men. who, when they ran out\nof\" smaller coins, threw dimes and quarters\naway. Half dollars followed, and each scram\nble almost resulted in a fight.\nThen McDonald drew a good sized roll of bills\nfrom one pocket, and. rolling off bill after bill,\nthrew it into the street and watched the scram\nbl?. The crowd jammed the sidewalk and\nstreet, and blocked pedestrian and vehicle traf\nfic Several bills were torn apart in the fighting\nfor them, and puffing men and boys rushed up\nto McDonald as he kept throwing- the bills away.\nThere was a pitched battle on the pavement for\nthe money.\nSome women, when a bill got anywhere near\nthem, did not think it beneath their dignity to\nmake a swoop for it. but none ever got any. Some\nboys fell on top of bills to try to maintain pos\nsession, but they were Immediately tumbled off\nand others fought for the possession.\nAn immense Jam of people surrounded Mc-\nDonald and Darrow until Policeman Forbes\npushed through and told the men they were\nunder arrest. By that time McDonald had not\na bill left of the roll. He resented being inter\nfered with and tried to thrash Forbes, but more\npolicemen came up. McDonald fought all the way\nto the West Thirtieth-st. station. He had ?1 90\nin his possession when searched. He did not\nknow how much he had in his roll, but some of\nthose in the crowd think he threw away not less\nthan -?7?i.\nMAY CALL FOR $7,500,000 ASSESSMENT.\nIt Would Be an Additional Guarantee of 7\nPer Cent M. S. R. Dividend.\nThere was a report in Wall Street yesterday\nthat 3 second call would be made soon upon\nthe shareholders of the Metropolitan Securities\nCompany for a cash assessment of 25 per cent.\nSuch an assessment would amount to $7,500,000.\nThe first call for such an assessment was made\nat the time of the organization of the Metro\npolitan Securities Company. In February, 1902,\nand it was said in Wall Street yesterday that a\nsecond assessment would be considered an ad\nditional guarantee of the 7 per cent dividend to\nbe paid on Metropolitan Street Railway Mock\nby the controlling Intemrban Company, the\nMetropolitan Securities Company being the\nholding company.\nH. H. Vredand was quoted by friends in Wall\nStreet as saying that the decision of the Court\nCf Appeals sustaining the Franchise Tax law\nwas \"entirely satisfactory\"\" to the Metropolitan\ninterests. Corporation lawyers have been figur\ning that the decision will not compel the Metro\npolitan to pay much tax in addition to the tax\nit already pays. The reports apparently had\nan effect yesterday to advance the price of\nMetropolitan Securities Company's shares.\nINDICTED IN RODS CASE.\nJerome's Assistant Asks for Dismis\nsal for Lack of Evidence.\nEllen Long, Louis J. Spmeryille and Michael Tim\npano have been indicted by the grand Jury for man\nslaughter in the second degree in connection with\nthe death of Leonard K. Boss, sixty-two years old.\na wealthy Fifth-aTe. art dealer, of No. 146 East\nFortv-seventh-st., who died on November 3S. ISO..\nWhile the indictments were handed In on Wednes\nday the fact was not made public until yesterday.\nA i barge of manslaughter in the second degree was\nmadtr.\nDeputy Assistant District Attorney Garvan went\nto the court and recornrnendeO that the indictments\nbe dismissed. He said that In the hearing before\nthe coronfr no evidence was shown that proved the\ndefendants contributed to the death of Roos. The\ndefendants had left the court, and Mr. Garvan\nsaid he would communicate with them, and navo\nthem In court to-day. He added that he would have\nMr Jerome sign the recommendation he had arnwn\nup. and th\u00ab indictment would then be dismissed.\nTO DEPEFSS TRACKS AT FIFTH-AYE.\nPlan to Run Forty-second-st. Cars Under\nRoadway Announced.\nBorough President Cantor yesterday announced\nthat a lan had been practically been decided on to\nrelieve the congested traffic at Forty second at, and\nFifth-are. As the result of a conference between a\nrepresentative of the firm of r\"arr*re & Hastings,\nthe architects, with Engineer Martin, of the Depart\nment of Highways, a suggestion, he said, had been\nmade for the depression of the. crosstown trolley\ntracks no that Fcfty-second-et. will be depressed\n400 feet east and west of the avenue, the care run\nning down the. decline and passing under the road\nway of Fifth-eve.\nThe conformation of the ground at this point. Mr.\nCantor said, was well adapted for this purpose, arid\nthe design, he added was both practical and artis\ntic. There will probably, he said, be a hearing\nbefore the local Board of Improvements for this\nsection at his office within a few days.\nCORNELL CLUB'S PLANS FOR HOUSE.\nAt the Cornell Club's annual meeting last night\nColonel Henry W. Sackett, *75; Dr. Robert F. Mor\nris. '*; Charles H. Blair, jr., '38, and Theodore I A\nBailey. '99. were elected governors for four years.\nA committee was authorized to report on the feasi\nbility *of the club's renting, purchasing or erecting\na home of it* own The Cornell Club in now housed\nin the Royalton. Xc 0 West Forty-thinJ-st.\nNEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FETDAY. MAY 1. 1903.\nDEAD, 56; LOSS, $1,500,000\nTHE DISASTER AT FRANK.\nInhabitants Perish as Theif Sleep\u2014\nExtent of Caiastrophc.\nFrank, X. W. T.. April Ml\u2014 lt is definitely\nknown that Jifty-six persons lost their lives\nbefore daybreak on Wednesday b>~ tnfi slidinK\nof the rocky top of Turtle Mountain down upon\nOm t-l'-eping village of Frank. Besides killing\nfifty-tiv, the ulide jlmrtrrrri the plant of the\nCanadian-American Coal and Coke Company,\ndid a vast amount of damage to the mine, and\ncompletely devastated about ten square miles\nof the finest and most picturesque section of\nCrow's I\\est Pass.\nMany of the bodies of the dead never will\nbe found. Some cabins are buried under 1W\nfeet of pock. Although organized efforts were\nmade last nielu and to-day U> search for bodies,\nonly nineteen so far have been recovered. Most\nof the corpses were manjrled almost beyond\nrecognition.\nThe disaster happened at 4:15 o'clock in the\nmorning:, when the inhabitants of Frank were\nsuddenly awakened l>y a tremendous < rash, fol\nlowed by a shaking: of the buildings. It wms\nstill dark, and, for a time, the greatest confusion\nprevailed, no one knowing just what had hap\npened. As soon as day dawned, it was seen\nthat the whole side of Turtle Mountain had\nfallen away. an(3 the valley for a distance of\ntwo miles was entirely choked up by rocks and\ndebris piled to an average height of sixty feet.\nSimultaneously with the falling of the reek!\nan immense fissure in the earth opened on the\nnorthern side of Turtle Mountain. The fissure\nextended for three-quarters of a mile. aJid was\nmany feet in width. This yawning chasm still\nremains open, according to reports brought in\nby mon who have been on the other side of the\nmountain.\nDAMAGE WILL REACH 51,500,000.\nIn the ruFh of the avalanche the entire operat\ning plant of the French -Canadian Coal Com\npany was carried away. Seven houses, also\nowned by the company, were smashed into\nkindling, fiix of them being entirely obliterated\nand their occupants killed, while ten other\nhouses which were situated in the valley east\nof the town were also demolished. The peo\nple living in these houses were instantly killed\nas th^y slept,\nThe direct monetary damage will exceed\n$1 500000. The actual loss to the mine com\npaV.v probably will not exceed $2O\\<>oo. The\nCanadian Pacific Railway Company loses heavi\nly through blocking of its track.\nThe scene of this awful catastrophe was orig\ninally one of the most picturesque valleys in\nCanada. Through the centre of the \\ alley ran\nthe Old Man River, which has its source on the\neastern Flope of the Crow's Nest Pass. The U>\nt*! -width of this valley was a litle more than a\nmile, and a sheer wall of rock rose to a height\nof 3,500 feet above th\" level of the town. The\nOld Man River followed the side of Turtle\nMountain, close up apainst the foot of which\nthe town of Frank was built. The mountain\nnail was, before the disaster, so tall and pre\ncipitous that even in the longest day in mid\nsummer the sunlight dlrappeared in Frank at\n3 o'clock in the afternoon, and after that a twi\nlight, ensued.\nTh\" material from the slide came down In\nalmost a \\-ertical wall of rock, and crossed the\nvalley, a distance of more than a i.iile, and went\npart way up the foothills on the opposite side\nto a height far above the highest building of\nth\u00ab town.\nCAUSE WAS NOT VOLCANIC.\nThe land, which was once of great value. aJid\nwas rapidly increasing in price on account of\nthe known presence of natural gas \u00abp well as\n0031 deposits, is now buried many feet deep In\nwaste matter and Is made almost valueless.\nAs there is no geological expert resident in the\ntown, it is Impossible to ascertain exactly the\ntruf character of the force exerted, but judging\nfrom the evidence now brought in by many who\nhave been scottting around the outskirts of the\nwas c of rocks and debris, many are inclined to\nbelieve that it was a huge mountain slide,\ncaused by an earthquake or subterranean ex\nplosion of gas.\nThe general opinion is that the trouble was nor\nvolcanic, as at. first supposed. Rocks are still\nfalling from the strangely altered top of Turtle\nMountain. These rocks in many cases are huge\nmasses', weighing hundreds of tons, and as they\nfall. crashing down with a noise Ilk* thunder.\nthey Ftart other fragments of rock in the path\nof the slide, which rush onward, bearing de\nstruction. For that reason it is extremely dan\ngerous to approach Turtle Mountain to make\ninvestigations into the exa'-t of tc<\u00bb ratafl\ntrophe.\nThe Board of Trade, which has assumed direc\ntion of affairs, in the absence of the local\nauthorities, has appealed to neighboring towns*\nfor assistance to defray the expenses of burying\nih\u00bb dead and caring for the women and children.\nMAY END BIG SWINDLES.\nFormer Tax Clerk Arrested Charged with\nForgery arc! Larceny.\nTnomas, .T. Murphy, a young man who says he\nwas formerly in the Tax Department, but now\nlives in Xewport. R. 1-. was held In the Manhat\ntan-aye. court, Brooklyn, yesterday, charged with\nforgery ana larceny.\nController Grout believes that the arrest may\nstop a large swindling scheme that has been in\noperation for five months. In November a largo\nnumber of cheeks were stolen from the paymaster's\ndepartment. Soon afterward th\u00ab checks, which\nhad been filled out for various amounts, began to\nturn up. having been cashed by various merchants.\nLast. Friday, as alleged. Murphy got John Saver,\nof No. 148 Franklin-si., Brooklyn, to cash one of\n:he checks for $15. On Wednesday night Murphy\nwas arrested and locked up in the Greenpolnt sta\ntion. The police say that three blank checks, such\nas are used by the city paymaster, were, found In\nhis possession.\nD. T. PULSIFER SUED FOR ABANDONMENT\nDavid Tenny Pulslfer, the well known horseman,\nwas arraigned in Jefferson Market court yesterday\nafternoon on a charpe of abandonment, preferred\nby his wife, Mrs. Ella 12 Pulsifer, who lives with\nher married daughter and mother in a house In\nKew-Rochelle, which Is, accordins to the test!*\nmony, (eased by the defendant. Through Frank\nBoland, her counsel. Mrs. Pulsifer asks for $50 a\nweek, stating that that is the least sum on which\nshe can maintain her usual style of living:.\nAccording to Mrs. Pulsifer's testimony, the last\nmoney she received from her husband was |S8 in\nAugust. 1902.\nMrs Pulsifer stated that her husband owned\nproperty valued at S'AOOO in Chicago, veal estate\nworth 120.000 in Buffalo, and the house at No. 121\nWest Beventy-nlnth-st., in this city, valued at\n$35 000. His income from real estate alone amounted\nannually to ?4,700. she alleged. According to Mrs.\nPulsifV-r. her husband offered her a life interest in\nth\u00ab Seventy-ninth-st. property if she would sign\naway her dower interest In the other property.\nLetters were Introduced of recent date. In which\nIllation was proposed by Mrs. Pulsifer. and\na resumption of relations witb her husband in the.\nhouse in Seventy-ninth-st. These negotiations,\nhowever, fell through.\nPulsifer's notoriety amonsr horsemen was due in\na large part to his ownership of the great stallion\nTenny.\nTO LAY CORNERSTONE OF CHURCH.\nThe programme for the -laying of the corner\nstone of the new Broadway Tabernacle Church, at\nthe corner of Broadway and Flftj stall) St., at 4\nr. m. Saturday, Includes Introductory remarks by\nDr. \"William H. Thomson and Invocation by t!ie\nRi v. Frank E. Ramsdell; the reading of contents\nof box by Joel K. Fisher, Urn trensurt-r of the so\nciety, the laying: of the cornerstone by the Rev,\nDr Charles E. Jefferfon, the psstor. and the bene\ndlction, by the Rev. Dr. A. J. Lyman.\nDISCREDITS BRIBERY CHARGES.\nSpringfield, 111.. April .'\u00bb.\u2014 The committee appoint*\n<\u2022\u2022! to mvostlgate charges of bribery in the Illinois\nleajtslattm Bubfl\u00dfttted a final report to the House\nto-night. The report declares that no real attempt\nwas made to bribe B|p*a,fcffr John II Miller, whose\nattempt to force a traction bill through the House\nled to a riot, and whose explanation was that h\u00ab\nbelieved briber > had been resort c.l to in the inter\nest of a rival bilL\nPOWDER PLANT WRECKED\nExplosions Kill Nine\u2014 A Score Mori-\nInjured.\nFARMKBS FLO IN TKRROR.\nHolidaysburg. Perm., April 3y\u2014 The extensive\nplant of the Crescent Powder Company, at Canto\"\ntar, about ten aaUea south of here, was wrecked\nby a series of four explosions this morning. Of\nthe thirty employes nine were killed outright, and\nall the others were badly injured. Among the ln\njored was Ad^m Tapgart, of Pittebur*. Mm super\nintendent of the company, who was found uncon-\nBStetJS in hia office by his wife, and was dragged\nout of tho burning buildlrg by her at the risk of\nhfr own life.\nTho first explosion occurred among the material\nin the mixing house, blowing tho building to atoms\nand also destroying the two punching houses and\nthe offl.P. The explosion waa felt in towns five\nmiles away, and all the houses in the vicinity were\ndamaged.\nFire started in tha wrecked buildings, and burned\nthroughout the day. No person ventured near tho\nplant for fear of adJltloiial explosions. There are\n2.24rt boxts of dynaxnito stored in the buildings.\nTerror stricken Carmen and limestone quarrymen\nhave flocked to WilliamsburK for refuge.\nThe Crescent Powder Company supplied the\npowder and dynamite used In the large limestone\nquarries of the Vnit<-d States Steel Corporation in\nthis county, and is composed of Ptttsburg men. There\n\u2022w-re eleven buildings in the plant, of which five\nare stiii standing. The estimated value of the\nplant was $35,000. George R. Mac-fabe. of Pittn\nbarg. Is the president of the company, and George\nTroutman, of the same city. Is the treasurer.\nA NEW CHRIST CHURCH.\nThe Babcock Memorial U to Take\nThat Form.\nA new building for Christ Church, now in West\nThlrty-flfth-st.. is to be erected as a memorial to\ntho late Rev. Dr. Maltble D. Babcock by the con\nprregation of the Brick Presbyterian Church, of\nwhich he was pastor at the time of his death, two\nyears ago. Last Sunday the Rev. Dr. W. R\n\"Richards, present pastor of the Brick Presbyterian\nChurch, announced to his congregation that the\nofficers of the church believed that it was time to\ntake up the project and push it.\nThe plan for a memorial was originated at the\ntime of Dr Bahcocks death, when several of hts\nfriends made voluntary contributions for a memo\nrial. As Dr. Babcock bad expressed the intention\nof starting a movement for a new home for Christ\nCtiorch. whose present buildings were considered\ninadeQ-mte for its many activities, it was consid\nered that the carrying out of the project after his\ndeath would result in a memorial peculiarly appro\npriate. Before last Sunday no effort had been\nmade to add to the first voluntary contributions.\nThe outlook for the fund is bright. Dr. Richards\nthtalk*. lie said last night, however, that the plans\nwere not matured and that they had not ye* de\ntermined the amount desired.\nChrist Church, which is in Thlrty-flfth-st. be\ntween Seventh and Eighth pves.. is affiliated with\nthe Brick Presbyterian and the '\"\"hurch of the\nCovenant. The recent departure of two Presn> -\nterian churches fr-.m the immediate neighborhood\nmakes the Babr-ock Memorial all the more needed.\nThese two churches are the United Presbyterian, in\nThirtv-fourth-st . and the North Presbyterian, at\nThlrtieth-st. and Ninth-aye. Christ Church grew\nout of s West Side Sunday school established b>\nthe Brick Cbvweb. and was incorporated in HBB.\nPEOPLE'S WITNESS IN BARREL CASE.\nOne of Those Arrested Cross-Questioned by\nMr. Garvan.\nPepino Fanaro. who was arrested in Jefferson\nMarket Court at the hearing in the \"barrel\" case on\na charge of perjury, was taken from the House of\nDetention to the District Attorney's office yester\nday afternoon, where he went under a crossfire of\nquestions from Assistant District Attorney Garvan.\nThe Assistant District Attorney would not divulge\nwhat Fanaro said, but Intimated that ho would be\ncalled as a witness for the people at the. inquest.\n\u00bb-\nSQUADRON BREAKS UP.\nNewport News. Va.. April Rear Admiral Hig\nginson hauled down his flag and the flag of Rear\nAdmiral A. 3. Barker was hoisted to the masthead\nof the battleship Kearsarge, with tho customary\nceremonies and salutes, at noon to-day. Admiral\nBarker assuming command of the North Atlantic\nSquadron. Admiral Barker sailed for Tompklnsvill*\nthis afternoon with th\" battleships Kearsarge. Ala\nbama lowa and Massachusetts, which will go into\ndrydock at Brooklyn, preparatory to making their\ncruise to the Azores this summer.\nThe battleships Illinois and Tr-*a\u00ab=. the cruiser\nOlvmpia and the refrigerating ship Culgoa proceed\ned\" to Old Point. The torpedo boat flotilla and the.\nsmall vessels that were at the drill grounds re\nturned to the Norfolk Navy Yard.\nThe training ship Essex arrived at Old Point to\nda- from N?w-L.ondon. and the training ship To\npeka arrived at Newport News from Annapolis.\nRESIGNED BEFORE SUIT.\nCharlrs T. Barney Replies to Attack of Ed\nward M. Shepard.\nCharles T Barney, president of the Knickerbock\ner Trust Company, said yesterday that he resigned\nabout a year ago from the. executive coauaittee ot\nthe Rapid Transit Construction Company.\n\"1 did so before I took stops fo obtain damages\nfor the injury to my houjp in Park-aye . by the\nbuilding of the subway th?r<-. Tn resignine I\nthought I would not hamper my former associates\non the committee by whatever action I might take.\nThe construction company did not decide the route\nof the subway in Park-aye . hut the Rapid Transit\nCommissioners did.\"\nMr. Barney mode th^s* 1 remark? in reply to the\nassertions of Edward M. Bhepard, counsel to the\nRapid Transit Commission, in a tilt on Wednesday\nat the City Hall Tilth Arthur H. Master- Mr Bfaff\nten is counsel for Mr. Barney. Mr Bhepard paid\nMr Barney was a member of the construction\ncompany, and that If he and Imp associates had\nnot wanted the tunnel where it is. under Park-aye..\nthey should not. have built it there.\n\"If any one is responsible Mr. Barney is. said\nMr. Phepard, \"and now h\u00ab come* here and tries to\nhold \"p the city.\nEXPECTS CANAL TREATY'S DEFEAT.\nVice-President of Hondtiras Does Not Think\nColombia Will Ratify Agreement.\nSenor Mai o Aurillo Loto, Vice-PresldenJ of Hon\ndnras, who is stayir.g at the Waldorf, doe* not he-\nHave thai the Colombian Congress will ratify the\ncanal treaty agreement. Speaking last ni\u00a3;ht. on\nth<t aiiv. -.ntuges oi the Nicaragua*! routs o\u00bba\u00bb the\nPanama route, be made this assertion:\n\"Ot course America will do thai which is most to\nn. r advantage, put i beoeve, none the less, that\nthe Colombian Congress, which meets this month,\nand is composed of intelligent men, win decline to\nratify America's agreement.\"\n\u2022Colombia.\" paid Bator Lota \"is unwilling that\nthe United States should cut through the repub\nlic, although two purely local interests favor the\nproposal. Central America, on the other hand, is\nwilling, nay. eager, that the United States should\nuse the Nicarag.uan route, because it feels that by\nso doing it will get a tide of capital and emigration\nBowing toward Central America, there to develop\ninterests. The advantages of the Nicaraeuan rout*\nare ninny. The Lake of Nicaragua, which wa\u00abM\nfall within this route and seed no canal construc\ntion, thus making the route little longer than Be\ntween Colon and Panama, Is of sweet water. Its\nadvantages to ships, In addition to Its dam facili\nties, are therefore obvious.\n\"Again. Central America Is a delightful country,\nrich in minerals, tropical fruits, coffee, cocoa, as\nwell as agricultural possibilities as yet almost un\ndreamed of. yet needing only American capital and\ninterest to ripen to a large development. Although\nthe air at the seaboards is warm, at inland altitude*\nit la always cool and refreshing. I feel, then, that\nI am voicing the sentiment of the Central repub\nlics when I say that i broad and far righted pol\nicy should deride the United State.*- on th\u00ab Nicara\ngua*, routs.\"\nWAITED MONTHS FOR DR. LOP.ENZ.\nHe Operates on English Child Who Went to\nChicago to See Him.\nChicago. April 30.\u2014 Dr. Adolf Lorenz to-day op\nerated on Rosa Btof\u00dfer, a girl who was brought\nfrom Bristol. England, several months ago In\nsearch of relief at his hands. Having arrived her\u00ab\nafter Dr. Lorenz ended his first visit, the girl and\nher parents have waited, almost destitute, for his\nreturn.\nNEGRO AND THE BALLOT.\nSUPREME COX RT \"S VIEW.\nWhy It Refused to Grant Relief\nfrom Disfranchisement.\nWashington, Apijll 30.\u2014 The text of the opinion of\nthe United States Supreme Court in the case of\nJackson Giles, of Montgomery County. Ala., against\nthe Beard of Registrars of that county, which ems\ndelivered by Justice Holmes last Monday, was mad*\npublic to-day. The opinion says that OSM, a n#rro\nmale adult, on behalf of himself and five thousand\nothers similarly situated, sousht by bills in equity\nto secure registration bb voters of Montgomery\nCounty, which had been refused, and thus test the\nvalidity of the suffrage provision of the \u25a0*\u2022 con\nstitution of Alabama. Justice Holmes says it was\nalleged by Giles that \"the refusal to register the\nblacks was a part of a general Krheine to dis\nfranchise them.\" The Federal Circuit Court for the\nMiddle District of Alabama dismissed the Mil for\nwant of Jurisdiction. It wan contended, says Jus\ntice Holmes, that the federal courts had jurisdiction\nin equity under Sections 331 and I.OTO of the Revised\nStatutes, providing that every person who. \"under\ncolor of a State Statute;, ordinance, regulation, cus\ntom or usage, subjects, or causes to be- subjected,\nany citizen of the United States or other persons\nwithin the Jurisdiction thereof to the deprivation\nof any rights, privileges or immunities secured by\nthe constitution and laws, shall be liable to the\nparty injured in an action at law, suit in equity, or\nother proper proceedings for redress.\"\nNO REMEDY IN AN EQUITY SUIT.\nThe court said that while some objections might\nbe raised on technical grounds to the Jurisdiction\nof the Supreme Court and of the jurisdiction in\nequity, yet the court was of opinion that the appeal\nopens the whole case, and that the scop* of the\ncomplaint was entitled to consideration. He then\nproceeds to announce the impossibility of granting\nthe relief sought, saying In explanation:\nIt will be observed, in the first place, that the\nlanguage of Section 1.979 does not extend the sphere\nof equitable Jurisdiction In respect of what shall De\nheld an appropriate subject matter for that kinc of\nrelief. The words are, \"shall be liable to the part.,\ninjured in an action at law. suit in equity. or other\nproper proceeding for redress.\" They al.ow a suit\nIn equity only when that is the proper proceeding\nfor redress, and they refer to existing standards to\ndetermine what is a proper proceeding. The tradi\ntional limits of proceedings in equity have not em\nbraced a remedy for political wrongs. Remember\ning, however, the Importance of the case, t tie court\nhas found itself unwilling to stop short of the final\nconsiderations to be taken into account in disposing\nof it. These were summarized as follows:\nThe plaintiff alleges that the whole registration\nscheme of the Alabama Constitution is a fraud\nupon the Constitution of the United States, and\nasks us to declare it void. But, of course, he could\nnot maintain a bill for a mere declaration in the\nair. He does not try to do so. but asks to be regis\ntered us a. party under the void instrument, ir.\nthen, we accept the conclusion which it is the chief\npurpose of the bill to maintain, how can we make\nthe court a party to the unlawful scheme by ac\ncepting It and adding another vote to Its fraudu\nlent lists? If a white man came here on the same\ngeneral allegations, admitting bis sympathy with\nthe plan, but alleging some special prejud lce that\nhad kept him off the list, we hardly should think it\nnecessary to meet him with a reasoned answer. But\nthe relief cannot be varied because we think that\nin the future the particular plaintiff is^ likely to\ntry to overthrow the scheme. If we ac cc j* the\nplaintiff's a!legatlons for the purpose of his case, he\ncannot complain. It seems to us that unless we are\nprepared to say that it is wrong, that all Its prin\ncipal allegations are Immaterial, and that the reg\nistration plan of th\u00ab Alabama Constitution is valid.\nwe cannot order the plaintiff's name to be regis\n\"it is not an answer to say that if all the blacks\nwho are qualified according to. the letter of the in\nstrument were registered the fraud would be\ncured. In the first place, there is no probability\nthat any way now is open in which more than a\nfew could be registered, but if all could be the dif\nficulty could not be overcome. If the sections oi\nthe constitution concerning registration were il\nlegal in their inception, it would be a new doctrine\nIn constitutional law that the original Invalidity\ncould be cured by an &cministration which defeated\ntheir intent. To express no opinion as to the : al\nleged fact of their constitutionality beyond saving\nthat we\" are not willing to assume that they are\nvalid in the face of the allegations and main ob\nject of the bill for the purpose of granting the re\nlief which it is necessary to pray in order that the\nobject other difficulty is\" of a different sort, and\nThe other difficulty is of a. different sort, and\nstrikingly reinforces the argument that equality\ncannot undertake now. any more than it has in the\npast, to enforce political tights, and also the sug\ngestion that State constitutions were not left un\nmentioned in paragraph 1.970 by accident.\nLAW IS PLAIN\u2014 BURGESS.\nThe Bishop Regrets Vanderbilt's\nEpiscopal Wedding.\nfBT TELEGKAFH TO THE TBIBOE.]\nHempstead, N. V., April \u2014 Bishop Burgess\nof The Episcopal Diocese of Long Island this\nafternoon denounced the marriage of divorced\npersons by th\u00ab Episcopal service He paid in\npart:\nI regret exceedingly the marria?*- of \\* K.\nVanderbilt and Mrs?. Rutherfurd ny a clergyman\nof the Church of England. I well know the\nBishop of London is bitterly opposed to the\nmarriage of a divorced person, and no doubt he\nwill take steps that will suspend for a time th*\nclergyman who performed the ceremony- At\nleast the latter will be reprimanded severely.\nI am firmly opposed to the marriage in the\nEpiscopal Church of a divorced person, and in\nmy diocese I would firmly oppose such a mar\nria^\u00ab\u00bb. The same conditions exist in all other\ndioceses of the United States.\nOur ecclesiastical laws state that once persons\nmarry they remain married until death, and so\nit will always be in the Episcopal Church. This\ndoctrine is so firmly planted in the minds of the\nclergy of the \"Episcopal faith In America that I\ndoubt if any will deviate from it. I know of\nvery few instances in this country where\ndivorced people have been married by an Epis\ncopal clergyman. Efforts will be made at th*\nnext general convention that meets in Boston\nnext year to settle definitely all matters pertain\ning to the marriage of divorced people in the\nEpiscopal Church. .\nAlthough the. marriage by an Episcopal\nclergyman of Mr. Vanderbilt and Mrs. Ruther\nfurd is to be regretted, it will no doubt result in\nbringing before the next general convention th\nmatter in a more forceful manner.\nALABAMA REPUBLICANS AT OBDS.\nIt Looks as Though There Would Be Two\nDelegations to the Convention.\n[ant raussuni TO tfle TRIBI'NE.]\nBirmingham. Ala.. April 30.\u2014 The Republican alt\nuation In this State is becoming more complicated.\nOne of the coaunitteemen. Ignatius Follak, quoted\nhs being \u2022\u25a0: favor of a meeting of th* committee,\nregardless of the desires of tne chairman, to-night\ndenied making '.ucli a statement, anil said that he\ndiil not Intend to attend thj Montgcmery meeting\nHe said that his suggestion to the chairman to\ncall \u00ab. meeting at any time was secured by th\u00bb\nreferees under a false Impression.\nThere is every Indication that there will be a\nsplit ii\u00bb tb.-\u00bb party, and two delegations will be sent\nto the next national convention, on^ for Roosevc-lt\nand one for either Hanna or Fairbanks.\nDENMAN THOMPSON STRICKEN.\nClaremont. N. 11.. April Penman Thompson,\nthe well known actor, was stricken with nt-ur.ilr\nof the heart here, to-day, and Is in a very serious\ncondition. AH dates for his \"Old Homestead\"\ncompany have been cancelled, Including a four\nweeks' engagement in New-York and one of two\n\u25a0weeks in Brooklyn. Mr. Thompson and hi\u00bb com\npany arrived here this afternoon.\nNOTES OF THE STAGE.\nA theatre for th<- appearance of Jacob I*. Adler..\nthe Hebrew tragedian, supported by an English\nspeaking company, has been selected. Contracts\nhave just been signed between Albert Weiss, man\nager of the American Th\u00abatre. and George H. Bren\nnan. manager of Mr. Adler. under th\u00ab terms <-.;\nwhich Mr. Adler'e engagement In this city will\nbegin in the American Theatre on May 25.\nArrangements have been completed by J. C. Duff\nwith Oottlob, Marx & Co., managers of the Colum\nbia-California Theatre, San Francisco, for the pro\nduction there of th* Daly Theatre musical comedies\n'\u2022A Runaway Girl.\" 'The Circus Girl.\"\" \"A Gaiety\nGirl\" and \"gas Toy.\"'\nThe first rehearsal of the principals to support\nBlanche Ring In \"The Gibson Girl\" at the Knicker\nbocker following \"Mr. Blue Beard\" took place yes\nterday on the stage of that tht-atre. Miss Kins\ncame over from Philadelphia. Others in the com\npatiy Include Harry Conor. Albert Hart. Rose Beau\nmont. Rente Davis, Violet Halls. Tesshi Mnuaiij,\nMlpnon Yon Hahn. Violet Carlstadt and for minor\nrA.e\u00bb at leant thr\u00bb-^ of the severs! hundred young\nwomen, each one of whom declares nh\u00ab was the\noriginal Gibson girt.\nTHE POSTAL IXQVIWY.\nPostmaster Roberts in Washington\nMr. Tyner Critically IV.\nfBT rXLt.fi TO TH* T\u00bbIBT;y\u00bb. J\nWashington. April .10.\u2014 The visit of Fo*tm*a\nt#r Roberts of Brooklyn to the roses** De\npartment to-day spread the report that he ha 4\nbf\u00ab\u00bbn summoned to assist in the investttratlon tr\nloose contract methods. Mr. Roberts <J-clar\u00bb<l\nthat his visit was for no other purpose than t\u00bb\ntenure authority for twenty additional cl?rk*\nand forty-six bmmi carriers for hi* office. He\nimr>resse<l on the authorities the fact that Brook\nlyn was increasing in population at th\" rate Of\nabout fifty thousand a yoar. and that the naval\nreceipts of the office were ll.l*>.tH'i'\u00bb in excess \u25a0 f\nexpenses. The first result of Mr. Roberts'j \\salt\nwas the announcement of Albert Kuck .is \u00bb>i\nj.erinten'lent of mails in Brooklyn.\nFirst Assistant Postmaster General Wysr.*\nthis afternoon denied pointblank that he hii\nrecommended the immediate dismissal ot Au\ngustus Machen. superintendent of the Division\nof Free Delivery, and that he had the support\nand countenance of Fourth Assistant Pcstrnw\nter General Bristow. attributed to sip in an\nalleged Interview which appeared in Ne^-Tnrk\nthis morning-. Postmaster General Pa.yr.e. when\nhe read the story referred t\u00ab. said it wan abso\nlutely without foundation Ho said he hal re\nceived no request from either Mr. Wynne or Mr.\nBristow for the removal of Mr. gIMSBBI\nJames N. Tyner, recently Assistant Attorney\nGaneral for th\u00bb Postofflce Department, Is criti\ncally ill. and Dr. Somers. win has had in con\nstant attendance on him '\"\u25a0 the last ttrw days,\nreports his condition as extremely grave. Judja\nTyner had been feeble for nearly a year, and\nfor the last few month* has been conflaed to\nhis house as th- result of a stroke of paralysis.\nThe strain of the last two weeks, following tHa\nsensational developments of his wife's visit to\nhis former office and her removal from the gov\nernment safe of his official and private papers,\nhas caused him to fail rapidly, and In his pre*.\nXt low state of vitality his chances of r-covery\nare regarded as desperate.\nVICE-GOVERNOB WRIGHT WELCOMED.\nManila Decorated, and Civil and Military\nHonors for Him.\nManila, April SO.-General Luke \u25a0 Wri*h\\\nVice-Governor of the Philippine Islands, arrived\nhere to-day from San Francisco, and ha.i an er\nthuslastic public reception. A marine proces\nsion escorted him ashore, and the fhipp was\ndecorated for th- occasion. The process\nashore Included the troops of the garrison and\nseveral thousand native-. Gtneral Wrishr ~\u00ab\nescorted to the palace, whe e addresses of wel\ncome were delivered. The city was decorated\nwith flags, and many arche* were erected alorn?\nthe route of the procession.\nA TOWN HEAR MANILA BUBNED.\nManila. April CO.\u2014 The town of Mariquina.\nProvince of Manila, has been destroyed by fire.\nA thousand houses were burned, and the lil.ab\nttants are in much distress. The people of Ma\nnila are relieving the sufferers. The fire is be\nlieved to have been of incendiary origin. Mem\nbers of scattered insurgent bands are suspected\nof setting tire to the place.\nCORRUPT POSTMASTER IN LEYTE-\nManila. April 30.-O. G. Milne, postmaster of\nTacloban. capital of the Island of Leyt-. has be** \u00bb\nconvicted of misappropnatin* fond* bur no r\u00bbn\ntence has yet been pronounced. MHn* la \u00abts\u00bb\ncharged \u25a0with embezzlement.\nNATIONAL GFARD CONVENTION.\nMilitiamen to Discuss the New Law Next\nWeek at Columbus, Ohio.\nWashington. April SO Apodal i-\u2022 Sea i Charts*\nDick, president of th\u00ab Interstate National Guard\nAssociation, the headquarters of which ai- bi\n\"Washington. has sent the following invitation t<-\u00bb\nthe Adjutant General at Albany:\nThe fourth annual convention of the Tr.t\u00bbrst*?\u00bb\nNational Guard Association will be held at Corem\nbus Ohio, commencing at 10 o'clock a. m. en Hon\nda May 4, ISO 3. The militia legislation recr.:!r\nadopted by Congress. together with the action 9i\nmany State legislatures in conformity thereto, hav\ning a very material tear in? upon th\u00abs state an-*\ncontrol of the National Guard orsran! warier', it b\nexpected that the convention of thU year will *m\nexceedingly Important and full of interest. ih*\nHon. Elih'.i Knot, Setrretary of War. ha? acc\u00bbnr^<i\nan invitation to be present, antl will address to*\nconvention on the afternoon of Monday. May \u00bb\nHe has also asrreei to invite officers of the War\nDepartment and regular army, representing, so t\u00bbf\nas practicable, each branch of the military serv{.-=\\\nto Be present and participate In the discussion-.\nwhich will doubtless be a most Attractive t'eatur\nof the general programme. This.*, it is appar<v\nthere will be afforded unusual opportunity for \u00bb<\nquiring authoritative instruction and inforrn;ifi-T>\nof a specially valuable character, ami therefor* r>\nargument is needed to show the desirability of foil\nrepresentation for even- branrh t^f me s?r' Ire \u25a0\u25a0\neach State and Territory. All of th? ofiWrs nt\nyour State are Invited m atfe\"\"l thi<\u00ab conv^nti^r\nThe ol\u00dfcers of the Ohio Narior..U Guard havi.'.ar It\nIn charge wlli contribute iv erer? possible manner\nto its success, and we sfcat! depend upon yo\u00bb:r a*\noperation to make the occasion one inein\u00abraM\u00bb ti\nthe history *>* th* aspociatiTt.\nGEN. AINSWORTH WINS IN LIBEL SUIT.\n\"Washington. April 3 \u2014 The District Circuit Court\nto-day decided tB favor cf. the defendant In th.3 suit\nof Charles A De %ma against General F. '\"\nAinsworth. chief of the record.* and revision division\nof the War Department, for $50,000 damages for a'\nleered libellous statements in a report en De A\nnaud's military record. The court he!d that a. repor*.\nmade by the bead \u25a0->- a \u2022\u00a3o\\-ernrr.ent departme\"\"\nunder the provisions of law is privileged, ar.-.1, cvi\nIf actuated by malice, if ma(i\u00ab in the tine of duty.\nis not actionable. An appeal was tsker; t--> tba\nCourt of Appeals.\nNURSES GET $100 WITH CERTIFICATES.\nEleven trained nurses were sraduat-d last nis*\"t\nfrom St. Mark's Hospital Traimas School tor\nNurses. Dr. C. A. Yon Rarr.dohr pr\u00bb\u00bb ... and ad\nd re s<se 9 were inavJe by Dr. Carl Beck president o*\nSt. Mark'? Hospital: Dr. .T. H. Rott\u00abnbers: and\nMaximl'.ian H. Ruttenau. Each jcirl receive with\nher certificate $100 to give hf r a start in lit-?.\nAHMY AND NAVY OHBERS.\n\"Washington. April 3*.\u2014 Th\u00bb Mki>M| army ami\nnavy orders ha- - b**n Issued:\nAim\nMajcr BENJAMTX 11. CHTEVER. *\u2022* <?a\\alry. r^-st\nm*v.t ef Dakota, p\u00bbn-iins: arrival of Ms fginwnt.\nMajor B3E\u00bb*HKK R RAY. psrirast'r, to X\u00abw-Xork CI\u00bbT\nCommander TV. .T. BARNKTTE. (Jrtartwtl Naval *~*-Ir-ri~\n\u00ab>nman<J\u00bbr S. W. \" P!RTII\u00ab lieuehM t*i\u00bb Marl*tf\u00ab; t\u00bb\ncoir.man! tl\u00bbe> Newport.\n1 im-'-nant CooraiMi4\u00bbT P A FIPKE. <t?r4'-h\u00abt is*\nUs\u00bbMelrantt\u00bb: to W*Ah\u00abWii t*t \u00bbxamlatftc\u00bbn f^r\npromotion.\nLieutenant CobibujiiJt C I.LOYP. Jr.. d*fao?>\u00abd Na^\u00bb!\nA'-a'l\u00bbniT to the }U?saoh-.i?e'T* a* ?x\u00bbrutiva officer.\nMeut\u00abnant 1. > .AM' 1 ' .ltta.-h\u00abvl ta\u00bb Mr: -i, to\nN\u00ab\u00bbport -i\u00bb \u00abi\u00abcutl*\u00ab *\"\u25a0\nI-l*utenant F. m n\\'?^KLU to Naval Arx-'.fxy\nI4\u00abntee\u00bbRt C nTUA d<-tach\u00bb-J naval torprto sutjon; \u25a0\nthe Baltimore.\nEn.ltn J. D. WAIN'VRTGIIT. \u2022. tin. Uonorcab^la.\nEniisns VV. P. CRONAN. K. C PINGER. II L. E3IN\nSER and 11. T. WIJfSTO!*. d^tarhM ifi# >t.irteita. tt\u00bb\nth\u00bb Nt\u00bbpo\u00bb\nMld\u00bbMprnJia C T. 'ItTCHINS. datacbWl ti\u00bb M\u00bbaan\u00aba\nh\u00bbla; to th\" \\V\u00abba\u00abh.\nAssistant Sunt\u00bbion C. O. S>ItTTT. MM t>.\u00ab Sbrtotta;\nto th\u00ab Newport.\nTay Itiir\u00abetor VI\". \u00abOIJ>3E\u00abROVGn <r*tireil\u00bb. it'irnr J\nNaval Araierr.v: horn*\nPirmMtT C M. KAY, '\u2022\u25a0 K\u00bb>aJ A>-3-3\u00ab-my.\nAwlstant l'ay:na*t\u00abr \\V. \\. OREEJt, dvtsrtkad t:-'*\nMarietta; to the Newport.\nSECURITY\u2014 privacy;\nFIVE DOLLARS PER YEAR\nWill secure i box in the\nFIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF VAULTS\nof the BtodSStSjai vifr l\u00bb l>o\u00bbil i*oiii|>ini% . la which\nyour valuable papers. Jewels. \u00abtc. eaa c* safely *\u2022\u00bb\u00ab.\nTrunk*. (\u25a0 liver Nstssea, Etc.. u&?n is stow**.\n208 Filth Aye. 1128 Broadway.\n<M\u00bb linen S<\u2014 fi Lincoln Trait O>. BaHJH\u00ab.",
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"text": "Til^m) PLD Of S\nfe?SPORJS^\nBASEBALL.\nXr:r Tram Ff'ffi* First Game \u2014 Beat\nWashington 6 to 2.\nFIELD AND MEN WIN FAVOR.\nRESULTS OF GAMES YESTERDAY.\nNATIOVAL, I^KA<- T\nPkQadateUlu \u2022\u25a0- New-Tork .'Plttsburir. IS: -\u25a0 Uoui*. 4.\nj |Bc\u00abon. \u25a0\u25a0\u2022. Brooklyn. 2.\nAMEfiICAX LEAGUE.\nFr.'ia^e'r!\".^- \u25a0.: Borton. 2.iN\u00bbw-ToTk. \u00ab TVa\u00bbhin?tori. 2.\nGAMES TO-DAY.\nNATIONAL LEAGUE.\nBoston at Brooklyn. 1 New- York at Philadelphia.\nAMERICAN LEAGUE.\nr--!s'>T-'\u00ab \u00ab\" \u25a0\u25a0( !I>etrolt at Cakaja\nPt! Louis b\\ (\"iet-eland. ,\nTHE RECORDS.\nNATIONAL LEAGCE.\nriub\u00bb Wonlywt. P.c . ! Club*. WawUaat P.c.\nV.,.Tcii ....*> 3 .727. \u25a0ton 7 6 .535\nj-ITtf^rK 9 4 .racist. Louis 6 \" .482\n' .. rsr .... 7 4 .KM! Philadelphia ... 4 \u00bb -30s\nBrooklyn . 8 \u00ab -455iCinclnnatl 2 \u00bb 1?-\nAMERICAN LEAGUE.\nnut* TVon.Lc^t. P.c ; Clubs. Won.Lost. P^n.\n\u25a0t\u00a3xS? * I .tin Chicago 3 3 -W\u00a3\nmr.^.l i '.\"i Clfv^Jaad \u2022;;;::? 8 400\n4 \u00ab Hi H Lnu!\u00bb . . . 1 * -\"^\nS^ake?p<?Bre. wh*n he wrote \"the cat will mew\nma Urn <3oc will have his day.\" was ignorant of\nthe Derayite Baseball Club. The ada*e. however,\ncrrtalnly applies to the way ir. which that club\nhad it? day yesterday. It was the u\"JMiln\u00bb of the\nciubs fason on the home ground*, and the local\n\u2022ream won from Washington by a score of 6 to C.\nIt indeed ua? a glorious uciaati* not only from\nth* point of vi. - of th* creat number? of office\nboy? ar.d old rooter;, but from that of the backers\nof the local team. If any one Phould -ay that the\nnanonal game is not MM more popular be would\nrrr-baMy be considered a poor ludpe of the drift\nrf baseball aff-irs. The aaaatl boys have, been In\nThe prapp of the -...;.. raj for some weeks.\n*nd th\" c^arp 15 beoomtnK stronser every time the\nlocal baaetall player? make \u25a0 hit. The popularity\nof baseball i? Iparfly proved by these HUM lads.\nJ aM year few of them had mere than one sunl or\nn conveniently Rot sick mvA needed them\nat horn* when there was a professional baseball\npsme scheduled to be played here. NOW most of\nthese hoys have many aunts and uncles whose\nr-hvpical \"munition is pr- rp l\u00bbxincr because one day\ntk*y ar\u00bb well and the next they are r,*ar <i \" aiVl s\ndonr. Wh*>n tn\u00ab\u00bb* conFlflerate relatives are very\nFl--k thf boys aro bent on serins \u25a0 came.\nTfrt were no pump? arannc the floral decora\ntions on the grounds\". Devery. by his presence In\nthe grandstand, mad*- amends for this nverFieht.\nro'itlciar.F wer*> there in force, and one of the\nmo*t conFplcuoay was \"Bin Tom' Fol^y. of the\nFourth Ward. Many looked with . distrust ;)t the\nf-andwi-h and lemona,^ me* Tb*> sandwich man\nreminded thrm ot the free lunch counter which\nwas far away, and the lemonade brigade brought\nvis.ir> r * to them of schooners of beer. There were\neoousti diamonds In ih\" shirt f. _mts of the politi- j\n,-iars t\u00ab start a fair sized jewelry store. There\n\u00bbr* thr^.- kinds of diamonds, it is said, which most\nr-niitiHans know much about\u2014 the diamond that\npamra< t v,^ a ,.\u00bb of diamonds and th* baseball\ntM smond.\nIt wa\u00ab= a perfect day for the sport. The s:;r! was\njxnmz and a sentle br\u00ab>ez\u00bb Wew across the stand\nhurt strong enough to Mk\u00ab it comfortable. The\nfiel^ i\u00ab rot vet completed. .*.-, belnc \u25a0 deep hol-\nSow mace on th\" Broadway side in back of Bra*\nh\u00ab\u00ab. ~here th- v>*4 * >** lo J n^ rhta\nhollow Tac is about a sixteenth of the field, and\n, t : n \u201e \u0084 filled In the _.. ....... the largest\nand ... baseball grounds in the world\nTVnen a ball was hit in this space, which is several\nfrl ., than the other part of the field, it\ncounted for two bases. The grandstands were\n... roof.-, h-n it aeemed remarkable how the\nEToands could have b\u00bben put in such pood condition\nfr, r th* opening In '\"^^ -- an \u25a0 month and a\nv-lf Th/ diamond has been sodded, \u00abnd was a\n~rWt relief t-y the glare of the sunbaked dirt of\nTh* otitfi^ld. Th\" whole \u25a0 -i.3 will V-- sodded as\n\u201e>\u201e!, as r-^ssible. Outside the grounds the -fakirs'\nin force, and as each spectator entered\nTh* eround\u00ab he ... a small American flag.\nIt w.i\u00ab= about \u00bb3! r- m. when Bayne, with his Oth\nRegiment h\u00abr,d. worted -he players onto the dia\nmond It was found necessary for th' men to\nd~\u00ab-/at a hotel near by. as the club's dressing\n-onrr.s have not yet been built. When the men\ncame narchlngTon the field to the tune of a pa\ntriotic song the spectators rose as if one. and\nstood until the band stopped playing. The _ decora\ntion* of flag= and buntins on the stands and bleach\ner? added ......... sisht. As on all open\nt^z dsv* spectators brought horns and whistles.\nand is the bleachers cowbells -were numerous.\nVlWtiw gameVas called there were fully fifteen\nthousand people present, a remarkable number.\nconsidering that the rapid transit road will not be\ncemp!et\u00abd this season, and that the spectators had\nto come on surface lines.\nPr^idont Ban Johnson of the American League\nhad the \"honor of throwing the first bail. The home\n[earn proved th.mselve, to be a swift lot of payers.\nwWte the fl^i^ work of the Washington team was\nz]Kn c-0.1 The rncst notable player to be missed\non tr- local side w Fulti. who. It was announced,\n\u2122uM not play- Hcirarland took his place, ana\nlir.ui il in s neditable way.\nThe Dereryltw began their first inning by making\nor- run. Davis was first to the bat. but his hard\nhit \"went to Robirton. and he was put out at first.\nK \u00abeler f~nt a hit to left, \"\u25a0' \u25a0 rot to second o:i\nRyan's fumble UcFfcrland's hit was caught by\nRoKnwm! Williams cam* next, and sent out a\ntwo hag?or. tallying Keeler. Oanael was the third\nman to be caught out. In the second inning the\nV.cal fam add^d \u25a0--\u25a0\u25a0\u2022 its lead Conroy\narS-tO the bat. made a hit for two ba ? es. < ourtn.>>\nnmdr a M*t Mcrlflcc lo Townseno. O C oni.or s\nh't past third allowed Conroy to score. / nesbro\n\u00ab;i.l Davis v<t\u00bb th*- r^xt two to be put cut thru\nwas rot until the fifth tanlx* ww JTnS^l^S\n/no'\u00bb nn f w\u00ab\u00ab made In this inning the Deveryltes\nfr\\rei two mor runs. Dax-is got to rirst on a nice\nhit K-eler got to baie on balls, whil- Darte stote\nJSrond McFarland bunted, but Davis was forced\nr\u00ab:t \"i 'third by Drills quick throw Williams hit\n, o r ;cht field for two ba^es and scored K<.e,.r. M<--\nV;- lr!i tallied on Ganxel's long fly \u00ab\u00bb**\u00ab by\nRobinson. Ccr.roys hign hit was caught by Boo\n\"Tn^he \u00bb*venth Inning the local team made two\nruns whil*> th* Washington team tallied their first\nr-jn\" OotlEbUn. first for Washington to the bat.\nmad\u00ab a --ir.Kle followed by a double by Dfmont.\nDrill Wt to Courtney, forcing out Demont. hot\n< -ou^rhiir. ta.llie-3 nn the play. Towpsend'a grounder\nvac got i\" time by Courtney to put Drill out. Rob\niTtson fouled to GanzeL For New-York Davis and\nK\u00abder walked to first. CbugbUn was put out. while\n-h^ fi-st two men ctole. Wiliiairs was struck out.\n;^nieTw\u00ab hTt knVl Scot to first. This filled the\nba^t-F Conmy*s hit for two bases scored Davis\n\u00ab-id Keeler and Courtney's fly mr handled ni\u00ab-*-iy\nr.v iK-lehantv. In the eighth Inning the senators\ner,t v!-e more run. when Belbaeti got to first on \u00bb\nmuS by Davis and scored m Ryan 1 ? fine hit. The\n\u2022\nN'EW-TORK. ! -WASHINGTON.\nIk t lb pc a < \u00bbbrlbp\u00aba c\nti,, .. if 4 110 0 Ci\u00dfohlnunn- m \u2022\u2022222*'\nX\u00ab>r rt.lt 2 8 2 1 *\u00bb \u2022\u25a0<,'{,' rf... S 1 \u00ab OO \u2022\u00bb\nMrFario.'cf 3 i. 0 \u00ab Delehanty. If 4 no I \u2022 \"\n~n (lliarnt- 21. 4 O 2 2 S << Ryan, rf 4 \u2022 2 ' 1 \u00ab\nOauwUflb.. 3 O \u00ab12 1 \u00ab Carey, 1b.... 4 \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 \u2022\nrr, nr ny. 3b. 4 1 2 r, 1 OiCoughlin, \u00bbb. 4 i 2 2 1 1\nCrurtn<-\u00bb ft S <\u25a0\u2022 1 2 1 1 I>iti-t.i 2b.. 4 \u2022 1 \u2022 * \u2022\noConw. r. 4 r. i 4 - O Drill, c * <\u25a0\u2022 \u2022\u2022\u25a0 '< I n\nCh^tY**- r \u25a0 4 O r> 1 \u2022<' \"iTownsenil. p. 3 *> 0 1 2 '\u2022\n._, j.nntafi ... .. 1 \u2022 0, on\"\nTnt\u00bbl\u00ab ...31 ' 827 12 3: ? :::,io,\n1 -Totals ... .37 2 724 10 1\n\u2022Rj\"te\u00bb\u00bb fnr \"rv>wn\u00bben<! In n'r.th innlnr.\n\u00ab, ;m York 1 1 A (i 2 <\u25a0' 2 '\u2022 X\u2014 \u00ab\nT. \u2022*bir.sion \u00a9 *> I. 4, 0 \u00b0 ' 1 \"'-\nBsrned rurit \u2014 Ne\u00bb-Vorj:. 2. Tiro ba*\u00ab hit*\u2014 Keeler 2.\nfCintat\u00df* 2. Conroy 2. Courhlin. Roblneon. Sacrifice hits\n- ilcFkrlani Courtne-.-. ptoleu hzse \u2014 CKConnor. Double\nr , ay Ryan and Drill Left on b*M's\u2014 New-Tork. \u2022\u25a0\nVa^hir.ir'r-r. \u00bb.\u25a0 fitft base ,-m i-*l!f Ott Chesbro. 1: irT\nTor.ns\u00abr.'3. 3 Fir\u00ab t\u00abw on \u00bbrror\u00bb\u2014 \u25a0 . \u00bb\u2022.. York. 1; \u00ab\u25a0*\"-\nIr.rtor 3. Hit by p'.trhed ball\u2014 By Trm-nsend. I. Struck\nc;t\u2014 Bv Ch*\u00abbro. 1; by TllHMlia< 4. Time. 1:30. Im\nptica \u2014 OooaoOy and Oamtlwrm.7 '^ *\u25a0\u25a0\nPHILADELPHIA, 12; BOSTON, 2.\n. , f~ MiM) Fit ** t\ni i .. \u0084 \u2022 s 4 n is i\n\u00a32;; . | <\u2022 \u2022 f. f. \u25a0 \u2022 \" <V 2 7 2\njjSSSain rimik \u00abr<J Pr,w*r*; Winter *n<J '\"rir\u00bbr At\nt. r\u00bb4a -\u2022 *\u25a0\u25a0\nRESULTS OF OTHER GAMES.\nIt ITtlca\u2014 rtic\u00bb. 0: Columbia 4\nA? Troy N Y-AU.U-) 33. Troy. 6\n.*i ggUaWi\u2014 \u2022- J. * o '\u25a0\u00ab\u2022\u00bb\u2022 bM\u00abiM). ii. Aii-\nB^ k cScerf. K. H-O\u00bbcocd. 8. NccwJeh. L\nGIANTS LOSE TO QUAKERS. 10 TO 2.\ni Play a Poor Fielding Game and Do Not Bat\nWell\u2014 Miller Ineffective.\nPhiladelphia, April 30 \u2014New-York played a rag\nged fleldins pane to-day, and could not hit. Miller\n| was ineffective, and the lcca.l team won without\n: difficult y. Van Haltren wrenched his back while\nI batting:, and was forced to retire. Bowerman re\n: placing him. The attendance was 2.875. The score:\nNEW-YORK. I PHILADELPHIA.\nat. r lb po a c! \" ab r lb pc a \u00ab\nBrowne, tt.. \u2022\u00bb \" - '2 0 1 1 Thomas, cf.. 3 1 1 1 0 1\nV. Ha!tr\u00abi.cf 3 <> 1 3 1 0 Barry. IX . . 4 2 1 1 0 0\nBowfrman.cf 1 1 \u00ab O ft (I Wolverton. 3b .1 1 2 2 7 0\nMrGann. lb. 4 <\u2022 1 8 1 OJKelster. rf . . . 3 3 1 1 1 0\nMortes. 1f... 4 9 2 2 O 2 , Braahear, 2b. i 1 \u00bb 2 1 \u2022\nDunn, as 4 2 1 ' 2 <> Douglass, lb. 4 0 3 8 1 0\nlouder, to.. 4 0 1 2 I 1I 1 I ' Hulswltt. ss. 5 0 1 3 3 1\nGilbert. \u00bb . 4 O 0 2 2 OZimmer. c... 4 1 0 7 1 0\nFreenahar.. c 3 0 o 4 1 Sparks, p.... 2 1 ft 1 0 0\nKilter, p 3 \u2022 \u00a9 \u00bb 2 \u2022 \u2014\n' Totals 34 10 12 27 14 2\nTotal* .. .34 2 624 11 4.\nrhiladHj-'hia 3 \u2022 2 1 0 4 \u2022 0 x\u2014 lo\nNew-Tork <> 1 i' o <> 0 0 9 I\u2014 2\nKarr,\u00ab-1 runs \u2014 Xew-York, 2 ; Philadelphia. 2. Two bas*\nhit? \u2014Dunn. niartiiai \u25a0nr-iw base hii)\u00bb\u2014 Mprtes. Wolv\u00abr\n;on. Sarrifice hits \u2014 Thomas. Douglass, Sparks. Stolen\nbaw( \u2014 Brown*. P.arrj-. Doubie plays \u2014 Zimracr and\nH-a!*witt. L&iidt-r and Gilbert: Van Haitian end Bresna\nhan. I>\u00bbft en bases\u2014 New-York. 5: Philadelfhia !\u2022. First\n! bt.se on baHi\u00bb Off V \u00ab\u2022 R Struck out\u2014 By HlU^r, 4; by\nI Pparks. 7 wild r't-b\u2014 Sparks. Time, l ;SO. rmplre.\nO'l>ay.\n\u2022\nBOSTON BEATS SUPERBAS, 10 TO 2.\nPlays an Errorless \u2014 Brooklyn Team\nFields in Wretched Shape.\nIn a poorly played came th<* Boston National\nLeague team defeated the Buperbas yesterday\n10 to 2. The visitors fielded perfectly, while the\nwork of Ranlon'e men in the field was wretched.\nHouseholder, in sliding to first base in the fifth\nInning, was hurt and was compelled to quit the\ngame. Ritter took his place, but mad\" man: er\nrors. Only one of the ten runs scored by the' visi\ntor? was earned. The score:\nBOSTON BROOKLYN.\nah r lb v - a *\u25a0', a b r lb P .\\ a \u00ab\nDexter, <\u25a0:.. 4 2 4 0 1 0 f*tranie. 3b. .. \u2022\u25a0> 0 I 1 <> 1\nT*nn*y. |b. 4 2 1 10 l O. UcTrf^die, rf 4 1 1 10 <>\nAbbVrhio. *ji i; o o r. 4 n Sh\u00ab\u00bbrkard. If. . 4 r> 4 I \" \u2022>\nCoolpy. 1f... 3 1 \u00ab 1 \u00ab 0 I Hou holder. ':niIOO\nCame; rf. . 5 0 1 800 Ritt<>r \u2022'*\u2022 <- '_' 0 0 \" 9 -\nBcauter 2b.. 5 2 3 3 2 0] Doyle. 1b ... r. 1 111 2 '>\nCmins^r. ?.h 5 O O 3 2 9'Pahleo. sp.. 3 o;l>3' X:2\nKittriiy*'. c. 8 \" 0 a 1 0 Jackl'seh.c&rf 2 n n 3 2 <\u2022\nTiart, p . . '\u2022 \" 2 <> :: Oj Flood. 2b :: 0 1 :: 1 0\nThl^lman. p. . 2 0 114 0\nTotals .. .40 10 11 27 14 0 -\n! T.<t\u00ab : ? . 33 21127 13 I\nKriston ...A A A 1 \" it :. r. p. - 11 >\nBrooklyn -. 1 .1 0 0 \u2022> 1 \u0084 (>-- L'\nEarned run? \u2014 Brooklyn. 2: Boston. I. Two bas\u00bb hits -\nPh^ckard. 2; Poylp. Bonn\u00bbr. First basp on \u2022rrnrs- 80,\nlon S: !>>\u2022\u25a0\u2022. on baaea \u2014 I 1 11: r.rooklyn. 12. SarrifW\nhit*\u2014 Sh^ckard. I>ah!\u00ab>n Home run\u2014 -Tenney. Stn!\u00ab-n\nba?*f \u2014 Carnry. \u2022 nner. Gr*\"mijic\u00ab j r. T>oubl< 1 plavp -Th:\u00abl\nmam. I\u00bboy]^ ar.l StraTiC; AKbati<-chio B nd \u2022;\u2022\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 Firct\nba*\u00bb on \u25a0.-::.- \u2014 By TfciPlrr.an S. : hy Piati '\u2022 Hit by\npitched bai:\u2014 By Plan. 1. Struck out \u2014 By TMMman. I;\n1-:- Piatt. 4. ra\u00ab\u00abf>d hall\u2014 Jajt-klltwJi WIH pitrli \u2014T).\\o]\nrnan. Tim\u00ab. 2:12. T'mpir^. Moran Attendance :: \"\u25a0 o\nPITTSBURG, 13: ST. LOUIS, 4.\nAt St. Laoaia R. H. E.\nT -\u2022\u2022\u2022\u25a0\u25a0 -c . ..0 A 0 <; n % A 2 0 \u2014 13 1\nSt. LaOute \u25a0\u25a0 i. 1. <. 60121 \u2014 4 8 6\nRattorl\u00bb>s \u2014 Brown. Rboadr\u00ab an : Wearer; Pbillirr' and\nI-hplp?. AttTidaTire. 2.71-\nEASTERN LEAGUE RESULTS.\nAt Providence. R. I.: R. H. E.\n>r\u00bby City . 2 A A O 2 r. I <\"> ri \u2014 .\u00bb, jo II\nProvMenor 0 ft n 0 o o 0 0 0 \u2014 O 7 -J\nBatterfcs- MrCann and M-?>!anu . Coon and Farmer.\nAttendance\u2014 3.\nAt Woroeat \u2022 R. H. K.\nNewark 4 3 0 0 0 f> O ft O--7 13 1\nWorcest\u00abr \u00ab n o 4 n <> 1 0 ; \u2014 fi it 4\nBatteriea \u2014 Thiery. Psrci\u00bb\u00bb ad Shea rappalau and Me\nCauley.\nAt Baltimore: R. H. E.\nBaltimore ...o 0 0 0 2 o n 1 o\u2014 3 .-> 2\nBuffalo 0 1 \u2022 0 0 \u2022\u2022 2 3 1-7 11 6\nRatt\u00ab\u00bbr!ei\u00ab \u2014 Mills and RoUoaon; McGee ard Shaw. At\n1 endance\u2014 6. MO\nAt Rochoster: R. H. K.\nToronto 0 t > 1 1 O\u20142 3 1\nRochester 2 a 0 1 O-3 f> \"\nBatt\u00bbrles\u2014 Brissa and Toft; Becker and Lllley.\nHARVARD BEATS AMHERST 8 TO 7.\nCambridge. Mas?.. April 30.\u2014 Harvard and Am\nherst had an excitinK although loosely played\npanic to-day. Harvard won out In the last half of\nthe ninth on a two-hagrer by f'larksnn. The score\nwas S to 7. Harvard had everything her own way\nup to the sixth Inning, when a base on hails, three\nhits and two errors sravp Amherst four runs.\nClarkyon's two-bagger In the ninth won the game.\nThe score:\nR. H. E.\nHarvard 3 0 O A 3 1 ft o 1 \u2014 7 4\nAmherrt 11 <\u2022 <\"\u2022 (i 0 4 0 \u2022 2\u20147 ir\u00bb >\nBatteries \u2014 Clarkson and Kernai Kanr and Monroe.\nYALE. 8: NEW-HAVEN. 7.\nA* N>w-Haven: r. H. 1\nYale \"2 0 1 1 0 2 A A A 2 \u2014 fi 10 7\nXfw-Havrn . . .0 1 92300A00 I\u20147 11\nBatteries \u2014 Rattan, Mien, Farmer and Wlnslow; Turkey\nand Jope.\nOTHER COLLEGE GAMES.\nAt Ithaca\u2014 R. H. E.\nCfrnell 2 2 4 .' 3 5 4 ft x\u2014 24 18 .'*\nBinchamtan \u2022 .-0 0 2 0 0 n 9 0 t\\\u2014 8 .\". 9\nRatter!*-? \u2014 r 'm\u00abtao. Merrill nd Welch: Scott, Kranefic,\nSmith. I'alm and Taylor.\nAt Atlanta- T>.lversity of North Carolina, 15; Univer-\nFllj- of Virginia. 15.\nPOLO.\nLakewood's First Team Wins from Kocka\nway, 12 to 13-4 in Dull Contest.\n[BT TELEGRAPH T\u00ab> THE TKinr.VE.l\nI>akewr,od, N. J.. April 30. \u2014 Lakewood's first team\nwon from Rockaway to-day In the second contest\nfor the Herbert polo trophies by the score of 12 to\n~.\\ poals. in a ratber tires - eamo. The Gould\nteam was in admirable form, with an easy au\nvantape in Ppe*-d. while Rockaway })lay\u00ab>d two sub\n}-titut\u00bb men and seemed to miss tli^ enthusiasm and\nslashii \u25a0 play of W. A. Hazard and I*. F. Collier.\nThe teams vent in on a flat handicap basis. The\ncoach Liberty, from New-York, driven by James\nH. Hyde, drew up at the fcore boards In the third\niieriorj The line-up and - core\nj jtkewood 1. Geore* J. Gould. 3: 2. .lay Gould. 3:\n\u2022\u2022 K*\"-iion Gould 4: back, Benjamin Xicoli. \".; team\nhandicap 15 Rocka way\u2014 l. G. G. MeMurtry. 2: 2.\nR La Montagne, Z: 3. F. .=. Conover. :.: back. D. F.\nSavage. 3: team handicap.' 10.^ I ft Rock\nSurrmarv: Plarned R oals-T>akewood. 12: Rock\naway. 2. Penalty of one-quarter goal against Rock\naway for eafetj\". Net score-Lake wood. 12: Rock\n\u00abway. I^. Referee-P. F. <^ollier. Tlmeke.\nE. Taylor.\nDE WITT BREAKS PRINCETON RECORD.\nPuts Shot 44 Feet 2 Inches in Trial at Cale\ndonian Games.\nPrinceton. N. J.. April 30.\u2014 1n to-day's lnterclass\n?ara . . 5r Caledonian trancf. De Witt. '\u00ab*. put 'he\nthat 4:; re\u00ab\u00ab - inches, breaking the Princeton record,\nIn a trial h^ afterward made a put of 41 feet\n2 inches. The winners were:\nOn* -hundred -yard da*h--O. Og> VM J\"^!?,'?^\nTwo-hundred and-twenty-yard dash \u2014 < .K. I urtelL o\u00bb.\n-' . rjn . ..; M. Gol.l.mith. 04 Time OJBH.\nHalf mile run-U M. Adsit. <>i. Time. 2-^BH.\nMile run\u2014 D. Chapln. P. O. Time 4 *.' *\nT^',> tnile rur.\u2014 S. W Knot. .ii Time. IMS\nr,nr-l\"!ndr\u00abd an-i twenty yard burdlei B H. C.ziv..;.\n-\u25a0*\u00ab>n!^ -a: hurdl-^-J. I. Grim**.\n/ ' , r> . n B. Tooker. '06; hefcht. 5 feet\n\u00b0 nunn'np ard Jump-\u00ab. Fox. Jr.. '04; \u00abH\u00abUnc\u00ab. 21\nA. F. DUFFY TO RUN ON SATURDAY.\n|BT TELECKArn TO THE TPfBI NX.I\nWa-h,,, P t^, April *.-At tn- ' '\u25a0\npariate ens\" \u00abli< \u00bb** *\" _ __\nSHARKEY TO WRESTLE FAUST.\n.._ m \" fih\u00dfr will make hi* first appearance in\nthJcTtvl, - wrestler on next Wednesday night.\nthU clt> as a \u00bb at Sul _ er . s Har .\nwhen he Uto meet Al^ Uft d . tWMty . feV e nl i,. fl .\nlem Casino. after the match\nihi'kf^n'To into^tfve training for his bet\nwith \"Jack\" Munros.\nNEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MAT 1. IM3.\nOPENING OF THE BASEBALL SEASON YESTERDAY AT THE NEW AMERICAN LEA OFF GRINDS OH WAaVJ\nINGTON HEIGHTS.\nGOLF.\nTravis Beaten by Reinhart at\nGarden City.\nThe unexpected defeat of Travis by Reinhart, of\nPrinceton, was the notable incident of the play In\nthe Garden City Golf Club's tournament yesterday.\nThe match was a stirring one. from start to finish.\nIt took place In the afternoon after Travis had\nwon the cup in the morning preliminary round, and\nwas followed by a laraje gallery. A year ago in\ntho . -\u0084 tournament Travis beat Reinhart. I up\nand -' to play, but at Morristown, in the autumn,\nReinhart won by 2 up and 1 to play. This was\ntheir first meeting since thai Urn?. Travis appar\nently lacked his usual accuracy, and did not show\nthe power of recovery he had In previous uphill\nfights.\nReinhart played a cl\u00ab\u00bban. careful game through\nout, occasionally dashing;, but for the most part\nh* 1 kept well within himself, especially on the long\nholes. Hp p.i th\u00ab first hole at 4 to 5 and then\nhalved the next three The 266-yard fifth hole was\nwon by i: inhart in 4 to S, and the sixth in a capi\ntal 3. one les-j than bosrfp. Travis needing a stroke\nmore. The seventh and elehth were halved, and.\nthough Travis got th- ninth, the score stood 2 up\nfor Reinhart\nStarting for home, Reinhart increased his lead\nby winning the 'nth at 4to 5. He. abandoned the\neleventh, however, which was approximated for\nTravis in -t, a.ft<r the latter had taken 3 to the\ngrr^n. ttefnhart whs bunkered on his second shot\nto this hole, and decided not to play it out. Th\"\ntwelfth was halved: Travis got the long 600-yard\nthirteenth in 5 to 7. on< better than bogi<\\ and the\nfoi!Tte*>nth w\u00bbnt to Reinhart. After halving the\nnext in , i t>i.-. bogie figure. Reinhart captured the\nsixteenth, anil won by 5 up and 2 to play. The\ncards were:\nTravis 5 3 4 6 & 4 5 5 4 40\nRelnhnrt 4 .\" 4 5 4 3 5 5 ft\u2014 3S\nTravis :. \u00bb4 4 5 5 & 6 <> 3\u2014 43- 83\nRetnhart 4 \u2022'\". 4 \u00bb7 4 S 5 4 \u25a0\u00bb\u2014 43\u2014 Si\n* Approximated.\nIn the same round Carnegie, the St. Andrews\np..;f. r. beat Mallouf, and Kennedy, the New-Jer-\nKey champion, defeated the Boston player. Welling\nton, by 6 up and \u2022\"\u2022 to play. Both the Tale men,\nByers \"and Alsop, won their matches in compara\ntively easy style.\nThe tournament opened in a most successful way\nin the forenoon, and if the promise of the early\nrounds is fulfilled the tournament will prove one\nof the most Interesting of the season. Play is to\ncontinue to-day and to-morrow. The course was\nIn line condition, turf and tees like upholstered\nvelvet. The weather was more, suggestive of July\nthan April, and the eighty-six who started in the\nmorning preliminaries made themselves comfort\nable in cool looking flannels. The sun had hard\nened the ground considerably, and a little rain\novernight would not be unwelcome.\nThe mornlne: v ie devoted entirely to medal piay\nat eighteen holes, the best sixteen qualifying for\nthe President's Tup and th\u00ab second sixteen 'or the\nGarden City Cup. Even with Garden City's bit;\ncourse th\u00ab committee was taxed to keep things\nmoving and to prevent congestion, but the crowd\nwas well handled and no cause for complaint arose.\nThe field was probably the strongest thai has ever\ngat hi red on a metropolitan links, barring the cham\npionships, and before the week ends son-,, good\nscores are expected. The record stands at ~'Z for\nboth professionals and amateurs. \u25a0 Stuart Gardiner\nholding tin former and Walter .1. Travis the latter.\nTravis was one of the most conspicuous players\nyesterday, not only - \" use of past achievements,\nbur because his opponents were quietly sizing him\nup for the approaching metropolitan champion\nships. If the> discovered any weak points in the\nmorning exhibition it was not generally apparent,\nfor Travis did his work with the same force and\nprecision, the same quiet confidence, as ever He\nreturned the best card in the preliminary round and\nwon the gold medal with his score of 7.. His\npartner was \u25a0 '. B. Cory, the Boston golfer, who\nfailed to make the first division, qualifying with\nthe second pet at SO.\nf'ollepe men figured strongly, the Tale and\nPrinceton players coming in for more than a share\nof honors Among them were F. O. Reinhart. J. W.\nBaker V. J. Sloan, Percy P>\"ne, 2d, and Murray\nOlyphant of the Princeton 'varsity team, and L.\nM. Richmond. V. J- O. Also;.. .1. F. Byers and\nStewart Campbell, of Yale. N. Maliouf. the Cor\nnell golfer was another conspicuous figure of the\nyounger set Mallouf knows the Garden City links\nprobably as well as Travis himself, and. In fact,\nhe was only five strokes behind Travis in the pre\nliminary round his Bcore of tying for second\nplace. Travis's card of 77 was:\n011 , 5 3 4 \u00ab 4 4 4 4 3 M\nln ;;;;;;;;; ; 4 .-. 4 \u00ab 4 4 \u00ab 5 3\u2014 41\u2014 71\nThose who qualified for the first, or president's,\ncup were:\nOut. In. Total.\nW. J. Travis Garden City \" ! \"' 41 77\nN Maliouf.' Cornell .. 41 41 *-\nF. .i Reinhart ITlncfcton \u00bb \u00ab *-\nA. M. Bobbins. St. Andrew's 41 44 \u00a3.\nI>. M. Richmond. Vale 4 J 4. 5\nF. J. O. AISOP. Vale \u2022\u25a0-. 45 41 M\n\\V. \u25a0\u2022 \u2022\u2022arn.cip. Anareu s 43 43 *5\n.1 w. Bak'-r. Princeton \u00ab \u00ab BT\nA N. K. nn,-,.i..y. XiomcUtr \u00ab g \u00ab\nh; G.HartweU, St. Paul's \u00ab 44 8.\nJ.F. : Byers/ Tale \u00ab \u00ab\nF. 3. Sloan. rrin.-'o:i \u25a0}\u2022\u2022 ** \u00a3\nT-. it. Pyne. 2d. Princeton 44 44\n11. .T. T\\ellin S tnn. Oakley 41 4. |\u00a3\nB. S Knaip. Westbrook \u00a3 \u00a3 ?f\nE. A. Freeman.\" Montclair 4 r > *- *> 8\nThose who qualified for the second cup were:\nOut. In. Total.\nG. T .-.\u25a0..- Oakley ~S V- |*\nMurray Oiyphait. i'rlnretor. *-\u00bb *\"\nDevereaux Bmmet> Garden cnty \u00ab 45 w\nli li. Robertson. Si Andrew s \u25a0>> \u00ab J\nr^^^. l^^ 1nty::::::::::1 nty:::::::::: 1 I I\nG s B. ( Vtv. ( lakley f. *Z H\nStewart Campbell. Yale \\\\ V> '\nG T Broka Wnceton ** *\u00ab li,\nW. i.. Hick Nassau:.:.- \u00ab 4S . 5\nI c^^Meai^::::^\u00ab ;\u25a0 S\nMeadow:::::: - - \u00ab\nThe summary of the afternoon match play fol\nlows:\n\u25a0r. i^\u00ab.,\u00bb- (~.ir, (fir\u00abt mnnd) J W. Baker. Frlncetm.\n-<\u25a0 ,B A Free-lan Mont, -lair, by 1 u P ; F. 6. Reinhart.\nVr'l-^f.r' ie^T Waiter J. Travis. Uarden \u00ab'ity. by S up\nPrinceton, oeai ta rnecie. .St. Andrews, b-at N.\n-. Allan N. Kenoa\ndlt vlr p!l -7ir l,fat H. J. Wellincton. Oakley, by^6 UP\n\u00abS ' m \u0084;\u2022 EgE g Knapp. Wegtbrook. beat F. J.\nSlSw Frinrelor by I up In 20 hole*: Percy .R-^PJ\u2122\n\u00bbi Mn \u2122Vw' H <:\u2022 Hart Well St. Paul> School.\n. . , -.v.^ H !. *hin\u00ab Oardea City.\nhg&gPl \\! le MbsK>^cM bs K>^c^ d 4 to ptaj t J. O.\n. \u25a0 >-hn,^i Tah b, 4 up an.3\n:,,\u201e rw\u00dfdl -U H. OonW i I juljaai\n. i - t .. \\ - i up in !\u00bb no es; I\u2022\u25a0\n. , -illirl.i llirl .- i. Tappin. W,\n,!av. ... W Buttt aat B H\nRnWeriwnn =| Andrew's by 7 up -\u00bbnd (. to p!a> : N. )>.\n!-Nmt\".e' V-le \"*at (J f 'Wl'.lr-. Oakley Country Club,\nbeat W. U. HlckaT- Nassau Country Club/by Z_up _***\u00a3\nid nla- li-o-if T Brokaw, Princeton, beat ( hwriet. b.\n' ii,*^r\u00ab'\nRhett <-r\".-ent A. r. ..:\u2022\u2022,.\u2022)'\u2022 n\" Jr.. I itthburr.\nby 2:u P :Tm. Olyphint. Princeton. eat Ja.-r-r I->-nch.\nLakewrrf.j by l up in 10 haf.\nw^'oc?;r^ t Vn/^ten r^n i t\nt^^r nt 'r,:z^w.ir^t^ t ;o\n\u25a0 aw\nmt*t in a special match.\ni PROGRAMME FOR WATER CARNIVAL.\nThe New-York Rowing nubs have announced th\u00ab\n\u25a0rhedule of their water carnival to be held on May\nri *; fnl.ows: At U> \u00ab\u2022 m . ,in R l\u2014 \u00bb shelL. double\nscuil ,IkUs. centipedes, four oared shells and Hrtt\noared shells, and at 3 p. m.. four oared barge-, six\n\\ will be 'from T^n.'x-ave. bridge to Sherm\u00dfns .reek\nand return.\n~\u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014\nH\u00abH<-hnll To-d\u00bbj. .T::SO P. M.\nGreater WjTW^\nL\u00aba|iue. All * I \" ate \u00a3 h A? UI A %,nue Sixth Avenue and\nKSE3SSSSS -r^^r^to *- \u00abr.\u00abn da. ,\u00ab,\u201e\nStreet and Broadway.\nFORM PLAYERS' DISMAY.\nFAVORITES ABE BEATEX.\nFive Lose at Jar\\aica \u2014 Africander's\nFirst A ppcara 11 cc.\nThe wave of prosperity, on the crest of which\nthe horse racing students have been riding with\nconsiderable buoyancy this spring, receded yester\nday with a precipitation that left many a wreck\nstranded on the, sands of Jamaica. Information\nthat did not inform, eliminations that failed to\neliminate, and equine material that did not ma\nterialize, may be set down as contributing causes.\nThe students could have forgotten with profit all\nthey knew in at least four out of ---ix of th\u00ab after\nnoon's rare?. A cooling breath from the sea\nstirred pleasantly beneath the rafters of the crand\nstand and kept down what might have been, with\nthe numerous sudden shocks, a dangerously high\ntemperature.\nThe Fulton Stake-, for three-year-oldp. at one\nmile and seventy yards, afforded the public its\nfirst opportunity this year of seeing Africander,\nth\u00ab Star Ruby colt that Charles Dwjrer Is said to\nhave refused SS.OM for. in a race Africander was\none of eight contestants, and. although he was \u2022\u0084'\u2022'\nvictorious, his performance\u2014 or one part of it. at\nleast\u2014 was sufficiently impressive to warrant the\nfame be has attained. Opposed to the Star Ruby\ncolt were John W. Sfhorrs Rightful. Frank Far\nrell's Colonist, J. Dunbar'n Mir- Dorothy. i\" J.\nLantry'B Dr. Savior. H. T. Griffin's Embarrass\nment. John A. Kyle's Ahumada and Mr?. M. C.\nT.yle's Pageant.\nWith the exception of Pageant, who whirled, and\nwhs practically left at the post, each of these con\ntestants at some state in the journey pave their\nsupporters at least a momentary vision of wealth.\nRightful made the running, but it looked as though\nhe were doing it on sufferance, and could be over\nhauled at any time. Each attempt, to do so, how\never, proved futile. First Ahumr.da. winner of the\nCarter, essayed It. and ran for two furlongs lapped\nside by side with the leader, in the backstretch\nMiss Dorothy responded to little- Martin's call and\nran up to Rirrhtful's throatlatch almost long\nenough to have her photograph taken with a rapid\nshutter. When she retired. Dr. Saylnr took her\nplace and at the head of the stretch it \u2022> oked an\nthough he had the. .race won. All this time\nAfricander had been running back with Pageant\nand Shaw's repeated attempts to rouse him !-r> ha<i\nbeen in vain. He had been quite forgotten in fact\nas a factor in the race until the last sixteenth, when\nhe came through his field with a magnificent burs:\nof speed, and. passing Colonist and Dr. Say.'or, ai\nmost caught Rightful under the wire. The time\nwas 1.48 2-6. Africander was the favorite for the\nFulton, with Dr. Baylor second choice.\nThe first favorite to he bowled over was Wax\nC.mule In the first race, a selling affair at six fur\nlongs. Fifteen selling platers ran. and Wax Candle\nwas so jostled about between them that his chances\nwore lost In the first furlong. Blue and Orange,\nvigorously ridden by Burns, had little difficulty In\nwinning :rom Star and Garter and Lord Turco. In\nthe Highwelght Handicap, at five and one-half fur\nlongs. Tim D.. jr.. owned by P. H. Sullivan, almost\nproved the second 100 to 1 shi>t oi the year. He\nwas leading all the way to within a hundred yards\n\u2022\u25a0f the wire an'\". the grandstand was on the verge\nof heart failure when Hoar brought Armeath up\nfrom fourth place In time to win in a rousing\nfinish. The 134 pounds was too much of a burden\nfor Cinquevalli, th> favorite, and he finished a\nrather poor third to Tim D.. Ir.\nMolinos, at 7 to 10. was the only first choice of\nthe afternoon to win. He came from fifth piao\nat the turn leading into the homestretch and gal\nloped away from his company. August Belmonfs\nTorchlight, winner of a selling race at three\nquarters of a mile, was bid up by \"Father Bill\"\nDaly to $2,00& and at that price Mr. Belmont let\nhis lil!y go Irene and Mrs. Bessie Fullum. neither\nof whom has been schooled at the barrier, whirled\nin the last race for maiden two-year-olds and were\nleft standing. Mimon won from To San and Temple\n,T , the favorite.\nSUMMARIES.\nFIRST RACE \u2014 Selling; 3 years and over; 6 furlong*.\nBetting.\nSt. pi.\nJam\u00bb\u00ab McLaiifthlin's b. <\u2022 Blue and\nOrange, by Fitz James\u2014 Tetal 11. 10$..\n(Burn\u00ab\u00bb 1 5\u20145 \u2014 2 \u2014 t\nStar and Garter, SK (M<-<~afrerty> 2 2O\u2014 l 7-1\nLord Turco. 108 (Shaw) 3 \u2014 1 \u00ab\u2014 5\nPetit Bleu. 90 <ConnellV 30 to 1 and 1O to 1: Rostand.\n10\u00ab hrar.l. H> to 1 and 4 to 1 : Blue Jay, 07 iFarley>.\n300 to 1 and 109 to I; Wax < 'ar.dle. 114 (Martini. 7 to 2\nan.! S to .\"\u25a0: Russell Garth. W < Henderson*, 300 to 1 and\n100 to I: Ro\u00ab\u00abpwater. '.*> tCallahar.i. 10 to 1 and 4 to 1:\nScoffer. 100. (Michaels). :\u25a0.\" to I and 12 to 1: B. Doyle. 11^\n(Bullmani. 40 to I an.l IB to 1: RinKdove. 98 <Haa.-k>. \u00ab>\nto i and 20 to i; Afnflrose. \u00ab*\u00ab Uooes). 200 to 1 and 60 to\n1: Ocean Dream. l\".\". tDaiyi. 7 t<. 1 and 3 to 1. and\nBobbinet 01 iffamrrt, 50 to 1 and 20 to 1. also ran.\nStart Rood. Driving by V.-2 lenstha Time. l:14 2 r..\nSECOND RACE\u2014 Hlghwelght handicap: 3 years and\nov?r; StS furlongs.\nFrank Fan-ell's dl h. Armeath. by En\nthusiast or Athellng\u2014 Mill Cor. 5. 13ti .\nrHoaii t \u2014 1 2\u2014l2 \u2014 I\nTim D.. ir.. 4. 121 \u2022Mi.-haels. 2 100- 1 3J\u2014 1\nClnqu\u00abvaJH. ::. 134 <Bullman>.. -1 I\u2014l\nWealth. 5. 136 lOdom). 4 to 1 and \u2022.' '\u2022> 1: Orloff. 3. 124\n(Burnsi 15 to 1 and 6 to I; Tommy Foster. 4. 130\n(O'Neill < 12 to 1 and 4to 1: Eloim. C (Robertson*. l\"\u00bb\nto I and 6 to 1: Bchoharta. 4, 12S rUrwia). 3 to 2 and even:\nMaman. 3 129 (Rice.. << to 1 an,! 3 to 1- Chicle .3. 119\n<roch-an> 25 to l and 10 Ie 1 : Ondur.iis, 6, 1\u00bb (Martin),\n\u2022JO tn l and <* to 1. and Neither (>ne. 4. 121 .McCl.\u00abky>.\n&t to 1 ar.l 12 to 1. also ran. Start *'\u2022\u2022 Driving by a\nlength. Time. 1:OSS.\nTHIRr> RACE- 2-year-olds: 5 rarleosa\nJohn W. Schorr's b. c. Molinos. by tea\n\"11 -Madame Hindoo. 115 i\u00dfunntkni \u00bb\u2014 lO 1\u2014 \\\nHigh Ball, 105 \u25a0\u25a0'-\u2022\u25a0-' 2 15\u201411 3-1\nHarelwood. 115 (Shawl \u25a0\u25a0 .\u20142 I\u2014l\nTim Favne. 105 (Cochran*. 40 to Uar.d 7 to 1: Flae\n!\u00abafr m 105 \u00abPonak>. 20c> to 1 and 4n to i : carel-ss. 105\n(Gannon) 10 to 1 and 3 to 1. and Graalalio 110 fOdom),\n4 to 1 and even, als\u00ab ran. Start jrnoJ. Driving by a\nh<-a. J , Time. 1:01 S.\nFOI'RTH RAf*R\u2014 THE FUI.TON STAKE?: I year-olds;\n1 mile ani 70 yards.\nJohn W. Pohorrf eh. e.j Rightful, by\nPirate of ponzance \u2014 Early Morn, in\ni\u00df'iUman 1 4-1 7\u2014 5\nAfricander. 118 (Shaw) 3 B\u2014l I\u2014l\nColonist, 101 (Gannon) jS Ij\u2014 l *- 1\nDr -\u0084-. lor 111 \u25a0Burn?'. 9 to .\". md 7 \u2022\u25a0\u2022 10; Ahumada.\n111 d.e~'i;\" h to 1 and \u2022\"\u2022 to 2: Rmb*rra\u00bb\u00bbn>\u00abit. 1\"1\n(Wilkersoni.' 28 to 1 and l\" to 1; Mil Dorothy. M (Mar\ntini \u2022\u00bb \u2022\u0084 1 and 3 to I. and Paeeanf. loi titt\u00abimj), -\u2022\"\u2022 t'\u00bb\n1 and 8 to 1. also ran. Start poor. Drtvlti\u00df by a\nlength. Time. 1 .*\u2022\u25a0'\u25a0\nFIFTH RACE!\u2014 Selling; 3 ' \u25a0\u25a0* and over; 0 furlonp.\nVua-osi Beimonts eh. ' Torchlight, by\nHenry of Navar.-e\u2014 Rushlijcht. 4. 112..\n(Bi.m\u00ab> 1 \u00bb\u2014 :- 1\np-rie \u2022? M (Dpsouiai 2 12 \u2014 1 41\nIvernlaV 4. VIS.'..\". (ISoie^n.3 1.'.-l rt- I\nMhany Girl \u2022'- M ij.-.nes). 2O to 1 and 8 to 1 ; Pistrr\nJuliet. 4. |08 (Michaels, 9to 5 and 4\u00abn :.. Agnes. D \u2022\">. 11,\n(Martin.. 12 to 1 ard ;. to I: San Antlrea, S 1-. .Oeam.r).\ntio to 1 *rKI 20 t<> 1: <\"ranerv.U^. .'',. \u2022\u25a0>> (( allahai \u00ab *\u2022> I\nand \"to 1- Julia Jur.hlr.. 103 .R\u00abld!nctom. SO to 1 an-1\nlit to 1- UMCben. 4. 10* (CKhran. 1U to 1 ani 12 l\" 1.\nand Fesrl Diver. 3 rMcdfTerty), \u00bb\u2022 to l and 7 to 1. also\nran. Matt fair. Driving by '* lenctn. Tim* 1:14*\u00bb.\nsixth RAt'E\u2014 2-y\u00bbar-ol'\u00bb!': 4 * furlop**.\nFrank F<irr\u00bbiif. eh. I Mimon. 1y . Ben _\n*r.n.. -S-ei th. Water. 112 ;lV\u00abr.l \u2022'\u00ab -1 T-i\u00ab\nTo San. ,i-\u00bb <Bu mar.. 2 +-1 j-S\nTe-s^l ' i- \u2022\u00ab\u25a0-\u2022\u2022\u2014 : ; *-- '--\nAM r-,ior\u00ab '\u2022- i<ianr.cn\u00bb. 7 to 2 and c, to 5; Mr*. Bensie\nFi'l'nm 11\u00b0 .Cocrrant. 4\" to 1 and \u25a0\u2022' to 1. \u00abno \u2022'\u2666\u2022\"\u2022\nJ^TTuj <Odons., 12 io i and 4 to 1. alf> \".*\u25a0 Start\nhad. 'prtvins by t'\u00bb tonstlu Time. .cS.-,*,.\nJAMAICA ENTRIES FOR TO-DAY.\nFIRST RAi'K tW\u00ab ;-er Ms. \u00ab\u00bbl!ir,|t. with |700\n\u25a0MaA \u25a0*!*\u25a0 furlonir\n.-._, vi \u2022\u2022 Name \u2022 Wt.\nBru^v.ll. Mff'.WtontWater W\n\u00bbi,.., a SO .-vniphnnj- \u00bb*\nExtralaw B7 ilo,.rh\u00abn \u00bb*\nIxiwcut - *\u2022, ,\nSECOND RACE\u2014 For thre#-year-cHs; handicap; with\nJSOO added. Six furlongs.\nSaecharemeter 124 ] Capti%-ator 112\nStamping Ground Plttaena til\nIllyrla ll\u00bb|Beoffer 11l\nruturlta 114!Gavlota \u2014 i\u00a9\u00bb\nTHIRD RACE\u2014 THE NfTftTOWN STAKES: for three\nrear-olds and upward, upline: with JI.OOO added.\nSix furlonjf!>.\nCameron 120, AaeaaaAn ._ '**\nDemurrer 120) Minota \u00bb- \u2022*\nThe Musketeer 116!\nFOURTH RACE\u2014 For fillies, two years aM: with $700\nadded. Four and one-half furlongs.\nJulia M 114lSterlln? Belle 103\nContentious Mt\u00dff Shylock 1\"2\nMordella n>*i Australina 1\"2\nOriza 10ti'(.*yprlenn\u00ab '\u00b0-\nGrecian MaM Ml\nFIFTH RACE\u2014 For three-year-olds and upward; selling;\nwith MM added. One mile and seventy yards.\nWild Pirate H'SExamlner I\"\nH. U. Coleman 10*! Ernest Parham 1\"1\nTribes Hill r ..10J ! Barbara Frietcaie '\u25a0*>\nKingralne l\u00abW!(; r aden \u00b0\"\nEarly Eve lo4,rolone>ay \u2022*\u2666\nNorthbrook 104, Past 91\nsi.XTrl RACE\u2014 For maiden three-year-olds and upward;\nwith $700 added. Six fllllama\nFrank Keane 115 (Mart Mullen IIP\nSamaden 115. Black Hussar 110\nTaps 114 Son Shower HO\nBarrow USl\u00dfavelment 110\nHome Signal 1 12 i Crua'han 11*\nCinch 112' St .(ill* 107\nMnii\u00ab I>\u00bbar It2jTh\u00ab Ouardsman 10.\nErdenla 110! Catch Me -I l *\nSi- Roache 110!Sontag g\nUoyal Pirate lio-ivnftta 105\nTact . UOiLady Knighthood 105\nTWO HORSES KILLED AT KINLOCH.\nSI I,ouis, April 30.\u2014 In th\u00bb second rac\u00bb Fridolln,\nthe favorite, and \\V.,.-..i.<;tir-k ran into one another\non th*> stretch turn. Both horses went down and\nwere m badly injured they were killed. Their riders\nescaped unhurt. Th\u00ab summary:\nFirst race ifour and one-half furlongs: purs\u00ab) \u2014 Lang\nford James 118 (D. Hal!'. 3 to 2. won: Don O'Hish.\nUK (Dale). 17 to 5. second; i>u\u00ab Heidorn. 11* (J. Bo\nland). 11 to JO. third. Time. rt:r\u00bbr.\u00bbj. Rowland M. al\u00ab>\nran.\nSecond race (one mile an 1 a sixteenth) \u2014 Socapa. 10.\niHtggins). 15 to 1, won; First One. ICO \"'. B\"nner\u00bb, 7 tc\n1 pecond- Or. Hart. IPS (HeideH. 7 to 2. third. Time,\nl:4Sk. CrutehfieM. Hallucination, Ledaea. King's Pet.\nVamer and Fickle Saint aI\u00abA ran. Frido'.tn and Wood-\nBttch fell.\nThird race (seven '\"happaqua, 108 if\nHalb 2 to 1. won: Reducer. 103 (Karl). S to 1. second;\nBon Lear. 88 (Bridwell). 4 to 1. third. Time. I:2S>.\nGlendon. B ti:. llee, Herodes and Kiss Quick also ran.\nRider fell from On the Quiet.\nF.urth race (one mile and a sixteenth; Goodwood\nStake?.\u2014 South Breeze. 104 CD Hall). I to 1. won; Scor\ntic '.\u2022:. .\\v H Wood) 1* to I, second; Kaffir. 1\"\u00bb\". <Brtd\nwell) 4 to 1. third. 'Time. l :4S Audlphone. i-nintlock.\nI>en Chance. Edpardo and Crimean also ran.\nFifth race iona mile and a sixteenth i\u2014?Jono\u00df.i \u2014 ?Jono\u00df. 1\u00ab\u00bb\n(HriJwell) .'. to 2. won: Mary Moore, 100 fS. Johnson).\n23 to 1 second: Free Pass, l'io \u00abD. Ha!l.\u00ab. 9 to I. third.\nTim' 1:49. Dawson. False, Atheola. Countess Clara\nand joe Doughty also ran. Aimless lost bridle at start\nand stepped.\nSixth race (one mlie and a sixteenth) Albert F. Dewy.\nlif. ID Hall). i\u00bb to 2. won; Kenova. !\u2022\u00bb (I* Spencer).\n1<; to 5 second: DnMooa, 1<\u00bb1 (T. Dear). 3 to 2. third.\nTime. i:47S. Submarine. Prtnce Richard and W. B.\n<;ate\u00ab also ran.\nRESULTS AT WORTH.\nFirst race (four furlongsV\u2014 Pocassat. US (Majniat, 7 to\n1 won- Interrogation. 110 fDomtnk*>. .1 to 1. second:\nShades' of Night. IH> (D. Head). 4to 1. third Time,\n0:M. Cassie Schaler, Away Right. Crcppi* and Hindiien*\nB 'second race \u00absix furlor.^)\u2014 Tayon. 112 (Domlnick).\noven won- OHa\u00aben. 105 i Henry i. 4 to 1, second: Double\nO S7 ii Booker) 3\u00bb to 1. third. Tim*. 1:1\u00bb. Doeskin.\nMarco. Vulcain. Play Ilk- and Amlrante also ran.\nTh'rd race (>ne miie\u00bb\u2014 Ahola. I.C (C K-!ly). 6 to 5.\nwon- Prodigal Son 1\"7 i.I Walsh). 4 to 1. second.\n'ngelee 10S fDomlnick). !> to 5. third. Time. .1:49.\nrttM , D orr. Ch miran^%\u00b0eveS.v ,ards>-C. \u00ab._>\u00ab!\n. f, \u0084v. , x Hal. \u2022 \u2022 ! \u2022 \u2022: Alhola. 100 \u0084T. Waiah'.\n;. S . - B t.. 1. thtrd\n107\n/cw-'ialr) I to 2 WOO: ? alto - HO rHenryV 13 \u25a0'\u2022 5. \u00bb\u2022\u25a0- -\n,nd Elle 104 (iV'rkenruth). 25 to 1. third. Time l : Oft V\nTime i:S Miss U\u00bb. Ceylon. Zonne. Branch and\nMarion I.vnch also ran.\nNEW STABLES FOR CHARLES REED.\nfBT TELE'-.RArH TO THE TRIBtNK. ]\nSaratoga, N. T.. April SO.-Oharles Reed, the turf\nman to-day purchased a plot of land In Xelaon\nave.! and will at once erect a number of stable*.\nTne property adjoins the racing quarters of ex-\nCongressman John Sanford and is near the run\nning park Of the Saratoga Racing Association.\nVANDERBILT HORSES RUN BADLY.\nPart?. April 30.\u2014 At the Bois de Boulogne meeting\nto-day \"W. K. Vanderbilfs Marigold ran third In th^\nrace for the Prix Fould. his Alpha was third In th*\u00bb\ncontest for the Prix Rochftte. and Edna, also Mr.\nVanderbilfs property, was fourth in the running\nfor the Prix de i'Arc de Triomphe\nPETITIONS IN BANKRUPTCY.\nThe following petitions in bankruptcy were filed\nyesterday la the clerks office of the United States\nDistrict Court:\nSchedules were filed by Hermann Vossnack. jr. an *\ncrealt'r \\* JVIAVB DALHCT. showing Uabitles of\nSSSO V>. and assets of $13 M. The principal creJltor, are\n*MS=rick Lumber Company. lone Island City. *\u2022-\u2022'\u2022 and\nII F McGee & Co.. Jersey City. Bit\n\\-, irvo'untary petition was nted against max\nVRXNKFI/ and SIMON RO?EXBI^TT. trading as\nFrankel * : Rn^nblati. tio. 21 East Eighth-st. Th\u00ab r\u00bbn\n\u2022 - ?. i creditors are Max W. Rosenbaum. *442: The\nWo-lf \u00abT.'n gin\u00ab [company. *13\u00ab: Holland &. Webb. $12?*\nL-u's E Bin\"'\" \u00bbai. appointed temp. -rary receiver with\n; \u2022 ~^^^\nMul^rn-s' his 53 \u25a0*\u25a0 fixed at -*'\nJUDGMENTS.\nTh\" following judgments for over $K\u00bb were filed\nYesterday the flr;=t name being that of the debtor:\n... . S\nfur^ard^ John-O I.indenm.yer and another.... J>\u00bb\n( L S % \"m a n Wn\u00ab-^\u00abU k - Ml.* \u2022M\n!; a !i- r^'t.V-W h' H^ksand anther 131\nliwvr Uu\" M- 1. S.n-heimer ani father \u00abrt\n\\\\*\\. \u25a0 ' LVancolse-J H Carver. e X e\u00abitor 27\u00ab\nmmmm^ 1\nn?Fsf f l' V; exe.\u00bbtr, .-:-.% U DarW. <-.-st*. .. \u0084..\nMl\n\\l'-'v\n'. \u2022\nC:\u00bbT*'IJ Freedmar I.MJ\nMorrK':. j'h.lup-fi I>Onm 2W\nKah^owitz Morns- Th.rea-I Agency V*\nVuSaZ'3 >!ontgon,er>-C Uonyn^ 2*\n-mitr Will am r.-W D <'\u201e> \u25a0 5.^\nf-ieeert. tMhtucm tTPonolw Cog\u00bb\u00bb \u00ab'omae IK\n\u2022r \u00bbiH*rt* lit a^e E \u2014 *3 Gr\u00bb^ en \u0084 - - IBi\nTucker William v. an,l Mai H-Fpurreenth\nTrfe tr Moro! I n'\u00ab' -Tournai' AMOcUtion- -F\u00bb >i ' Brandt'. 1 1!.\nTexss'oiV Dwv^aaeat Company -S Gander 7.1>7\nThe i* n \u00ab \u00ab'urlo<\u00abitv Company\u2014 A MrKennr \u00bbJ\nMetropolitan Street Railway Company\u2014 A HennlnS \u00bb\u00bbt\nRan*\u2014 M L. Orave\u00ab. rost\u00ab \u2022\u00ab\n-*P4e- Kiverfi.le PtabJe. Pamptnv. ro\u00abts.. \u00ab*\nManhattan r-,:!\u00bb\u00ab, Company -J hit*. C 0.t\u00bb.... 11*\nSHAMROCKS NEW 3IAS7 STEPPED.\nHer First Spin Under Her Hew Big Fixed\nfor May 5.\nGlasgow. April 30.\u2014 Shamrock Ill's r\\\u00bbvt r-..i\u00ab\n\u2022was stepped to-day and her boom was Klnti\nThe new Raff is expected to be reniy to-mnr\nrow. The yacht's cbainplates have be\u00bbn\nstrenarthened. The Cup etttaaamjar'a new sails\nleave Coves to-day and win arrive at th\u00bb Den\nnys' yard to-morroTr. The yacht's flrnt spin\nunder her new ris Is provisJonally ftx\u00abl for\nMay .V\nThe reports published r^cnrdinic the al>c\u00ab\"l\nenlar.srerr.ent of the ?a:T \u25a0plan of Shamrccfc 111\nare unfounded. Her \u00bbpar\u00ab and enn-.-as ar\u00ab* ex\nactly as before the >a<h was dismasfe.l off\nWeymouth.\nRELIANCE SAILS FROM ITEWPOBT\nComes Into Race Under Her Own Sail-\nSighted at Fisher's Island.\nXaw-Loodon. <v.nn.. April 30.-f-BcatM4 .<f \u00bb wrjokT\nhaze which hum nv^r I\u00bbn\u00ab Isl.ird SV-im-1 this \u00bbf\ntcmoon th Rf-ilanc. which pafs^l throneh tb#\nRace on her way to NVw-Riwh*-!!* shorf^v t<#fnre S\no'clodt t'ni? afternoon, actording \u00bb\u25a0> \u2022bMTHn at\nFisher's Islan'!. l>a<l rot b^^n siKrit^d from th*\nConnecticut shore up to \u00ab o'clock. Th>\u00bb yacht h^<i \u25a0\n(rood sailing i>rf\"X^ Kolnir rns* KishT's I\u00ablanfi and\nthrough th* Fiacc. but th\u00bb-r* was ten wlr.fi within\nth* Sounri. at l\u00bbast along th\u00bb north*rn *her*. The\nsea was \u00abrnooth. and M was thotizhr that even\nshould th* wind fall her she would corsttr.'i* on\nher way down the Sound Ii tow cf h<>r tsnder. th\u00ab\nSunbeam.\nTh* Reiiance s\u00aball\u00bbd this rnornins from Newport\nfor New-Rochelle. X. V.. where she will spend two\nor three weeks tuning up. The wind waa so USM\n*ar!y in the day that It was thmjKht the yacht\nwould havo to be towed, but about 9 o'clock a\nfreshening: breeze from th* southward enabled her\nto start under sail She was followed by the t*3der\nSunbeam and a large steam yacht.\nCOLUMBIA TO SAIL WEST TO-DAY.\nlarnuman TO th? TUMCTS.]\nNewport. R. 1.. April 3*).\u2014 Th\u00ab yacht U mbJa>\narrived her- this afternoon from Bristol and\npicked tp th* moorinc? of th* \"\"onstltutton In th\u00ab\nBrentons rm\u00bb Th* >-acht wiil sail to the wait\nward to-morrow. wh#r\u00bb '* i\u00bb *xpe>:t a d ther* will\nb\u00ab a serifs of turt'nsr \u00bbr> rac*s b*rwe*n the la\u00bbt\ndefender of th* America's Orjp and th* Rellanca.\nBREAK MILITARY RECORD AT SHOW.\nHalf Mile Surpassed and Quarter Equalled\n\u2014 Sailors Appear in Force.\nThere was on* military r*cord broken and an\nothT equaile.) in th* athl*tic contests at th\u00bb 3Cll\ntarj- Show last evening. In th* half axil* rod* far\nthe military championship H. V. Valentin*, <ot th%\n23d Regiment. w>n th*. contest and broke th* rec\nord for th* distance In 2*S. The old time was held\nby M W. !<>-\u00bb. of th\u00bb same regiment, and \u00abv\n2:103-6. In the garter mil- run for the- military\nchampionship H. L.. HSllmari. of the 13th R<t\u00ablmant.\nequalled th* r*cord tin* for the distance.\nTh\u00ab ah'etir- cont*st? for th\u00bb\u00bb military chamsten\nship resulted as follows:\nEi*ht-hundr\u00bb^- *n\u00abl--et\u00dfi\u00abls ya-1 Tin \u2014 VTya by H. T.\nValentin*. 3d ReKim^r.t: J. Joyc*. \u00bbJh n\u00bbirlm*nt. aai'Maa:\nW. B. Grady. 23rl R\"\u00ab!rr- ESisln*\u00bbrs. tMr<i. Ttm*. 20^.\nFour ' '\nman. I3th R\u00bbsrim\u00abTit H\u00bbavv Arrl!>Ty: W. S. V'.war-ia. 2Ssl\nF:, rr,,-. Basil \u2022- r\u00ab. wml; 11. A. s\u00bb<*l\u00bbr. Jr.. \u25a0 R*\u00abl\naaaM third. Ttm*. < \u2022\"\u25a0'\nTuff \u00abf \u00bbar \u2014 V.'en by th* l\u00bbr Nural Ba'taT'.on frmn t?)\u00ab\ni:;th Regimont F'-i.-- \"Artill*r\u00bb \u2022>-. \u2022 lnrh\u00bb!\u00bb\nOn*- hundred yard Jash\u2014 Wnn by P. j. \\V%,*h. --\u25a0* TUgU\nm\u00bbnt Er/Kln\u00ab\u00bbrs: W. P. FJlwari\". Ttt r.\u00bbK\\vr\u00bb-\\r .---\u2022.\n? -.\"i J C r*B.i*><iT 22d H\u00bbe!m\u00bbnt ETi\u00ab!r.\"*n>. th'r^. Time.\n\u2022 :!<>*\u00bb.\nMUTINY ON RECEIVING SHIP\nOfficer of the Wabash Assaulted ScoTes of\nMen in Irons.\n. .. #-\nBoston. April 3f>.\u2014 Between seventy an\u00abl ei\u00ab*irr\nra*n are In double irons to-day on th* T'nit*^ Srat's\nprison ship Southern, at the f'harlestnn Xitt Tsrd.\na* the result of a mutinous riot wh'eh \u2022;\u2022\u00bb\u2022\u2022\nlast nleht on the receiving ship Wcbash. \u2022 >n- \"f\nthe officers was assau!t\u00ab-d. Th<\u00bb n)*n hay\u00bb !i.\u00bb*n\nsentenced to fire days\" imprisonment on bread sn.i\nwater.\nARRIVALS OF BUYERS.\nI>ir\u00bb\u00bb Pnneroy * st\u00bbwart. R<\u00bba<linr. F\u00bbrrn : TT\u00bbi-r\nE!\u00bbr.b\u00bbrtr. notion*. so. 2 Walker-* _-\nWalker Proth*r* T.Tyjc>\u00ab*\u00bb fv.mranr. Palt T.a)c- r !tt.\nt'taV B V Shell. fJr?iro<..Js. No. 47 Li<rp^7iar<l-st.\nCharles sef?ls, I.as _-ma. N. M . H. Luriii*t:n. r>ir\nnitur* Furn'tur* Kyhanir*. No -- I.\u00abx:na\" m-ave\nTiid'-n Ihurh\u00bbr '\"\"\u2022npanr. Provider)*\"*. R. I.: P. <T.\nH\u00bba-ne \"furritur-. Furnitur* Exoharjte.\nPrentice. Bufaio: \u25a0WiUlara IT. Pr\u00bbntt<-\u00bb. frirr.'.tur*\nFurniture Exchar:*\u00ab>. _\"'?\nJohn Ma?ui-e Albany, furniture. Fan \u2014 E*rt>\u00abCKe-\nF. E. Gray. Park {'.!!\u00ab'. S. .'\u25a0. fumtt '\u2022 Fumirur*\nExchanic*.\nRaymond & Son. \\'<>rw\u00bbik Conn- ; <\">\"-*\u2022 H. Rai lima*.\nfurr.itur-. F^jnitur\" Exchange.\nMrs. \u2022' W. Hunt. Altoona. Perm.. f>trnt\".ir\u00bb. F'lrnitar*\nI?.**LoT-\u00bbnstcln. FT.berrn. V. J.. furtrar*. Furnitu-*\n\u2022_-,\u00bb-.-\u25a0 :t- - \u00bb_..-\u2022 i-< : \u2022 -^\nWUltarr' \"\u2022!--\u2022 S'luth Rtrcr. X. 3.. \"'\u2022\" \u2022\"* **\u25a0\"\"\"\nn!tun> E3*-nansr<\\ _ _ _\nXT. 11. Van T'T' rittsburr. rumitur*. Fumtmr* Y.x\n\u00b0 M^'ris Cohn. Newark. N*. J.. furriitur* Fumifur* ~\nrhanir*.\nBicycles.\nFor the balance of this week we will\noffer to prospective purchasers of\nbicycles the best bicycle bargains\never offered.\n1903 Victors, complete with coaster\nbrake, $25.00.\nA special line of Spalding, Cleveland.\nColumbia, Tribune, Monarch,\nCrescent and Rambler Chain and\nChainless at very low prices.\nJUVENILE BICYCLES. There\nis no Juvenile Bicycle that has the\nstanding that the Spalding has.\nFitted with Hartford tires, at\n$17.50. $10.50. f22.50.f 22.50.\nSpecial attention to mail orders.\nA. G. Spalding & Bros-\nLi-q^St Manu?actui\u00abr\u00bb in !h\u00ab World el\nAthletic Supputs.\n128-12% v TWO . \u2022\u25a0\u00bb. 51. S>\nNassau Street if STORES \u00bb West V2l Street\nSporting Goods.\n{ Tennis a^nd\nGolf Goods j\n\\ Guarantee of Reliability. \\\nI M. HARTLEY CO.,\nB",
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"text": "0\nAGREES WITH MR. RAER.\nKlirT OUT COMPKTITWS.\n{ Lchigh's President Wants to Submit\nContracts, but Counsel Says No.\nAlthough President Bacr of the Reading: Com\npany continued on the star.d at yesterday's coal\nliearins before \u2022\u2022\u2022 Interstate Commerce Commis\nsion, by far the most striking witness In more\nfeatures than one was Eben B. Thomas, presi\ndent of the L^high Vailt-y road.. One of these was\nthe following statement made by him after deny\n1:4: that th\" division of the earning trade was\nBttMkfal. and saying that if the railroads reached\nInto the territories tapped by each other it would\nhart a!! the interests and to no one any pood, in\nreply to OH question by Clarence J. Snearn:\n-Would not the rrlce of coal and the carrying\nrates be reduced by puch competition?\"\n\"I do not believe in creating unnecessary and\nunreasonable competition. I do not believe I should\n\u25a0b* \u00bbble to justify myself to those whose property\n3 direct If 1 should originate any reckless competi\ntion.\"\nAnother feature was his willingness to answer\nQuestions and show contracts and the expression\nof regret that he mu^t obey the objections of coun-\nF el. who told Man to disobey the instructions of the\ncommission.\nWhen Mr. Fa?r first took the stand Mr. Shearn\nasked:\n\"You have the power to restrict the output of an\nthracite coal if you cfeoosa to do so?*\n\"If the R^adint; Coal and Iron Company desired\nto forget Its obligations to the public and to its\nstockholders It could, of course, shut down ail Us\nmines and stop its trains from carrying the coal\nfrom other mines.*\"\n\u2022\u2022Have you such 'power'?\" Commissioner Prouty\nasked.\n\"As the executive officer of the company I have.\n\u2022If more coal was mined.\" asked Commissioner\nClements, \"could it be sold cheaper?\"\n\"Not la make \u25a0 profit for the mines. If the pro\nduction exceeds the demand the price must fall, as\nth\u00ab coal Is held in storage until a remunerative\n7>nX\u00bb Is reached. The effect of the last strike has\nrut us back years and years. It will take us a long\ntime to regain our markets. We have lost the New-\nEngland markets, which have gone to Nova Sco\ntia and bituminous coal. Our market to-day is\npractically restricted to the sea. It is almost Im\npossible to sell anthracite coal inland.\"\n\"It Is utterly impossible.\" Mr. Baer said, \"to re\nduce our rates without bankrupting our company.\n*CVe have been able to pay only 4 per cent on $25.\nmn.m of stock out of $140,000,000. and last year we\npaid only 1 per cent. The summit of our hopes is\nto pay 4 per cent on the total, and in thirty years\n\u00abf effort \u2022we have not been able to reach that figure.\n\"You told us, Mr. Baer.\" Commissioner Prouty\npaid. \"that all you are working for is a fair profit.\nTtua want to be the Judge of what is a fair profit?\"\n\u25a0\u2022Ko. We ask only a fair rate, the nominal rate\nof interest on the capital invested, with a fair al\nlowance for the depreciation of the stock.\"\n- \"What would you consider a fair profit for your\ncompany, the Philadelphia arc! Beading Railroad?\"\nMr. Prouty persisted.\nMr. Btier fenced with the question, and finally\n\u2022mid it was impossible to fix the value of the\nSteading holdings.\n\"Would you be satisfied with 4 per cent on the\nmarket holdings of your stock?\"\n\"Oh. no. I should not be satisfied with any such\n\u2022valuation as that. It is worth much more than\nthe stock shows.**\n\"Should the people pay more for coal to enable\n\u2022you to collect interest on an Increase in valuation\n\u2022f property that cost you nothing and with which\nyou have bad nothing to do?\" Mr. Shearn asked.\n\"Should John Jacob Astor be permitted to charge\nmore rent to-day for the property he obtained for\nText to nothing some generations ago? was Mr.\nswer. -;_ .\n\"The Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron\nCompany has made a profit of $390,000 since Novem\n\\t. 1306. after paying all expenses and \u2022 fair al\nlowance from its own coal for the depletion or\nland value The company would h* operated at a\ncertain loss if the. Reading railroad system charged\nfull interest for the J79.00MM) to which the coal\ncompany is Indebted to the railroad company.\nOnly r- 4 per cent is charged.\n\u2022 Mv policy in the face of the present unrest,\nMr. fTstr said, \"is to get several million tons or\nooal of all sizes stored so that should any calamity\nthreaten again we shall be prepared .or It and the\npublic shall not buffer. The Reading company has\nabout 4\"O.OUO tons of coal at various storage places.\nPresident Thomas of the Lrehigh is also an officer\nof the Hillside Coal and Iron Company, which is\n\u00ab< ntrolled by the Erie Railroad, which practically\n'wns also all of the stock of the Pennsylvania Coal\nCompany. Until 1901 Mr. Thomas was head of the\nNew-Tofts Su\u00ab\u00abqueha.nna and Western Railroad\nCompany, whose stock Is voted by the Erie. The\nNew-York and Susquehanna Coal Company is also\ncontrolled by the Erie system, which taps the\nLi4-awanna district of the anthracite region.\nThe witness said he was present at the confer\nence of coal road presidents in ISO. at which a\ntentative plan, never lived up to. to divide the ton\nnage according to colliery production was sug\n\"And you were bound in honor to each to main\ntain that percentage?\"\n\"Well. I don't know.\" replied the witness, with\n& laugh*. \"There is not much honor in the freight\nThe allotment for the Lehigh road. Mr. Thomas\nthought, was about 15 per cent, and on the Read\ning 4 per cent. The agreement had nothing to do\nwith the production or the restriction of the pro\nduction of anthracite coal.\n\"Would not the plan limit the amount of coal to\nbe carried to market ?\" asked Mr. Prouty.\n\"Oh. no. It was made in answer to complaints\nof the Industrial mine owners that the railroads\nwere discriminating in favor of the mines they con\ntrolled.\"\n\"You carry those same Ideas Into your business\nfes a salesman of coal?\" asked Mr. Shearn.\nCounsel objected, but the commission voted the\nquestion pertinent.\n> Francis B. Gowan, of counsel for the Lehigh. ad\n} vised Mr. Thomas not to reply, and, despite the\n\" direction of the commissioners, Mr. Thomas abided\nby his lawyer's advice. A similar proceeding fol\nlowed Mr HIM a ill's question if the price of an\nthracite at tidewater was fixed by conference and\nagreement among the presidents of the coal com\npanies.\nMr. Thomas asserted, as had Mr. Baer. the legal\nright of Lls company to stifle the opposition of the\n\u2022Simpson & Watkins scheme for an independent\nrailroad and a general sales agency here for the\n\u2022coal of th\u00ab individual operators.\nMr Tnomas thought the Erie made an excellent\nlaaiajnlii in the purchase of the Pennsylvania Coal\nCompany for B&HMMI The plan for so inde\npendent railroad from Lackawanna to Kingston\n)H-enared by the Pennsylvania Coal Company was\nm invasion of the Erie road, he said. \"That pur\nohase protected cur traffic and made the Erie at\n\u00abin^e a dividend paying property,\" he added.\nMr. Thomas invited the commission, Mr. Phearn\nand W. R. Hearst to visit the anthracite- regions\nait his expense, to acquaint themselves with the\nconditions prevailing there and with the difficulties\nthe coal roads have in collertir.j; freight.\n\"What would bo the effect,\" Mr. Prouty asked.\n\u2022if the freight rate on coal was reduced?\"\n\"My opinion Is.\" Mr. Thomas replied, \"that the\nIndividual operator would raise the. price of his\n<-oe.l. I know that is what the I^hip-h Valley Coal\nCompany would do.\"\nEXCISE OFFICE'S BUSIEST DAY.\n.Applicants for Liquor Licenses Still On Hand\nat 2 a. m. To-day.\nYesterday was th? busiest day in the year at\nthe excise office at No. 1 Madison -a All day\nthere was a line of men waiting to set their\nliquor tax certificates, sometimes as many as\n\u25a0fifty being in line at once. Liquor dealers who\nfailed to pet their new certificates by last nipht\n\u2022will not be able to open their places this morn-\nIng. Many dealers delayed more than usual\nthis yfar, too, because of the increase In the\ncost of certificates from S. *\u00bb to $1,200.\nAt 3 p. m Deputy Commissioner Milliard had\nthe doors closed until 6 o'clock.\nFor the year ending yesterday the total re\nceipts at Mr. Milliard's office were about\n47i i.ikhi The office covers Manhattan and\nThe Bronx.\nAt 1 o'clock this morning one of the officals\nIn the excise office said that at that hour busi\nness was still booming. Liquor certificates were\nstill being sold, Bad! it was expected that it\nwo'ild be 4 or 5 o'clock before the books could\nbo balanced.\nFOR STOMACH DISORDERS.\nGOUT and DYSPEPSIA\nDRINK\nCELESTINS\nBeit NATURAL Alkaline Water.\nTHINKS MUS. LTNDE DEAD.\nWas on Ferryboat\u2014 Counsel Believes\nHer a Suicide.\nMrs. Augusta H. Lynde. who disappeared\nfrom her home, the Van Corlear apartment\nbouse. No. 200 West Fifty-slxtli-st. f on Tues\nday night, was last seen en an Erie ferryboat,\nand her friends believe she jumped overboard\nand was drowned. Her counsel, Herbert S. Og\ndcn. of No. 31 Pine-st.. offered a reward of 5300\nyesterday for the recovers* of the body.\n' \"Mrs. Lynde.\" said* Mr. Ogden, \"left her home\nabout <\"\u00bb o'clock Tuesday evening:, and was not\nheard from until the superintendent of the Brie\nftrrieai reported that her pocketbook had been\nfound on the ferryboat Chautauqua. which runs\nfrom Twenty-third-st. to the Erie station at\nPavonta-ave.. Jersey City. One of the deck\nhands and the mate told me a woman in a gray\ndress suddenly disappeared while the boat was\ncrossing to this side. I immediately identified\nMr? Lynde by the description and the visiting\ncards she carried. A deckhand and the mate\nsaid they saw her sitting outside, aft the\nwomen's cabin.\n. ' Bke crossed over to Jersey City at 7:2,\"\u00bb p. m..\nvent to the waiting room, and returned on the\nsame boat, sitting: outside, as before. They\ndid\" not notice anything unusual about her, and\nsupposed she had crossed to meet some one and\nhad been disappointed. Five minutes after the\ndeckhand had seen her on the return trip, he\nwent forward again and saw her parse lying on\nthe seat.\n\"He searched the cabin? and the carriages for\nthe woman, but could not find her. At the\nNew-York ferry slip he watched again as the\npassengers left the. boat. Only two women\nwere on hoard, and they did not see her. I am\nsatisfied Mrs. Lynde stepped from the seat to\nthe mil and jumped overboard. It would have\nbeen very easy for her to have done that, and\nnot be seen, as few were on the boat.\n'Her friends cannot account for her act. She\nhai ample means, seemed rational and happy,\nand ihere w.-ip do reason, so far as any one\nknows, for committing suicide. She must have\nte*>n deranged.\"\nSome time eco Mrs. I^ynde was run down in\nFifth-aye. and~injured. After her recovery she\nwas nervous, especially about crossing streets,\nbut her reason did not appear to have been af\nfected. Mr. Ogden added that she had read and\ntalked about the Openhym suicide, and may\nhave brooded over It. The suggestion that Mrs.\nLynde had been kidnapped was dropped as soon\nas Mr. Ogden was satisfied that she was on the\nferryboat.\nMrs. Lynde \u00aba? the widow of Charles R.\nLynde, arid the daughter of Joseph W. Harper,\none of the founders of the Harper & Bros.' pub\nlishing house. Mr. Harper died years ago. Mrs.\nLynde has two sons\u2014 Charles W. Lynde, who is\nin Europe and Rollin H. Lynde. a lawyer, at\nNo. 31 Pino at She entertained a good deal,\nand was to have given a reception at her rooms\non Tuesday evening. Her collection of engrav\nings is said to be a remarkable one. Mrs. Lynde\nwas sixty-eight years old.\nMAYOR VETOES TWO PLATOON BILL\nMakes Comparisons Between New-York and\nBuffalo Measures.\nMayor Low yesterday vetoed Assembly bill No.\n827. known as the two platoon bill. In a memo\nrandum the Mayor Bays that the defects in the bill\ncan best be shown by a comparison with the legis\nlative bill providing for a two platoon system for\nthe Fire Department of Buffalo, which the Mayor\nsays was accepted by the Mayor of Buffalo and was\nsigned by the Governor. The Buffalo law wan per\nmissive, while the two platoon bill for the Fire De\npartment of this cit> is a mandatory measure, and\nthe Mayor thinks It an affront to this city to at\ntempt to coerce the action of its officials while the\nofficials of Buffalo are left free to use their own\ndiscretion.\nThe Mayor says it is proper to add that the local\nmeasure is opposed by the present Commissioner,\nand the officers of the Fire Department, as every\ntw> ilatoon idea has always been opposed by pre\nvious commissioners.\nThe Mayor points out that the Board of Aldermen\nha\u00ab authorized an increase in the present member\nship of the force by over five hundred firemen.\nwhf<-h will Insure for'them more time at home with\ntheir families, one day off In five and two v.-eek:-'\nvacation every summer. He suggests that before\nthe city permits a two platoon system it will be wise\nto see \"how the system works in Buffalo.\nESCAPES FKOM SING SING PRISON.\nTen Year Term Burglar Swims Around a\nWall He Was Working On.\nThe whistle at Sing Sing Prison yesterday about\nnoon told the people of the surrounding country\nthat a convict had escaped. The fugitive is Thomaa\nYork He is twenty-three years old, a bricklayer.\nA new wall is be.ing erected, and on this York was\nat work. The wall runs down t~> the river bank.\nNoon is 1h\u00bb dinner hour, and when the roll was\ncalled it was found that York had disappeared. He\nhad been seen only a few minutes before.\nYork's convict yuit was found on the bank of the\nriver. It 1? supposed he jumped into the water,\nswam around the whII, and. coming ashore again,\nfied into thf thick woods. He may have had con\nfederates w!th citizens' clothes. The whistle blew\nSteadily for half ar. hssr. It can be heard five\nmiles from the prison.\nYork was received at the prison from this city\non April 23. 1901. He had been sentenced to ten\nyears for burglary in the tirst degree.\n* York was caught some, miles down the river.\nWarden Johnson and two keepers had driven down\nin a wagon, searching the woods. York was found\nconcealed under some boards which were lying\nclose to fl. bridge in a private driveway. He was\nclad in a discarded uniform coat and trousers of\nsome of the prison guards. He had probably picked\nthem up it various times and concealed them.\nYork loses\" all good conduct time for his term. He\nmay be prosecuted and sentenced for attempting to\nescape.\nPOLICE HAD WANTED HIM FOR A YEAR\nPresident of Clothes Cleaning Company-\nCharged with Swindling.\nWilliam H. Raynor, of Demarest, X. J., was ar\nrested in hi* office at No. 22 Park Row, yesterday,\non a charge of swindling. The detectives say the\nman has been wanted over a year. It is declared\nthat the National Wardrobe Company, which start\ned business at No. 402 Fiflh-ave., about p. year ago,\nto clean men's clothing at so much a year, soon\nwent out of business, ar,d that $2,000 in collected\nmoney and about the same amount In clothing were\nnot returned to owners. Raynor was the president\nof the concern.\nRaynor went to Pittsburgh. He etarted. or was\nemployed in. a similar concern, the detectives Bay,\nand on May 26 of last year they declare that he\nwas arrested on a. similar charge of swindling in\nconnection with the company's concerns. All the\nmoneys and clothing collected were returned, how\never, it is said.\nRaynor protested against his arrest. He admit\nted having been president of the National Ward\nrobe Company, but said that he was merely an\nemploye. He was taken to Police Headquarters,\nana he will be arraigned in the Tombs police court\nthis morning.\nNEW REPUBLICAN CLUB OPENING.\nI^uls Stem. pres. Jent of the Republican Club,\nlast night appointed a committee of forty to tak>\nbarge of ihe s\u00dferdses and arrange a programme\nfor the opening of tho hanrtsome new clubhouse\nof the organization in Forticth-st.. facing Bryant\nPark. This committee will meet on May 4, and\napp'Mnt sub-committees. Invitations will he sent\nto Pr^^ider.t Roosevelt, all the Republican Gov\nernors, and in *<11 there will be about a thousand\ninvit-inon* The intention was to have tl.e open\ning in June-, but on account of a strike amons;\nthe carpenters at work on tne buikling. it may not\nI*- practicable to have it take place aa early as\nhoped for.\nDECLARED SANE AFTER FIFTEEN YEARS.\nJohn Vanderbilt, of No. 29 West Forty-eighth-sL,\nwho was on January 17, 1888, declared incompetent\nto take care of his business affairs, and committed\nto a private canatorium at Spring Hill, Conn., by\nthe late Supreme Court Justice George P. An\ndrews, was yesterday declared Bane by Justice\nBlanchard, in the Supreme Court, on the applica\ntion of M. 1! Field, a lawyer. Mr. Field submitted\nan affidavit by Dr. Willet Stuart Brown, of No. 56\nWest Fifty-sixth-st., who stated that Mr. Vandtr-\nLIX was now of sound mind and understanding.\nMr. Van<lei.,i!t h.i forth in an affidavit that he\nwas detained In the Spring Hill institution only\nuntil July 25. IsBB. when hi- was discharged. In the\nlast fifteen years, he says, be has travelled alone\nthrough this country, Europe. Asia and Africa.\nDATLY TRIBUNE. FKTDAY. MAY 1. 1003.\nSHIPYARD MEN TO GO OUT.\nConference Lasting Over Twelve\nHours Fails.\nSTRIKERS TO NUMBER 12,000.\nAfter sessions lasting over twelve hours be\ntween committees representing the New-Tork\nMetal Trades Association and the outside em\nployers in the shipbuilding trade, on the one\nside, and the Brotherhood of Boilermakers and\nIron Shipbuilders on the other, at 2 a. m. to-day\none of the members of the conference gave out\nthe following statement:\nWe are no nearer a settlement than wo were\n\u2022when the conference began, at 11 '\u2022\u2022(.\u2022luck yesterday\nmorning, and it doe.s not look as it\" we would come\nto \u25a0 settlement at this conference. We are getting\ntired of this thing, and we cannot hold out much\nlonger. The bosses have agreed on nine out of six\nteen propositions, but the, seven that remain are\nthe ones of vital importance to us.\nYen can say that not a man will zo to work tn:\u00ab>\nmorning, for\" I do not think that we can come to\nan agreement. There are seven yards Wbere tne\nbosses have signed the agreement, and in tho.*>\nyards the men will return to work. Those yards\nare not represented here.\nThis business of a long conference is too much\nfor us to stand. While the bosses can send out and\nget the best of food and wine, we have to work the\nfree hrnch. The only way for us to do that . can\nsee is to give up this fooling a:.d go out and fi\u00dfht\nthem to a linish.\nThe members of the various lodges to which\nthe boilermakers arc affiliated stayed in their\nlodgerooms all over the city all night waiting\nfor word from (he conference. Committees were\nsent from eacb lodge to the room of the New-\nTork Metal Trades Association, with lnstruc-\ntions to report f very hour by telephone. All\nthe committees had to report was that there\nwas \"nothing doing.\" Members of those com\nmittees said that the men in meeting places\nwere becoming more and more impatient as the\nhour grew later, and very few of them hoped\nthat a settlement would be made. They declared\nthat they were willing t\" ma*sTe a light, and say\nthey are strong \u00bb noiigh to win.\nAt l!:3<> o'clock it was announced by Presi\ndent Devlin, of Lodge No. 21, one of the largest\nOf the bolierm.ikers' organizations, that the con\nference was over and that it bad proved a fail\nure. Tin; employers would not meet their eni\nployes\" demand for $3 a day, but came within\nsix cents of it, offering $- '.H. They would not,\nhowever, recognize the. union organizations of\nthe strikers, a fact which precluded any hope of\na settlement. President Devlin said that twelve\nthousand men employed in shipbuilding in the\nMetropolitan District would be on strike to-day\nas a result of the faiure to reach an agreement.\nSTRIKE IN THE SUBWAY.\nAt Least Two Thousand Men Arc\nInvolved \u2014 Trouble Feared.\nITALIANS WANT $2 A DAY.\nThere is a strike in the Subway, including all\nthe Italian diggers and rockmen. It includes\ntwo thousand men at least.\nThe night shift did not go to work, and for\nthe first time in a long while there was no w^ork\nin the Subway. The men want $2 a day instead\nof $1 2Z> and $1 7,~>. The demand is made by\nthe new organization known as the Rockroen\nand Excavators' Union.\nThe men will not go to work this morning, and\ninstead will \\ ait for the report of their griev\nance committee, which will see the various con\ntractors. If the demands are not complied with\nthen, it is said a strike- to the finish will result.\nThe police have some feir of the situation.\nTheir parade takes place to-morrow, and they\nsay that if the contractors attempt to hire men\nto take the place of strikers the Italians will\ngive trouble, knowing that so many policemen\nwill be in the parade. Broadway is torn up In so\nmany places that the Italian strikers could prob\nably give a lot of trouble.\nThe -liapid Transit Arbitration Committee of\nthe Central Federation, met the Subway con\ntractors in the office of John B. McDonald, in\nthe Syndicate Building, yesterday.\nThe* conference came to an end at 2 O clock,\nshortly after the senior member of the firm of\nDegno'n & McLean had left it. It was said that\nMr Degnon had objected to granting an eight\nhour day, on the ground that the work on the\ntunnel had been delayed so often.\nTEAM DRIVERS TO STRIKE TO-DAY.\nAt a meeting held last night at Imperial Hall,\nFifty-nfth-st. and Slxth-ave., the Team Drivers'\nUnion decided to strike for higher wages, and one\nwas ordered, to go Into effect to-day. The strike\nwill affect about four thousand team drivers in\nthis city. They demand {2iJ a day.\nBRITISH SAILORS KILLED.\nFifteen Reported to Have Lost Their Lives\nin Trinidad Riot.\nHalifax, N. S., April 3ft.\u2014 lt is reported here to\nnight that fifteen of the crew of the British\nsecond-class cruiser Pallas were killed and a\nnumber injured during the rioting at Port-of-\nPpain, Trinidad, on Tuesday. The officials at\nthe Admiralty refuse to confirm or deny the re\nport.\nWITHIN $7,000,000 OF DEBT LIMIT.\nFull Value Assessments Will Increase Lee\nway by $200,000,000.\nC'untroller Grout said yesterday that the city\nwould have to go slow \\\\ ith appropriations for\nthe Tiext sixty days on account of its present\noutstanding indebtedness being close to the debt\nlimit.\n\u2022We have a margin of about i?7/RH>,OOO, but\nthe Board of Estimate has a large number of\nappropriations In hand, and from this time until\nJuly, when the full value assessments are con\nfirmed by the aldermen, we shall have to pro\nceed with caution.\" declared the Controller.\nThe raising of real estate assessments to the\nfull value basis will give the city a wide leeway\nfor incurring debt if its officials see fit to in\ncrease expenditures. In round numbers the as\nsessed valuation will be raised^ from about\n$4,000,000,000 to about 50.000.000.000. and as\nsuming that tht municipality is up to the debt\nlimit now. the $2,000,000,000 will allow an in\ncreased debt limit of $200,000,000.\nController Grout denied that the city had at\nany time exceeded the debt limit, and said that\nwhen it was found that the limit was unpleas\nantly near, the finance department had author\nity to take cash from the assets of the sinking\nfund and buy revenue bonds to any desired ex\ntent, thus increasing the city's debt incurring\npower to the extent of the bonds so purchased.\nHOWARD FOUND GUILTY.\nHe Gets a Life Sentence for Murdering\nGovernor Goebel.\nFrankfort. Ky., April 30.\u2014 1n th\u00ab third trial Of\nJames Howard on the charge of killing Governor\nWWllam Goebel. more than three years ago, the\nprisoner was found guilty. The Jury tirst reported\nthat it coul<i not ague Judge Cantn.ll sent it\nback with Instructions to remain <ut until an\nurreement was reached. A half-hour later the Jury\nreported with a verdict of guilty, and fixing th^\npunishment at life Imprisonment.\nThe jurors all voted foi v< rdict of guilty, the\ndisagree m\u00bb-nt being a.-> to the extent of punish\nment. Death wis favcred by ail except one. wh<\u00bb\nannounced that he would under no circumstanres\nvote for the death penalty, and a verdict for Ufa\nm Dtence was agreed on.\nMATCH ORDINANCES NOW EFFECTIVE. j\nThe regulations regarding the sale and use of j\nmatches which recently became ordinances went j\nInto effect at midnight to-day. The regulations ;\nprovide that no one. unless he bus a permit and j\nUs licensed matches, shall be allowed to give ;\nthem away or s^.i them.\nThe tail dealers, the regulations provide, must\nnot sell matches with over one thousand in a box,\nand the splints of the matches must be strong. |\nThey must easily Ignite on the \u00bb\u25a0 cratch surface,\nwith little- noise. Matches made so that the heads\nare apt to fly off when lighting must not be Bold.\nThe retail dealers must have their names and ad\ndresses on the box\u00abs of one thousand or less, either ,\nby stamping the boxes or by a label. A. sample of '\nth\u00ab mutch sold must also be deposited with tho ;\nFire Commissioner. Should any one be found sell- '\ning matches without a permit it is a violation of :\nthe regulations, and is punishable with a flue of i\nt/i and the forfeiture of the license. : \u25a0\nFIRES WIPE OUT TOWSS.\nPennsylvania Forest Fires the Worst\nKnown.\nBradford. I'enn., April .'!<\u00bb. The worst forest\nfires in the history of this section of Pennsyl\nvania are raging to-night, and ?1.000,000 worth\nof property has been destroyed. The forests have\nbeen ablaze for the las! week; but the fires\nwere kept under control by large gauss of men\nuntil this morning, when si stiff southeast gale\nsprang Op and fanned the smouldering embers\ninto a roaring mass of flames.\nWatsonvile, ten miles south of this city, is re\nported as being destroyed, and it is feared that\na number of lives have been lost. The last word\nfrom there was received at 2 o'clock. At that\ntime the fire was on all sides of the place and\nthe people were fearful of being burned to\ndeath, as there was no avenue of escape. All\nwires are down in that direction.\nAt Simpson, where the forest is thick and\nthere are a large number of oil wells, the tire\nwas very fierce. On both sides of the railroad\nthe woods were a mass of flames and swept\nover an area of two miles, taking everything\nin their path. The people of the town -were\nrescued by a special train run as far as Davis\nCity. They lost all their belongings. The latest\nadvices from Simpson say the town is destroyed.\nIt is feared that some have perished in the\nflames.\nWATCH WAITERS FIGHT.\nTheatre Croud Gathers Outside Cafe\nMartin.\nThere was a blockade of carriages and pedes\ntrians in front of the Caf6 Martin, at Twenty\nsixth-st. and Broadway, last night Just as peo\nple were leaving the theatres, while two w:iit\"rs\nfrom the caf4 were fighting in the street. It\nseems that Paul Jaccard, who had been dis\ncharged by Alfred Sargent, the head waiter,\nchallenged Sargent to come outsMe. The latter\naccepted, bringing an umbrella with him, which\nfigured prominently in the struggle.\nJaccard was arrested and Sargent appeared\nagainst him at the Tenderloin station. Sargent\nhad inflicted so much damage on Jaccard's\nface that both were held.\nCALLS NEW-YORK CLEAN.\nDr. Tolman Says It Surpasses All\nOther Big Places.\nThe Get Together Club No.l had a dinner at the\nHotel Martha Washington last night, in com\nmemoration of the 2oOth anniversary of the found\ning of the government of the city of New- York.\nWarner Van Norden presided. There were about\n270 persons present.\nTt was to contrast the present greatness of New-\nYork with the simplicity of the old Dutch village\nof New-Amsterdam that the Get Together Club\ngave its dinner, and assembled ppeakers to tell\nof the changes wrought in the passing years. The\nspeakers included Hamilton W. Mabie, on \"Higher\nCivic Life\"; Walter H. Page, on \"letters\"; Warner\nVan Norden. on \"Commerce \" and Dr. W. H. Tol\nman, of the Institute of Social Service, on \"Our\nDebt to i_;ues Over Sea,\"\nHamilton W. Mahie said in part:\nMuch has been done toward the rehabilitation of\nthe metropolis in the eyes of the world and the\nconfidence of the country, hut much still remains\nto be \"done. This work cannot be accomplished by\nMayor Low and his associates, unless they are sup\nported by an intelligent and wisely Greeted public\nopinion, \"nor can it be carried to a successful end\nunless that opinion confirms In successive elections\nthe policy of the present administration, whatever\nchanges of personnel may take place. New- York\nwas not redeemed fro.n the evils of corrupt and in\ncompetent government by bold leadership, though\nit has not lacked such leadership: it was redeemed\nby the combined action of Its citizens: it can he\nkept in its place as the foremost of American cities\nonly by the combined action of its citzens.\nDr. Tolman said In part:\nIn the matter of vice in this city, it has long been\nthe custom for everybody ami anybody to taiK\nand write about what a wicked city New-York is.\nThe time has come to stop knocking New-York; the\ntime has come to recognize that there is a better\nNew-York, aa wen as a greater New-Tork. New-\nYork Is to-day, population and all other things con\nsldered, the cleanest city In ihe world.\nLet me tell you a few things, and contrast them\nwith tho same things fifteen years a^o. Take the\nBowery, a thoroughfare which gained an interna\ntional reputation for vice yean and years ago, a\nreputation that has clung to it during all the pass\ning years, and clings to it to-day. But wh>-r.; are\nth<\u00bb tilings that made the reputation of the Bowery,\nwhen an honest man could not walk that thorough\nfare in safety, even by day? They are all none.\nTh<- Bowery of to-day la no different from Broad\nway: no different from Flftb-avi\nTake the Tenderloin, another place the reputation\nof which has gone abroad to the detriment of Xew-\nYork. What is the Tenderloin of to-day compared\nwith the Tenderloin of lifteen years ago? Absolutely\nnothing;. There is no Hell's Kitchen now.\nThere are some men hiKh In authority who know\ntins better New-York. One of them is Inspector\nGeorge nfcClusky. bead <\u00abf the Detective Bureau.\nHe has authorized me to s;iy for him to-night:\n\"New-Tork is the cleanest city in the country. It\njdves better protection to the travelling public\nthan any other city in America.\"'\nA NOVELTY IN ELECTRIC TRACTION.\nThe \"Multiple Unit\" Principle Applied to\nthe Baltimore Tunnel.\nBaltimore. April 30 (Special*.\u2014 The Baltimore and\nOhio Railroad will reeoixe during thff next two\nweeks the first \u00abf two ISO ton electric motors for\nservice In the Baltimore tunnel. These motor.-- are\nthe heaviest ever built, and with the three ninety\nsix ton motors now in use will enable the company\nto haul all freight atnl passenger trains from Cam\nden station to tho top of the grade without any as\nsistance from the attache.! steam locomotive.\nThe new electric motor i.- made up of two duplicate\nsections coupled together, so arranged that either\nsection can be operated independently or from any\none section two or more sections can be controlled.\nThe capacity of the locomotive can .it any time he\nincreased by adding duplicate sections aa desired.\nIt Is thus possible to multiply the available power\nus.'.l to any limit. The principle is somewhat like\nthrit which has been applied to t^ electric trains\non the New-Tork elevated r o;ids, wher.i the amount\nof motive power available can be varied <'ii short\nnotice. Each car there having its own motor, few\nor many can be called into operation.\nThe two sections of the motor, weighing together\none hundred ami fifty tons, are designed to handle\na loaded train, weighing complete with steam loco\nmotive, bui exclusive of electric locomotive, fifteen\nhundred tons over the bell line grade from \u00ab'.im\ndeu station through the tunnel to the summit, a\ndistance of 3.44 miles, at approximately a maximum\nspeed of ten rules an hour on the 8-10 per cent\nmd nine miles an hour on tbe J.- in-r cent\nKr::i!.- when operating al 62S volts.\nThe sides and roof of each cab are made \"f sheet\nsteeL <\u00bbn eacb side there i.s an entrance door, and\nat each end the-.- is <m additional door which per\nmits of ready communication between sections when\ncoupled together. Large windows aflVr.i a practi\ncally unobstructed view In .ill direction*.\nThe controlling apparatus, consisting of master\ncontroller and i n;;l leer's valves, is. in duplicate, a\ncomplete set, being located in diagonally opposite\ncorners of \u00bb.i^ii cab, so that the engineer when jt\nsuits his convenience can stand in tiit- fr..m end of\nthe locomotive when runcing in either direction.\nEach section of the locomotive is equipped with\none bell, one whistle, two locomotive headlights,\napproved air brake mechanism, Including two en\n's valves and a;r gauges, necessary brake\ncylinders, foundation brake, air reservoirs, coup] srs\nand drawheads.\nCRAMP DIRECTORS RESIGN.\nThe $5,000,000 Loan and $1,500,000 Stock\nIssue Approved.\nPhiladelphia. April 3).\u2014 At a special meeting to\nday of the Board of directors of the William Cramp\nShip and Engine Building Company, the J3,000,00<>\nloan and the J1,.'\"0.0t\u00bb issue of additional stock ware\napproved, and the. following voting trustees were\nelected: E. T. Stotesbury, of Drexel & Co.; Hich\nard H. Rushton, president of the Fourth Street\nNational Bank, of this city, and G. F. Baker, presi\ndent of the First National Bank of New-York.\nAfter transacting the business of the meeting the\ndirectors resigned, in order, it is Bald, to allow the\ninterests supplying the loan to be represented on\nthe board. The directors wero Thomas Dolan.\nClement A. Griscom. Morton M.-Michael. Samuel\nDiekson. Charles H. Cramp Edwin Cramp. Will\niam H Barnes and Henry Seligman. The loan. It\nl - said will not Increase the indebtedness of the\ncompany, but will provide for the funding of tho\ndebt for twenty years. Lead the discount, the rat\u00a9\n-X Interest will bo about &'.* per cent.\n./ RIXORD MOVING DAY. MIGHT RUN TUG HIMSELF.\nExodus of Business Men from Old\nOf/ices to New.\nOwing to th* proposal tearing down of an un\nusually larse number of big downtown buildings to\ngive way to modern skyscrapers, many law. real\nestate and business firms in the business section\nmoved to a\u00abw quarters yesterday. It was truly\nmoving day, and th\u00ab scenes in th\u00ab downtown dis\ntrict will probably be ob:\u00bb2rved there again to-day.\nThe greatest number of removals was from the\nTrinity BvlMt\u00dfs;, No. 11l Broadway, which hi soon\nto be torn down by the Equitable Life Assurance\nSociety and be replaced by a twenty story office\nbuilding.\nAM day there were scores of workmen carrying\noffice furniture, books, etc.. from the building la\nnearby places. As most of the persons who moved\nhad l^asrd rooms within a short distance of their\nold offices, moving vans were not In great demand.\nSome men who have teen many a moving day in\nthe business section saM they had never witnessed\nso many signs in th\" streets to remind one of the\nday.\nSince UK the New-York Baal Estate Salesrooms\nhave had quarters In the basement of the Trinity\nBuilding. In its room all the court and the ma\njority of other auction sales In that time wer\u00ab\nheld. There was a short list of auction sales yes\nterday, and about 1 o'clock, when the last parcel\nhad been sold, the auctioneer? and other persons\npresent listened to an address by Peter F. Meyer,\nwho up to a short time ago was engaged in th*\nreal estate business with Richard Croker, under\ntho firm name of Peter F. Meyer & Co. In his ad\ndress Mr. Meyer said:\nSince Mr. Reed, the veteran real estate auctioneer\nand dean of our fraternity\u2014 the oldest man in th\u00ab\nbusiness and the man whose years in X\u00abw-York\nreal estate has exceeded the long Pontificate of the\nHoly Father at Rome, whose Pontificate has ex\nceeded, so ft is announced, that of St Peter In\nlength of days\u2014 that old veteran has declined\nto make us an address, I want to say a few words\non this our departure from the place \"we have occu\npied almost continuously for forty-three years.\nIn this forty-three years In this place a great\nmany young men have got a start In life and\namassed fortunes In New-York real estate through\nthis exchange. I could name you dozenS of the\nveterans of the past, like Raynor, and Muller and\nI-n.'l'iw. and I could point oat and name scores of\nyoung- men to-day who are well on their way.\nOn behalf of the veterans I want to express the\nhope that in the future young men will come to\nthe front In this business, take hold of it and carry\n1' on with the same high standard of honor shown\nby the old real estate dealers of New-York.\nThere were songs and a general jollification, and\nthen the auctioneers went out together for lunch\neon. Afterward the members of the Auctioneers'\nAssociation were photographed. Tax Commissioner\nWells, who is the president of the organization, be\ning in it.\nThe follow-in? is a list of the places to which ths\nIndividuals and firms with offices In the Trinity\nBuilding have moved or will move:\nAnway. Wilmore. No. 156 Broadway\nAtterbury. Albert 11., No. 115 Broadway.\nAyers. Henry E., insurance. No. 150 Broadway.\nArnold & Byrne, -rsal estate. No. 41 Llberty-st.\nBoyd. jr.. Robert M., No. 203 Broadway.\nBlssell. Arthur If.. Master in Chancery of New-Jersey.\nNo. 203 Broadway.\nBojrart, Oiaiie.-i Percy, No. 156 Broadway.\nBowne, estate of Walter, >.'\u25a0> 66 Broadway.\nBronson. Henry T.. r^al estate. No. 13 South Wllllam-st.\nBaer, Edward, real estate. No. 135 Broadway.\nBrooklyn Builders' Association. .\nBernstein & Bernstein, architects. .\nBrown, V. Walter, lawyer. No. 37 Nassau-it.\nBrown, Henry V\"., law>*r. No. 37 Nassau-ct.\nBrooks. George M.. lawyer. No. 41 Wall-st.\nHelta. Frederick, No. 54 Wllllam-st.\nClayton, Walter X.. lawyer. No. 208 Bread-way.\nConnelly, John E., lawyer, No. 15 Wall-\u00abt.\n1 '\u25a0!:\u25a0\", Andrew M., \u2014 .\nCommunipau Coal Company of New-York, No. 17 Bat\ntery Place.\nClark. Frank a, tourist asent, No. 113 Broadway.\nCoster, (3. W.. real estate. No. 15fl Broadway.\nCarroll. F. J. E.. real estate. No. IX- Broadway.\nCooper. A. R.. No. 52 Willlam-et.\n. Duffy, James P.. lawyer. No. 15 Wall St.\nDillon. J. RMneland\u00bbr. Investment necuritiei\", \u00bb\nDevlin, Francis C. lawyer. No. 203 Broadway.\nDally Bulletin ot Real Estate, No. 115 Broadway.\nDeane, John H., lawyer and real estate. No. 27 Fine\nst.\nDeane, Sumner. real estate. No. 27 Pln\u00ab-\u00abt.\nI>avies &. Co., J. Clarence, real estate. No. 156 Broad\nway.\nI>e Witt .* Co.. F\u00bb:\u00ab;r. coal, No. 53 Broadway.\nDalslejr. H. H., No. 150 Broadway.\nEssex Construction Company. No. 203 Broadway.\nKrni-ich. Joseph, builder. .\nEms, Oscar, manager of the Anglo-American Nils\nSteamer and Hotel Company, No. 113 Broadway.\nEno, Amos V. , real estate. No. 13 South W!lltam-\u00abt.\nEno, William p.. real estate. No. 13 South Wllllam-it.\nEno. Henry C. real estate. No. 13 South Wllliazn-st.\nFranklin. Morris, real estate. No. 166 Broadway.\nFox. William 1., real estate. No. 15 Broad-st.\nGoldstleker, Samuel, No. 115 Broadway.\nGuarantee Company of North America, No. 115 Broad\nway.\nGroo, William Jay. .\nHall. Joseph, No. 54 William st\nHoyt. Francis D-, No. 60 Wall-st.\nHaisht, Charles C. architect. No. *S2 Flf:h-ave.\nHoppin, William Warner .\nHullldajr. Alexander 8., No. 42 Pine-st.\nHlboard, Pratt & McAlpin, lawyers. No. 1 Nassau-st-\nHaskell, Edward E.. Sawyer, So. 46 Pine-st.\nHatter. Alfred, real estate. No. 185 Broadway.\nHoughton. Frank X., real estate. No. 115 Broadway.\nHall, Bottom, lawyer. No. 99 Nassau-st.\nIsaacs. J. Stanley, mortgage loans. No. 115 Broadway.\nIntcrai.an: & Co., D. Pho-nlx. No. 115 Broadwajr.\nJoseph. George, real estate. No. 135 Broadway.\nKnowles. Robert Bell, lawyer. No. 15 Wall-et.\nKaufman. Edward S., No. 42 Pine-st.\nKronengold, A., real estate and loans. No. 165 Broad\nway.\nKelly, William H., lawyer. No. 229 Broadway.\n- I^eavitt. John Brooks, lawyer. No. 115 Broadway.\nlister, Asbury, No. 105 Hudson\nMartinsen. R. T., lawyer. No. 203 Broadway.\nMcKlnney. Glenn Ford, lawyer. No. 52 Williams?.\nMuehlenbeclc. C . civil engineer. No. 118 Nassau-st.\nMcCrone. John, lawyer, .\nMeyer. Isaac T.. real estate and mortgages. So. 27\nW!l!lam-3t.\nMurphy & Lloyd, lawyers. No. 92 Willlam-st.\nMlley Colour Photograph Company. No. 92 Williara-st-\nManhattan Coal Company. No. 17 Battery Place.\nMandelbaum & Lewlne. No. 135 Broadway.\nMinor & Co.. George E., publishers of \"The Daily Bul\nletin of Real Estate,\" No. 115 Broadway.\nMayhoff. Barney, No 115 Broadway.\nMeyer, Peter F.. real estate. No. 155 Broadway.\nMile* & Hefner, real estate. No. 135 Broad-way.\nM Mah..n, Fulton. No. 54 William\nMerrill & Rogers, No. 31 Nassau-st.\nMore, Taylor, No. 115 Broadway.\nKorris, Edward W., lawyer No. 25 Broad-st.\nKevins & Perelman. real estate. No. 115 Broadway.\nNew-York Real Estate Salesrooms, No. 161 Broadway.\nNew- York Tax Reform Association. No. 62 William-st.\nO' Kennedy J. J. Karbry, No. 203 Broadway.\nOgden. David 8., lawyer. No. 52 Willlam-et.\nOils & Presalnger. lawyers. No. 05 LJberty-et.\nOk. Marcus 1... real estate. No. 135 Broadway\nOT.mnell Thomas, real estate. No. 115 Broadway.\nPhllbln, Beekman \u25a0\u00a3 Menken, lawyers. No. 52 Wllliam-\nParsona, Cloasaa * Mcllvalne, lawjer?. No. 52 VT\\V-\nHam st.\nPalmer. Lucius N.\nPeckham Warner & Strong. No. 62 Willlam-st.\nPennsylvania Railroad Ticket Ofilce. N\u00ab 113 Broadway.\nPatten, William S.. real estate. No. 156 Broadway.\nJ'alen. George, real estate, No. 115 Broadway.\nPurdy. Lawson. lawyer.\nR.y:.aiid. Albert, lawyer. No. 52 VI illiam-st.\nRunjon, Charles. No. 17 Battery Place.\nRunyon. C. R.. No. 17 Battery Place.\nReal Estate Bovr 1 of Brokers. No. 115 Broadway.\nRanker, George, real estate. No. 115 Broadway.\nRenwlsk, James A.. No. 52 WtUUm-st.\nSmith, Irvtng T., rep.l estate. .\nSullivan, John J.. No. 203 Broadway\nS::;iririel,l Beach Company. No. 52 Wi]Ham--\u00abf.\nSimpson. Jam\u00ab 3. trnstsa of the Smlthn>ld Beach Com\npany. No 52 William\nSherman. Henry 11.. No. 42 Plne-st.\nPhcpard. Edward M. lawyer. No. 28 Liberty-st.\nStoUUanl. Charles 11.. No. 156 Broadway.\nSchapiro. L E . \u25a0 .\nSmith, Thomas C. real estat\u00bb. No. 135 Broadway.\nSni:!ln. EUsha. real estate. No. 135 Broadway.\nSmith. Phineas. realty Investment* and loan*. .\ngouthack & Co.. Frederick, real estate. No. 25 Broad st.\nSeton. Jr.. Alfred, real \"state. No. 15*5 Broadway.\nRtaresland, J. M.. No. 150 Broadway.\nK. .it W. If.. 1\nSmyth. Bamuel, eu^lreerlnp anl contractiny. No. 41\nLJberty-Bt\nSweet. William A., lawyer. No. 203 Broadway.\nTaylor. John A.. No. TV William\nTaylor. Herbert W.. No. 7\u00ab William\nTownsead & A very, lawyer*. Hanover Bank Building.\nThroop, Francis H.. tourist agent. .\nTrimble. J. D., real estate No. 41 Wail st.\nT'nitert States Guarantee Company. No. 115 Broadway.\nValentine \u25a0& Son. K. li.. No. ISO Broadway.\nYon Wilraorosky, F. F. bankers an.) merchants' foreign\nInformation bureau, .\nWeekes. The Herbert A. Weekes Company, builders. NVx\n105 East \u25a0 enteenth \u00bbt.\nWlllmann. Edward, No. 52 William\nVernon. P. Harwood. .\nWolff. Samuel I- . lawyer. \u2014 -.\nWhit comb & Wliiteomb. lawyers. No. 203 Broadway.\nWerner. M. .T.. \u2014 .\nWood, (Tialmers, No. 52 William\nVltielinr- & S..n\u00ab C. grate bars. No. 150 Broadway.\nSwinge', Bernard, lawyer. No. 2\"3 Broadway.\nTURKISH BANK BUYS CITY BONDS.\nController Grout yesterday announced that the\nImperial Ottoman Bank of Constantinople. Tur\nkey, had purchased from the city $1,000,000 of Its\nrevenue, bonds paying P/k per cent Interest. The\nController would no! state who the agents of th.\u00bb\nbank In this city are. Mr. C.rom some time ago\nannounced that certain Wall Street interests were\nccmbined to keep down tho prices offered for city\nbonds To stop combinations In bidding for city\nbonds and widen the fleM of competition, the Con\ntroller has been trying to encourage the buyln< of\nCity bonds by foreign banks.\n&*j\u00abs >j% 1 1 3 1 \u00a7y3 ft I B A\nare used most because\nthey lubricate most.\nMade only by\nVACUUM OIL CO.,\nRochester, N. Y.\n. Major Woodbury Gives Dissatisfied\nMarine Engineers a Surprise.\nStreet Cleaning Commissioner Wo\u00bb. . , U ry i^,\nconfronted the harbor engineers at -work on tu\u00aba\ntowing; city \"cows with the proposition that ha\nla something of a marine engineer himself. S\u00aby.\neral of the engineers, who Just now are \u00ab\u2022\u2022\u00bb\ntemplating a strike for an increase of 25 per\ncent In pay. called on Major Woodbury yester\nday to explain Just why they had decided to\nJoin their associates In \"resigning\" their places\nuntil the raise in their pay is made. Major\nV/oodbury is on good terms with the :r> - ar.d.\nafter hearing that they were likely to leav\u00bb their\nposts, he said:\nI \"Now, gentlemen, see here. You have been\nwell treated, and your wages are as jjoo<l a*\nyou could expect. Don't try to tie up th\u00bb scow*\nengaged in towing city garbage and ashes. If\n: you do, I'll take a hack at this ensrlneer busi\nness myself.\"\n\"You're all right at street cleaning, bat you\nwouldn't cut much ice at running a tug.\" mid\none of the callers.\nFor answer Major Woodbury went to a dra^tr\nIn his desk and fished out a martne \u00bbn*ine\u00abrs\nlicense.\n\"That's one on us. \" said \"V.\" of th\u00ab* enilnatui\n\"Is there anything that you can't do?\"\nThe harbor engineers at work ,or th\u00bb city no\u00bb\nare receiving 5100 a month. They demand %Y\u00a3T t\na month and board, and $**\u2022\"> for lavetr assistants.\nAt Commissioner Woodbury's office yeat?rday\nIt was said that the city's two st^am \u00ab<-o*i\nwould be used for towing In SMa th\u00bb --giiMsr*\non the tugs employed by the city strike. An\nother expedient will be to charter \u2022;*\u25a0\u00bb outrisjht.\nCommissioner \"Woodbury \u00ab\u00bby s h* thinks that in\nsome way he will be able to take out to \u2022*%\nwithout serious delay all MM city garhage.\nCommissioner Woodbury '.n the role of a ma\nrine engineer would demonstrate an\u00ab.<* that h\u00bb\nIs up to date In many professions and catlings.\nHis friends say that he is a practising physician\nand surgeon, a lawyer, civil \u00abnS&\u00bber, *\u00bb!*na\nengineer, soldier and special policeman.\nHe \"pl-ais guilty\" to most of the?\u00bb counts.\nDR. BURGESS DISAPPROVED PRIZES.\nOwing to Bishop's Views. Those Bought for\n\" Charity Euchre \"Were Not Awarded.\nIn accordance with taW views of Bishop Burs-s*.\nof the Kplseopal diocese of I>ong Inland. thT* w>r -\u00ab\nno euchre prizes at the- euchre party held at th\u00ab\nGarden City Hotel on Wednesday rJsht by the\nCathedral Guild In aid of the Summer Horn. of St.\nGiles the Cripple. The favors had been pur-hasM.\nbut the patronesses. Mrs. If. B. Bryan. Miss Bur\ngess. Mrs. Horace E. Henderson. Mrs StsmiUj.\nMiss Mart* Mrs. \u00ab\u2022 P. Turner Mrs J H ' \u00ab\u00bb\nand Mrs. David Provost, .led.; not t\u00bb a\u00bbar<X\nthem. The euchre party was a sucl^ss. however.\nMay Day News of\nWomen's Dresses\nand Wraps\n'THERE never was a\nTHERE never wn* I\n1 Summer of the past for which\na May Day gave such promise\nof beauty in apparel. The keynote\nof our present display of costumes\nis given by the Grand Prix dresses\nwhich have been exhibited all this\nweek \u2014 matchless productions of the\nthree kings of Paris fashion of the\npresent season. Beer. Paquin and\nDceuillet. The unique feature about\nthese costumes is that the millinery\nand the parasols have been made\nto match the dresses. The hats\nby such famous modistes as Marie\nCrozet, Camille Roger. Lewis and\nSuzanne et Barault. The Parasols\nare made by Beer and Boismaurer.\nAmong the more practical dresses\nthe collection is no less notable.\nWe have an extensive collection of\nSummer gowns for morning, after\nnoon and evening wear at shore or\nmountain, including coat suits of\nlinen and crash. There are Summer\ndresses of organdy and point\nd'esprit, at $15 to $100; shirt\nwaist suits of linen and lawn. $5.50\nto $20; of silk and pongee at\n12.75 to $25 : tailor-made dresses\nof voile, at $18.75 to $75; stylish\nWalking Suits, at $10 to $50.\nThe Summer Coats are made of\nsuch cool fabrics as linen, crash,\npongee and novelty linen fabrics in\na marvelous variety of attractive\nstyles, mostly hip lengths with\nlinings of figured batiste. Prices\nrange from $15 to 70.\nSecond floor. Broadway.\nMay Day Blossoms\nIn\nPrinted Fabrics\nORGANDIES still main\ntain a prominent niche in\nwomen's favor. The newer\nfabrics win many friends, but al\nmost every woman is loyal to or\ngandy for one or two gowns at\nleast.\nWe have just received a score or\nmore of handsome printings from\nFrance to add to the collection\nalready quite notable. Price 35c\na yard.\nA harming collection of printed\ndimities has just arrived from Bel\nfast. Dainty little rosebud pat\nterns, as well as larger floral\ngroupings, and figures and figured\nstripes on white and colored\ngrounds. They have \u25a0 character\nand originality that distinguishes\nthem at once from even the pretti\nest thing in the cheaper grades.\n25c yd.\nAlso new arrivals in French\nprinted Challis. Some have at\ntractive Persian borders for the\ntrimming. Then there are many\nother new effects.\nPrice 60c a yard. vManak\nJohn Wanamaker,\nFormerly A. T. Stewart 4 Co.,\nBroadway, 4tb. are., yth and lOth st\u00ab.",
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"text": "' \"'\u25a0' \u00abf^'l\u00ab^\u00a7^* \"^\"SvoS^VTT*^\nfloss w V^ii#p Wonm\nAX EXQUISITE CREATION IX CKEPE DE CHIXEL\n\u2014 i/Ladies' Pictorial.\nJTCXGARIAX FAIR.\n\"PicturcsqiLC Bazaar, zciih Interesting\nFeatures, Xozl Open.\nTerrace Garden. In Fifty-elghth-st.. near Lexing\nton-sve.. was brilliant with red. white and green,\nthe rational colors of Hungary, when President\nCarter last nigh; opened the charity bazaar of the.\nHungarian Ladies' Aid Society. Hungarian folk\nfrom far and near were present In a great crowd.\nand rr.or.ey changed pockets with magical rapidity.\nto the music of an Hungarian band.\nRed, wh'te and green the hall will remain for the\nrest of the week, and by the time Sunday comes\nthe women who have the affair at heart hope their\nr-roceeds will have mounted -into the thousands.\nAlready a large amount of money has been con\ntributed, Mrs. L K. Rosenfeld. the president, hay-\nIr.g herself collected $700 in cash and checks. The\n7>rize of a sterling silver fruit dish, which Mrs.\nHcser.feld offered to the person collecting the most\nmoney, would hay\u00ab gone to Mrs. Rosenfeld had she\n\u2022rared to compete As it was. It went to Mrs.\n3klathes Brown, who collected 5356.\nThere ere eighteen booths, devoted to groceries,\nJe-welry. pillows, clears, llcjuors. drugs, candy.\nTowers, etc. President and Mrs. Roosevelt have\nrer.t their photographs, with their autographs, and\n\u25a0thf-5f- alone have realized $201- Among the two hun\ndred and fifty piliows at the pillow booth Is a\n\u25a0beauty In white satin, embroidered In cherries and\nfoliage, embodj-IT-.g the red, white and gTeen of\nHungary. This cushion is *he handiwork and the\n*r:ft of Mrs. Moschcowitr. Mrs. Roseiifeld's mother,\n\u2022who is seventy years of age. It is displayed in a\nclass case and has already earned ISO 50 for the\ncause of Hungarian charities.\nOne of the pcpular booths is the Hungarian booth,\niraog with the national coat of arms. Here Hun\ngarian wines, walnuts, paprika, majolica, and other\nnational wares are on sale by women In national\nHungarian costume. Souvenirs, in the form of\nrmall tea plates, bordered with red and gresn. with\nthe name and date of the bazaar, find a ready\nsale.\nSome notes of various denominations, issued by\nXjOOIs Kopsath. the Hungarian patriot, when he\n-was m this country, signed by him. and payable\none year after Hungary fhall have attained its\npolitical liberty; are attractive alike to the auto\neraah hu r :?er and the curio seeker.\nThe bazaar will last through .ff\u00ab,^^\nr\u00bb\" Saturday afternoon mere will be a children s\nTratSVe at which twenty children will present a\nnlav \"NuTserv Rhymiau\" under the uirection o,\nAdolDh \\ L : pV*- ilisa Selma Sondhe:m will in\n\u00a3\u00a3\u00bb!?\u00a3 U en* entr'acte the -Dane- of \u25a0 the _R*in>\nDarDa'y\". A dance and auction will wind up\nls T^^^af \u00a3S A^iocietvi* assist^\n-e'4i^'the Lady Jefferson Club and the Boulevard\n\u25a0re wwfclw\n-\n;\n\u00a3;%\u00a3 M^ B- r^^un, and Mrs J. Horow.tz.\nRECREATIONS FOR CHILDREN.\n*o successful were the vacation srhooN last year\nThe. num^r o, \u00ab\"\u00a3 r * '}^* incrM s^d. to make\nn^e to h^ve a... _ SUllim cr playgrounds\nbu'id'nc^ P'-it in o-ofr .0. . , rt-creauon\n- Timir.g\nSnTfcS mad- welcome A \\^ hhou^,, of Ma.,\nwill be taafb* .1\" \u0084_ L,v\"ivr\nA FOUNTAIN DEDICATED.\n? \u0084t <n for \u00bb-th man and . w\u00ab.\n\u25a0 A drinJdnS f\u00b0 r Municipal league.\nriven to the city M \u00ab*?Jj yesterday at ttt\nTr.rr.cnt fflhrtdonj w '^ '\" Xr 'and Turnout aye*.\npoist of Bseful\u00bb>\u00bb: \u00a3*** vpd tbe fount aln\nPark Commissioner K~ p ,, t , ere President\nfor th* city. Among; t-^%. p \\ v S n^, rr^id*\"* ?f\nti!\u00ab*Taxp-iy*-rp'. 1-\" \u00ab < 5 U '' 1 _\nWEDDINGS.\nPATTON-M-IN-TVRK\nAt the Rutgers Pr~ W\u00abri\u00bb \u00ab \u00ab\u00ab J vr.ung\nat S O'clock Mia J^ E1 * \u00b0?\u2122 K^nMclntyre. ar.d\n\u00abt dasgbter of Mr. and Mrs. tu former\nFrano* Lardey Pattnn. Vr^ts \u00bb\u00ab* uilit^ in\nBrette* of Prtoc^WJ \u00a3\"\u00a3\u00a3?\u00a3\u00a3 ot xh* bride-\nWlip iv I*- WgSSSrKai- .atm. with\nDoom. The bride wa. aaired\nc coliir of point lac*, a^d a or ,f me\nHer bouquet was of r^es and aiatar. *\u2022\nvalley. Her only attendant *a. - matr on oj\nHenry Atterbury Smith, who^a^ \u201e\nhonor, and wow I'irM W*P? > p\u00abtton had :* r\n\u00abhov.-\u00abr botkjv* of f\"\u00bb\"-' !\"-' c c ' ntM r\\itv:m_ -'\u2022\ntit Lot irar hi? orotJfJ\" \u25a0;':,. vhi 'I sb' 1 \u00ab>\u25a0*\u25a0 \u00a3i W\nto* as ush-r? Paul i:'- J '^^:::' irrln^^- * oh ?}Sh\nforth E. Dwiffbt. arm vv t JJ t ''',tv^ Sroir^f *\u00a3*\u00a3\u00ab\nMclrityre and Henry K. y^ l^*^; D r. and Mr?.\ntelo. Jar. Fatton. who if **\u00a3,??\"\u00a3* of Princeton.\nPatter of Princeton, is a ZJ?*d\u00a3 3>\u00ab--T\u00abrk l-\u00bb\n''I^SB of *\u00ab, fc.' d a. BB\u00bbs1ajBJBl of tii\u00ab \u2022\nGOOD CHEER.\nHave you had a kindness shewn?\nPiss it en.\n\"Twa* not given to you alone \u2014\nPass it on.\nIjrt It travel down f\u00bbe rears.\nLet It wire another's tears.\nTill \u2022-\u25a0 heaven the deed appear* \u2014\nPass It on.\nNOTICE.\nAll letters *nd packnfre* Intended for the\nT. S. S. should he addr*-i\u00bb*ed to The Tribune\nSunshine Society. Tribune naildins. >>vr-\nYork City. If the above address is cnrefnllr\nobserved, eoiiimnnieations intended for the\nT. I. *>. *vlll be less likely to so astray. The\nTribune Sunshine Society has no connection\nwith any\" other organization or pulilimtiun\nnslnar the world \"'Sunshine.\"\nBRANCH REPORT.\nTh* Easter report of the Anr.isquam (Mass.) T. S.\nB. branch. Miss Caroline Griffin, president, shows\nthat a!l the branch and neighborhood invalids were\nremembered with fruit and flowers on this plad\npome day. Between th\u00ab different holiday greetings\nthe member? of this branch make and fill comfort\nbags for the fishermen to take on their trips. These\nbags contain nee-lcs. thread, pins, court plaster.\netc During ea^h season the members assist in a\nmidsummer bazaar In aid of the village^ church.\nThe branch meetings are beid the last Saturday\nof each moi ' The good cheer work is dona in a\nsystematic manner.\nREQUESTS.\nAn invalid member In Massachusetts asks for In\nformation about raffia, a kind of straw from which\nbaskets, mats and trinkets can be made, wiiat kind\nof thread and needle is used in sewing and where\nbought? Another request has come from Troy\nKills, X' J.. for directions for knitting woman's\nsweater with plain and pur! stitch and without a\nMrs.' Little, of Summit. X. J.. asks if some of the\nmembei will remember an invalid from time to\ntime with bits of cheer. Necessaries are not re\nquired in this case, but little attentions that will\nbif>ak the monotony of the day will be much appre\nciated\u2014a cheery iett^r. pretty pieces of silk for\nli^ht work, etc. Kor seventeen years this invalid\nha;: not been able to v.alk, because of paralysis.\nThf address is Mrs. Coleson, >'i*>rjviont, X. V.. care\nof Mr. Winant.\nTV \"PASS OX.\"\nA large contribution of bright colored wools, ma\nterial for fancy work and a variety of card? for\ndistribution has been received from Mrs. Scofleld;\na box of fresh violets, which will be given to a\n\u2022\u25a0^hut-in.\" from Mrs. Dayton, of Patchogue, Long\nIsland- magazines* and religious reading, from\nMrs F Grifiin, of Kast Orange-, N. J.: fancy cards,\netc from Mrs. G. W. Westell; a comfortableshoul\nder' shawl and illustrated booklet, from A. M.\nPalmer as cheer for an ii. valid. Chinese stamps\nfrom Mrs. Morrison ar.d a greeting from Florida.\nPLEASANT LIVES.\n\"Many years ago.\" says Oliver Wendell Holmes,\n\"in walking among the graves at Mount Auburn. I\ncame, upon a plain white miirble. slab which bore an\n\u2022^nita^-h of only four words, but to my mind they\nnfeant more than any of the labored d\u00abCrtP\"onsoi.\nother monuments. \"She was so pleasant That one\nnote reveled the music Of a Hfejof which 1 knew\nnothing more.\" How much good can he done in\nSmrcfa; home and (society by just being pleasant;\nhow r^a.Mv awrblttea it will sweeten; how many ob-\nSSielesH will brush away! All our virtues must not\nL \u00abf the heroic and strenuous type: we need also\nhe errtinr. finer graces. The^Bible ha* mu-h to\ngain some.\nMrs. Morrison, of New-Jersey, offers a book of the\nI'sdlms If. large print to any one who would like it.\nTHE TRIBUNE PATTERN\nA Tissue Paper Pattern of Woman's Strapped\nCoat. No. 4.412. for 10 Cents.\nCoat* marie with stitched straps are much in\nvosrii\u00bb\\\" and are exoeedirprly smart. Thi? attractive\none is adapted\nto suitings \u2022\u2022'\n*il sorts as well\nas to materials\nUF<\u00bbd for general\nwraps, but is\nshown in tan\nrolored covert,\nrloth stitched\nwitli siik.\nThe quantity\nof material re\nquired for the\nmedium .size, hi\ntwo and three\nquarter yards 44\ninches wide or\ntwo and r. half\nyards .\": inches\nwidf. in- coat\nP a 1 1 *>!-!.. No.\n4,412. is cut in\n>lze? tor b 22.\n\\4. 36. 3S and 40\ninch bust mea\u00bb\n' , ,\u00ab,v- >TR*prrf J Jm T^Mr!t|\u2122\n-' '\u25a0 \u25a0 **'-' n ' '^J ' \u25a0 *n> ; ad^ i \u00ab\u00bb on\nr nls P.ease give number on^^ ..[\"^^york\nNEW- YORK DA TLY TRl\u00dfttfnfi. FRIDAY, a\u00a3AT 1. W>.\nSUMMER NEEDLEWORK\nHints for Embroiderers \u2014 Work on\nShirtwaists.\nThe use of embroidery l& more extensive this\nseason than It has ever been before. It appears in\nevery conceivable form on gowns and dress acces\nsories, as well at on all sort* of decorative and use\nful articles for the home. Some of these are bo\nelaborate as to necessitate the work of an expert,\ntout many of the simple stock* and linen trimming*\ncan be made with ease. The effect of these Indis\npensable trifles depends not so much on the amount\nor style of embroidery employed as on the neatness\nand carefulness with which the work la done.\nThe storks, which promise to be bo popular this\nyear, are usually made from butcher's linen. These\nmay be cut pointed or have -tole ends, while\nFrench knots, worked In rather coarse Renaissance\nthread, always make a suitable decoration. On the\npoint, or on each stole end. may be placed tiny but\ntons or a spider web. Small conventional flowers\nare also pretty, and should be padded, as Initials\nare.\nShirtwaist s\u00abts, consisting of stock, cuffs, pleat\nand belt, are often done In the simple cross stitch.\nThis is easy to do. and yet makes a stylish trim\nming. Embroidered bands are seen on all the smart\nshirtwaist suits, and may easily be made by alter\nnating spider webs or a simple conventional flower\nwith groups of French knots. Yokes of butcher's\nlinen done in the same way are also worn, the edges\nbeing finished with a linen hand or buttonholing.\nInexpensive sofa cushions for summer are made\nof the ordinary white or unbleached huck: and as\nthis material has a square weave, the cross stitch\nIn any simple design may be used upon it to ad\nvantage. Stripes in cross stitch are most effective,\nand may easily be made by putting: a cross diag\nonally In every square of the huck. one after the\nother. The width of the stripes is regulated by the\nnumber of rows that are worked so- Id. Squares are\ndone in the same way. These cushions are excel\nlent for use on the piazza or in the hummock, as\nthey wash well when floss that will not fade is se\nlected. They must, of course, be made with slip\ncovers, the opening being neatly concealed under\nthe ruffle by means of small buttons and loops.\nThis ruffle may be either buttonholed or hem\nstitched in the same floss as Is used on the pillows.\nThe hemstitching is perhaps preferable, as It may\nbe done more quickly, and huck is apt to fray when\nbuttonholed unless the work Is carefully and closely\ndone. If the material is of good quality the threads\nwill pull very easily.\nRibbon embroidery Is greatly In evidence on\nhandsome sofa cushions. The material used Is\ngenerally silk moire in the very delicate shades.\nForget-me-nots, rosebuds, violets or. In fact, any\nemail flowers look extremely dainty when done In\nthis way, and soft green moire, embroidered with\ndaisies, makes a lovely cushion. The petals should\nbe done with white ribbon, and the centres filled\nIn solid with yellow French knots. The leaves look\nbest embroidered with silk in the usual way.\nIn the case of embroideries done on white ma\nterial, the background Is often covered with darn\ning in a pale shade, done In straight lines. This\nentirely changes the appearance of the piece, mak\ning it seem as if the silk thread were woven into\nthe material. When the color of a piece is too\n\u2022vivid, It may be toned down by laying fine white\nor cream net over It. This Is best accomplished by\nbasting the net over the whole piece and then\nworking right on top of it. The pictures on artists'\nsatin sold for cushion tops may be much improved\nby this treatment.\nBrown linen embroidered with large, showy\nflowers makes handsome centrepieces. Popples and\ndaffodils are admirable for this work. Green linen\nis also used, but the brown harmonizes better with\nthe bright colors used in the design. Conventional\ndesigns In deep toned silks are also popular. These\nare done In fancy 6titches. with a great deal of\nthe Spanish-laid, such as is used on altar cloths.\nThese centrepieces are particularly suitable for\nlibrary tables, as they are in striking contrast to\nthe dark wood, while the heavy, rich work is in\nkeeping with the furnishings of such rooms. Fre\nquently the edges of these pieces are finished by\ndeep ecru lace, applied outside the buttonholing.\nChinese dragons and heads, worked in brilliant\nsilks, with dark materials for the background, look\nextreinelv well in screens or panels. These drag\nons may \"be worked in darning quite closely done, or\nin haif-solld Kensington, the outlines being done in\nlong-and-short. Jewels are used for the eyes, and\nsometimes at the edges of the wings. As in all\nembroidery done on dark materials, the silk should\nbe very heavy.\nSpanish-laid is probably the bes; stitch to use\nin making very large letters, or monograms, in\nsilk. It Is not nearly so difficult U cio well as the\nregular initialling, and. besides, it offers splendid\nopportunity for good shading.\nBlack satin, cut the same shape as a fraternity\nor class pin, with the figures worked in gold, makes\na novel and attractive pillow for the college girl.\nIt is edged with a golden yellow cord, and backed\nwith satin of the same shade. The Idea is to\ncarry out the scheme of the pin as nearly as pos\nsible.\nPROUD DAY FOR TOTS\nChildren's Aid Society Classes Have Exhibit\nof Fine Work.\nAn unusually large audience of. interested visitors\ncrowded the assembly room of the United Charities\nBuilding yesterday on the occasion of thf' third\nannual exhibit of the work of the industrial schools\nof the Children's Aid Society.\nEarly in the afternoon a number of the articles\nwere marked \"sold,\" especially the burnt wood,\nleather and wrought iron work, chairs, tables and\ndesks. The Assembly Hall display represents the\nwork of nineteen primary grade schools, eighteen\nkindergartens and six evening schools. It embraces\neverything from the simplest pencil marks on paper\nto the most elaborate etching, painting and em\nbroidery; from a whittled stick to a finished gown\nor piece of furniture.\n\u2022 One of the most interesting exhibits is that of\nsome of the \u25a0 King schools. Oniy the simplest\ndishes prepared from the plainest materials, and\nprincipally indeed from the \"leftovers\" which the\nuninitiated are given to throwing away, are here\nshown. But they are each and all most daintily\nattractive and appetizing.\nThe showing from the Walton branch of The\nTribune Sunshine Society, including a part of the\nLeor.ard-st. school, is especially attractive. The\nSunshine colors, yellow and white, are everywhere\nshown in most realistic paper daffodils, daisies and\nbuttercups. huge chrysanthemum lampshades,\ntwine and shpving paper dollies, for all of which,\nincluding even the paper flowers, a ready sale is\nAmung the older classes of the Leonard-st.\nschool dressmaking and millinery are a ieature.\nThe girls are encouraged to bring their own ma\nterials and make them up at the school. They are\nasked how they would prefer to have them de\nsigned and why, in order to bring out their In\ndividuality. Now and then the teacher makes sug\ngestions, if tastes in colors show a ten* to be\ncome too riotous. The garments and hats, both for\nchildren and auuits. show careful work and simp!-.\ntasteful arrangement. Orders in both sewing and\nmillinery are taken tor outsiders.\nThe exhibit from the Kast Broadway school,\n\"St-ward boys \" Includes hammocks, cord portiere.-,\nfishnets and finely designed and mad. woodwork,\ndesks with delightfully multitudinous pigeonholes,\noddly shaped chairs, bookracks and tabies. us^rul\nkitchen utensils, salt boxes and settees, while a tine,\nseaworthy rowboat. some twelve or fourteen feet\nIn length Is perhaps the crowning achievement.\nThe showing of beadwork. too. is particularly\ninteresting and equals the finest examples of\nIndian design. Among the kindergarten txtubits\nare some artistic blttl of line and color, paper folu\ning, needlework and clay work. In the truant\n-chool classes chair caning and cobbling are feat\nures of the exhibit. A very fine grade of \"home\nmade\" candy offered for sale is made by the\nsociety's \"boys,\" and a number of the littie crip\n,.les from the classes especially tor their instruc\ntion an at work in the assembly rooms showing\nhow aptly their mall lingers finish the tusks by\nwl,>ch later on it is hoped they may make a\nllvins Little nine-year-old Emma Bayerie is al\nrl ay \u2022 s i,ronri\"r.t it. embroidery v many a grown\nui^ al ,'/, terest and affection of bar short suf\n.ering lUe \u00bb^ming to centre in th\u00ab pleasure of tne\nfreehand cutting, the charcoal drawing\nand much of the color work the Italian classes\nsnow . \"uerial ta,\u2122i. Of the total enrolment of\ni vvii'',j:\u00ab of \"3^4. 7.^14 are oi foreign birta.\nam \u2022'\u25a0'>* oi inene Italians. on- sma.l t>oy of tins\nfatjonaiitv i. mi!! proudly displaying tne auio-\nL-ra l?n i \"tier of tue President, win.li reacned him\nr^;\" ,wo years ago. In recognition of the gift\nof T burnt wood stamp box lent the big man at\n. \\\u00bb xi-niri Hniisc NotMue would do but that\npmaU Uifvann^ Troesi of 'the East Side Italian\n'S.n shouid again -i&^K.\"^ trea \"\nu-r- wnn trie \u00bborK of the Fcnool this J\u00ab^\u00bbr. .-v.>\nsSbtmbm rears the Prwadenra family haw been\nSK\u00abEg BOT\u00a3o\u00df^^B3 THE\nMrticuiarlseuooJ ot wbict, iJtovanni is a member\nHMmethlng owe man\ni *uich opened, yesterday in\n\u2022 c \u25a0hari'.le. Building. wIU continue to-day end\ntomorrow from 9 Oil 5:30. \u00ab\u2022 well a* \u00abr, fiaturrtai\nnight until 10 o'clock. . . ,\nMy Governor.\nI must confess I was disappointed in the gov\nernor. 1 haw tried to xuaite allowances lor mm.\nbecause no man can lie tsx^ecvcU to live meet OX\nhis me. in a place liKe India ana remain\u2014 well,\nquite good form. I have never torgotten tnai he\nliHa a claim upon sac, and 1 believe i nave never\nlet him see quite how disappointed 1 was. But tho\nfact remains mat my first meeting with him came\nas a very great shock to ms.\nI \u00dcbed to be rainer cocky about the governor.\nWhen he was a captain he came through a hill\nrow very creditably, und they aye him me V. C.\nand he lias seen a lot of servlos since. 1 did not\nuiioerstanu men how hill service knocks the paint\noff a man. aiiu I i~btd to swagger a bit about the\nCross. i have learned much since I met the gov\nernor. i suppose these, things axe excellent dis\ncipline for a teiiow. \u00b1iut, all the same, it is no end\nrough.\nThe mater died when I was a kid, and the gov\nernor went out to India Very soon afterward. I\nwent to Deiare'a when he left, and spent my holi\ndays with the governor's brotner, who was a bar\nlister. He was a decent fellow, but made too much\nfu.~s over hia girls\u2014 awful brings, giggly and long\nlegged. He insisted on my taKing tnem to auuaay\nparade in the park. That was all very well when I\nwas a kid; but when i got my remove to the fifth\nit was awkward meeting the men I knew, The\ngirls only seemed to grow in their legs, and their\nIdeas about hair dressing were very primitive.\nThere were five of them\u2014 only one maid. I\ntried to speak to my uncle about it. but he was, I\nregret to cay. very rude, and finally trotted out\nthat absuru remark about only being young once,\nor a barrister. I must say my uncle strikes me as\nbeing ot a very low order of Drain power.\n1 was mugging up for Sandhurst. The governor\nwas anxious that I should go into his regiment; but\nas he was only in the line, ana Cockran major was\ngoing Into the cavalry, I objected. The governor\njawed a bit on paper, and wrote some pittie about\nthe old \"rocks\" being good enough for him, but\ngave ill. We \u2014 that is. Cockran major and myself\u2014\nwen leaving that term to go to a crammer's. I\nexpected to get through long before the governor\ncame home, so that it was a shock when 1 got his\nletter.\nCockran major was my great chum. He was In\nthe sixth, and a chnking good bat, beastly strong\non the oft side, but not a bit stuck up. He was\ntwo years my senior and no end of a. \u2014 why, I\nhave seen him hit three boundaries in one over, off\na rattling good left handed bowler, \u2014 but he did\nnot put on an ounce of side. The only drawback\nwas that at times he put on patriarchal frilly, and\npatronized me In an amused manner.\nI showed him the letter.\n\"Well, young 'un.\" he said, \"you ought to be no\nend glad, iour guvnor must be a rare plucked\n'un. A man must have some grit to get the V. C.\"\n\"We Mortimers,\" I answered, \"get there, you\nknow, Cockran.\"\nHe grinned.\n\" Aiemoiis of a Remarkable Family.' by Guy\nMortimer.\"\n\"Shut up. Cockran; you are no end of a beast\nsometimes!\"\n\"My friend, this habit of coarse language is a\nvery pernicious evil. Beware of it; But you don't\nseem giddily hilarious. Guv?\"\n\"Of course. Cockran. it will be nice to meet the\ngovernor again. One must stand by one's own\nblood, and the V. C. is a bit of a crow. But the\nquestion is, what will he be like?\"\n\"L.ike?\" Cockran sat on my study table, which\ncreaked, and whistled. It was a long, shrill whis\ntle.\n\"You see. I shall have to trot him around a bit.\"\n\"My dear chap, that's awfuliy good of you!\"\n\"And I know a lot of decent people, and if he \u2014\nwell, you see, Cockran. a governor does belong to\na chap so much and rather stamps him, doesn't\nhe\"\nCockran looked at me for a little while, and then\nbegan to laugh. I hate a fellow to laugh when\nthere is no joke. He positively rolled with it.\n\"That table wan not made for a performing ele\nphant,\" I said severely. \"One leg's very groggy.\"\nHe was too helpless to resent my remark. \u00bbVhen\nCockran laughs, its like an earthquake In good\nworking order. The groggy leg creaked, bent and\ndoubleu up. Cockran sat down on the floor sud\ndenly and my ink-bottle made an awful mess on\nthe carpet.\nWe put things straight for a few minutes. Th\u00bb\nleg of the taoie got back all right and looked fairly\nfit. It came in handy afterward for Beauehamp.\nI arranged matters for him so that his Jacket saved\nmy carpet from the ink. He was very unpleasant\nabout it; but some fellows never can see a joke.\nWhen Cockran had used a shirt of mine to wipe\nup the ink he cellared my only easy chair.\n\"My dear chap,\" he said gravely, \"it will r>e an\nordeal, but we all have to undergo them. That's\nthe worst of having a family. Your guvnor will\nprobably persist In wearing a turban, and is sure\nto have a passion for red and yellow ties. A pair\nof flannel bags and a flowered cummerbund will\nnaturally be his Idea of a fit and proper 'get-up' for\nSunday parade.\"\n\"Don't talk rot!\" I said.\n\"Seriously, my young friend, you are not to be\nenvied. You can't cut your guvnor very well, and\ni he is certain to have very objectionable manners.\nThat lovely blush of yours will take up a permanent\nresidence in your cheek.\" I chucked a book at him,\nwhich brought down my uncle's photograph.\nCockran went on in a meditative manner. \"He\nwill laugh very loudly, talk in a brigade address\nstyle, have Indian made clothes, and collars of a\npast axe Poor old Guy!\"\nThe governor came unexpectedly to Delare's. He\nmight have known that it would have been better\nto wait until I met him at my uncle's. The parade\nof family affection is such beastly bad form. I was\nsent for tc the drawing room of 'my housemaster.\nThere I saw him. I own I was upset. He looked\nso very frumpish. His boots were SQuare toed and\nawfully large; his clothes hung about him: he\nwas reddened with Indian suns, his face was work\ning as though he had St. Virus' dance. I think I\nbehaved very well I smiled affably, crossed over,\nand held out my hand.\n\"Guy. my boy Guy!\" he shouted. I shivered at\nthe shout. \"God bless you, Guy!\" He caught me\nby the hand and Jerked me to him. It quite disar\nranged my collar. When I looked at him In the\npur.light I saw there were tears in his eyes. It\ngave me a shock. I was awfully afraid he was\ngoing to blub, and in two minutes the fellows would\npass the window.\n\"Lovely day. ain't it?\" I said. \"I hope you had\na pleasant journey, governor? Hadn't you better\ncome out of the sun\u2014 it's very strong just now.\" I\nadded nervously. ;\nHe looked at me strangely, and sat down abrupt\nly on an occasional chair. It groaned fearfully,\nand he jumped up again as though he were shot.\n\"Why in the name of thunder do they stick\nthese orange boxes about?\" he cried. He was\nstanding in the window again, and the fellows were\npassing; but. luckily, he showed no more signs or\ngushing. Cockran looked in. and I nodded affably.\n\"Who's that?\" my governor asked.\n\"Cockran major, sir.\" I said, \"He's a bid swell,\ncaptain of the eleven, and all that. We are great\nchums.\" _\n\"Harry Cockran! Little Harry Cockran! Good\ngad! Call him in.\"\nIt was rather awkward. I could not refuse very\nwell, and I was afraid of how the governor would\nbehave.\n\"Good gad\"' said the governor, when 1 intro\nduced Cockran. \"How you've grown!\" Old Cock\nran and the governor had been tv the same regi\nment before old Cockran came in t'er the title and\ncut the service.\n\"Yes. sir,\" said Cockran: \"fellows do grow after\nthey are twelve.\"\n\"Seve-i years\u2014 it's a long time to be out of one s\ncountry. No end of changes. I suppose.\"\n\"Ask 'Collars,\" 1 &aid Cockran. Cockran called\nme \"Collars\" because I dressed decently and took\nsome sort of interest in my appearance.\n\"Ah! You've been kind to my boy?\" went on th*\ngovernor. I interposed. The conversation was\ndrifting In ar awkward direction.\n\"Cockran ard I rub along very well together.\n\" 'Collars' looks after my manners, sir. and l\u2014\nI lick him now and then for the good of his sou.\nand the evil of bis suit.\"\nSomehow Cockran took to the governor, although\nthe governor did not treat him with proper respect.\nTh.\\v yarned abut India, and the next three even\nings\" the governor dined us both at the. Dragon\ndown in the village. i was glad it was only a\nthird class place, for the governor had very primi\ntive ideas about evening dress.\n\"Good enough for an old campaigner like in*-.\nGuy \" he said. \"It's only in the fifth chat you have j\nto \"be particular.\" It was all very well for the |\ngovernor to sneer, but he was only In the line and j\nI was going into the cavalry. Besides, a man may\nnot expect to keep any position in the world if he ;\ndoes not dr. s.s decently. j\nThe governor, finding out that Cockran was goir.sr\nto th-> same \"crammer\" as he had settled upon for\nme and that the long vac. would give us a long\nholiday, proposed that he should come with us to\na Hydro on the West Coast run by the widow of\na man in his regiment. It seemed to me an ex\ncellent plan I told Cockran BO\n\"We can look after the governor there, ' I said. ;\n\"It's sure to be beastly dull, but he wants trim\nming ... he goes into decent society. You'll\nbe an awful brick if you'll come.\"\n\"Better Introduce him to your friends. Collars,\nsaid Cockran. IT\n\"I can't \u25a0 ' I si>id \"lie is so awfully primitive. lie\nIt friendly with the waiters, will persist in wearing\nthat ungbdlv suit; and talks in a hurricane. You\nknow the people 1 know. Cockran\u2014 good\nform, swagger, and all that. I can't launch the\ngovernor on them until we have toned him down.\n\"Look here. 'Collars.' \" said I ockran, \"you don t\ndeserve such a governor! He's as simple as a babe.\nand as bra c as \u25a0 lion. He's got the V. C. and\nha<- eer in tight places. Lord, you make me feel\nsick, and I should like to kick you!\"\nCockran really is very unreasonable at times. Of\ncourse he said that to rag me. but all the same he\ndid sV\u00ab>m to take to the governor.\nThat evening the governor, in a deck chair\non the balcony of the Dragon, wearing his old\ntweed suit with trousers too short and showing a\nfoot of red sock on his cocked-up le*s. anu with a\nhuge Indian cheroot in his mouth, talked over the\nmatter. \u201e\n\"Better have a flutter round town first, air.\nCo-'kran said \" \"Collars' knows no end of people in\ntown, and I'm surf he'd like to introduce you. You\npee. he's been b^Wine around in the holidays so\nI suppose Cockran thought It tunny. He always\nwas a bit of an :-.se.\n\"Town?\" answered the governor. \"A regular\nma'i'oleum to me. my boy. Good gad. every stone\nIn Piccadilly would have a dead memory tor me.\nevery shop would cry out, 'How old Mortimer's\nlocking!\" The wheels have gone round since I knew\nTown and I don't want to be reminded how far.\"\nSo we went to the Hydro, at Texbay, kept by the\nwidow if a comrade of the eov<?rnor'\u00ab. Texbay\nwas a slow plnce. but M>m\u00b0 newly oper*d golf links\n:~.,j<- attractir.p people, and there was good boat-\nIng The Hydro, was one of those meanly preten\ntious places hydros generally are. I should nave\nhated Texbay at any other time, but a more swag\nger watering place with the governor was not to\nbe thought of.\n\u25a0 ran'! be any decent people in a hole oka this.\nCockran,\" I said, as we drove up in a shaky old\ncab . ned landau-wise, and with th* governor in\na battered straw hat puffing. at one of his terrible\n\"Good gaflr; Tied the governor, \"charming place.\nmy 'son! Green fields, blue sky. white cliffs. Wait\nuntil vcu'vp been in India 'or years\u2014 a brown land\nw'th a bilious sun! That \u2022 the house for a hundred\nrupee*! \" And poor old Kar\u00bb!ait\u00ab? s widow on the\n8 w'-'drov* tip. I caught a vision of thro* sir!* at\nBY AVALTE\nK. GROIi.W\nthe drawing-room window. They looked present\nable. One had sunny hair and a blouse In the\nproper shade of blue. I can to wish the gov\nernor was not with us. Some fellows run down\nfeminine society, but 1 always wag susceptible.\nThe governor sprang o>it of the cab and skipped\nup the steps, He looked positlvt-ly ridiculous, for\nhis hat biew off and the driver, very uncertain on\nhis legs, owing to rheumatism, had to hobbto af\nter it.\n\"My dear Airs. Karslake. how are you? I'm Colo\nnel Mortimer\u2014 knew- your husband well. He was\nwith me in the Katirah affair, and was howled over\nby my pide. Good gad, what an awful low i am.\nraking up sad memories: But I'm delighted, de\nlighted! My boy hi down there.\" He grew purpler\nin the face with the hurry of hi? words.\n\"I'm not Mrs. Karslake.\" said the lady. '1\nhelp her. Mrs. K\u00abrs,i.K>- Is unfortunately bed\nridden and finds it a drawback In keeping this\nestablishment, so 1 manage it for her. I'm Mrs.\nJones.\"\n\"Good gad!\" said my governor, and laughed that\nloud, messroom laugh of his, and the three beads\nat the window ducked all together as though\nJerked by wires.\nThe three girls resolved themselves Into one.\nShe was ripping. The other two were mere foils.\nThe one was the possessor of the sunny hair and\nthe blue blouse. On the third day I spoke to\nCockran.\n\"Have you ever thought seriously of settling?\"\nI asked.\n\"I never pay bills. 'Collars,' and that last bet\nwas off.\"\n\"Settling down?*' I continued. \"I suppose every\nfellow must settle, and at ail events it Is good to\nhave an aim.\"\nHe looked at me gravely.\n\"I think a felt tennis hat would be advis\nable In this sun.\" he said concernedly. \"They\nmay not be quite the thing, but you should\nmake sacrifices for the sake of health. You\nare going into the cavalry, you aren't going\nto be a gunner, so don't talk rot about alms!\"\n\"To work for an ideal.\" I went on. ignoring him.\n\"You will have to work for a gaudy crammer.\nyoungster!\"\n\"To know that one's efforts have a distinct goal.\"\n\"You have consistently shirked rugger.\"\n\"Is a spur\"\n\"Now we're getting to the \"osses!\"\n\"I'm serious,\" I said, annoyed. Cockran will rag.\nand it gets on a fellow's nerves.\n\"You are \u2014 the most serious beggar I know. That's\nwhat makes you so lolly funny!\"\n\"Look here, Cockran. what do you think of Eva?\"\n\"Eva?\"\n\"Eva Lea\u2014 girl in blue blouse, sunny hair, big\neyes?\"\n\"Ripping! I was over the links with her this\nafternoon. She Is about the most decent girl I've\nrun against for \u25a0 long time.\"\nI did not like his manner. He was undoubtedly\nenthusiastic.\n\"She Is very good natured.\"\n\"What do you mean. \u2022Collars'?\"\n\"Eva strikes me as a girl who Is fond of the re\nfinements or life. I read Shelley to her the other\nday.\"\n\"What rot! You should see her drive'\"\n\"I shall alter all that. I object to masculine\nwomen.\"\nCockran studied me seriously. He even stopped\npolishing a bulgex to look at me. .\n\"You are not a bad sort in your way. Collars,\nand when you recover from this youthful meases\nof prirgishness you may be a credit to your gov\nernor and to me. Eva is twenty-five ana you\n\"My age does not matter. One Is old kg\ninner experience. A few years of feeding ana\nthat sort of thing does not count.\"\n\"It's absurd. 'Collars,' and you had better drop\nit! Fact Is, I have never seen a girl I like hetter\nthan Eva. She understands a fellow so awfully\nwell. I feel pretty much of a worm in her pres\nence, but\u2014 but I can teach her something at\nputting, thank goodness, and she is grateful.\"\nJust then, when my soul felt sick and I was mov\ning off. for Cockran can cackle most astounding\nrubbish, Eva's hat appeared over the hedge which\nseparated us from the tennis lawn, and with it\nthe governor's head inside his absurd straw They\nwere very close together. Cockran and I looked\nat each other.\n\"I did not think the governor had so much tact.\nI said. \"He must have seen that my affections\nwere engaged and is doing the civil to Eva.\"\n\"He was playing golf with her this morning.\n. Lockran said, gloomily. \"He can't play for nuts,\nand it took them three hours going round the\ncourse.\" _ , \"\n\"It is quite evident he approves, I remarked,\npulling my tie into place.\n\"Approves! Tea I think you've hit It. youngster.\nHe dropped the bulfrer and kicked it savagely.\n, It must have hurt him. for he swore under his\n' breath and went off limping\ni Cockran and I were not such good chums for a\nfew days after that. Th\u00bb fact was we were both\nbusy dodging after Eva. \"When she appeared\nCockran was always hanging about with his bag\nof clubs. He sneered openly at me because I hap\npened to be near with a copr of Shelley. He began\n\u25a0 to patronize me because of the two years between\n; us. At table he talked loudly.\n\"Remember that match against King's. Guy.^\n' he would say. \"You were watching. I remember.\n! Unfortunately, although very fond of Shelley, Eva\nset great store by atnietic prowess. And she was\nawfully keen on golf. Beastly game, too. It cut\nInto our reading Shelley together terribly.\n! Cockran was mostly savage, bat I was not wlth-\nI out hope. She was very kind to the governor,\neven ate some of his chutney\u2014 was unspeak\nable\u2014and took a great interest in his Indian stories.\nShe d; not even serm to mind his clothes, or his\n' big voice, or his ab-sentmlndedness. All this, of\n', course, .vas because he was my governor.\ni Mrs. Jones spoke one evening when we were eat\nimc soup\u2014 at least all but the governor, who \u25a0is\n; gobbling his fiercely. I could have blessed Mrs.\nI Jones then, although she had once said she wished\n! I would play more games like other boys, for she\nI forced a sweet admission from Eva.\n! \"I thought you ware not going to stay. Miss\n; Lea?\" she said.\n\"I have changed my mind. Mrs. Jones. The place\n; seems more attractive.\" She looked at the gov-\nI ernor, and he looked at her. Then she blushed.\nj Of course. I understood it. The place must have\nbeen insufferably dull before I came. And she\n; knew the governor had noticed her delight in\nI Shelley.\nI could not help smiling at Cockran, he looked\n| so down in the mouth. After dinner he went for a\nj long walk.\n\"Your friend seems rather upset. Guy.\" said the\ngovernor. \"He's not going to have whooping\ncough, or anything, eh?\"\n\"Cockran baa been through all infantile com\nplaints some years \"\n\"Oh. has he? Tea I suppose so. Good gad, or\n' course!\"\n\"Cockran is\u2014 is troubled in his mind.\"\n\"Eh? What?\" cried the governor. \"In his\nI mind? Go\"d gad!\"\nThat evening I read Shelley to Eva. It was a\nsoft gray evening and very warm. She sat In a\ndeck chair and I lay on the grass. Then I read |\n! her a thir:g of mine I hid dashed off, pretending\n!it was out of the book. I paused. There was\nsilence \u2014 or would hay\u00bb been, only the governor\n' was telling a yarn through the open window to\nMr?. Karslake. and his voice Is so loud. Mrs.\nKarslake occupied a room on the ground Boor, and\nher bed was near the window, so that she could\nsee. the garden. The governor generally sat near\nf her window In the evening, and shouted stones\nthrough, to \"cheer her up n bit,\" he said. she\nsuffered from headaches very much about that\nEva made no r.-mark. She had turned her head\naway from me. The only place away from me was\n!in the direction of the governor. My littie thing\nwas very passionate. l saw sbe was afraid lest\nI should read her eyes. I snoke.\n\u2022 What do you think of it?\"\n\"Beautiful.\" she murmured\n\"Not v.;t to the other things.\" I said, modestly.\n\"Oh. no, not at all.\" she answered. I was dum\nfound^i': Was she learing on my opinion? I was\nconsidering this when she spoke again.\n\"What an exceedingly kind man your father Is,\nshe sa.'t.\n\"Oh. he's not bad.\" 1 answered. \"Of course,\nliving such a long time '\u2022; India has rather taken\nthe paint off. One must make allowances.\"\n\u2022I think.\" she said hotly, \"he is the grandest\nman I have ever met'\"\nHoy; loyal she was to my relations.\n\"Miss Lea.\" I said, \"er\u2014 Eva\u2014 l Should like as\n\u00abay something very Important to you.\"\n\"four father is goi:;g for a stroll.\" She was con\nfused, I saw at once. \"Oh. colonel, may I come?\"\nsht- cried\n\u2022\u2022Er\u2014 good gad! I was going to ask you. IBM ;\nLea. Lovely moon, glorious sea. what a grand \u2022\npace En eland is. to he sure!\"\n\"It la Important. Eva. I must speak! \u25a0 I wr.i\u00ab\n\u2022TvThen I come buck.\" she murmured. Poor girl,\nshe was so evidently shy that I pitied her.\n\"All riffht!\" I answered; and she went off with\nth\u00ab\" governor\nCockran came back about test tf\u00bb was very\nv \"I'm * going to <-ut the cavalry. Guy.\" he said.\n\"I shall go to the Cape and tors digger. I \" write\nto my ji\u00ab-ople to-nipht.\"\n\"What's up?\" I ask\u00bbd. ._ ...\n\"Everything! Met your governor and Eva\u2014\nLea Good night.\" ..\n1 chuckled it was a bit rough upon poor old\nCockran. but then any pir' prefers brains to mere\nSt Half an ho;:r later the governor came back with\n\"fiuHo Guv!\" he said. \"Xot in b\u00ab>d?\"\nI did not answer him. Bed at half past ten! The\ngovernor was so absurd. He wa\u00ab always looking\n\" E\u00b0va?ried 9 to away She looked awfully pretty\nin \"Don'f nllfrht. said the governor. \"We've had\n- go, Bva.\" \"ill Urn i\u00dfwnwr, -v\\-^<\u00bb had\na tW Guv mv boy.\" My heart beat. I confess It.\n\"I i n't know what Eva can see in an old cam\noa'snVr like me. but. food srad! \u00ab*e has promised\nrr'lL' _\u201e. mP an d b<\" i mother to you.\nF\u2122 * mom*nt the world waited. Then I pulled\n\"voVniv sinrerest consr-atnlations.** T said.\n\"I am very jrlao 1 -\" Then I went in.\nI spent a beastly n:*rnt.\n\\r *i-*>akfa\u00abt n\u00ab\u00bbxt niorrdn- Cockran came down\nlooking 'very fit. There was a letter on his plate.\nHe nnened It and shoutr-1. \u0084,\n\"They've asked me to p'.ay for the \u00ab\u2022 \u25a0\u2022> he\n\"'\u2022TUit tbe C\u00abDe. CorVr.-inT' I \u00abafd.\n\"Caoe be han?<^: play for the riday -otinty.\nWhat wurfv h:ck!\"\u2014 <Cass^'.rs Magarln*.\nRUN.\nFrom Puck.\n? he threw h\"rs> -at her father 9 feet, pr.-testir.g\nwith many sobs that she had M her huabar..i for- !\nr ,V, Ur short weeks sbe arts*. \"I have run the \u2022\n\u201e,.. of human errorions. from the seventh heaven |\nfj h'i-. to the uttermcX bell of misery?\nThe erav old man soft-v stroked the bowed head.\n\u2022je\u00ab- like her mother, - shr he muttered. \"Her \u2022\nmorher'wiis alus fer runnin' things.\"\nThe memory was too much for him. and ?-. mln-\nE lijh\u2122 tears with tho^ of hi. wretched child.\nMR. THOMPSON f\\ OFFICE.\nI\\ n I M Stewart Retir t \u00a7 Private\nSrcretarff. Tf*>.\nSTATEMENTS MADE ALL AROL'N'D.\nHenry S. Thompson, the new Superintendent of\nBuildings, took charge of the bureau at Eighta\u2014 til\nst. and Fburth-ave. yesterday afternoon, relieving\nPerez M. Stewart. \u00ab hr. was on ami) in the morn\ning. When he was introduced to Thomas J. t>uti\u00ab.\nMr. Stewart's private secretary. h\u00bb- said:\n\"As soon as practicable, Mr. Dunn. I would IV**\nto have you send In your re\u00abgnatk\u00abii.~\nMr. Dunn forthwith resigned.\n\"\"I nave not decided or. a mtm secretary ]et '\nsaid Mr. Thompson lat\u00bbr In the day to * Tribune\nreporter. \"'I made the rounds of the department\nH. S. THOMPSON.\nTh\u00ab new buildings superintendent.\nand told th\u00ab men that their positions were seenrw so\nlong as they did their work, and that a '-pull' would\nnot work In th\u00bb office. Mr. Cantor has asked ra\u00ab\nto give a strictly business administration of th\u00ab\noffice, and that is what I propose to do. X ha.v*\nstopped the practice of callers making th\u00bb rounds\nof the offices because of their acquaintance with\nsome particular mar. In the bureau. Hereafter they\nwill have to state their business to the head of th\u00ab\ndepartment. I also have issued an order fort>lddina*\nany one opening; the office mall. Under my prede\ncessor two or three persona, I understand, opened\nthe mall. I shall open every letter myself, so that\nI may know exactly what Is going: on In the war\nof correspondence.\n\"As a builder I have experienced th\u00bb embarrass\nment cause<l by architects* plans being held up in\nthis office In days gone by. I am not now criti\ncising Mr. Stewart's conduct of the office. I shall\nmake It a rule to pass on plan* either one way or\nthe other with greater promptness than ever.\nBorough President Cantor had little to say yes\nterday about the retirement of Mr. 3tewart\n\"l have read in the morning papers.\" said Hr.\nCantor, \"all that Jlr. Stewart has said regardlajc\nhis reasons for being dismissed, but I hare nothing\nto say. in reply to them, and don't expect to have.\nMr. Stewart can have the centre of the stage to\nhimself. I am responsible for that department, and\nI have appointed a man who will take good ear*\nof it.\n\"As to the 111 a Him that Henry S. Thompson\nis ineligible because he has not been a builder for\nten years, tha: is not true. I had some dtf\u00dfealty\nin getting him to accept the place, as he Is a rich\nman. so you can se\u00ab he made a sacrifice '.n accept-\nIng it.\"\nMr. Stewart said he had not made any plans\nfor the future. Regarding his removal. r><\u00bb \u00abav\nout a statement, saying in part:\nIn accepting the appointment of Superintendent\nof Buildings I did so with the firm determination.\nas far as lay In my power, to correct tft* abuse*\nthat from my experience as a builder. I felt *>xi-=i*Hl\nin the department. To thai end I have made ar\neffort to see that that part of the public which ha.l\nbusiness with the department should realize that\neverybody who had such business should be tre;iteil\nalike; that under my administration there were f>\nbe no rites, and that everybody would be abl\u00ab>\nto get from the department speedy an<l courteous\nattention, and that none of the employes should\nbe permitted in any way to harass them. It mat\ntered not to me whether such p<\u00bbopk were Republi\ncans. Reformers. Greater New-York Democrats.\nProhibitionists or members of Tammany Hall.\nIt has betn asserted that I have had no sym\npathy with the pr\u20act\u00bbent administration. I know of\nno greater benefit that can accrue to any admin\nistration than an honest effort to perform one's\"\nofficial duty without fear or favor. This I hay\u00bb\ntried to do. and with what degree at success I\nmust again leav\u00bb to the public to ai:swer. and I\nalso invite the testimony of th\u00ab* heads of the other\ndepartments under this administration as to th\u00bb\nco-or*- ration and assistance I have Always **\u00bb#r\u00bb\nwilling to render them.\nIt has a!\u00abo be\u00ab\u00bbn statM that my ir.thr-.acv with\nmembers of Tammany Hall was an injury \u2022\u2022 my\ndepartment, and reflected in seme way or other\nupon the present a'lm!r.!strat'on. For this I hay*\nno ar-<->'os r v to trow. I h\u00abve r ever been a m^rriber\nof a Tammany Hall organization\u2014 in fact, of any\npolitical organization\u2014 and the few friends who\nhave come to me in my business and political ac\ntivities have my confidenc* and esteem, and th\u00ab\nquestion of political affiliations has never been, nor\nwill I permit it in the future tr> he. a consideration\naffecting such friendship.\nSAYS IT'S A CIZAB VIOLATION.\nMr. Livingston Declares Penalty Might B\u00ab\nRecovered for Vanderbilt Portico.\nCommissioner Livingston of the Public \"Works De\npartment said yesterday that the architects re\nsponsible for trying to build a portico In front of\nGeorge W. VanderblU'a house, extending to th\u00ab\nstoop line, were clearly violating th* building or\ndinance.\n\"The house of George W. Vantierbilt Is built as*\nthat the front of it Is nov on the building line,\"\nsaid Mr Livingston yesterday. \"The only latitude\nthe owner has is in building a front areaway If on\u00bb\nIs wanted. That is as far as he can go. The archi\ntects who planned this covered portico, extending\nbeyond the building line, were fully aw* of the.\nlimitations in the case. or. at least, they should\nhave been.\n\"It rests with Boroueh President Cantor now an\nto whether the builders shall be allowed to g\u00ab\u00bb\nahead with the structure as designed. I suppose\nAssistant Corporation Counsel Arthur F\\ Cosbv, in\ncharge of the Bureau for the Collection of Pen\nalties could ?:o ahead independently of the Bor\nough President's office, as it appears to be withla\nhis province to Institute an action for the recovery\nof a penalty where the violation is plain,\"\nV Wedding Gifts\nof Gold or Silver retain their j\noriginal value ant] brilliancy j\nindefinitely hen cleaned and j\npolished -with\nj^ Silver Polish g\nSILICON\nUsed by owners a n d mafc^r\u00abpf Valu- j\nable Plate for more than a J\nquarter century. j\nEIECTRO-SILICO* SILVER SOAP. ;\nIf you prefer a soap to a powder. H\nI has equal merits. Groeera4Droczi\u00bbts. Jm\n13 CENT* PER CAKE. jtf\nQARPET fiLEAH3iN3\nUrar.i In the World. Hvtrj tletmtU\nTHE THO>. J. STEWART CO.\n.Ho vrnri' eip\u00ab*rteiiee.\nnro\u00abilrrar. cor. 4\u00ablth St.. >\u00ab-\u00ab York.\nt'rlr- and .\".tl\u00bb *t\u00bb.. .Irr.ft City.\nSTORAGE WAREHOUSE AND MOVINO VANS.\nWrtt* or telephone for - \u2014 \u00ab\u00bb\u25a0 -\u00ab > \u00ab K'.vt.\nThe C. H. BROWN CO.\n:\u2122. I CARPET CLEANSIN6\nompreurd ! 221 E. 3STH *T. T\u00abL 1531\u2014 \u00ab.\nAIR. J Taklnr \u00ab?. AlMTin*. R\u00bblaytnc.\n7",
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"text": "8\nAmusements.\nACADEMY Or \u2014 \u00ab IS\u2014 Th\u00bb S\u00bbVurb\u00aba.\nAMJiRiCAN THEATRE- \u2014 D\u00bbrb\u00bbr\u00ab Frljtcaj*.\nRELASCO THKATRB- B\u2014 Th\u00ab DarUaa ef th\u00ab Ood\u00ab.\nBIJOU THEATRE\u2014 \u00ab:IS\u2014 Kancy Brown.\nBROADWAY THEATRE Prince at rn\u00aben.\n' TKCL.V THBATP.E\u2014 2:li\u2014 S:li\u2014 Vandevllle\nCRITERION THEATRE \u2014 A \u00bb\u2022\u25a0-\u00bb\u00bb\u00ab\u2022 from ilar\u00bb.\nPAL.Y*B THEATRE- -Tt<* Starbuckn.\nEDEX Ml'SfcE\u2014 S\u2014 The Wnrld in Wax. \u2014 .\nS3MPIUI; THEATRE\u2014 h:ro\u2014 I '\u25a0\u2022 Mummy an 3 ti-.e Hum\nFOURTCENTU STREET THEATRE\u2014 4 Cohan*.\nGAKDEN* THEATRES\u2014 ?ao\u2014ev\u00abrjmaa.\nGARRI'TC THKATRE\u2014 \u00ab:IS\u2014 Mice and Men. .\nHARLEM OJ'ERA HOUSE\u2014 Frisky Mr\u00bb. John-\nHT^RAJ-r. BQCAJUE THEATRE\u2014 \u00abl:l(V\u2014 Prettr P*^: .\nIRVING PLACE THEATRE\u2014 *:2t>\u2014 IM* I*urP\u00ab < Th \u00ab Do\").\nKEITH'S \u2014 fjpntlnuous . rrr.pn,\u00ab. n\u00bb- r <l\nKNICKERBOCKER THKATRB- S\u2014 Mr. niu\u00ab P*2^:_t-\nWAIiSJN fcQUARB GARUKN\u2014 73O\u2014 Military To\u00abnu\n\u25a0AOISOK SQUARE THEATRE\u2014 S:\u00bbv_ A Fool and HI\nMAJESTIC THEATRE\u2014 *\u2014 TIi^ Wirard of Os\nMANHATTAN\" THEATRE\u2014 *- 20 -The Earl or F*w-\nMtRRAT HTLX. THBATRI3\u2014 2\u2014 Malton.\nrEW PAVOY\u2014 The Taming of Helen.\nPASTOR I **\u2014 ContiruOTs Performance.\nPRINCESS THEATRE\u2014 S:2O\u2014 There and Back .\nPROCTORS THEATRES\u2014 Comedy and \\audnU*\u00ab.\nVICTORIA THEATRE\u2014 s:l3\u2014 Resurrection.\nm AI.LA-K IS\u2014 *:l6\u2014 Sultan of \u00abulu.\nTIT.NT \u25a0:Vl< THEATRE \u2014 \u2014 Shore. Acres.\nIndtx to Adoartiaemeuti\nr*S\u00ab. COL! P \"*ifi 2 1\nAn-ui*Tn\u00abit\u00bb 14 \u00ab' Instruction 1\u00b0 -*\"3\nAn<ti\u00aba Sales R. E..1\u00ab sjlxjrt -Jil'-.l\" 2\nHanker* & Broker*.. l3 Sj Marri.|\u00ab * rx\u00bbth\u00bb-. it 5-\u00ab\nr-^ird * Ba*aM.....W * : Notic* of Summon....\" P\n<arp-t Ci-anlr-K ..-1\u00ab 4 ; rkvan Steamers \" J\nOtt Hotels 1* 4;OSic* Furniture \u00bb \u2022\u2022\n'\u2022\u2022 \u2022 Prop, iorS\u00bb>..l\u00ab \u2022 Pawnbrokers- S*l\u00abi .1\" 4\nOr'ta\u00ab\u00abMp Notices 13 3 Pro,K>\u00abals J* *\"!\nCountry Property for Public Notices j] *\nnn L\u00bbIIJL \u00bbIIJ Property to BaaJ B3state l\u00ab \u2014\u00bb\nIX 1\" SfPteamboats \u00ab *\nPivta^nd Xoti\u00ab*....W SJSprtwr \u00df2*?^\u00a3l*--JT *\nTurn Fitn. Wanted.. \u00bb-7 ! Snrros*te\u00bb* Notice*... H *\nHmphm't Arei^ies.V* 4 horn. R\u00abort C\u00abide\u00ab.>W \u00ab\nnianrtaJ M**tin\u00ab\u00bb. . . \u25a0; : *jTh\u00ab T '' r ........ ---I*\nF-wI<MK S\u00bb:\u00ab---.\u00ab \u2022 To Ix\" tor Busin\u00ab\u00ab\u00ab\nI^irnlsted Rooram.-.10 4 Purpos\u00ab\u00ab -\u25a0 \u25a0- \u25a0\u25a0 : \u2022\u2022 \u2022- \u00bb1\"\u00bb 1 \" s\nFvrrt*h*fi Hoa\u00bbe\u00ab to I rnf>irn!\u00abh\u00bbri Ar tment? \u201e\nt*t. OounaT-.----10 2 I tn L\u00ab \u2022 '\" , -\nir-ln -Wactftd 10 6 1 Work Wanted '\" \"-*\u00bb\nZVkft^arkiUaiitj ariitint\nFRIDAY. MAY 1. 190?,\nTHE NEWS THIS MORNING\nFORKTGN.\u2014 Th\u00bb Ottoman Bank at Salonica,\nEuropean Turkey, wnj blown up by dynamite,\nbo\u00bbbs we\u00abr\u00ab thrown in many places throughout\nthe city, and two men were killed in the disor\no*r\u00ab: i^^--: ADr.ouncemsnts were made in Par\nliament that the British Government has re\nceived authoritative information that Russia\nhad no new deigns in Manchuria. \u25a0 Era\np*-nr Wnttem and Queen Wilhelmlna were\namong tlw present at the neddinp of the\nGrand Duke r.f Kaxe-VTelmar and Princess \u00ab-aro\n!rn- of Reu\u00ab=. at Buck<-b*>rg Castle. ===== The\nR\u00bbtciw:a\u00ab was prorogued. :^-= : The weeKO\nvia rue mortality in India exceeds thirty thou\nsand \u25a0anal ===== A mob recently attacked a\nParty of American engineers at work ori l the\nCarton-Hankow Railroiid In China; the United\nFta\u00bb\u00ab punboat Callao went to the rescue of the\n#n-ine<?r-. = The health of Cardinal Vaughn\n\u00abo? S not improv-. and it la unlikely that he trill\nr\u2014 uittp active duty. =^i King: Edward left\nKerne fer Paris. ===== President Loubet landed\n\u2022 tMarteHW \u2022\u25a0 his return from Algiers; among:\nthose rc<^iving the Tre?ident was Admiral Cot\nton. U. S. N.\nDOMESTIC\u2014 The buildings of the Louisiana\nPurcia*e Exposition at St. Louis were dedicat\ned. P-e=ld-\u00bbnt Roosevelt and ex-Pregident Cleve\nland making the principal addresses. == : Re\nturns at the State Excise Department m Albany\nfhow that there has been little, if any. falling\noff in demands for liquor licenses due to the In\ncreased tax. ===== Reports from the Adiron\n<-,\u00ab.\u00ab-ke Indicate that UN most serious forest fires\nIn years are raging: several hotels and cottages\nare* threatened, and much valuable timber wi.l\nl.\u00bb destroyed. === It is expected that the Pa\ncific cable will be completed to Manila by July\n4. and that President Roosevelt and Governor\nTaf t trill exchange messages on that day. -\u2014\nThe opinion of the United States Supreme Court\nIn the Alabama case, refusing the petition of\nTi^pro voters for relief from disfranchisement.\n\u25a0>-as made public ===== Late reports from\nFrank. N. TV. T.. are that fifty-six persons lost\nih*sr lives in the landslide of Wednesday.\nClTY.\u2014 Stocks were dull and Irregular. ==\nTa'lbot J. Taylor was the chief witness at the\nAmnry-Vreeland hearing yesterday, testifying\nUiat ii\u00ab* did not know how reports from his\nf,i> g\u00bbnt to Mr. K\u00bbf-n\" reached a newspaper\noffice; counsel for both sides summed up. \u25a0 - -\npresident Thomas of the Lehlgh and President\nBmt of th*- Reading were witnesses before the\nInterstate Commerce Commission at the con\ntinuation of the coal hearing. ==--= A book\nmaker knowingly took a bet on the Jamaica\nraces from a detective at Seventh-aye, and\nFortieth-st- and was arrested, supposedly as a\npart of a plan of bookmakers to take the con\nstitutionality of the racing law to the United\nState 6 Supreme Court, : -r It was announced\nafter the conference that the threatened general\ntieup of harbor craft would not take place, the\nengineers and the railroads agreeing to arbi\ntrate th\u00ab? former's demands.\nTHE TTEATHER.\u2014 lndications for to-day:\nRain, much colder. The temperature yesterday:\nHlKfaent. 85 degrees; lowest. 02.\nSIGyjFICAXCE OF LOUISIANA.\nThe addresses of the President and ei-Presi-\nI dent fit St. Louis yesterday were especially ad\n' roirable in their suggestions of the true signifi\ncance of the occasion. It would have been easy\nto dwell in resounding periods upon the ma\nterial aggrandizement which has come to the\nnation through the transaction the centenary of\nwhich 5 s now being celebrated. Nor would we\nregard snch treatment of the theme as alto\ngether unfitting. It wonld haye \u2014 It has\u2014 lts\nplace. But far more important, profitable and\nworthy 1* it to consider the constitutional re\nsult? of the Louisiana Purchase and the moral\n\u25a006 civic effects of it upon this nation and upon\nfoe world. Mr Roosevelt described the Pur\nchase as the greatest work of the American peo\nple between the adoption of the Constitution\nfind tha outbreak of the Civil War. It was that,\nand it iras something more. It was an act of\nexpansion unique In the history of the world\nand of greater significance to mankind than any\nother in history. This fact was made plain by\nMr. Roosevelt In his comparison or contrast of\nAmerican expansion with that of Greece and\nRome, In the Greek colonies local independence\nwas carried to an extreme, with the result that\nthe colonies did not strengthen, but rather\nweakened and menaced, the mother country.\nThe Roman provinces, on the contrary, were\ntoo much subordinated to the centralized author\nity of the imperial city. Toward one or the\nother of these faulty extremes practically every\nimportant act or process of expansion inclined\ndown to a century ago. It was then the lot of\nthe United States to set an entirely new ex\nample to the world, of a new system of expan\nsion., in which the acquired territories became\nIn due time sovereign and equal parts of the\n.fov^relpii nation. That achievement marked,\nas Mr. Roosevelt said, a new era In statesman\nship as well as In pioneering.\nMemorable, too. Is the fact of which Mr.\nCleveland reminded us\u2014 that the great transac\ntion was a peaceful one. \"Every feature of our\noelebratiou.\" said the ex-President, \"should re\n\u2022 - mlnd tin that we memorialize a peaceful acqui\nsition of territory.\" Nor was that all The\n.\u2022u-rual deed of transfer was peacefully effected,\nand it was no less peace preserving in its pur\nport and in Its results. Through It war was\navoids, at that time and In all future time.\nFor. a* Mr. Cleveland recalled, the purchase\nwas an alternative^ we may say the sole alter\nnative \u2014 war. No one saw that more clearly\nor expressed it more vigorously than Jefferson,\nwho declared himself ready to stake the very\nexistence of the Republic In the straggle. Writ\ning to Livingston a year before the purer -\nJefferson said frankly that it would be aaapaav- j\ntitle ior France and America Ii remain friends j\n\u25a0with tfce former settled at New-Orleans. If i\nFrance took possession of New-Orleans, lie\nMid, the United States must build a powerful\nnavy, make a defensive and offensive alliance\nwith Great Britain, and at the first opportune j\n**jC\u00a3O\u00abDt begta- \u00ab max of conquest for th\u00ab pos- |\nsession of the French colonies. Such a course\nwas not sought nor desired by the United\nStates, but was forced upon it as a necessity\nby the laws of nature, Such was Jefferson's\nattitude all through the negotiations. Such\nwas the attitude of Congress. Such. was the\nattitude of the American people; and at the\nvery moment when this 'peaceful acquisition of\nterritory\" was effected the United States was\nenergetically taking up arms by land and sea\nto effect the acquisition by forcible conquest.\nThese facts are profitable for remembrance.\nThe great event which we commemorate was\neffected through the alternative of peace or\nwar. The lot fell for peace. But there can be\nlittle doubt that it was mightily Influenced so\nto do by our readiness for war and by the un\nconcealed frankness with which this nation con\ntemplated an immediate resort to arms in case\nnegotiations failed. The reminder of this came\nthe more fittingly from the distinguished speak\ners of yesterday, too. for the reason that each\nof them has. in bis own administration as Jef\nferson's successor, been a noteworthy exponent\nof the policy of securing just rights through\npower to take and to maintain them, and of\nattaining a peaceful settlement of controversy\nthrough demonstrated readiness to accept the\nbelligerent alternative.\nSOME ESTABLISHED FACTS.\nThe proceedings before Magistrate Barlow on\nWednesday, In which various individuals and\ninterests connected with the Metropolitan com\npany were implicated, established certain facts,\nas follows:\nThat Daniel Nason had several interviews\nwith William N. Amory at which they dis\ncussed a purchase through Nason of stock in a\nbicycle seat company, owned by Amory, at a\npreposterous price, namely. $200,000.\nThat Amory was designedly led to believe\nthat William H. Page, jr., an attorney for the\nMetropolitan company, had authorized Nason\nto conduct such a negotiation and was fully in\nformed as to its nature, purpose and progress.\nThat Nason caused Amory to understand that\nthe object being aimed at was to secure a\nwithdrawal of his charges and an abandonment\nof his efforts prejudicial to the Metropolitan\ncompany.\nThat, after every interview of this sort be\ntween Nasbn and Amory. Nason saw Page and\ntold him what had occurred: that Page knew\nthat Aincry supposed him to be the real and\nresponsible Instigator of the attempted negotia\ntion, and that Amory was encouraged to draw\nthe natural conclusion.\nThat the actual object of the attempted ne\ngotiation was either to buy off Amory in the\ninterest of the Metropolitan company, and of\none or more persons connected therewith, or to\ncatch him in a trap and expose him as a black\nmailer.\nPage and Nason are members \"of the New-\nYork bar in good and regular standing. There\nare lawyers who could never be persuaded to\nengage In S*cb a business as the testimony\nproduced on Wednesday and substantiated by\nthe principals described. We hope that such\nlawyers constitute a majority of the Bar Asso\nciation, which occasionally makes an Investiga\ntion of matters affectinsr the professional char\nacter of members of the bar.\nA colossal landslide.\nThe early accounts of the disaster which\nwrecked the mining village of Frank, In British\nNorthwest Territory,, on Wednesday, called it\nan explosion- White there was some excuse\nfor thus describing it: there was also wan ant\nfor scepticism. It is hard to imagine that such\nviolence as was exhibited on the slopes of Turtle\nMountain could have been caused either by\ndynamite or firedamp. It would have been\nmore reasonable to attribute the event to vol\ncanic action had the adjacent country been thus\nafflicted of late years. That pretext was lack-\nIng, however, and there was no outpouring of\nlava. No doubt is now entertained on the sub\nject. The catastrophe was a true landslide,\nenormous masses of rock having become de\ntached and having fallen Into the valley below.\nThe only wonder now Is that the damage was\nnot greater. Had Frank been a city of consid\nerable size the result would, of course, have\nbeen very different.\nA partial explanation of r phenomenon of\nthis kind is afforded by the tilting up of rock\nstrata so commonly observed by railway pas\npen^ers when going through a cut in mountain\nous districts. The~ layers above do not al\nwnvs cling firmly to those below. The former\nmay not slip, because they are buttressed by\ndebris, but gravitation is always tending to dis\nlodge them. If by human activity or the corro\nsion of riven? the mass becomes undermined\nthere will eventually some a fall, the Quantity\nand distance depending on circumstances. The\nfuries which weaken the hold of the upper\n6trata operate so slowly and gradually that\ntheir action is usually unsuspected; but at last\nthey preponderate over adhesion and a land\nslip? occurs. Such things may be common in\nuninhabited districts in America and on a\nsmaller scale, but one does not often hear of -in\navalanche In this country that Is attended with\nsuch mortality as that recorded yesterday.\nNO FRANCHISE TAX DEDUCTIONS.\nOne important feature of Judge Vann's ad\nmirable and exhaustive opinion on the Fran\nchise Tax law seems to have escaped general\nnotice. That Is, concerning the deductions to be\nmade in the tax on account of other payments\nto the city which may be \"in. the nature of a\ntax.\" After Judge Vann's review of the mat\nter there can be no ground for holding that any\nof the payments formerly made for franchises\nwere \"in the nature of a tax.\"\nAt one time while the bill was pending in\nthe special session of 38'Jlt. it contained a\nclause providing for deductions for all sums\npaid for franchises in any form. That was\nchanged m> as to permit deductions only for\npayments \"in the nature of a tax.\" Some\nmonths ago Justice Hooker, at Special Term.\nconsidered the question. The Crosstown Street\nHallway of Buffalo bad a franchise which it\nbought at public auction on a bid of 11% per\ncent of its gross receipts. Under its contract\nthe road in 1900 paid $13.480 43 for its fran\nchise. When for that year a franchise tax of\n131*31843 Avas levied upon it. the road sought\ndeduction of the 113.48045. Justice Hooker re\nfused to grant this petition, holding that the\npayment was not a tax. No anneal from his\njudgment has yet been decided, but Judge\nVanu completely covers the point, and be will\nundoubtedly be sustained. Judge Vann, with\nthe concurrence of the whole Court of Appeals,\n\u2022:\u2022 PR\nThe franchises are grants which usually con\ntain contracts executed by the municipality, but\nexecutory as to the owner. They contain vari\nous conditions \u25a0\u25a0:. stipulations to be observed\nby the holders of the privilege, such as payment\nof a lieei.se Gee. of a gross sum down, of a spe\ncific sum each year or a certain percentage of\nreceipts, as a consideration or \"in full satisfac\ntion for the use of the street?.\"\nThe condition upon which a franchise la grant\ned is the purchase price of the grant, the pay\n\\ nient of which in money, or by an agreement to\nbear some harden, brought the property into ex\nistence, which thereupon became taxable at the\nwill of the legislature, the same as land granted\nor leased by the State. There in no implied\ncovenant that property sold by the State cannot\nbe taxed by the State, which can even tax ita\nown bonds piv^n to borrow money for its own\nuse. unless they contain an express stipulation\nof exemption.\nThe rule of strict construction applies to\nState grants, and unleos there is an express\nfUtMitatinf U3t v. Ujs liie right la r&serv&d as\nXTCVT-TORK *fI*\u00a3TLY TBTOUIW, FRIDAY. MAY 1. 1903.\nan attribute of sovereignty. Special franchises\nwere not taxed until by the act of 1899, amend\ning the tax law. they were added to the other\ntaxable property of the State.\nAs all those paymcnt\u00df for which deduction is\n\u25a0ought are purchase prioe. they cannot be \"in\nthe nature of a tax.\" The--Court of Appeals\ncompletely closes that avenue of escape, and\nleaves the corporations to pay the full tax on\nthe value of their franchises assessed in the\nsame proportion as are houses and bufkUngs.\nIt say? not only that the old payments were not\nla*es. but in the broadest lauiruatfo that \"spe\n\"einl franchises were not taxed until hy the a<-ta <-t\n\"of 1880.\" If s]K\u00bbcial franchises were not taxed\nat all. except by this law. then certainly no\nformer payments of any kind can be construes!\nto l>e \"in the nature of a tax.\"\nFrom another point of view It Is clear that\nthe payments to cities for franchise grants are\nnot *in the nature of a tax.\" The city has no\nright to levy taxes of itself. It may pell fran\nchises and collect the purchase price, but It Im\nposes no taxes without express authority of the\nState. As Judge Vann says:\nThe entire taxing power belongs to the legis\nlature, and not a dollar can be raised for local\nor general purposes to carry on self-government\nin legalities or in the State or to provide for the\npublic safety, order or health, except by its\nauthority.\nAnil elsewhere he declares:\nThe 'unction of assessing a special franchisee\ndocs not in its nature belong to a county, city,\ntown or village, for it has never been exercised\nby officers of such localities, but to the State, by\nwhich it I\" now exercised for the first time.\nSince, tiien. no local government ever did levy\nany tax on franchises and had no power to do\nso. certainly nothing \"In the nature of a tax\"\ncould ever have been paid to a local govern\nment in connection with the franchises. What\never the corporations paid was of some other\nnature and it evidently' will not be allowed to\noffset the tax -which the State, the only taxius\npower, has now for the first time imposed.\nDV CHAILLU.\nThe African explorer whose death is re\nported from St Petersburg had a host of ad\nmirers all over the civilized world, but espe\ncially in the United States, the land of his birth.\nHis contributions to science were rather those\nof a naturalist than of a geographer. Thus, in\na broad sense, his work was differentiated from\nthat of Livingstone and Stanley. Some of his\nrevelations concerning the gorilla were at first\nreceived with incredulity, but his reputation\nfor careful observation and accuracy was event\nually vindicated. Moreover, he was a man\nof engaging personality, and instantly made\nfriends wherever he went.\nAnother claim to affection was the popular\ncharacter of his books about the Dark Conti\nnent. Thousands of youngsters attended his\nlectures, but a larger number read his stories\nand descriptions. In fact, these writings ex\ntended over so long a period that he ministered\nto at least two generations of boys. They cer\ntainly exerted a powerful fascination, went far\nto demonstrate th- lay'.ui tiiat truth is\nstranger than fiction, and are destined to charm\nother readers for years to come.\nTHAT TOXSOrTAL JOKER.\nWith reference to the barbers' bill now await\ning the action of the Governor, the mysterious\ncharacter of which we pointed out the other\nday without venturing to attempt an elucida\ntion Mr. James P. Carey, chairman of the legis\nlative committee of the Master Barber* 1 Associ\nation, says, among other things:\nThe idea that the barbers who have worked Rt\nthe trade three years or more would be exempt\nfrom the provisions of the bill la a mistake.\nThey will be under the control of the board of\nexaminers, and must comply with the sanitary\nregulations or expect their certificates will be\ntaken from them, not to be restored until their\nshops or men have been passed upon and ac\ncepted again by the board.\nAssuming that Mr. Carey has no wish to de\nceive his professional brethren of the razor, the\nscissors, the towel, the brush and comb, the\nbay rum, the flowing shampoo bowl and the\nexpectantly wielded clothes broom, we respect\nfully Invite his attention to Section 13 of the\nbill, where be will find the following provision:\nThis act shall not In any way apply to or af\nfect any person who is now occupied or work\ning as a barber in this State, nor any person\nemployed in a barber chop or an apprentice,\nexcept that a person ?o employed less than\nthree years prior to the passage of this act shall\nbe considered an apprentice, and at the expira\ntion of such three years of such employment\nshall be subject to the provisions of this act.\nIf Mr. Carey will cast the penetrating eye of\na legislative committee's chairman over this\nsection of the bill we think he will observe that\nit is exactly adapted to the purpose of catching\nthe apprentice of less than three years' standing\nand letting the rest of the tonsorial world go\nfree. We concede that it may be full of loving\nkindness for posterity, but It certainly would\nnot reform the present generation of barbers.\nPURE DRUGS.\nTiie Attorney General's opinion that the State\nBoard of Pharmacy has a right to take samples\nfrom bottles of d\u00bbngs kept for Bale by druggists\ngives that board an opportunity to do much\ngood. The authorized inspectors of the board\nnow have the right to purchase samples of drugs\non sale and determine whether they are pure\nand of the quality established by the pharma\ncopaeia. There are undoubtedly pharmacists all\nover the State who will look upon this opin\nion as tyrannical and will condemn the In\nspectors as busy-bodies. But the objection* will\nnot come from pharmacists who aim to dis\npense pure goods. It was at their instigation\nthat the board was called into existence, and\nthey are responsible for the legislation which\naims to prevent the sale of cut rate impure\narticles.\nThe profits in the drug business are not small.\nSome people go so far as to say that they are\nlarge, ami that at prevailing prices drags of\nstandard quality ran be handled without loss.\nRegardless of this fact, however, impure, di\nluted and reduce! drugs are sold in large quan\ntities with gain to the unscrupulous venders\nand danger to the public. This practice will\nreceive a shock w hen the men who have profited\nby it read the opinion of the Attorney General,\nin which be says:\nI think it entirely clear that it is the duty of a\nproprietor of a drug store to furnish to a mem\nber of the State Board of Pharmacy, or an\nauthorized Inspector thereof, samples of his\np. !ods upon beintc tendered the porc&ase price\ntherefor, ar.d that in the \u25a0 \u2022 Ma refus i!\nto do so he thereby becomes Liable both to crimi\nnal prosecution and to an action for the recov\nery of a penalty.\nThe man who in order to compete with his\nneighbor reduces the quality of bis merchandise\nmay be committing a commercial blunder, but\nthat is his affair. The man who tampers with\ndrags in order to reduce their cost or to In\ncrease his gains commits an offence against the\ncommunity, and this fact was probably recog\nnixed when the drag inspector's rights were\ndefined.\nThe State Board of Medical Examiners has\nchecked the career of rho quack and has earned\nthe thanks of the public. The State Board of\nPharmacy will receive its share of commenda\ntion also If it will prevent the quack druggist\nfrom selling to his poor and Ignorant custom\nera adult* r:\u00bbr\u00ab'.i and spurious drugs.\nPurely this is a country of contrasts! While\nManhattan was passing through the hottest day\nup to data in 1903, anow was falling In Duluth.\nIn some part of the great republic there is al\nmost everything to suit any taste, at any time.\nThe State Board of Arbitration and Concilia\ntion In Massachusetts decided recently after\nthorough investigation that the Lowell mills\nwith few exceptions had not been doing so\nprofitable a business that they could safely\nafford to tfrant the 10 per cent advance In wages\nwhich their employes demanded. That bward\nhas an excellent reputation for fairness, ability\nand grasp of industrial problems. It cannot be\nthat Lowell men and women who have worked\nin the mills will be bo blind to their own in\nterests as to compel the ruin of Lowell manu\nfactures and to send the employers Bouth!\nThe plantation \"cakewaik,\" first devised and\npractised below Mason and Dixon's line long\nbefore the Civil War, seems to hava becom\u00ab\nmarvellously fascinating within recent months\nfor the devotees of frivolity on the banks of the\nSeine. New-York became weary of such ridicu\nlous antics long: ago.\nSome of the poolroom men may perhaps in\nterpret the Court of Appeals decision In the\nStedeker case in euch a manner as to feel en\ncouraged to resume their operations in a bold\nand open way. It will not be wise for tnam to\nprovoke the action of the public prosecutor by\ndefiance of the statutes. It may be Impossible\nunder the findings of the highest court in the\nState to send them to prison for felony. But\nhow will they fare when the District Attorney\nproves them guilty of misdemeanors?\nAuthentic reports from England nay that\nRichard Croker is now a dairyman resembling:\na diamond of the first water In purity. Had\nMr. Croker turned Tammany Hall Into a dairy\nfarm years ago. New- York would bavt\u00bb raised a\nstatue in his honor.\nThe most famous open races for three-year\nold thoroughbreds in any country are the Two\nThousand Guineas at Newmarket, the Derby at\nEpsom and th\u00a9 St. Leger at Doncaster\u2014 all three\nIn England. Xo filly ever captured the three,\nalthough a few fillies have been successful in the\nDerby and the St. Leger. Several colts have\ntaken the honors in every one of the series, and\nsuch victors are always acclaimed as wearers of\nthe Triple Crown of the Turf. It is significant\nthat both the first and second horses in the Two\nThousand Guineas at Newmarket this week\nwere ridden by American Jockeys. The Tankee\nrider is still at the top.\nThe celebrations of two-hnndred-and-flftteth\nanniversaries of the settling of cities, towns and\nvillages in various parts of the regions along the\nAtlantic coast are coning on apace, but it may\nbe noted that Chicago will have a long time to\nwait before the enjoyment of memorial exercises\nof that kind.\nMuch criticism is current concerning the poor\nspelling of pupils in the public schools and the\ncolleges. Those oldtlme \"spelling bees\" in the\nlittle red schoolhouses were smartly contested\nand were keenly appreciated by the lads and\niHsnes who carried off the honors, and they were\nindisputably fruitful of benent Nevertheless it\nmust be admitted that in the peculiar English\nlanguage, with its eccentric vagaries, perfect\nspelling Is a rare accomplishment.\nTHE TALK OF THE DAT.\nThe Pacific Coast is sending across the continent\nand across the ocean for oyster seed. The Pacific\nCoast is in need of good oyster seed, and Japanese,\nas well as American seed, is sought for the beds.\nThat from the Atlantic seaboard Is from Warehara,\nMass.. where the raising an- shipping of seed has\nbecome a considerable Industry. It does not cost\nmuch more to bring th\u00ab Japanese oysters across\nthe ocean than it does to ship the \"Wareham seed\nby rail, and the government la especially desirous\nof having the. Oriental stock tested-\nCAMPAIGN AND CHAMPAGNE.\nCampaigning: with the workers:\nChampagneln? with rhe heelers;\nCold glances for the shirkers;\nHot air for all the spielers-\nRut billboards for the- voters\nAnd board bills for th\u00ab floaters.\nA little swallotvtalllnK\nWhere there be fads to follow\nSome lies that call for nailing;\nSome doubtful talcs to swallow\u2014\nBut billboards for thf> voters\nAnd board bins for th\u00ab \u25a0 aters.\n\u2014 ill ago Tribune.\nAccording to a dispatch from Porto Rico the\nsmuggling eases have been settled. Charges were\nmade against certain officers of the army and the\nnavy, and the grand jury, at San Juan, returned\nindictments against five of those accused. A per\nsonal Investigation of these cases was made by the-\nSecretary of the Navy and the Postmaster Gen\neral when in Porto Rico recently, acting under\norders of the President, and they submitted a re\nport recommending that all criminal proceedings\nagainst the officers be dismissed. It seems that the\nspecific facts upon which the charges were based\nwere that the officers had brought to San Juan\ncertain articles for personal use, namely, cigars and\nliquors, which were subject to easterns duties.\nThere was no charge that any of the articles were\nsold to any one in Porto Rico, although In one in\nstance a present was made of some of the cigars to\na local club by one of the officers who had re\nceived the privileges of the club. It is stated that\nthe officers in question have paid the penalty Im\nposed In such cases, which is double the amount of\nthe duties.\nWillie ha.l been to Sunday school. At luncheon\ngrandma passed him the deviled ham. \"No. thank\nyou \" said Willie. \"1 have renounced the devil\nand' all his works.\"\u2014 (Springfield Republican.\nOut in Missouri tho papers speak frankly, espe\ncially if the subject is politics. In more polite parts\nof tho world it is the custom to make such hints as\nin the following itei.i only regarding persons of\nanother race or nationality, not of friends ana\nneighbors. \"The Centrsiia Courier\" has just rapped\na successful candidate over the head in the follow\ning item in praibe of the defeated man. \"Professor\nOreea, of Sturgeon, Is a clean, able master of the\nscience of pedagogica. He would have mad\u00ab a\nsplendid school commissioner, but, alas! he Is a\nman who bathes and wears store clothes and holds\nhimself up like a man. Hard to elect any one who\nlak.s his baths regularly.\"\n\"Her novel is one of the ephemeral successes.\"\n\"Indeed?\" \"Oh, yes. It was published before 9\no'clock in the morning, and was not completely for\ngotten until quite a bit aft* C o'clock in the even-\nEg.\"\u2014\nA Warsaw journal relates the following story of\nan experiment made by a Polish nobleman to\nascertain how far storks migrate during the winter,\nlie caught a stork and attached a plate to its\nneck on which were Inscribed the words, \"Ilioc\nciconia ex Polonia\" (\"This stork comes from I\\>\nia:\\d\"t. In the following spring the same stork wma\nfound in tho nobleman's park, with a bundle around\nk containing several pred ma sir. res of great\nvalue, aad the metal plats with these words on the\nother side: \"India cum donis remlttit Polonls\"\n(.\"India sends him back; with presents to the\nPoles\").\nXot Much Left.\u2014 Jones has terribly bad\nmanners.\"\n'\u2022Well ha la an uncut diamond, you know.\"\n\"Yes. imitation.\"\u2014 (Brooklyn l-if*.\nAn oddly carved tombstone marks the resting\nplace. in Ax's Burying Ground, Germantown. Perm.,\nof the remains of an old resident of that suburb.\nIt bears the following inscription: \"In memory of\nAtom Bblsler, who departed this life Dec, 22d, 1777.\naged 369 year?.\" Every one In Germantown. how\never, believes that Master Shlsler was not a M.\nthuselah, and Is confident that there must have\nbeen tome mistake. And so there was. The ex\nplanation Is that the stonecutter marked the man's\nago 9-J. instead of CO, by an accident that m!ght\nhappen to any absent minded person. To correct\nthis error the \u25a0'\u2022 was rilled with cement and an\nother figure was cut after the \"6.\" Time and frost\nhave loosened the cement, and Daw the once hid\nden ':>\u25a0 appears us distinctly as the other numerals.\nA Question \"What do you think of the new\n.feoarder?\" asked Mr*. Staryem.\n\u2022\u2022Oh I don't know.\" replied btarhoard.\n\"I think he's very polite.\"\n\"Either that or very sarcastic. Did you hear\nhim aak mo if I'd have the 'cream' r '-(Philadelphia\nPress.\nA.botit Weo&le and Social Incidents.\nTHE DIPLOMATIC CORPS.\nWashington. April M (Special). Mm.- Hengel\n| mtUler. wife of the Austrian Ambassador, who\n! sprained her ankie Sunday evening. Is recovering\nI so satisfactorily from her accident that there need\ni bo no 'ie!ay In tho departure of the ambassador \u00bbnd\nI his family for Europe on the .late selected. May 3.\nP. 3. LetelMer. recently appointed secretary of\n| tho Uolglan Iteration, arrived here to-day. ha.vir.e\nI made the passage on tho Vi leri.vml. M. Letellier\nis a young man. an.i the present post is his flrat\nin th- diplomatic service. if* succeeds M. Boye.\nwho leaves Waaadlifjtflai Mao, with his wife and\nchild, for his now post in Rotterdam.\nGeorge L. Lorillard. of New-York, has been ap\npointed second secretary of legation at Havana. in\nplace of Henry P. Fletcher, of Pennsylvania, who\nhas been transferred to Peking:, to replace William\nE. Balnbrldse, who has resigned, to represent the\nUnited States in the approaching arbitration at\nCaracas.\nNOTES OF SOCIETY IN WASHINGTON.\nWashington. April 30 (Special).\u2014 Constance\nMills, daughter of Gtneral and Mrs. Anson Mills,\nwas married at noon to-day to Captain WaaaWi\nScott Overton. V. 8. A., at the home of her\nparents. In Dupont Circle. Chaplain Pierce, of\nFort Myer, performed the ceremony in the pres\nence of a email company, limited to relatives and\npersonal friends. The bride descended the stair\nway with her father, who wore the full uniform\ncf his rank. Her wedding gown was of white satin\nand duchesse lace, with the bodice elaborately em\nbroidered In pearls. Strands of pearls fastened\nher tulle veil to her hair, and she carried a bouquet\nof lllles-of-the-valley and sweetpeas. Miss Kline.\na cousin and house guest, attended her In a pretty\ngown of light blue crepe, with hat to match. Gen\neral Mllls's nephew. Lieutenant Martin, of the Kth\nInfantry, and Harry Orndorf. a nepnew of Mrs.\nMills, were the ushers, and Captain Clyde Splcer\n\u25a0nab the best man. Five hundred guests attended\nthe reception, held at Rauacher's at 1 o'clock. The\nballroom was elaborately decorated with flowers\nand palms. with large pink chip baskets, filled\nwith hydrangeas, suspended from the archways by\nwide pink ribbons. A string orchestra was hidden\nIn a vine wreathed balcony, decorated m the centre\nwith large silk flags and American Beauty roses.\nAt the rear of the large ballroom a breakfast was\nserved from a buffet table, decorated with Cowers\nand shaded lights. After 2 o'clock the bridal party.\nrelatives and out of town guests sat d\"wn to a\nbreakfast of fifty covers, served at heart shaped\ntables decked with sweetpeas and lilies-of-the-val\nley. In the banquet bail downstairs. Captain and\nMrs. Overton started late in the afternoon for the\nformer's post at San Francisco. General Mills is\nthe Inventor of tho cartridge belt used by the army,\nand he has just erected the Mills Buildlr.s, which\nthe government - -?..- leased tor the navy, ana in\nwhich Admiral Dewey baa made h'.s headquarters.\nMrs. J. Howard Kir-, and the Misses King, of\nAlbany, who spent the winter In Washington, will\n6ail in a few days to spend the summer abroad.\nMrs. Loiter and Miss Daisy Letter have Joined\nMr. and Miss Letter at their Duport Circle home.\nNEW-YORK SOCIETY.\nMr. and Mrs. Dave Henaesi Morris are receiving\ncongratulations en the birth yesterday of a aflsi ar.d\nheir at thetr bonaa faa Weal Berenty seeend s\u00bb, M\u2122.\nMorris was Mise Alice VanderbOt Shepard, daugh\nter of the late Elliott F. Shupard. and a grandchild,\ntherefore, of the late W. li. Var.iU rbiir. Mr. and\nMrs. Morris have only one other child, a girl, born\na couple of years ago.\nThe Church of the Incarnation was the see-* yaa\nterday afternoon of the marriage of Miss Marion\nHopklnson BmitU, daughter of Mr and Mr?. F.\nHopkinson Si-utii, to Peron Goodhart. third secre\ntary of the British Emba: rat Constantinople. The\nbride was dressed ta white trimmed with Irish\npoint lace, and wore a veil of old point lace. Her\nflowers were Ulies-of-the-vailey. Mis 3 Therese\nKeyser, her only bridal attendant, was in sky blue\nvoile trimmed with Valenciennes lace, with which\naha wore a large white straw hat trimmed with blue\nplumes. C. Clive-Bayley. the British Consul at\nNew- York, officiated as best man, while ihomas and\nHenry Moore, William Van de Venter, John K.\nMitchell. 3d. of Philadelphia; Joseph Howland Hunt\nand Thomas Bobbin* were the ushers. After the\nceremony, which was performed by Bishop Doane.\nof Albany, there was a reception glTen by the bride's\nparents at their house in East Thirty-fourth-st. Mr\nar.d Mrs. Goodhart will sail for England en rout*\nfor Constantinople on May 27. Among those present\nat the wedding were Mrs. Richard Irvln. Mrs.\nAlexander T. Van Nest, Mrs. J. Stewart Barney\nand Mrs. Charles I>. Dickey.\nAnother wedding which took place yesterday was\nthat of Milt's Josle Maclntyrs, daughter of Mr. and\nMrs. Ewan Maclnt> and Francis L. Patton, Jr..\nson of the former president of Princeten University.\nIn the Rutgers Presbyterian Church, Broadway and\nSeventy-third-st. The bride was dressed in white\nduchess \u00a3~tln. and wore a tulle veil, while her\nmatron of honor and only attendant. Mrs. Henry\nAtterbury Smith, was in pale pink cr?pe de chine.\nRobert Patton was his brother's best man, and th<\u00bb\nushers were Paul Patton. Wilbur. John and Henry\nMaclntyre. Ellsworth Dwight and John Hubbard.\nAfter the ceremony a reception was given by tha\nparents of the bride at their house in \"West Seventy\nfourth-st.\nMrs. Stephen H. P. Pell gave a luncheon yester\nday at Sherry's for Miss Florence Cramp, the\nfiancee of her husband's brother, Theodore Roose\nvelt Pell\nMr. and Mrs. Robert M. Cushing leave town to\nday for Newport, where Mr. and Mrs. William E.\nCarter, of Philadelphia, are expected to-morrow\nfor the season.\nMr. and Mrs. Robert F. ScheTl have returned to\nMUSIC.\nme. Bloom field Z eider's Concert.\nCircumstances, among: which the Illness of her\nhusband was one, conspired to limit the appear\nances of Mme. Fannie Bloomfleld Zelsler In Xew-\nYork this season to two, one in the Borough of\nBrooklyn on Wednesday evening and one at Men\ndelssohn Hall yesterday afternoon. She Is a fa\nmiliar figure In our concert rooms, and has been\nfor a considerable number of years, during all of\nwhich time she has held the Interest of the know-\nIng and challenged hearty admiration for tha\nmost of her work. Since \u00abhe last played here she\nhas been again In Europe, whence some silly ad\nvertising stories of the kind calculated to make\nher Judicious friends grieve were sent to these\nchores, but It was observed yesterday that her\n{rood qualities are still so many and so great as to\nforefend the forfeiture of any respect for her as an\nartist. Her popularity was attested, too. by the\npresence of the most substantial audience drawn\ntogether by a pianist in New-York this season.\nMme. Zelsler played a long and varied programme,\nbeginning with Beethoven's Andante in F and a\nMinuet in E-flat, followed by Liszt's transcription\nof Schubert's \"Erl King\" and Schumann's Sym\nphonic? Variations. Then came the customary\nChopin portion\u2014 lmpromptu In F-sharp major, t'u\u00bb\nD-flat major and C-sharp minor waltzes (from Op.\n6-0, the G-flat major study and Andante Spianato\nand Polonaise. Op. \u2014 ; finally, to end. Henselt's \"If\nI Were a Bird\" study, and Liszt's E-flat Polonaise.\nThere were some queer rhythmical wrencasi and\ndynamic singularities in the reading of some of\nthese pieces (notably the first of tha waltzes, which,\nnevertheless, won a demand for a repetition); but,\non the whole, Mme. Zelsler displayed most admir\nable mastery of her art A tensity of nervous\nstrain forced itself upon the attention of her lis\nteners, and caused occasional approhension lest\nher powers should fall short of the severe test to\nwhich she was submitting them. But she always\ncame out of the trial triumphantly, assst trium\nphantly of all In the Symphonic Variations.\nTHE CHICAGO ORCHESTRA.\nThe future of tho Chicago Symphony Orchestra,\nover which Theodore Thomas has presided since he\nleft New- York, twelve years a* \" 1 has been In the\nbalance for several months, the trustees of the\norganization having announced that its continu\nance- was contingent upon the subscription of\nJToO.OOO. to bo applied to the erection of a nultabla\nhall for the orchestra* concerts. Tho time Baas]\nset was the end of the aeason, which closed on\nMarch IS. Not fiulf of the required sum having\nbeen offered by that time, Mr. Thomas went to his\nsummer home, in Massachusetts. Last Tuesday\nhe passed through New-York on Mi way to Chi\ncago, an.i Intelligence now comes which indicates\nthat. r.: -v \"U\u00a3h tho terms of tho projected sub\nscription have not been met. a modus vlvendl has\nbeen adopted which Injures the. maintenance of\nthe orchestra for at least one year more.\nTh* trustees who are Interest**! la th\u00ab new sub\ntown after an absence of several wveki. aid \u201e_\nat their house. In Ka\u00abt Slxty-seventh-et. They Zm\nleave next month for their country place a* Vortk\nfle.M. Mass. *^\nMr. and Mr\u00bb. William B. Dlnsstor*. Jr.. are itijw\nIng- with Mr. and Mrs. Richard I>e!aSeld *s\nTuxedo.\nMr. and Mrs. J. V U Pruyn leave town fop\nNewport next week, and will take possession of\nthe Arnold cottas*. which they hay* leased sar\nthe season.\nMrs. Jordan 1,. Matt. Jr., returned to town yes.\nlasiasj from Boston, where she ha\u00bb been malting *.\ni.nort stay.\nMr. and Mrs. W. Bayard CaMaaaj have returned]\nto town from Lenox.\nMrs. 8. Bruce Ismay. who was Miss Flomtcsj\nScbieffelln. Is booked to sail for Kurops sex*\nWednesday.\nMr. and Mr*. James L. Barclay and 11! \u00bb\u00bb Adnw\nMil Barclay will spend the summer at theirs\ncountry place, at Southampton. Loss; Tsland.\nMay 19 has been set as tie data of the wsiifcy\nIn Grace Church of Mlaa Grace S. Heno? aa<S.\nR. Da Peyster Tytus.\nAlfred Huldekoper Bond, the president of th\u00ab\nCalumet Club, an.i Charles Ssepard Bryan wer\u00bb\nentertained by a number of members of 'he aM\nat a dinner last night In recognition of the activ*\npart which they have played In Its reorganization\nand In placing it on a flourishing financial basis..\nAnon? those present -were Arthur Turnur\u00ab, Win-.\nlam Le Gendre. Parker Syms. Newboid La Roy..\nEdgar and Charles \u00bb Boyd.\nVANDERBILTB AT NEWPORT.\nNewport, R. 1.. April 30.\u2014 Sir. and Mrs. FUr.nal-l\nC. Vanderbllt returned from their weeding tonr tx>\nCanada to-day, and went to Oakland Farm, wh^ce*\nthey will go to Sandy Point their own farm, for rj\nbrief etay before going abroad.\nDINNER TO MR. AND MRS. C. VANDER3ILT*\nRome, April 80\u2014 Ambassador and Mrs. Meyeii\ngave a dinner to-night in honor of Mr. and Mrs.\nCornelius Vanderbllt. The- guests Included Prtne*;\nand Princes* Dorio. Prince and Princess Tear.<\\,\nthe Duke and Duchess of T\u00bbrrar.ova, the Prtncsj\nand Princess San Faustina the Duchess Grazloll^\nPrince and Princess Boncompagnle, Alice Blight,)\nCount yon iloltke. Kelclse lleyer and Miss Storey.}\nNIECE OF M'KINLEY TO MARRY.\nOenoa. April 30.\u2014 1t has been learned from \\ prt^i\nvate source that Mrs. Barber, a niece of t. \u00bb\nPresident McKlniey, la engaged to be married, ar.ii\nIt Is said that the ceremony will occur next monta*\nat Nice. The identity of the prospect.--\ngroom, however, was not made known. Mrs. Bar\nter lives In Genoa.\nIN THE BERKSHIRES.\nLenox. Mass., April \u25a0 (Special).\u2014 Mr. and Mrs\u00bbi\nGeorge Wir.throp Folsora, of New-York, and thai\nMisses Folsom, who have been spending -> \u2022 wfcta\u2014\nIn Naples, Italy, arrived In Boston o. Tuesday anda\ncame up to Lenox yesterday. They win open their\ncottage. Sunnyslde, this w\u00ab-\u00abi\u00ab.\nDr. Charles Alc\u00dfurney, of New-York, and family\nwill arrive at their country home In 9toc'#brld\u00ab\u00abi\nthis week.\nPelton J. Van Rs~.r*ela\u00abr. who has been In F\"or-\u00bb\nida for the winter and spring, has arrived In Stocks\nhrldga.\nMr. and Mrs. Thomas Shields Clark, of Naw^\nYork, are at the Curtis Hotel. Mr. O*rk has *2\u00bbS\ncompleted his new cottage and studio. FembrocX\non the Fittsfleld Road, and will open the cottage\non the ISth.\nMrs. J. \"Williams Blddle, of Philadelphia, wha hast\na cottage here, will go abroad In May, cot return-*\nlug until autumn.\nClover Croft, the summer homo of Mr?. Oscar\nlasigi, of Boston, where Mrs. lasigl has recent!^\nspent $10,000 for an Italian garden, has been r>per.\u00bbA\nfor the season. Mrs. laslgl and Miss lastgi are en\u00bb\nroute from Europe and will arrive here this week.\nEllas P. Browne!!, of New- York, has taken a*\nlease of the Judge Bytngton cottage. In SL?ckbridge.\nGeneral Francis V. Greene, of New- York, ha*\nbeen In Btockbrtdge looking for a. cottage for tasi\nsummer.\nThe golfing season In the Berkshire Hills opene<%\nto-day on the Lenox and Ptttsfleld Country duls\ncourses.\nMr. and Mrs. John Swarm have sailed from Costa*\nRica, where they have been for the winter, on Mr,\nSwarm's plantation, and will be the guests of Mrs.\nJohn Swarm. sr.. in Stockbrtdj\u00dfre.\nM. L Mac Donald. of New- York, and John \"Wa\nters, of Chicago, are negotiating for the p^irchaaa\nOf fourteen hundred acres of land In New-Marl\nboroupb. Berkshire County. located on \"\u2022 o* a\u00bb\nmountain range known as th\u00ab East Indies. Th\u00bb\ntract U three and a half miles long. It la the ln-\u00ab\ntention of the purchasers to convert the property\nInto a game preserve for New-York men.\nNOTES FROM NEWPORT\nNewport. R. 1.. April 30 tSpecfal)-\u2014 Commoner*\nElbrldge T. Gerry, Mrs. Gerry and the Misses G\u00abrrr\nwill sail from New- York on May 12 for Europe, and,\nwill return to Newport the first week In July.\nMrs. Henry A. Rice, of Boston, has opened b\u00bb#\nvilla In Washlngton-st. for the season.\nThe arrivals from New-York to-day for the season\nwere Mrs. W. C. Schermerhcrn. Miss Sarah Scher\u00bb\nmerhorn, Mrs. John Inncss Kane. Mrs. Guldet.\nMrs. Guidet-Duryee. Mrs. J. V. L. Pruyn. Mr. ar. i\nMrs. Hamilton Fish Webster. Miss Woolsey (better*\nknown under the norn de plume of Susan Coolidee).\nWilliam Rogers Morgan and Mr. and Mrs. S. E*\nHantlngton.\nscrlptlon have urged that a smaller hall than th\u00ab\nAuditorium was necessary In order to make th\u00bb\nconcerts popularly and artistically successful. Ti\".'\u00bb\nsmaller hall could be provided In the new building\"\nwhich had been projected, and dM remaining\nrooms be made to yield an income which would\nkeep the orchestra alive. This project did not com\nmend itself to the Judgment of many of tie bafts*\nentlal friends of the orchestra, especially thai\nwealthy men who own tha Auditorium, and lars*\nsums were slow In coming la. Then an appeal\nwas made to tha masses of the people, and a. nu\nmerous committee appointed to agitate th* ques\ntion of the subscription. Capitalists, merchant^\nbankers, lawyers, editors, critics, brokers \u2014 man-.\nner of people were mustered Into tha service. Mr.\nThomas's name is a mighty one to conjure wliX,\nWhen ha reached Chicago there wer\u00bb over 6.1C0>\nnames on the subscription list, representing Mv.4***t\nThis was considerably short of the required sunv,\nbut it seems to have been looked upon as so sts>\u00bb\nniflcant a demonstration that the trustees c.i.i - a\nthink it wise to carry out the threat of abandon\nment, and a compromise measure has been adept\"*\ncd. The Auditorium has been re-engaged for\u00bb\ntwenty-four evening and as many afternoon con\ncerts next year, and last season's deceit o* $-\u25a0/\u2022.\u2022>\nnas been guaranteed. Meanwhile. It Is understood\nthe work of raising the money to carry out thai\nnew plan will be continued.\nTHE WEDDING AT BUCKEBERG CASTLE.\nBerlin, April 30.\u2014 The Grand Duke si ts\u00abs>\u00bb\nWeimar anJ Princess Caroline of Reuss were mar-*\nrlei.at Buckeburg Castle, principality of Scfcaiinv\nburar-Lipp*. to-day, by the Rev. Dr. Rothe. a asaaa*\nber of the Weimar Cabinet Tha bride, who wa\u00bb\ndressed In white satin trimmed wita lace. was at\ntended by her uncle. Prince George of Schauruburs-\nLiype. and her cousin. Prince Henry XIV of Ite'-s*.\nThe bridegroom was accompanied by his motaes*\nand an archduchess of th i family. Then can**\nEmperor William and Queen WUhelmlna. followea\nby thirty-three princes and princesses, each *'\u25a0\u25a0*\ntended by ladies of their respective courts ar.d ai\u00ab\nju'ants and eauerries In uniform.\nThe present of Emperor William was a yuiuilaS*\ntable service. Queen Wilhetaina grave a cnine\u00bb\u00bb\nporcelain service. The Prince of Reusa, who t\u00ab\nknown In literature as the author cf a book on now 1\nlackeys shou'.d deport themselves, save the on-^\nsome* old. restored family portrait*. Tha author\nities of th* University oi Jena, presented an i.iu;n-\u00bb\nmated address.\nPALMA'S FIRST ANNIVERSARY.\nCentral Valley. \u25a0 V., April SD (SpeciaD.-Thc p*cm\npie of this vlilaga are preoarins to celebrate, on\nMay at th\u00ab first anniversary cf the tnausuraticn oZ\nGeneral T. Estrada l\"ai.r..i. their forcer mttMf^\nas President of the Cuban Republic. General Pafcass*\nwas a resident cere twenty years an<2 was popctat*\nin the community.\nWhile the exact nature of tha celebration has not,\nbeen decided upon by the committee, consisting o-\nIrvtng Washburn. Miss Anna Thompson and Rica\nard Ptcken, Invitations to attend the exercises bav_\u00bb\nbeen sent to General Maximo O\u00abn\u00ab \u00bb\u25a0]\u00bb\u00ab I^\u00b0TT\nin St. Louis; Sefior Gor.salo d* \u00a7-* sa^*v_Y!r ji\nMinister la Washington, and Seror O\u00a3*\u2122> *\u2022*\nZayaa, Consul General or Cub* In .N\u00ab*-Tar\u00ab.",
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"text": "MISSOURI CORRUPTION.\nyationcl Political Interest in Devel\nopments There.\n\"Washington. April SO (Special).\u2014 As viewed in\nTTashir.Eion. the sensational developments of\ncorruption In the Missouri Legislature, with the\nattendant indictment d leading members o* the\nFtate Senate for bribery, art of national politi\ncal Importance, aiid give Missouri a greater ln\nf>r\u00ab*t to the managers of both parties than has\nattached to that State for many years. It is as\nserted by Republicans and dreaded by Demo\n< rats that the exposures now being made by the\nprsr.d Juries at Jefferson City .-.i.i St. Louis spell\ndemocratic defeat In Missouri D 1004. It is true\nthat about half of the State Senators thus far\nsr.<Jlcted are Republicans, but it is also true that\nthe trail of corruption lerds past the door of the\nDemocratic Lieutenant Governor, ho has Just\nresigned, to the very citadel of the Missouri De\nmocracy\u2014the State Central Committee of that\n]<arty. Indeed. It does not even end there, for it\nr rM\u00bbs on up to the latest Idol of the Missouri\nl^Tr.ocrats. William Joel Stone, who has Just\ntaken his seat In the United States Senate, who\n\u25a0\u00ab! vice-chairman of the Democratic National\nCommittee, arid r. - hc- only a few weeks ago was\neulogized by \"William Jennings Bryan as one of\nthe rr.cst likely candidates Bar the Presidential\nnomination In 1904. Senator Stone resents with\n\u00bb:-\u00bbKt Indication the Insinuation that he has\npsrtlclpated in any form in the corrupt methods\nthat have been employed through the. lobby at\nJefferson City to influence legislation, though\ntfce fact that he confessedly accepted a fee to\nret as attorney or a concern whose agent\n\u25a0i-oLifrht votes for the measure in the leri\u00ablnture.\nfar which Mr. Stone also pleaded with the lavr\nc-.er\u00bb before he was elected to the Senate, will.\n[1 :s believed, effectually put a stop to all talk of\nY'.rz as a Presidential possibility. What effect.\n1f any. It will have upon Ma standing in the\nSenate at Washington remains to be seen, as\nnnyrovr he Is yet, too Dtwt\" the Senatorial toga\nfor his eteture to have be^n taken and his rating:\nf Ted In that body.\n\u2022Tohn A- Lee. who has Just resigned the Lieu\ntonaiJt Governorship, after n sensational disap\npearance from the Slate under charges and his\nr^apreararice under dramatic circumstances, for\nyezrs has been a close personal and political\n\u2022friend of Senator Sio&e. When the Senator was\nGovernor of the Prate he appointed Lee vlce\nr.res'dent cf the Board of Police Commissioners\nof St. Lov.is\u2014 r. place of great prestige and in\nfluence. Since then Lee has been one of Stone's\nchief lieutenants and advisers. It was Stone's\nfl pence that forced T^ep's nomination for Lieu-\nTenant Governor en the ticket with Dockery\n- -er the latter's protest, and it is an open secret\n\u2022 \u2014 rt Misrcrnri Democrat? that the Stone ele\nr-)\u00ab?nt, which has dominated the party in Mi?\nsouri since 1?96. was looking favorably upon Lee\nfor Governor next year. In fact, when Senator\nf-tone *rj last In Washington he told a friend\nthat Governor Dor-lrery would be succeeded\neither by Lieutenant Governor Lee or Mayor\n\"Jim** Feed of Kansas City. Be was unknown\n!n politics until he w.-\u00abb taken up by Stone when\nthe latter w\u00abs Governor of the State. He be\nlongs to the Kentucky family of Lees, which is a\nrnilateral branch of the Virginia family. He\nwas a commercial traveller for years out of St.\nLouis, and am* one of the organizers of the\nTravellers' Protective Association, one of the\nlargest national organizations maintained by the\nr?rcrr.mers of the country. For several years he\nwas president of the Travellers' Protective As-\nFociatior. with headquarters In St. Louis. At\nthe earre time he conducted a trade paper\ncalled \"The Interstate Grocer,\" and it is to this\nemployment to which he sadly announces he Is\n\u25a0Bang to return and eschew politics forever.\nIt is generally understood here among Mis\n\u00abrarians that there will be no prosecution of\nLee along -with the State Senators against whom\nIndictments have been returned. Lee's confes\nsion to Attorney General Crow made the finding\nof the Indictment- easy, and It is probably due\nto this fact that the prosecuting officers have\njurreed not to proceed against Mm. However,\nthere is no tilling what may be the Intention of\nthe Circuit Attorney of St. Louis, Joseph \"W.\nFolk, \u2022'\"\u2022ho is at once an enigma and a terror to\nthe old political bosses of both parties In Mis\npouri. It was he \"who exposed the shameful\nrausicljal corruption of St. Louis, and who did\nnot etop until he had indicted and convicted\n\"Boss Ed\" Butler, the Croker of St. Louis, of\ncorrupting nearly the entire legislative body of\nthe city. For more than. twenty years Butler\nhas been the undisputed Democratic boss of St.\nLouis, with an Influence in Democratic State\nconventions that frequently determined the\ncharacter of the tickets nominated- Had Butler\nknown the fort of man Folk Is, it is not at all\nlikely that the latter would have been made the\nDemocratic candidate for Circuit Attorney three\nMan ago. Folk is not yet thirty-five years old.\n1? a Tennesseean by birth and rearing, and a\nnephew of the venerable Senator W. B. Bate, of\nthat State. Mr. Folk's vigorous and unsparing\nof the municipal boodlers made pos\nsible the sweeping Democratic victory in St.\nLouis in 1901 over the outspoken protest of Mr.\nBryan and the silent opposition of Senator\nStone. Mr Bryan 's protest was based upon the\nfact that th\u00ab \"Democratic nominee for Mayor.\nRolla Wells, had not supported him In the cam\npaign of 1506. Senator Stone, as Mr. Bryan \u00ab\nchief lieutenant in Missouri, followed the lead\nof the Nel.raekan In this matter, as did all of\nMr Stone's close advisers, including the un\nhappy John A. Lee. Mr. Folk has been drawn\ninto the prosecution of the State boodlers by\nreason of the fact that some of the boodle money\nwas paid to members of the State Senate at\nhotels in St. Louis.\nAnalysis of the returns of the last two elec\ntions in Missouri exhibits the interesting fact\nthat had not St. Louis and the other large cities\nof the State given large Democratic pluralities\nfor the first time in years the State would have\nbeea carried by the Republicans. In other\nwords rural Missouri, so long the stronghold or\n\u2022he Missouri Democracy, is rapldiy becoming\nHepablican. and but for the corruption that\ncrest Into the last Republican administration in\nBt. Louis, which was so thoroughly exposed and\nprosecuted by Circuit Attorney Folk, It Is not\nreasonable to suppose that there would have\nbeen bo radical a change in the election results\nIn that city at the last two polls. With the ex\nception of \"Boss Ed\" Butler, all of the mur.ici\n-\u00a3l boodlers prosecuted and convicted by Mr.\nFolk were Republican ex -officeholders\u2014 a fact\nnot generally known in the East. This exposure\n( I official corruption -o disgusted decent Be\npublicans in St. Louis and other cities of the\nState -hat when the Democrats put up clean\nticketa they deserted their party and voted with\nthe Democrats. In the case of the State bood\nlor* the choc is an the other foot. The rural\n-arts of the State already are anti-Democratic\nor at any rate It has been abundantly proved\nthat they are anti-Bryan. The Democratic State\nnnn\u00dfsikn Is completely in the hands of the\nUryanites with Senator Stone the dominant\ntauter It is natural to suppose that the Bryan-\nLMfl through the Stone machine will continue to\ncontrol Democratic affairs in the State. Lender\n*heee circumstances the rural electors win con\n\u2022>bc to vote against Democratic n ' ( \" and meas\nma. It then remains for the Republicans to re\ngain their lost ground in the cities in order to\ncarry the State. It is this view of It which\nmakes !h: political situation In Missouri at\npresent of national importance. That the Dem\n(-.rrats will have to f.pht bard for the State next\nyear seems more than probable.\njfUCH COLDEE WEATHXK PKOPHESIED.\nWarm Wave of Last Two Days to Cease\n\u2014 Two Prostrations from Heat.\nTfce \u25a0warm wesT\u00dfer of dM last two days will Klve\n.\u25a0 a y io-Ce.7 to much ccMer weather and rain, with\nbrisk to high \u00bb'\"\u00bb' winds, according to the Weather\nTJtsre&u. It will fee followed by fair weatlser and\na moderate i\u00abap*r\u00ab.tare on Batuiday. Yesterday\nt>e teicr^rature went on * ****** higher than on\nTMLauJeofimj the maximum being- E3 degres at 1:10\np. m- TTere were two prostrations from heat.\nIJILLV WHISKERS.\nTie A\u00bbl\u00abbiocr\u00bbPb>' of a Coat A Jolly *iorr\nfor Uor* \u2022\u2022* srlrU. now running In TJIE\n\u00abT\u00abDA V TKIOI Be \u2022\u00bb\u00ab\u2022\u00ab to read ft next\nIRVING AS DANTE.\nA Striking Impersonation at the\nDrury Lane Theatre.\n(Special to The New-York Tribune by French Cable.)\n(Cocrrt\u00bbht: 1803: By The Tribune Association.)\nLondon, May 1. la. m.\u2014 great assemblage\nat Drury Lane last night was swayed by many\nemotions. There was Intense curiosity among\nthe literary class over the expedients of Sardou\ni.nd Emlle Moreau in creating a drama out of\nthe sombre career of Dante, with the bickerings\nof the Guelphs and Ghtbellines. and the poet's\nadoration of the dead Beatrice. There was con\ntroversial interest in the substitution of Cardinal\nColonna for Pope Clement V. There were modi -\nfications in the music, and alterations In the\ntableaus at the last moment. There was also\nas eager desire among: Sir Henry Irving's host\nc: admirers to welcome him once more to the\nLondon stage, and prove by a prolonged out\nburst of applause when he was first seen that bis\nhold upon popular affection had not been weak\nened. The literary problem was quickly solved\nivben the drama was fairly opened. The few\nmeagre episodes in Dante's life were pieced out\nfrom passages of the \"Divina Commedla\" re\nspecting Pia di Tolomel, France?ca dl Rimini\nand Ugolini, and in place of the historical drama\ndealing with complex political intrigues and the\nsublime tribute paid by the poet to Beatrice, as\nrelated in the \"Vita Nuova,\" there were blends\nof legend, allegory and poetry, with a champion\nof justice, liberty and religion towering in epical\ndignity above the magnificent spectacular melo\ndrama. \"Dante\" proved to be more consistent\nand interesting than \"Robespierre.\" and the\nscenes illustrating the Inferno were more vivid\nand weird than the revels of Walpurgis Night\nor. the Erocken. as witnessed in the Lyceum\nwhen \"Faust\" was produced, with the sardonic\ndiablerie of Mephistopheles.\nThat the dramatists had provided Sir Henry\nIrving with a congenial part was evident from\nthe outset. It was an intellectual Impersona\ntion, with subtlety in the byplay, and supreme\nmoments of righteous indignation and emotion\nal power. One of the?\u00ab moments was in a terrl\nhle malediction scene early in the play, and be\nfore the series of pictures from the Inferno came\nmother, when Dante rescued his daughter from\nthe hands of the Condottierl at the convent of\nSanta Clara. There was still another when he\nobtained a pardon for her by threatening Car\ndinal Coionna with the fires of hell. Sir Henry\nIrving'? voice was full and strong, and could be\nheard more diFtinctly in Drury Lane than in\nthe Lyceum. His impersonation of Dante was\none of the most impressive of his long series of\npreat parts. Pathos of the patriotic exiles' fate,\ndetestation of tyrannical cruelty, dreamy remi\nniscences of Beatrice, ecstatic outbursts of senti\nment and devotion to those whom he cherished\non earth, and the poetic imagination of the in\nspired seer of an undiscovered country were the\nfeatures of this highly artistic and successful\nimpersonation.\nAn immense and most brilliant audience was\nthrilled with enthusiasm and delight- Irving\nwas well supported by Lena Aprnrell, -who en\nacted th# double part of Pia di Tolomei and her\ndaughter Gemma with emotional power and\nhigh intelligence. The stage was crowded with\nfigures, and the scenery was wonderfully ef\nfective, especially the springtide fete at Flor\nence, the Tower of Hunger at Pisa, the Papal\npalace at Avignon, and seven pictures illustrat\ning Dante's passage from Campo Santo, Flor\nence, through the Inferno to the Valley of As\nphodels. The drama enflea with a prolonged\noutburst of hearty appreciation for London's\nfavorite actor. 1- *\u2022\u2022 F.\n\"THE BUNA WAYS.\"\n*' _\u00bb ______ \u2014\nKew Musical Comedy Produced in Balti\nmore.\n[BT TEI^GEAPH TO THE TKl\u00dfTifl!. ]\nBaltimore. April 30.\u2014 \"The Runaways,\" a new\nmusical comedy, in two acts, by Addison Burk\nhardt and Raymond Hubbell, both of Chicago, was\nproduced at the Academy of Music here to-night\nbefore a large audience. The piece is the Joint\nproduction of the Shubert brothers, of N\u00abw-Tork.\nand Nixon & Zimmerman, and will go to the New-\nYork Casino on May 11. as the successor to \"A\nChinese Honeymoon.\" Alexander Clarke. William\nGould. Van Rensselaer Wheeler, \"Al\" Fields and\nArthur Dunn\u2014 chiefly Arthur Dunn, who is an ab\nbreviated edition of James T. Powers\u2014 are the\nleading men la the cast. On the whole, the Hen\u00ab*\nler sisters promise to be the- leading women.\n\"The Runaways\" Is staged with a lavish hand.\nas the saying goes; the costumes are many and\nbeautiful, the chorus, physically and numerically,\nstriking, and the ensemble pictures characterized\nby the 'same pood taste and sense for beautiful\neffect as was so noticeable la \"A Chinese Honey\nmoon.\" and there are surprises of stagecraft never\nattempted in the latter r.i*os.\nTh\u00ab book and music must wait a Broadway ver\ndict- New-fork has becora\u00df expectant of good\nthings out of Chicago\u2014 in musical comedy\u2014 and\ndoubtless \"Tbe Runaways\" will be under the whip\nof the stage manager constantly for the next week.\nIt was warmly received, however, by Baltimore.\neven with Its first night faults upon it.\nAMERICAN AKTISTS HONOEED.\nBy the Emperor's Bequest Berlin Academy's\nShow Has an American Section.\nBerlin. April SO.\u2014 Eighty pictures by American\npainters ar* In the Royal Academy's annual ex\nhibition that will be opened on Saturday. The\nAcademy, by request of Emperor William, formed\nan American section, although other nationalities\nare not so represented, the representatives of other\ncountries simply sending their works as individuals.\nHis majesty, in giving his reasons for during an\nAmercsn section, said that what he had seen of\nAmerican art was good, and that he thought It was\nscarcely realized in Germany how good it really\nProfessor Arthur Kampf. president of the exhibi\ntion asked Gar! Melch^rs. an American member\nof the German Academy, living in Paris, to super\nintend the American division. Twenty-five painters.\nabout half or them living in Europe and the other\nhalf in New-York, have had works accepted. Borne\nof them, such as William Sergeant Kendall's \"A\nFairy Tale.\" a prize winner at the exhibition of the\nAmerican Artists' Association of IS9I. have been\nexhibited elsewhere: but roost of the work is fresh.\nJohn La Targe has a Tahiti landscape; Irving\nRamsey Wiles, a portrait of Julia Marlowe; Edwin\nA. Abbey, a theatre scene from \"Hamlet\"; James\nJ Shannon, a portrait of \"Phil\" Hay: John Singer\ngarment, a portrait of PuUft-l. the French\nPianist; George Hitchcock, a aiadoana: G-ri\n*!eieh\u00abrs a French country gentleman; William A.\nCoffin Somerset Valley; William K. Chase, a\nJapanese lady: Henry Ward Ranger, a night v>ew\not an armory. New-York, and Cuilfle Hassam.\ntoon for the Boston Library.\nMETHODIST BISHOPS MEET.\nMeadvil'e Perm., April 30.-Tho \u00abeai-annual as\nie tx t^TSaIZ U the M-t^st Kpi\u00dfCopal\nChurrh of the world is In session here. In Ford\n22S- Ctapel of Allegheny College. The f j- o\nliSfefltll\nStepnen \u25a0- \u25a0\u00bb Henry W. Warren, of Den-\nJoyce. \u00a3-' A 1 i r-^nir<ixi oX Ta^oma; O. C. lleCafce,\n'^^wfflStS of Sm Franci*- :\n..a. J. -- iUl Jh!.'\"- M : If?- *' India;\n'^I'^-ri^i^^- W\u00ab\u00abe, of InUU.\nInd David H. Moore, of Pek.ng.\nEUSTIS BUYS ELECTRIC LAWN MOWER.\nPark CoxmalMloaer Eusfi. of Tha Bronx ha. re-\nJvUy purchased an eJectrtc lawn mower, which\nrentij Pl^\"*\"P 1^\"*\" ucb wor k v a man and\nIs B\u00abven feet wide. It cost *!.\u00ab\u00ab\u25a0\nNEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUTE. FRIDAY. MAY 1. 1903.\nOBITUARY.\nPAUL DU CHAILIU.\nSt. Pster\u00dfburg. April \u00bb.\u2014 Paul Dv ChafUu. the\nAmerican author and explorer, who was stricken\nwith partial paralysis yesterday, died at midnight.\nA brother of Verestchagln. the Russian painter,\nwill arrange for the burial of the body in the\nlitterateurs' Cemetery, If it is dealred that the\ninterment take place here.\nPaul Bellonl Dv Chaillu. who first mad\u00a9 the\ngorilla known to civilized people, was of French\nparentage, and most of the authorities say he was\nborn at New-Orleans on July 31, IBS. although\nsome say he was born In Paris in 1535 and was\nnaturalized In this country after he came of age.\nHis father was a trader on the West Coast of\nAfrica, and the boy spent his early rears in the\nFrench settlement at the mouth of the Gaboon\nRiver. He was educated in a Jesuit institution,\nand early acquired great fondness for natural his\ntory, and learned the languages and customs of\nthe native tribes. He came to this country in IB\non a vessel carrying a cargo of ebony, and wrote\nsome newspaper articles .about the Gaboon coun\ntry which aroused discussion. In 1555 he returned\nto West Africa on an exploring expedition, which\noccupied four years, in the territory lying within\ntwo degrees of the equator on either aide. On this\ntrip he travelled over eight thousand miles, with\nonly native companions, going into previously un\nexplored country and discovering many new species\nof animals and birds. He stuffed one thousand\nspecimens of the former and two thousand of the\nlatter, and brought the first gyet linens of the\ngorilla seen in this country and Europe, although\nthis species of ape had been slain in 1351 by Dr.\nHenry A. Ford, of the Gaboon Mission. Mr. Dv\nChaillu brought his many specimens to this coun\ntry, and after they had been exhibited, with a col\nlection of native arm? \u00abnd nn.-UmciHs. he sold\nmany of them to the British Mu-^um.\nIt was his vivid word painting of the great man\nlike apes, of which he had secured specimens, that\nexcited an almost world-wide discussion. His ac\ncounts of both gorillas and the Obcngt> dwarfs\nwith whom he came in contact were contradicted\nby stay-at-home scientists, and he was held up to\nridicule as an African Munchausen, but he stead\nfastly maintained his ground, and the truth of his\nassertions was fully confirmed afterward. Profes\neor Gray, of the British Museum, was one of Ms\nassailants, white he was defended by Professor\nOliver and Sir Roderick Murchison. The first ac\ncount published by Mr. I>u Chaillu of hi* explora\ntions was entitled \u2022\u2022Explorationa and Adventures\nin Equatorial Africa.\" In th\u00ab controversy which\nraged around this th? explorer ha* only Ms com\npass bearings to confute the previously made maps,\nand after equipping himself b7 further scientific\nstudy he returned to Africa la IKS. and spent a\nperiod of two years in explorations. It was on\nthis trip thai he had a serious delay, due to the\nupsetting of a. canoe on th\u00bb Ogolai River and the\nloss of supplies- He also had an encounter with\nferocious natives, in which he lost all save his\nJournals, The fruit of bis explorations appeared\nin \"A Journey to Ashango Land.\" A French eci\nentifle expedition con8nB\u00ab<l many of hti discov\neries, and Captain Burton testified that hi\u00bb ac\ncount of cannibaH?m practised by the Fan tribe\nwas correct.\nAfter his return to this country the \u00ab-rp\u00abor\u00abr lect\nured, in many plage* and wrote a series of books\nfor the young, which included \"Stories of the\nGorilla, Country.\" \u2022'Wild Life Under tie Equator.'\"\n'Xost\"!n the Jungle.\" \"My Apirgri Kingdom\" and\n\"The Country of the Dwarfs. 1 1 In 1872 and li.* he\nmade an extended trip of exploration in Norway.\nLapland and Finland, and published eub^Mjue\u00dftly\n\"The Land of the Midnight Sun.\" \"Ivor, the\nVtkina:. 11 and 'The Viking Age.\" He spent much\ntime and mw-y in excavating mounds on the\ncoast of Norway for relics of the days of the\nvikings. His earlier works were subsequently re\nvised and condensed. *>\u00abiasr published und*r the\nnew names, \"Adventures in the Great Forest of\nBJQUatoriai Africa\" and \"Th* Land of th\u00ab Long\nKiKht.\" He also wrote \"How Animal\", Birds.\nReptiles and Insects Talk. Think. Work and Live.\nIn lfc>l Mr. Dv Chaillu started for Russia, to ex\nplore and invest! the conditions r>f that great\nempire, for the purpose of writing an exhaustive\naccount of the same. He had been enraged in this\nwork for about eighteen months when his death\noccurred, and intended to devote four or five years\nto It. Ka had seen the Russians, from the Czar\ndown to the humblest of his subjects, in their\nhomes. Mr. Dv Chaillu In described ac having been\na little but strong limbed man of indomitable en\nsrgy.\nR. F. DOWNING.\nR. V. Downing, the customs broker and shipper.\nof No. 11 William-st. and No. 33 Broadway, died\nyesterday, after an illness of several years, at Jus\nhome. No. S3 Eighth- a ye., Brooklyn. Mr. Downing\nwas bom May \u00a3. 1819, in this city. H\u00bb was a son\nof Thomas K. Downing, of this city, who many\nyears ago held the office of city ir>*?\u00abrteT, and\nwas a prominent contractor.\nHe founded the customs hrekerag3 and shipping\nfirm of R. F. Downing & Co., with branch offices\nin Europe nnd this country. Mr. Downing wrote\noa the tariff, and on each change of the tariff law\nIssued the volume known as \"Downinfi's Customs\nTariff.\"\nHe was an enthusiastic yachtsman and sports\nman, and was a member of the Indian Harbor,\nAmerican and Larchaiont yacht clubs; the Gatlneau\nFish and Game Club of Canada, the Prospect Gun\nClub of Long Island and was the owner of several\nyachts. He was also a member and director of the\nMontauk Club, of Brooklyn, and had been president\nof the Columbian Club, of Brooklyn, and a member\nof the Manhattan, the Lawyers' and the Catholic\nclubs the Xavi\u00abr Alumr.i Sodality, the Downtown\nAssociation, and was president or the Amaranth\nof Brooklyn for several years. Mr. Downing was\na member of St. Augustine's Roman Catholic\nChurch, of Brooklyn. _ . \\_\nMr Downing married Miss Julia A. Lyons, of\nOswego, N. Y. lie leaves a widow, three sons and\ntwo daughters.\nPHILIP GOLDSTEIN.\nPhilip Goldstein, a.g*d sixty-two years, who for\ntwenty-five years was a manufacturer of fchoe laces\nin Newark, died yesterday at his home. No. 263\nBroad-st.. Newark, from neuralgia of the heart,\nMr Goldstein was the inventor of the no-called\nporpoise Bhoe lace. He leaves a widow and two\nBOD*.\nCHARLES T. DUPUY.\nCharles T. Dupuy. for over half a century a\nmember of the firm of Hughes, Dupuy & Crehan\u00dfe,\nImporters of French novelties. Manhattan, died on\nTuesday, at his home. No. 175 Madison-st.. Brook\nlyn. Mr. Dupuy was born in Lausanne, Switzer\nland, eighty-two years ago. Last November Mr.\nand Mrs. Dupuy ceieorated their golden we-lilng\nanniversary- Sha survives him. as do two daugh\nters. The funeral will be held to-day at 3p. m.\n, . \u25a0 \u00bb \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\nTHOMAS S. COOPER.\nThomas B. Cooper, of the clothing firm of T. S.\nCooper &. Boas. Broadway, n\u00ab*r Bedford-aye.,\nBrooklyn, died yesterday at bis home, No. 543 Bed\nford-aye.. that boroush. He was born in Dundee,\nScotland, in. IK7. In the Civil War Mr. Cooper\nserved as captain in the 47th New-York Volunteers.\nHe was a member of Hyatt Lodge. F. end A. M..\nand of the Hanover Club. Two years asro Mr. and\nMrs. Cooper celebrated their jroldcn wedding anni\nversary. She survives him. as do four sons.\nFUSION FORCES ARMING FOR FRAY.\nExecutive Committee of Citizens Union Con\nsiders Basis of Representation.\nThe necessary steps toward gaining a fusion of\nthe anti-Tammany forces in the coming municipal\ncampaign were considered at a meeting: of the ex\necutive committee of the Citizens Union, which has\nbean made the conference committee of the or\nganization, held late yesterday at No. 32 Liberty\nst. The committee is considered an ideal one, bo\ncause it is made up of .Democrats, Republicans and\nrepresentatives of labor interests, Its members\nbeing Francis C. Huntington, chairman; K. Fulton\nCutting, E. R. L. Gould, Abner S. Haicht. F. L.\nMarshal. John W. Weed, Arthur M. Harris. A. P.\nW. Seaman. Charles C. Nadal, Charles H. Strong,\nJohn J. Young, Guatave W. Thompson, Herman W.\nSchmitz, A. J. Boulton, Edwin S. Kassing. Frank\nHarvey Field, Julius Clumbers and August H. Steb\nbins.\nA plan for fusion was discussed and the basis of\nthe representation In the conferences considered,\ntut no decision was reached regarding the latter.\nThe names of the anti-Tammany organ .zatlons\nwhich will be asked to join will not be made public\nuntil the invitations sent oat bays be\u00abn an\u00abue red\nThe first general conference of the organizations\nwhich will take an active part in the coming &iim\nnaJirn will be held late in May. letter, to promi-\nThe on^ttM decided to Bend letters to promi\nnent men in all parts of the Stale asking them to\nI^in^l petition to the next legislature to pa*, the\nUnion 1 * Excise Commission hi!!, which provides for\nth\" appointment of a non-partisan commission of\nexperts to investigate the liquor traffic and report\na ft^was^ann^nced following the meeting that\nthere would be another meeting: of tns executive\ncommittee this afternoon. It was divided to c\u00bbil\na conference of nil anil-Tammany ormnizatiors at\nthe headquarter* at the Citizens Union on M\u00bbnrtaj.\nMbv U. Candidates will not be <H\u00abeus9\u00ab<l. Sub\ncommittees will be appointed, and the prospect of\na fusion campaign will be talked over. ~^\nBOYCOTT ON ST. MARK'S.\nBishop of London's Announcement\nA pplauded.\nLondon. April 30. \u2014 At the night session of ihe\nLondon Diocesan Conference yesterday the\nBishop of London, the Right Rev. Arthur F.\nIngram, made a statement to the effect that he\nhad thrice sent for an explanation from the\nRev. Mr. Hadden regarding tha VanclerbHt-\nRutherfurd weddin?. and that none had be*>n ra\nceived.\nThe galleries and the floor of the little church\nhouse, in the shadow of Westminster Abbey,\nwere crowded, in anticipation of the Bishop's\nannouncement. Arising amid intense silence, the\nprelate said he had hoped to present to the con\nferonc: an explanation from the officiating cler\ngyman in the matter of the \"grave scandal\nwhich recently had occurred in the diocese.\"\nHe could only surmise that a family bereave\nment, the death of a child, was responsible for\nMr. Hadden having entirely Ignored the Bishop's\nletters and messages. The Bishop characterized\nthe use of St. Mark's Church for the perform\nance of the ceremony as constituting a \"grrave\nmoral scandal,\" and expressed his determination\nnot to enter the church until due reparation had\nbeen made.\nThe prelate then briefly recapitulated the con\ntention of the chancellor of thjj diocese, that he\n(the chancellor) was obliged by law to issua a\nlicense to divorced persons if any clergyman\ncould be found to marry them, that the chancel\nlor's Jurisdiction was entirely Independent of the\nBishop's, and that the lit ecse went out in the\nchancellor's name, and not in the Bishop's.\nContinuing, the prelate said:\nIt only remains for me to express my own\nopinion of the great scandal which has been per\npetrmted in the diocese -more important than\nany uueatioa of ritualistic observance because\nof the moral scandal involved.\nThe Bishop then reed an extract from the de\ncision of the Lambeth Conference of 188S in\ncondemnation of the practice of marrying\ndivorced persons, in which it Is recommended\nthat in case the innocent party to the divorce\nshould desire to remarry', the question of the\nchurch ssrvice should b\u00ab left to the Bishop of\nthe diocese.\n\"There has been consiierable que?tion on th!s\npoint.\" contlptiea the prelate, \"ana the opinion\nof the Church has been strongly against even\nthis concession. The law does not compel the\nloan of a church, and much less of a clergy\nman, to solemnize such a marriage. The present\nscandal Is involved, but I hope It will not be\nwithout good effect if it directs the attention of\nthe entire world to the attitude of the Church on\nthis subject, and emphasizes the fact that the\nproceedings of the chancellor are entirely be\nyond the control of the Bishop.\n\"I hereb;- express my earnest wish that the\nclergy do r.ot celebrate such marriages, and I\nr\u00abrtainly shall not enter St. Marks Church until\nreparation has been made for the Insult thus\noffered to the diocese \"\nThe Bishop's remarks were vigorously ap\nplaudsd. an- ihe session ended with the passage\nof a vote of thanks, moved by the Suffragan\nBishop of London.\n\u2022\u25a0Father\" Black, the Protestant clergyman,\nwhose protests against the marrying of divorced\npersons have attracted considerable attention,\nhas written another letter to the newspapers on\nthe subject of the Vanderbilt-Rutherfurd wed\ndinp. announcing that ps Secretary White of the\nUnited State! Embassy h\u00abts not replied to his\nprevious letter, he has now cabled to New- York\npapers asking \"if the Americans who respect re\nligion think the secretary of their embassy ought\nto join with a disobedient clergyman in a back\ndoor plot to outwit the Archbishop of Canter\nbury and the Bishop of London?\"\n\u2022 \u2014\nFAVORS A FREE PLAYGROUND.\nMr. Blakie, at the Christodora House, De\nclares for Another Park in The Bronx.\n\u2022William Blaki\u00ab, at the annual meeting of Chris\ntodora House, in Cooper Union last evening, ad\nvocated the opening of a park, somewhere la The\nBronx, for a playground for boys and girls. He\nwould not have any \"Keep off the grass\" signs\nstuck up. but wanted, he said, a big. free spot\nwhere those who seldom get into the country could\ngo at least once a week and play ball, skate, or do\nanything in the line of athletics that would make\nthem healthy and strong. The city should, he de\nclared, set aside fX.<W>,OOO of Its funds for the^ pur\nchase of the land needed, and a similar park should\nbe provided in Brooklyn.\nMr Blakie said it would be well to set out apple,\ncherry and peach trees, and let the boys \"shin up\nand help themselves to fruit.\nTHE WEATHER REPORT.\nYesterday's Record and To-day's Forecast.\nWashington. April 30.\u2014 Since Wednesday night th\u00ab\nstorm centre has moved from Northern Ill.nols to the St.\nLawrence Valley with \u00abTeaUy Increase* intensity, and\nthe cool wave now extends from the lake region and\ngbbxxbJ valley* westward Into the slop* region, although\nli \"is not so cold a\u00ab on Wednesday In the latter district,\nla the Atlantio States temperature* continued high, but\nfell In the afternoon on the New-England and Middle\nAtlantic in\u2014 la portions of Nebraska Kansas, OJcla\nh<Mn*. Western Missouri and In Northern Tex** the tem\nperature? Thursday morons were lower than ever be\nfore rec. : for the {line of the year, rangins; from th\u00ab\nfret-zing po-.u to 8 degrees below.\nThere win ; \u2022 rain Friday la the Atlantic States ren\nerally ann in i:.e greater portion ot the lower lake re\ngion, accompanied by much lower temperature; there will\nalso he showers in Montana. On Saturday showers are\nprobable in the Northwestern States and the middle pla\nteau: elsewhere Friday ana Saturday the weather will be\nfair. It will tie warmer Friday In the elope region of the\nMissouri and upper Mississippi valleys, and warmer\nlater In the central valleys and the lake region.\nOu the New-England and Middle Atlantic Coc\u00abt the\nwinds will be- high south\u00bb-i\u00bb-t to nurthwr*:; on the South\nAtlantic i vast brisk lo hi\u00abn souii\u00bbwe*t to northweet; or.\nthe Oulf Court, fresh nor::. wept, on the upper l*ka\u00bb. north\nand diminishing, and on the luwer MM iu*li and mostly\n:. \u2022. Lhwest.\n' Steamers departing Friday for European port* will\nhave iijgh sguin-.vtst to northwest winds, with ram aad\nlower temperature to the Grand Banks.\nSturm warnings are displayed on the Atlantic Coast\nfrom Jacksonville to Eastport, and on the Oreat I-iiL*^,\nexcept superior.\nWarnings of fr^\u00bb\u00bb\u00bbnr t\u00abnt\u00bbr\u00abwr\u00bb hare been issued tor\nStates north of the Ohio River and of heavy to killing\nfrusta in interior of Texas, Arkansas. Oklahoma, Northern\nLouisiana and Tennessee f.i . Kentucky. Frost warnings\nhave aleo bssn i\u00bb&ued lor Southern Louisiana, the Texas\nf-a^t fcxtrtiou northern portion* of iii\u00bbr.\u00bb\u00bb.p|ji *ih3 Ala\nbHma, Kastern Orejyn. i..tsLcrii Washington tLtxd Idahd.\nFORECAST FOR TO-DAT A.ND SATTRDAT.\nFor New-England, rain to-day; much colder, except\n!n Eastern Maine: high west to northwest wind*. Satur\nday f\u00bbir and cool.\nFur District ot Columbia, Maryland, Virginia, New-\nJersey. Eastern Pennsylvania and Eajstera New-York.\nruin and much coder to-day; brisk to high west Winds-\nSaturday fair, with roiderate t\u00abrnj>eraiure.\nFor i>elaware. rain and colder to-day; high west winds.\nSatu: . v- .- fair.\nFcr Western Pennsylvania, rain and colder to-day,\nfollowed by clearing; hips northwest winds. Satuixlay\nfair; warmer in south portion.\nFor Western New-York, rain and colder to-dar: possibly\nenow along the lakes; high west to northwest winds.\nSaturday fair.\nTRIBUNE LOCAL OBSERVATIONS\nIn tola diagram the continuous white Una shews the\nchanges in pressure as Infilsat\u00dfa by The Tribune's self\nreconjine barometer. The dotted Hae show* the tempera\nture as rccarfle'3 i>> DM local Weather Bureau.\nThe following- official record from the 'Weather Bureau\nshows the changes tn the tenj\u00bb<rawr\u00bb for tba laat twenty\nfour hours in. comparison with the corresponding Cav>\nof last y*ar: ijo\u00bb| uog _ 1&02.\n8 . m Oa 53 6p. m 75 73\n12m. \u00a3::- }* %l i2 +\"L\" L \u2014 2 S\n12 m. i\u00bb *\u00a3 l - * \"^ \"\u2666\n4 r,. m \"* - i 3'\nHighest temperature yewtarday. 85 degrees; bwwt, (52;\nia>s: year; 94; average temperature (or ccrrts:yoad;as date\nl**t y\u00abar. (M . \u00ab.\u00bb\u2022!\u25a0%*\u2022 tem-\u00abr\u00bb.tu.r\u00ab for UH\u2014 \u00bbu\u00bbrUi S <l*te\nlaft twer.tv-P.ve years. 63. ...\nlocal forecast. \u2014 Rain and much colder to-day, br.sic to\nhigh Hindu. Saturday, fair, wli^ isod.erau umpfitur*\nMUSEUM REOPEXS TO-DAY.\nAcquisitions Include Paintings, Jap\nanese Armor and Many Gifts.\nThe Metropolitan Museum of Arts, which has\nbeen closed for the annual spring houseclear.lr.g,\n*-ill be reopened to the public at 10 a. m. to-day.\nSince the opening of the new east wins last Decem\nber many alterations have been made by General\ndl Cesnoia. Three picture galleries have been re\ndecorated and some of. the collections have been\ntransferred to make room for others. Some of the\nCyprus untiquiUed of the Di Cssnola. collection,\nstored for a time for lack of room,, are, now in the\nnortheast alcove of the south wing, and the col\nlection has been historically arranged. Many\nEgyptian antiquities have b\u00absen added to the ex\nhibits is the north corridor.\nAmong til. acquisitions in th\u00bb picture frallcries\nare \"The Valley cf VaucVoss.\" by Thomas Cole,\npresented by William E. Dues?, \"L/Enleveraent de\nRebecca,\" by Delacroix, from th\u00ab Lyall sale.\n\"Boats on Shore,\" by Danbigny, and a landscape\nby Rousseau, bought at the Mrs. 3. D. Warren\nBale. and \"The Protest of Luther,\" by Linden\ntchmit. the younger, given by W, E. Dodge. Three\npictures were bought with asssjssj from th\u00ab Jacob\nS. Rogers fund. These are \"Marie Marguerite\nLambert de Thorigny,\" & portrait, by Largiilterre.\n\u2022wfco died In 1748; a portrait of the Emperor Joseph\nII of Austria, brother of Marie Antoinette, painted\nby Drouals In 1770, and a portrait of -Princess de\nCome as Diana,\" formerly owned by Queen Marie\nAntoinette, and painted by Jean Marc Nattier, who\ndied in 17W.\n\"Autumn.\" by D. W. Tryon. Is lent by the artist,\nand \u2022 VersMee*hovan, \"Laimatape and Cattle.\" ut\nlent by Mrs. A. E. Saoenberger.\nOne of the notable additions 13 the collection of\nold Japanese armor, leat by Dr. Bashford Dean.\nprofcssoi of philosophy in Colum'oi* University.\nTrofessor Dean spent some time in Japan collect\ning;. There are nineteen complete armor suits,\nrepresenting the principal periods In Jar>\u00bbnese his\ntory, from 120Q to. about urn. They show the auks\nworn by the commnndex-in-chi*! down to those\nworn by soldiers. The art is extinct, dyicg In IsGS.\nwhen the Shegun was deposed as temporary em\nperor. arid the .M'.&vio came Into full control.\nAmons t^e suits is that of the Prince of Saltal.\nan armor in red and poid lacquer, dated 1550. and\na suit once belonsiner to the Prince of Arima, dated\n16C0, lent by Louis B. M:Ca?g, eons#k\u00abr\u00a3d one of\nthe Wsx. tx&mjUs of etched work ov*rla.i<J with\ngold that has been brought out of Jatan.\nIn the collection 13 a red and bql4 armor of\nthe Tckugawa. period. i\u00a3oo-li?S. worn only by a\ncoramaii(]fcr-in-chi^\u00a3. aad Jated i<uu- Another 13\nsteei and tack, laced with white deer hide. The\nwar harness of a Japan-?** officer at the time or.\nthe Mongol Bnraston hi 1252 is b*\u00bbllev*4 to be the\nonly complete one of this rerio-} that has beer.\npreserved. It v.'t>* the wrrK of Miochlu Jluri*\nti;L;:-i, of the fifth gt-nerstion of the great armor\ners of eld Japan, dating from 1130 to I^CO- Aa:ons\nthe specimens from i: -, irjira period. dating >vi 3\nto JO: :\u25a0>. Is an armor In boiled leather glided. There\nare copper scales taken out of graves, running\nback to the ninth century. A helmet and masK\nwhich belonged to General TakeJa 3hlns*n, date\n\\'~. ': and orce practlealiy ruler of the empire.\nrepresents the head of a pod of the mountain.\nTbsre arc a'.Rv pieces of European armor traded to\nJapanese in I7fi6 throurt Nagasaki, the only op e\nport of that time. The collection occupies nearly\nthirty eases.\nAmong other additions to the museum Is tha col\nlection of seventy sur.dia'.s given by the &znily\nof Stephen B. Tucker. They date from th* \u00bbix\ntsenth century. Mrs. Purport Morgan selves a\nmahogany rase: D. J Nolan, a bow mandolin; Mrs.\nArthur Corbin. a Japanese plaque: Mrs. Robert De\nForest, a bronsa mai^k of Nnpoleon I, and the ex\necutors of the estate cf Henry G. Marquand, a\nmantelpiece, Italten. of the sixteenth century.\nTerra eotta vaaes from Asia Minor. Gre,co-rtoman\nstatuettsja, brents and glass vases, from Pa Ida\nand Haifa, and gol<i ornaments frcm Tar3us are\namong the acquisitions.\nA miniature of the Princess Augusta Sophia is\nlent by J. D. Larkln^ and a Gre\u00abk church triptych,\noval plaaua. by V. E. Jlacy.\nDnrnftt'j Vantlla Extract\nis th* best, and the best Is bom too good for -r-jr faei\nand drink. Invlrt on having ourneu*\u00ab.\nMarried.\nFHABER\u2014 mi/OX- Acrtl SO. IS**. hi AM Bool*\nChurch. BOth-at. and 4th-ave.. hr the R\"*. Thomas K.\nSlieer Grace Arniltaee, daughter si Mr and Mrs.\nyranklia A. 'Wlleoi to Alfred Auyuotu* Fras\u00abr, Jr.\nRIKER\u2014 RJKER\u2014 On ITednesday. April 29. at the Church\nof the Incarnation, by the Rev WJU'-am M. Gro-veacr.\nMary Jaek\u00bben. dao\u00abrht\u00ab?r of Mr. and Mrs. John I*\nRlker, to Henry Inrererjll Rlker.\nROOT\u2014 At Greenwich. Conr... April 29, by the\nRev. Josiah Strons, I>. D.. Helen Henry White to Rob\nertson Tyler Root.\nSO HAMILTON'\u2014 On Wednesday, AJI'-l 13.\nat the residence of the bride's brother. No. 49\u00ab .WTer\neon-ave., Detroit, by the Right Rev. Thomas F. r\u00bb\u00bbv!e\u00ab.\nD D T.T. D., B>hT of Michigan. Jean Ponton Ham\nilton.\"' dausht*r of th\u00ab late David Hamilton, to Dr.\nThomaa Saepard Souihworth. of Naw-Tork.\nNotices of Marriages and Deaths must be In\ndorsed with full name and address.\nDied.\nAldis Owsa W. HavUaaa. Ger3u3\u00ab K.\nBasSord, Andre* J. Kcyu Ch*\u00bbUs A.\nrinwnfli' Api'Vit fT Lewis, xvev. i,. *>.\nCosfer Stfit T\u00bb L Mayo.' EU\u00abb*Ui B.\nsXm ransU S. Prectisa. David O. a\nDupuy. Charles T. Saaxw Charlw S.\nTTIBB-r \"arnbne Matt. Car^!lr.#\n%<?&: N>[='n J. Ward. Fwaertr A\nQfbes, X Willard.\nALDIS-At Hotel Manhattan. April 30. *{\u00bb\u2022<*\"\u00ab WBV\nlara AMI* son \u00bbt Owen F. AMI*, of Chicago. Funeral\nstn-i^es in Chicago. Ch!ca 939 3 and Boston papers p!eas\u00bb\ncopy.\nBASHFORD\u2014 In New-York, on TTmrsday April 30. of\nBrunt's disease. Andrew J.. son of the late John and\nfit her A. Baihtord. of Yonker*, la the 69th year of bis\naxe. Relative, ard friends are respectfully Invited to\nattend the funeral 9 \u00bb' Tl \"\u00bb? n S\u00abturda- afternoon at^.\nw'eloclt at ihe resilience ef hi\" brothor. Henry W. l*a\u00abiv\nford. Xo. 33 Highland-are.. Tinkers.\nB<\"iN\"XELIr-~O\u00bb Wednesday \u00ab-Tenlnjr, J\u00bbth i\u00df\u00bbt. Agatha\nE wl*eo*A r>i\u00dfby BonntH. N'oi S4 Garden Place.\nKroo~i4. VaneralJrvlce* it S p. m.. Satnrday. May\n\u00bb at the Church of the Holy Trinity. M<mta*u\u00ab arid\nCllr.ttm \u2022[\u00bb. Interment \u00a9rival*.\nCOSTEH\u2014 At VveM Chester. K. T. Ob Tuesday. A\u00bbrU 28.\nIBM I Julia De Lan-v daughter of the late Daniel J.\nSr J Fungal service, at St . P.Uf. . ChureX W\u00abt\nChester, on Pridsy afternoon. May 1. at 5.1* \u00b0 rlock -\nTrutn for W\u00bbst Chester ieares Bd-are. arid I^th-Bt. at\n4:4? Relative, and friends are kindly revested not to\n\u25a0end flowera\nDECKERSON- at Harerstra-w. \u25a0 T. April \u2022).\nI&G3. Mr*. Fannie Sloat Deckerson. In her \u00ab4th year\nFuneral services at her late residence, Havcrstraw. on\nSunday. May 3. at *:30 p. m.\nDrPUT\u2014 On Tuesday. Apr:! 2S. Charles T. DupaT. to isi\"\n\u00abd year. Funeral \u00ab\u00abrvir\u00ab at his tote \"*\u00a3 a \u00bb c*>e *> No.\n175 Madtson-?t.. Brooklyn, on Friday. May 1. at S\no'clock. Interment private.\nF^^t~\"\u00bbidt'w*lir\" r^-tf.:jirc \"n\"' Ftaet. In' 5\u00bb22, >S^,\nReUtives and trter-ds are invited to .tten\u00ab fan\u00ab\u00bbl ttom\nW^t MoUon-are Rahwar. N. J. T. Barnes. ;t\u00ab; t\u00abr SO on.\nW\u00abt il'tJn-ave. Rahw,y. X. J.. Friday s\u00dfernoo\u00df.\nMay 1. at 5 p. m. Interment at cc\u00bbTenienc\u00ab of Cwnlly.\nGATES\u2014 WeineaOar. Air!! \u00bb. J\u00bbetK\u00bb J. O\u00ab\u00ab~\nFuneral services at his late residence No. 1.1\u00ab Dean\nft Erooklyn. on Frliiay ever.jng. May 1. Nt 8:30 o'clock.\nRelatives and Irtenda lir\u00bblt\u00abd.\n\u00abBDS\u2014 In New-H*ve\u00df. Corxn.. Aprn a Projeaiiflr J.\n*^,, r i G\u00bbnbs a*e<l <H years. Funoral \u2022ervte** at\nhla W* \u00absW\u00abce. No. 121 H^-\u00bbt. N.w-Haven, on\nFriday. May 1. at 2:30 p. m.\nHAVrLANI>\u2014 On Thursday. April \u00bb. Gertrude Kaox.\nwife of Isaac T. Hav!.an<l Funeral Mnrtco from her\nlate residence. No. 317 \\Vinousht>y-*T\u00ab.. Brooklyn, on\nSurdav May 8. 1S\u00ab8. a: 2\u00ab p. m. Interment In\nfamily \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u2022<-. Greenwood, at convienence. at family.\nHOYT- April 18. 1903. at th\u00ab l*\u00bb\u00bbden\u00abe i ef tl\u00bb \u2022on, ,\nvasLdsna Cal.. CnarW\u00bb AJbert UoyU or Brooklyn, ru\nwZZumtrto* \u00bb' BurUa*toc Vu. Un iluaday morain*.\nMay 4.\nV IS F A 4 I ZSa i in^^'th^lr-of &.*&%:\nvrAV>_nn Thu\u00ab9dar April 3<>. 1904. st h\u00abr !at\u00ab MSt\n*^ u>\u00ab U\u00ab TUuuoa* Jtaic ut Greece \"ich. v-oaa-.\nheld at CariitCharca. Greenwich. Conn., en Saturday.\nHay 2. at 1 releS\u00dfi\n_ N __ e;s _T)- Tl .j Offden Breill\u00bby. N<>. 39 West One\n\"undrld-a^i-th'\" 3 -\" \u2022 died April 30. .g\u00ab one year.\n\u0084..u vu v Broekim. AWll 2*. Chariea S. Saasay.\ny mi tirvlces at the residence of al\u00bb aunt. Mr*. E. U.\nK.*U? \"l\" Cblumwa asU^tSi Projikljn. on Frt\n\u00a3Ty!iiay 1. at 2 o'clock.\nCI A-rr\u2014 A- Nenrk. N J.. on April \u00bb. IMS. OarolJn*\ncVtT wYdow of Wllltam H Start, n her TSrt year.\nf'. iaV-9 und frtendi are invltad to a;t\u00bbBd funersi frvm\n.\"(.r?,- of h*r \u25a0!\u25a0 IB WIW J. T. Barnei. V I*3\n- :\u25a0\u25a0\u00ab, vt^ton-a^.. lUhww. N. J.. FYitay sfl\nMay 1 *t 6p. \u25a0\u00bb- lm\u00ab*ro\u00ab n * al con\u00bb\u00bbi\u00abtenc\u00ab of f\u00bbuniiy.\n_\u0084.,., p.. April 23- \u00abx-Ju*tic\u00ab FreJertc A. Ward, aged\n*;V',^ and \u00bb days. Funeral from Orae* Church.\nSuSS^n iwUS. U3 o-\u00ab^ck. Saturday aiteraooo.\nThe W\u2022\u2022* \u00bb\u2022 w \u25a0 Cemetery\nla the most accessible cemetery of the metrop\nolis ty Harlem trains. troUey cr carrtaxe.\nThirty ra!nuU\u00bb froa Grand Central Lots\n\u2022old at $123 up. se\u00df\u00ab tot lUtuitraUd Book\nie ir *T request a r\u00bbp\u00ab\u00bbt\u00abt\u00bbtlv\u00bb \u00ab1U csU.\noffice, 20 sajbt aai>-\u00abT.. y. Y. CTTT.\nSpecial Notices.\nA^.l.'-C MWeI I i M\u00ab\u00bb\u00bbe\u00bb Jt Co.'*\n\u00ab\u25a0 ITT a a \u25a0 \u00ab\u25a0\u00bb\u2022\u25a0 CUCliilliEKJ*\nfar is* skin, l\u00bbm\u00ab\u00bbsat\u00ab in egeaC All doalara.\nTrlkmoe \u00bb\u00bbl\u00bba\u00abTiptloo Rat*\u00ab.\n_\u0084 tptbL'NE will be mi by mall to any address in\nBr^rr^m^d^ con ' e3JeBI - b3B *\n6TNGLXS COPI?S.\nKX-VD4.T B cents IWIXKX.T wcvicvr. 5 cent*\n&^.%> T - 3 cent* I -%V EE2O.X. i ceqts\n\\VEE^iT rABMB3R.\u00bb c\u00abBt\u00bb| .\nTRIBOTS JkXMAXAa 2& CENT*.\nSpecial Notices.\nBT EARL.T MAIL TRAIN.\nTot all pcl=t\u00bb to th\u00ab United 3Utea. Canada as 4 Kexleo\n(ouisto* of the boroushs of Manhattan and The Brsax).\nDAILT AND SUNDAY: IWEtKLf FARMER:\nOne montn. $1 <v> -(\u00bb Mont.i\u00ab. v>\nThree Muntha, *-'\u25a0'.\u25a0> Twelve Monthe. tl SO\nBix Month*. tiWi V\\ti.ivi-y RSVi\u00a3Wt\nTwelve Months. $10 00 fU \u00bbon:hs. \u25a0>\u2022\u2022\u00bb\nBU.VDAT ONLT: ! Twelve M \u00bbn\u00bb\u00bb. SI \u00bbi\nTwelve MocUia. \u25a0TRittfNU AUa.N'AC:\n\u2022DAILY ONLY: I !'\u00bbr copy. 55\nOne Month. TJ-.IM! YE !.VT>BC:\nThre* Months. 12 Orti Per Copy. i: '-\u25a0\nSix Moatha, *\u00bb \"0. TRI3V NE EXTRAS:\nTwelve Months. ss<<> Send tor cf\\.o\u00abiMi\nTRI-WKEXLT: I\nMz Month*. 73',\nTwelve Uontha. (1 B-ks\nNEW-YORK rrrr.\nMali subscribers to tIM DAILY and TRX- ITBBKI.T win\nbe i-r.itrit-'l \u2022\u25a0\u25a0 *-- :.: a cc^y ex:ra posta(\u00ab In addition to\nthe rales earned abore.\nTHE mum \u2022 \u25a0 i*> raa'.led to run\u00ab. Porto >SBB.\nHawaii and the Philippines without extra npmmm toe\nFor pcirts lr. Karor* \u00abrd all countries tn the ral\u00bb\u00bbyl\nPostal \u00bb ti! .n THE TRIBUNE will &\u2022 mailed at the fol\nlowing rat\u00aba:\nDAILY AND SUNDAY: I D.VILT OJTLT:\ni ne Jl\u00abnth. I! 7\u00bb Six Months. |T 13\nTwo Months. 13 3*!! Twelve Mnntha Si* 58\nThree Months. \u00bb\u25a0\u00bb v. 7!:; *\u00ab>KLT\nSix Months. tO \u00ab>( Six Months. \u00ab \u00bb\nTwelve Months, $!.)..- Twelve Months. WO*\nSUNDAY ONLY: I WEKKCY FARMER:\nSix Months. 12 M SUMorths. $152\nTwelv\u00bb Months. So 12) 'i .velre Mocth#. $2 0*\nDAILY ONLY- jVTrrKI.T nETirW: _, _,\nOneilnrth. *'. 44. Fix Months. * t \u00ab\nTwoMrmrfcs. $2 SS| Twelve Mr. \u25a0 \u2022. *2 0*\nThree Months. $3 371\nAOiree* i>li cominunJcatloiw relative to \u2022afcsertptlo\u00dfS i \"\u2022\n\u00bb,iTiertl^naen\u00a3\u00bb to THB THIBLNci r\u00abw-York City. \u00bb\u2022\nrclt by Postoffice money order, express money order. Sr*n\nor r*s\u00bbl\u00abr 1 totter.\nOFFiCES:\nMAIN OrTJ\u00ab~I. H 1\u00bb4 Naiwe,u-et\nUPTOWN O?nCS\u2014 N-\u00bb. 1.3\u00ab Broadway, or Bar A\u00bb\u00abTi\ntan J>ittrUit Tele^rttpa t;ttjce.\nWAStirNGTON Bl'REAl'-.No. 1.522 F-st.\nHHWAttX ZIKANCH VICE- Frederic* N. So=\u00bba\u00bb\u00abT.\n>-'c. ~IH Urual-at. _^_\nAiIi:i:ICANS ABROAD \u00ab!!! I-.: TKE TRTBCTfE at\nLONDON\u2014 oru:e \u2022< TlfE TKTBCXE. at JSB. \u00bb\u2022\nBrowa. Gould A Ox. No. **\u2022 Ne-\u00bb-Oxfon*-\u00abt.\nVc.'-tii anj tins <cii\u00bbi\u00bb\u00bb\u00bb. Cankers. BuHl\"i\nU\u00bbU\u00ab\u00ab. ilv.>. *\u00bb\u00bb\u2022\u00ab\u00bb.\nAm^ricar; F.si-ress <;onjpany. No. 3 Waterloo Place.\nThomas Cook i- m Tiuris* (\u00bb\u00bb\u25a0\u25a0\u00ab I.nrra\u00ab\u00ab Clrc\u00ab\u00bb\nT\u00bb- U>c<lm\u00df o\u00abce of THE rRIBUKB M a coB luliat\nc!ac? to Jsmwe ad\\ert!s\u00abniesta a*i \u00abv\u00bb*\u00bbacr'.;Uais\u00bb.\nSICE. mASCE~ Cretiit Lyoanai*.\nPAKIt>\u2014 J. il'jn.-oe jfc Co.. No. 7 Rue 3crtfce.\nJcha Waaasaaker i. Co.. No. M Bus das rBSHes\nEc-jf.e. .\nMaps, Kur}\u00ab\u00bb 4 Co.. Jfs. St Boulevsra Htnumami.\nCr\u00ab3;t i-y--r.;.rtia. iiuieau \u25a0:\u00ab\u00bb Euawt\u00bb:a.\nCcntlr.er.tal Hot*: ntwjsta.nd.\nOr.isd ilo:el ne\u00abssiiii4.\nErenta^o'i. Net 27 Av\u00bbnue de l'Oc*rs.\nAmerican Expre?s C clr ra2T. ?\"0- U R:\u00bb S<rrtb\u00ab.\nOKN'EVA\u2014 Lombard. \"-r * Co. an.l Union Bank.\nFW3H\u00a3>. CE^Fr\u00ab>ch. Leaon A Co.. No*. 2 aad 4 Via\nTorr.aSuon!.\nHarp ay , v Cm., Banker?.\nHAJl^UllfJ\u2014 Amer\u00bbc#n \u00ab\u00bbp\u00ab-e\u00ab9 Cescyeny. No It\nFrh.n'ede Strjsre.\nWWTtTTT AmerK^tn Express Company. ?*o. \u2022 3ahah9i\nS;.-a <\nGENOA\u2014 An:er?r3n Express Cczpjmt. No. 15 vTs> fe*\ntoren-rn.\nANTWERP. BKLniT*M\u2014 American Expre\u00ab\u00bb Cet\u00bbl\u00bb*aT.\nNa ~ Qua I Vaa DycJc\nTr-r the \u25a0\u2022 -tv\u00ab-;e\u00ab-\u00ab of TRISCNU RCAOEJtS a\u00abjr<i<i\u00ab\narrsr^fmenta hsr s been made to k\u00ab-p tie DAILT aiaJ\n\u2022 T-XTi \u25a0 \u2022 TRTBf'VH OT2 Sl\u00ab tr. T.he -.---\u2014.\u2022 ef \u2022\"\u25a0\u00ab\nhotels \u25a0nsm-'t l\u00bbelPTr:\nLONPO\"\u00ab Kotei Vlctcria. ?\u00abv\u00bb-.y Betel. The L*BSham\nH^tol. rarity HofJ na.-Ts^s Ho?-!. H=te' M*tr^\n,\u2022.,.\u00bb HnteJ <-*. M!d!\u00bbm! \u2022 \u25a0-.\u00bb\u2022 Hotel, n.irrex\"* %'\u25a0\u00bb\nllothL Urn.\" Russell. Ths H,.w;if< H>\u00bb\u00bbJ. NorfoCi-rt..\nF^m^^^-lkmer!t. _ ,\nHXCLAXD- A\u00ab\u00abeTr\u00bbhl Hotel, LJrerpnal: <Jaee^> Krt\u00bbl.\nLu*\u00abs: MliKnd H\u00abt\u00ab!. Mrv< - !-\u00bb<\u00ab\u2022* WelUn^cn.\nTunhrldjre W\u00abUf: MUUaa-i Hoft liorecan*e Pay:\nIvoyai H\"t-!. Ros!^n-w r .; 'R'.Tl Hotel. Casa*\u00bb\u00ab\u00ab*r\n\\WwlMck M-\"\"\u00bb> Wpwl\u00ab> MiT's-i \u2014 -^. l> ' rT\nHoli:<T-\u00bb Bhankl \u25a0 Hotsl Isl\u00ab o* Vv \"\" l *\"U-J^ a w 9 VT\nHotel. Ffttws-y->\"*r.-<i tV^:\u00bb\u00bb: R.-ra: Oait ? . . _ \u2022\nBettws-v-C\u00ab^J. \" TTa '\u00bb\u00ab--: !C\u00abT^aOl Kat\u00abl. Bnsirwn:\nH&tel virtorU; Hotel Metn\u00abole. __ ;.\"\nSCOTLAND\u2014 St. En-ch IT-.t-l. G:^.\u00absow: Station Dote..\nAyr: fte.tl->n Hotel. TVinifrie*.\nCrBRALTAH-rThe Hotel QmU _ . ,- \u00ab\u00bb..i\nPARl=\u2014 Hotel Oi^tliarn. Fote! Bind* Hran.? p \u2022\u2022?. nc\"'\nrfu Palais. Hotil ,1^ la unn.i* Bretaye. Ha\u00bbal Opn-\nIRELA*n'dL&clm Ko^l. Cl*b***\u00abT: Shaibnrst Hot-.!.\nITALY AND Cl SOTrrri OF \"FTtANC!v-P;-.vl-r\u00bb r *J?;*\"\nMnnU. Carlo: H&tal Sl^trooole. R.-Jse: Hotel fle rH>'\nrnita^e. M-nte Carl-): K^ya! Hotel \u00ab\u2022\"\u2022; G I?\",\nHctftl. Rcrne: Grand H 'el A:t lej Bag 19 \"- \u2122*l?i\nK\u00bb^i--) Ara '-\u2022 ' ' '* \"12 \u2122**i * 1X\nleu Calo?: \"rand Hotel Venice: ' -.t- Mar-.a \",?f!-\nMen' G<!. H-.t^l \u00a9iiirtnaJ. R\u00ab>Tce: ' ? '\u00ab r^-\u2122{*7-\nX!p\u00ab- Cos!T\u00bb.-\u00bbr\u00ab!ltan. Nice: Kraft's CJranc! Hotel d-\u00bb\n>\u00abcc: Hotel B\u00abau Site. Cbhb\u00ab\u00ab 3\u00bb*c^H3t\u00bbl. O?\" 0 *-\nEden J-a'-a.--. \u2022Jen'\"* Grand H\u00abel. rSor-nce: \u00ab\u2022**\u25a0'\nRoyal TmnieH. Venleo: -Jr-i!vl H \u00bbel Venlee; \u00bb' '\n<1^ la Vi.> Milan: Hotel Savoy Rossanlga. >\u2022\u00bb\u00bb\u00ab\u00bb-\nI \u2014 Grand Cu\u00dftrn\u2014 H.tei. Cairo. -\nBELGIUM\u2014 Le Grand Hot*!. Bms*eJs; --\"-'* Kb?'*** \u00bb n *\nBeau !\u00ab!te. \"\u00bb'en-1 Ont!nent\u00bbt Hotel. O\u00bbten<S.\nDENMARK\u2014 HoteI de rAr.s>terre. Coaenhagen-\nRT'SiSilA\u2014 Hotel Berlin. M\u00ab*cew. _ ___\nGERMANY\u2014 Nsssauer-Hof Hotel. Wl\u00abBby\u00abBS>; ****\u00bb-\nHa' and Anfjute Vlct-rta-ba-l. Wiesbaden: Four Sea\nsons H\u00abtel. Attmleh: Hotel Straoas. <u\u00bb!i\u00bb\u00bbfj\u00ab\u00abl\nFterbanie. Ba<4e\u00bb-Baden. H9WI BbOsb>M TJinewi:\nHot-: Metrppo.l'i. Schwal^s-h: Hotel Oaeclce Bad\ntT!Mu\"\u00bbpr\u00bb. near Cai~-! *n<l Pran^furt: \u2022\u00bb\u00bb\u2022! <\"*\"\nton. Berlin; libt\u00bb\u00ab^-\u00ab: H-t^ Frankfort -on-Man:a n :\nGrand Hotel M-troro!e. Bad-Xauhem: Hotel UMr\nterr\u00bb. Ems: Hotel Mesumer. B\u00abrten-Ba<!\u00bbn: Hntel ?.\u00ab\nttonaJ. St-BMbnrs: Or\u00bb!id Hotel Vllhalfns\u00dfn\u00dfA \u00bb\u25a0\u2022\u2022-\nMl: Sa\u00abl>\u00abA\u00df Hctel. Alx la CT-.\u00abl>*!ie: H\u00abt*l Ka!*\u00bbr\nncf. Berlin: Hotel M\u00bbirot>ole, Heidelberg: H \u25a0t^ld*\nRusale. E\"W!n: Hotel da Russe. Munich: Grand^ ho\ntel. Nurenberr: K\"tr} de H-llande. Sfayene\u00bbon--\nRheln: Hotel \"Wurlgail-.str. H\u00bbf Nnr-nNers;: Hotel\nset: Ventlena H\u00abrt. A!s \u00bb\u00bb Chappie: Hotel !*;'\nren- Cont'n-nri'! Rotel. Hannrer: Continental. Berl'n.\nAUSTRIA AND SWITZERLAND\u2014 Hot\u00abI frtjtol. Vienna:\nGrt. TJrttl Nation*!. Lucerne: Grand Hotel Ppr ;\nCarlsisad: C?rarl BJBM Huriarta. Pu.lape\u00bbt.\n\\-ietor'a. Inter'aken; Hotel Europe. BBlaborV: Hotel\nVTelma- M\u00bbrienb=\u00bbd: F-.--' Victoria. Ras!e; Wo\nPavor We-t Kr-1. Carlshed: Hot-l Bn!\u00abr. Bssi*:\nHnte! BcjMrboi Bunt; Continental. Laum\u00bbnn#: Hot??\nT . r . , rla Frsae^e. Hotel Kl!n^\u00bbr Marienbaa: \".--2K-1\nHotel. T-irr FraubTlctr. rntert*k\u00bbn: G->\u00abn<\u00bb Hnt\u00bbl.\nLa\u00ab-ai\u00bb*\u00ab\u00bb: Hotel Beau Rl\u00bba*\u00ab\u00ab. C\u00ab\u00bbeT\u00bb; Grand \u00bb\u25a0--!\nde la t\u00bb-.'t Genera.\n;\u2022 ..< -m . ' \\otle\u00ab.\nShould be read O.MUX \u00bby \u00abl! Interested. as iftSUH\nmay occur at any tinie.j\nyore *r> tnaiU for the week ending Mar 1. 19**. will\nalee* pmsnotty in all easr\u00ab> at tfe* General PusmSlr.s B\u00bb\nfollows- F-irc\u00ab-:&-Pos; Ma;.* cia\u00bb ore naur earlier ti\u00bb-\u00bb\nclosi\u00df\u00df time shown below, c Parcels-post sails for \u00abVr\nmany close at S p. m.. Monday.\nJleeular and Supplementary malls doja a? FortUa \u2022'\u25a0-\nMen balf hour later thai closing time Btouws below \u2022ex\ncept that s iiw i\u00abmm;\u00bbnr Mails for E\u00bbrrc\u00bb and , ORtr\u00bbl\nAmerica, via Clou U\u00ab\u00ab*\u00bb CO* OQUr later at Fortis\u00bb \u00bb\u00ab\u00bb>\n*ton.>\nTRANSATLANTIC MATXA.\nFHXDAT \u2014 \u00ab:3Q p. m. for Aiore\u00bb Island* \u00bber a. a.\nC\u00abmbrom\\n. frcjn Boston. - _.\nSATURUAT\u2014 At 6a. m. for Euros*, per a, a. C*m\u00bba\u00df\u00bbB,\nvia QiieensU<w\u00df ; at S a. m. for Beliytuia <5lr\u00bb\u00ab;t, per I. \u00bb\u25a0\nVaderUnd (mail inurt be dUeeted -per \u2022. \u2022. \\\u00abder\nland\"); at 9 a. m. for Italy direct, per <\u00bb. \u2022.\n(mall must be direct*! -per a W.tmar-;. \"* *?\na. in for Scotland direct. p\u00abr \u00bb s C\u00bbtuniM\u00ab (null must\nbe directed '\"per s. s. Columkla\"*.\n\u2022PRINTED MATTER. ETC.\u2014 This steamer tales Prtut^\nMatter Commercial Papers and Sample* for ft\u00bbiis*y\nonly The siTia claaa of mall matter for other parts of\nEurope wUI not ha sent by thi\u00bb \u00abiip valsss ipedanr\nArter eC be b clc4iss oX th \u00ab Sv?P>went\u00dfnr TrasaatUst\"*\nMalls name* above. stiffens! \"upplefnentsry Malls ar*\nopened en the pier, of the American. Bagllsh, *>\u00ab^v\nand German steamers, aad remala opa* until wlUB\u00bb\nTea Minutes of the hoar of sailing of steamer.\nMAILS FOR SOUTH AND CENTRA!. AiiZHZCX. -WTS?\nINPIE3. ETC\nrRrr\u00bbAT\u2014 3 a m. for Barbados and Sorthar\u00df M,\nper i 7s. CearenWr at 12 m. for Me\u00abeo per sa. Sfla*.\nara. via TampSeo {raaU most ba directed \"P\"ar B. \u2022. 10\nasrara\"); at 0.30 a. m. CaupjUsmentaix 10ZQ \u00bb. in-> f\u00bb\u00bb\nCentral Amric\u00df. except Costa Rica and 6outi ,\u2122Blfl'\u00bb\nports per I c. Sarat\u00bb\u00aba. \u00bb1\u00bb Olcn (mall far Ou\u00bbt\u00abrp*l\u00abi.\nmost be directed \"per s. *\u2022 Earmtega*^; at \u00ab:3O p. m. tor\nPorto Plata per *\u25a0 \u00ab roxhsCl. from Beaton (man MB\nother parts of the Dominican Bap as Me must be dlrasta*\nim\"Rr>*T At \"3\" *. in. rs.irpl\u00abrjentarjr t:*\u00bb a. B>>\n'for Porto Rice. Curacao and Vaaa\u00df\u00df\u00dfi*, per a, a.\nCaracas (mail for \u00ab\u00bbavanlTla aad Cartagena mast &\u2022\nd!rect\u00abd **P\u00bbr sl \u00bb \u2022ara.asr^. at \u00bb:Sft a. m. \u00absnp?l\u00bb\nri\u00abi.r\u00bbry 10:30 a. m.) lor P*rt\u00bb\u00bbe I?lbb4. Jamaica.\n\u00abavar.llla and Cartasena, per \u00ab a Altai imall tor Coat*\nRica m'\u00bb\u00ab M <\u00abir<\u2014t\u00ab! -per \u00bb \u25a0- Altai-): at \u2022:\u00bb \u2022, nv.\n\u2022surplereectarT 10:30 a. rat for Haiti aad *\u2022-\u25a0<\u25a0* M\u00abrt\u00bb.\ncer a- \u25a0\u2022 Athcs; at 10 a. m lor Cuba, per \u2022- * ljflsss>\nf':i\u00bbt!e -! \u25a0 Havana: -' 10 a. m. tor A-\u00ab\u00bbT\u00bbtlBa. Cr\u00bb\u2014\ns-mr and Pmrasn;a\u00bb. per a. \u00bb Bl(7B\u00bb; at 12 JO B. m. fo\u00bb\nC'Jt.a. per a. a. OUr.tla. v.a Havaaa.\nMAIL* IDRWARrpm OVERI^ANO. ETC. \u25a0T \u25a0 T \u2022\"?\nTRANSFACIFTC.\nCUBA\u2014 By rail to Port Tampa. ma.. Sn* tUmni *r\nsteamer, closes \u00abt tMs cCi\u00bb d*i;y. eacepi TimrajUft aS\nt3:30 a- m \u00abthe r- nne ring malls eiOM-i here ea Jro\u00bb\nda '\u2022\u2022. \\V\u00abdn\u00abadcya and Saturdays*\n3JEXICO ClTT\u2014 O*a\u00bblaa\u00ab, uni\u00abe\u00bb specially syWre\u00abs\u00bb4 m*\ndispatch by st\u00ab\u00bbrc\u00abr. .'\u00bb\u00bb' *i thia aS^a daily. aswap\u00ab\nSuiuiajr. at 130 0- in. and ll^w \u00bb. m. Sus4*J\u00bb \u00ab4 1\np ra. arid ll.'jn r>. m\nSEWFCL\".VDUAND-E\u00bb rail to Jfort\u00df Py\u00abney. ana tSeee*\nbr fleanvr closes at th's office dal'7 \u2022' \u00ab:3O p. to.\n(ccenect!r.jf mails close hare erery Monday. VTeia\u00abad*r\n\u00bb:irt Saturday).\nM'OUEIjON\u2014 ky rail \u00aba Boston, and thence by staasar.\n( w, at thu. offlc* dally at 6:30 p. w>\n\u2022EvOAzr. PtTRTO CDRTEZ and CUATEiIALA\u2014 By ran\nto New-Orleans, and IMBM ty \u00abt\u00bbam\u00bbr. c!o\u00abs at th a of\nfice <\u00abai!y. ex^pt \u00bb*rr\u00bb<is\u00bb. *t \u2666\u2022:\u00ab\u00bb p. m. and tllJt*\n, c m Hendays at \u2666! P. \u00ab\"- and til:\u00bb 9 . m. teocnectio*\nroail claes nrre Morvla*-, ,t \u2666IlrSO p. m.>\nCO^TA KICA\u2014 Cy iati w N\u00abw-Orleaaa, and tkepe* Irr\nreamtr clo\u00bbs at tt>H oClce Cally. axctpt Sunday, as\nr.\" ( T B m aill *H SO p. m.. Suadar* at ti \u00abB. m.\n\u2022nJj'+l'^'* P- ITS - iconaecOa*: mail eiusea her\u00bb TwaaAajrai\ntr'eslsV I \u25a0 maTl' clones \u00ab\u2014\u00bb m. Bre*\u00aboua day.\nTRANSPACIFIC MAO 9.\nn VAd^l^^ & S&Z Islands, rta lt%\nU-\u00a3\u00a3U -\u00a3\u00a3,:\u25a0;, :\u25a0; \u00ab:\u00bb B. m. ap U> Ma, \u00bb\u00ab.\nI-^SSS^S^.S^J^-\n\u25a0 ' las **. a. -\u2022 - ' \u00bb CaMinwas.\n*.\u2022\u2022\u00ab\u2022 vm '\u25a0 and Via* iM. v. i San *T\u00bbn\u25a0\u2022^sro. <1 tt Baraj\n\u00a3||\u00bb *IJU rv. m. a:--r A^r.: rto \u00bb*a OB ?\u00bb Ma, *>k\ntac \"-lye ror dispatch dm s. s. Son.irr.a. tlf the Curani\nMBBSBav^tirryt\u00dfa the Oritith s\u00bba!: for New-Ze*!\u00bbna\ntoum not arrfre tn t:rae t-> eoamact \u00bb!^fi U\u00bb\u00bba dfspaaak.\ne^ra Mils\u2014 closing * 3.30 m.. 9:30 a- - \u00abn\u00ab *\u00bb\npam; 1 \u25a0 lisj lat *A> a. m.. \u00bba. st aad 6:?0 p. ta.\u2014\nwill be mad\u00ab u\u00bb u.vj f \u00bb\u00ab\u00abBrJaa us*U U- arrival e>; tte\nCunard \u00abte\u00bbmer.> - \\-\nEflwa*.'-. Cbisa, JSMH and PWUorkna I\u00bb^nJ\u00bb. tlb far*\nFrar : c!*cf>, elcw\u00bb ' dai'y tt \u00ab.*> p. m. \u00abD to May UV\nteiclusrre. for tls\u00bbBtrl> per s. a. Nippon Mara\nC^.^t. and \u25a0'*\u25a0-\u25a0\u25a0 rta Tacoraa, CiQBS bars d*liy at \u2022*\u00bb\nP m. up to May tli Ui-iuiive. for dur;atca per a. a.\nA \" ~ Finns' West>. r.\u00bb UUr\u00aba asa Xsjai Ca',a*=\u00abla\u00bb\nTi\u00bb Visccaver \u00ab3d VfJhl a C jsb he\u00bb \"^J* 1\no:3f v. m. \u00ab^it May \u2666* a>* up t\u00bb lias \u2666\u00bb \u00ab\u25a0*\u00bb\u00ab\u25a0**\u00bb.\nfar dispatch -\u00bb*\u25a0- * s. \u25a0\u25a0\"-\u25a0\"?! .\nTahiti anrt Manja*\u00abas Islands, t!s San Frarsc!s<?<\u00bb. en\u00bb\u00bb\nber\u00bb ea!ly at \u00ab\u00ab\u00bb J*. m. Tip to Msy t3O. .ncloar\u00bb\u00ab\u00bb i\u00dfa*\ndispate* par a a v-.r\u00bb>eaa. .\nNOTE.\u2014 frleas p^erw'.sa aillrwtsfd 'West Anrtraria. J\u00bb\n\" f,iwar4as -.Is, Eur\u00bbp\u00ab: an 4 New-Z*\u00bbUw* an\u00ab PJJ;^*\npfsjes via S.n Franclsto\u2014 \u00ab\u2022\u2022\u00bb\u00ab :-i ( e \u00bb t routes. - rnt^t\nntnas speclatly a\u00abres\u00abed \"> a Canada\" or **Tia Banyt\n\u2022\u00fc\u00dft be ruliy praps \u2022 at tha for\u00ab>fart\u00bb *a\u00bbSB> \u25a0\u00bb\u2022\u00bb\u00bb -a\n.'crw4r.lt.! wla San Fraas!\u00abci> escSiisive^r. , T1m _ -_^\nITanKpaciac m*i'\u00bb *re forwaried ta pert af aarflaa: da.\nend tSo \u00bb\u00abn\u00abdttU ef etoni-i* la arragr^l en \u2022::e\u00ab'*-.*rt4\nt|on CT th\u00abLr \u00bbsi?terTUp:\u00bbd overland Uwuiu tR\u00ab\u00bb-\u00bbt\u00abf\u00bb4\nbbsJl alusaa Hip as. Biawt\u2014s Bur. __\nCOR.NEUTS VAN COTT. \u00bb^atmaasJl I\nPoatafSca. New-Tork. K. T- AprU 24. 1\u00bb(\u00bb /*\n9",
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"text": "10\nHEAL ESTATE.\nThe Hamilton Institute Building to\nHave an Annex.\nThe Frank L. Fisher Company has sold to Pro\nfessor N. A. Shaw. jr.. the twenty-foot, three ftory\nand basement private dwelling house No. Ml West\nKlKhty-first-st.. which will be used as an annex of\nHamilton Institute.\nA report of what took place on the last day in the\nNew- York Real Estate Salesrooms, at the Trinity\nBuilding. No. 11l Broadway, and \u25a0 list of the re\nmovals from that building will be found in another\ncolumn.\nTRANSACTIONS IN REALTY.\n\u25a0\u00ab\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 & Hobbs have sold for Emily L. London\nto a client for occupancy the four story high stoop\ndwelling house No. 316 West EigMy-<\u00bbiph!h-st.. on\nlot 20x109.R\u00bb feet.\n.T. J. Fredericks has sold No. Bl East Klft:>-!>ec\nend-st.. a three story and basement dwelling house,\non a lot 15.9x100.5 feet.\nMarie Cess has MM No M Central Park West,\n.-. five story flathous*\".\nIr\\-inp Judis has sold to Samuel Jacobs No. 195\nilnriison-ct.. a three story tenement house. on a\nlot \u2022 MM feet.\nSchmeldier & Bachrach have bought No. EOS to\nSU Ea.<t Thirteenth-st.. two four story buildings,\neach on lot . d U feet. The buyers own No. 511.\nHerman Cohen has sold No. 63 West One-hun\n<3red-and-seventeenth-st-. a five story flathouse. on\n3ct 55x100.1l feet, adjoining Uat northeast corner of\nIvenox-Bve.\nL. K. Field has sold for the Harlem Savings Bank\na. three story brick building, on lot ZSxIOO Beet, at\nthe corner of Unlonport Road and Morris Park\nare.: also for A. Hotunno a two family brick dwell-\nJr.r house on the east side of Garden Place.\nLowenfeld & Pragrr have bought from Charles\nELrepp No. 214 East Slxtecnth-st.. a four story ten\nement house, on lot 19.3x10X3 fret.\nDouglas Robinson. Charles S. Brown & Co. have\nfold for Dr. John B. Garrison to George F. Miller\nNo. HI East Seventleth-st.. a three story and base\nment bro*Ti!>tone front dwelling house, on lot 23x\n3W.5 feet, near Park-aye.\nI>. fy!var, Crakow has sold for Meyers & Aron\nbozx to Joseph I* Buttenwelser. Nos. 217. 219 and 221\nEast Twenty-second-st., three thre\u00ab story brick\nbuildings, on plot 5\u00a3.3x7u feet.\nIt is reported that No. 1.495 First-aye.. north\n\u2022west comer of Seventy-eighth-st.. a five story\ntenement house, on lot \u25a0Jb4H feet, has been sold.\nSllvencaa &\u25a0 Levy have bought Noa. 1.461 and 1.453\nFifth-eve.. northeast corner of One-hundred-and\neighieenth-srt.. a five story flathouse, with stores,\non plot MM feet, and the adjoining five story\nflathouse. No. 3 East One-hundred-and-elghteentb\n\u00ab:.. 27x50.5 fee*.\nbevy Brothers have bought from Alfred I*\n\u25a0vTblte No\u00ab 23?. 2SI and 263 Bleecker-st.. three three\n\u2022story bu!;dlng\u00ab. on plot f.SxSO feet, adjoining the\nnorthwest corner of Cornolla-st- A six story tene\nment house will be built or. the premises.\nJohn Davis has sold for Ellas A>lel and several\nother persons to a Mrs. Marx No. 15 Forsyth-st.. a\n\u00abix story building, on lot SkM feet.\nOppenhelmer & Hamerschlag have sold the plot\nforming an \"L\" around the northwest corner of\nBroadway and Fifty-Sfth-st.. fronting 77.4 feet on\nTtroadway and 25 feet on Fifty-flfth-st.. with a\nnorth line of 74.10 feet, and a west line of 100.5 feet.\nJ. Scott ha? sold for Albert Pelser No. 1.801 Lex\nlnglon-ave,, southeast corner of One-hundred-and\ntwelfth-st^ a five story flathouse. with store, on\nlot 19.11x70 feet. He has also sold for Wllhelmina\nFarmer No. HUM Madlson-ave.. a three story dwell\ning house, on lot 16x100 feet, adjoining the southeast\ncorner of Ore-hundred-and-twenty-second-st.\nA. W. Miller & Co. have sold for the Central Land\nCompany to the Ludin Realty Company. No. 511 to\nfils West Thirtv-sixth-st.. stables, on plot 75x95.9\nfeet.\nFrederick Schlueter has sold a plot, 5->xl2s feet, at\nthe southeast corner of Bradhurst-ave.. and One\nhundred-and-fifty-first-st.. to James I. Follett. who\n\u25a0will erect a five story flathouse on the site.\nEdward J. Welllne. jr.. has sold for Mary H.\n\u2022Tohanson No. IB West One-hundred-and-twenty-\nTi!r.th-st.. a two story frame dwelling house, on lot\n3>ri>9.ll feet.\nSALE RECALLS ANDREWS FIRE.\nTVhlteboTise & Porter havo -old lor G. C. St.\nJohn, executor of the estates of \"Wallace C. An\n/sr\u00abTrs and Margaret M. St. John Andrews. No. 554\nFifth-aye.. a four story and basement stone front\ndwelling house, or. a plot \u2014 '\u00ab**\u2014 feet, for about\nX3T5.Q00. The building was formerly connected with\nthe house Xo. 2 East Sixty-seventh-st. A fire oc\ncurred in the c v--r,th-pt. house In 1599, In\n\u25a0which several members of the Andrews family\nlost their lives. The r.arn^ of the buyer of tue\nFifth-avff. house was not announced yesterday.\nREALTY NOTES.\nGeorge F. Miller si the buyer of No. 63 East\nSev\u00abity-fifth-st., and Raymond Hoacland of the\nX>arcels at the northwest corner Of Sixty-sixth-st.\nand Madison-aye.\nJohn J. Scannell took title yesterday to No. 72\nRiverside Drive from Charles F. \"Weber.\nThe Friars Minor of the Order of St. Francis\ntransferred title yesterday to Xo. 157 Mott-st. to\nTommaso J. Arossi.\nRichard V. Harnett & Co. have leased the prem\nises a.t Ncs. 2 and 4 West Twenty-ninth-st. These\nhouses formed a portion of the hotel and restau\nrant occupied by Ang^lo Morello for nearly twenty\none years.\nPocher & Co. have leased Xo. \u20ac7 West Forty\n\u2022ilxth-st., a four story dwelling house, for Rudolfo\nG. Barthold to Graham Rice, for three years. The\n\u2022same firm lias also leased No SS West Thirty-\nJourth-st.. a fo-jr \u00abtory dwelling house, for Emma\n31. Borderi to Eertha Meincho. for or!-- year.\nPocher & Co. have also leaped No. 119 West\nForty-fourth -st. for a client to Anna Gormlev for\nene year, and for the estate of Wolf Wolf to Will\nlam Doyle the store No. SO Lexlngton-ave. for\nlaundry purposes for one year.\nMiss Josephine W. Drexel took title yesterday to\n\u2022> parcel. 20xJW.5 feet, on the j^outh side of Forty\n#e\\-enth-et-. 85 feet east of Lexin&ton-ave., from\nB\u00ab=rtha S. Korn.\nBUYS WALL-ST. PROPERTY.\nThe Jauncy Company, of which W. IC Aston Is\nthe president, has bought from Joseph Grafton\nITlnot and Grace J. Atnory Nos. 93 and 97 WaH-st..\ntwo four story buildings, adjoining on the fast the\nnontheas't corner of Wall and Water eta. The plot\nhas a frontage of 4\"7 feet in Wall-st.. a depth of\n40.8 feet end a rear line of 4\" feet. The j\u00abiun^y\nCompany bought the southeast coiner of Wall and\nWater sts. sow -weeks ago as a site for a new\noffice building. The new purchase will form part of\nthat proposed building site as soon as the present\nlease expires.\nPLANS FOR SEVENTY-FIRST ARMORY.\nPlan? mere filed yesterday at the Bureau of Build\nings. Manhattan, for a five etory and basement\narmory for the 7lst Regiment, to be erected on the\neast side of Park-av<\\. between Thirty-third and\nThirty-fourth sts. There will be a large seven\nstory tower at the Thirty-fourth-st. corner. The\nmain drill room will be IM feet long by 189.8 feet\nwide. On the fourth floor will be an additional drill\nroom two stories high for the signal corps. The\nbuilding will be of brick and granite, Clinton &\nRussell are the architects.\nPlans were also filed for a six story and base\nment brick dwelling house, to be erected for Mor\nton F. Plant. The building will be of brick and\nIndiana limestone, and will face 100 feet In Fifty\n*eeon<3-\u00ab. and 50.6 feet In Fifth-aye. On the ground\nfloor will be a large dining room and drawing\nroom. w'.'h a smoking room annex. The second\nfloor win contain the library and music rooms. The\ntipper floors will be used as living rooms. A cir\ncular grand staircase will occupy the centre of the\nbuilding. R_ W. Gibson is the architect. Tha\ncost is estimated at 5300.000.\nTHE BRONX BUILDING PLANS.\nIndt-pendence-ave., northwest corner of Two-hun\nfired-and-flfty-second-st.. one and a half story\nframe stable. 60x27 feet; Mary L. H. McOill.\nwnfr; Clarence L.. Sefert, architect; J3.S/).\nTAKES TRINITY BUILDING TITLE. '\nThe Trinity Building Company yesterday trans\nferred title to the Trinity Building. No. 11l Broad\nway, to th\u00ab Equitable Life Assurance Society. A\npart of th* twenty etory building to be built on\nthe \u00abHe will be used for certain departments of\nthe society's w..rk. and the balance will b* sub\n;\u00abv-t to rental. J\nADDITION TO CHURCH.\nPlans were Sled yesterday for alterations to the\nChurch of St. Edward the Martyr, at Nos. 12 and\n14 East One-hundred-and-nintb-st. The plane call\nfor the erection of a one story addition In the rear.\n89 feet front by 25 feet deep. It will be occupied\nJointly by the vestry and new choir. J. B. Snook\n& Sots are the architect*. The cost Is placed at\nt \u25a0-\nBUYS BROOKLYN BUILDING.\nHugh Stewart, of the- Horton Ice Cream Coin\nptMT. has bought the three story brick building\n\u2022t the northwest corner of Fulton and Duffleld\n\u00abts.. Brooklyn. It has a frontage of 86 feet and a\ndepth of 104 feet. The property was bought from\n\u2022**\u2022 Jn**ph Howard estate for Jilfc.OOa It 1* at\n\u25a0\nInstructi m.\nPUBLIC\nSTENOGRAPHY, TYPEWRITING,\nMIMEOGRAPHING, Etc.\nBY EXPERTS.\nRoom 128, - - - Tribune Building\nSTTUVnVESIR SESSION.\nDRAKE BUSINESS SCHOOLS,\nt. new York ,f Day and Night. >: '^K T \\\nORANGE j \"* L . \u2022\n.., : \u00ab\nr>rm-vTnwv nmCS NEW YORK SCHOOL,\nTiaSuNE SUE: ITTH ST. AND BROADWAY.\nFor Younc Ladies\u2014 City.\nMRS. FINCH'S CLASSES AND B-^ A K^lN^ SCHOOL\nFORCIRLS DAY SCHOOL 7^3 FIFTH AVE_ CO\nBSTH ST. Boarding Oept.. 735 Madison Aye.. near \u00ab>4tn 5-\nWSbJSSSS SSVSSVmooL for GIRIA\nIS and 13 West Wh Street.\nNear Central Park. New V >rk <'<>\" -,cT\nREOPENS WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER IST.\nTHE MERRIL-VANLAER SCHOOL.\nX Boarding and Day Scnool for Girls.\nTUB PEEBLES AVi- THOHSON SCBOOU\n80. 32 and Si East 57th street. N'-^ \\otk ' \">\u25a0\npresent used as a part of the department store of\nChapman & Co.\nREAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.\n7th-ave. Nob 391 and US. c \u25a0. \u00ab\u00a3\"\u00bb: Elizabeth\nHafner to the Btuyv\u00absant Rejl Eatatj\u00df Co--.-. .-100\nCth-ave. No 16^. \u00bb s. 2 ;xlS>x2.\u00bb. 11x1.0; -\u2022\"1\" 1\nNo 31 East. 22.4x70.\u00abx22.5x. <\u00bb.\u2022; 3d-ave. No ! \u2014\n\u00bb- K. 24.5X05; Bowery. No 204, \u2022 s. 16.8x100:\nSth-kve, No KM, s \u00ab\u2022 \u00bbr l\u00abth 3&10\u00bb80. in\nterior lot, 91.6 ft nof 15th-st and 19.0 ft wof\nMh-ave. runs n w 45.9 x n *.<ix w 23* \u2022 w .U.t.x\nI c 9.5 ft: Giles G Meine.l to Mary E Light.\nq c. \u00ab-10 part, all title 1.500\nPark-aye a c cor WJth-st. 100.6x90; Isaac Boehm\net al to Meta Frank \u25a0 \u2022 i (1|)\nMadison-aye. .> s. 19 ft s of lU2d-st. 15x35; \\\\ ll\nheimina Turner, widow, to Albert Pelser; mort\ngage (15.000.. 19.000\nLexing'tcn-ave. No 1.801. s c cor Il2th-st, 19.11 x\n73- Albert Pelser to Wllhelmna Farmer; mort-\nEase, W. 900 26.000\n97th-st. No 139 West, 16x100.11: Mars- X Eich\nhorn to Thomas V Kelly: mortgage. $11.000... 100\nLexington-ave. \u00bb c cor KiOth-Bt, 20.11x6\"*: Jacob\nIndorf to Jenny Brann; mortgage, J9.000 100\n6Sth-st. No 543 East. 27x100.4; J Stanley Foster\nto Frank Casper and another; mortgage. $20,\n000 25.000\nBth-ave. No 2.433. w b. 25.6x100: Eliza Neumann.\nwidow and devisee et sj to Leopold Guggen\nhereer 26.0 i\u00bb\n43d-*t. No 13. D c. lII.S ft w of Maoisor.-ave.\n22x100r.- Mariar.na B Lewis to Henry Phlpps\nand other Nominal\n91st. No SM. t> s. 241 ft c of Riverside Drive. 17x\n100 \u00ab\u2022 C^xue O Baker, 1r and another, executors.\nto Ashb'el R ElUott i\".300\nBoulevard. 9 c corner 172d-st. 95x100; Liwrence\nf\u00bb Folger to Alfred Pehrens 20.000\n43d-p*. s s. 373 ft w of \u00bbith-ave, t*2*ixlOOr>; James\nT Saffen et a', to Martin McHale; mortgage,\n514.000 \u00aboi>\n4Sth-st. \u00ab s. 225 ft W of 6th-ax-e, 20x100.5:\nHarris Mandelbaum and another, to Wolcott\nG Lane: mortgage. ' 090 199\nLexington-ave. s c corner 64th-st, 20.5x\u00ab0: Har\nriet B Barrow to German Evangelical Lutheran\nSt Peter Church: mortgage, $25,000; o c and.. 100\nB4th-st. \u00bb c, 117.11 ft c of Levin eton-Bve. 17.10 x\n100.5: David F King and ar ,:her. to German\nEvangelical Lutheran 9t Peter Church: mort\ngage, 52.500: o c and 100\n47th-st. <= j. S5 ft c of t*xta|rtoa-ave, 20x100.5;\nBertha ? Kom to Josephine W Drexel: o c and. 100\nWest End-aye. n w .-or 7 -h-Ft. !<W.!SxUM>: Fred\nerick %v White to the Collins Building and Con\n6tru-tlon Company: B A S 87.500\nHoustor,-st. Koa 100 and 102. n B. 3\u00ab Ix7l lOxir\nregular: Thomas B OsboiT' to Cesare Rizzettl et\nal: mortgage. $30,000 .. 14.500\nAUCTION SALES TO.DAY.\nAT 161 BROADWAY.\nBy L, J Phillips & Co: 328 and 32S 12th--t, s s. 320.<1\nft \u00ab of 2d-ave. 37x103.3x \u2014 , 8 story bk team h : S M\nRsivr- art T Krakower et at: Krakower & P. attys;\nI M Proskauer. ref; amt cue. $3,274 65: taxes, etc. $700;\nprior mort. f32.(>TKt.\nBy James L Wells: 324 Lenox-ave. c s, 50.4 ft n of\nI26th-st. 16.Cx75. 4 story s f dwl h; FT D Tiffany et a!\nact L Tiffany et pi- PaviF. P & A. attys: R H Under\nbill, ref; amt due, 14. 075 50; taxes, etc. 51.37S P\u00ab.\nNEW BUILDING PLANS.\nt2d-fit. No 2 East, fcr a six story and basement\nbrl<-k dwelling bouse. l\u00abox3Sx irregular; M F\nPlant, owner; R V* Gibson, architect $300,000\nPark-aye. c s, between S3d and 34th Fts. for a five\nstory and basement brick armory. 197.6x2?.R.5;\nArmory Board of the City of New-York, owner:\nClinton & Russell, architects \u2014 \u2014\nISth-st. Nos IS and 17 East, for a ten story brick\nfactory, with store. BCxM: Brc-p.-.n Construc\ntion Company, owner; Israels & Harder, archi\ntects .... 100.000\nUnfurnished Apartments to Let.\nHOFFrvTAKHSmvis,\nMADISON-AYE. AND SDTH-ST.\nFurnished Apartment: southern expo3are; summer prices:\nprivate kitchen or restaurant sum\nA\u2014 CORNER APARTMEXT,\nTen \u2022\u2022iirr- moms, all \u2022 >vements,\n\"THE SORRE.VTO.\" 130 Maillaoo fi-rrnnr\nicornfr list street); possession at once.\nJ. ROMA INK BROWN & CO.. 53 West 33d street.\nBrooklyn.\nT\"\u00bbEOUCED RENTS. $2- bo $30; cannot be duplicated\nJA for $45; corner arartments; steam heat and hot\nwater supply; fireproof halls; six an light rooms and tile\nbath. Decatur-\u00abt. and Howard-aye.\nFurnished Apartments to Let.\nTO RENT. \u2014 Completely furnished housekeeping apart-\nA ment; all cool outside roon-.s. 12\u00bb East 3-lth-st.\nCountry Property fur Sale.\nAN ISLAND, near Greenwich. Conn., for sale: over\n25 acres; no marsh: f.ne anchorage; grand beach;\n2 springs; suitable for yacht club, excursion resort, in-\nBtitution. hotel, private residence. Particulars of\nWM. S. ANDERSON. Mount Vernon.\nAT rOXKEBS. N. V.\u2014 3; Fairfleld Road, I>u<liow Park.\n-*Jt- two minutes station. 14 room dwelling; overlooking\nI Hudson; np\u00bbn idnmblnc: hot water heated; newly deco\n| rated; plot 100x135; fruits and flowering bushea; will sell\n; at reasonable price. Apply on premises, or J. E. BKIGGS,\n! 432 Columbus-aye.. New-York City.\nFOX SALE. \u2014 Country residence. 50 minutes out. In New\njj Jersey, near railroad station; 17 rooms; 16th century\nColonial: 32 acres land; chicken plant for S(R> head; all\nkinds fruit, lawns, shade, garden. Photographs. Address\nOWNER. No. 6.\"6 Jerg--y-sve.. Jersey City. N. J.\n; For Sale or to Let \u2014 Country.\nFOR SALK OR TO LET.\u2014 In SARATOGA, ore of the\nA handsomest cottages, on the principal residence etreet.\nUnlon-ave. . 14 roome, newly and thoroughly furnished\nthroughout: will rent only to right parties, small family\nand thoroughly reliable. \u2022 STABLE, with four stalls and\nroom for coachman. Rent complete for f 1.200 for season.\nSelling price $IS,OOO. Apoly for particulars and photo\ngraph at 7 1 *! Broadway. New-York. RATCLJFFB\nHICKS. Owner.\nI.\"V)R SALE OR RENT.\n. Bargain for responsible party, beautiful Queen Anne,\n8-etory. 15\u2014 room brick residence. Latest modern Im\nmania. Brick ttable, < stallr,. Fire grounds, high\nelevation, eplendld unobstructed view of surrounding coun\ntry In a.ll direction!: on .rain line of H. R. R. Addrtsf\nBox 683. y;,:iTi!' Ct.\nFurnished Houses to \u2014 Country.\n~^WYCHMERE (CAPE COD)\nHarwich. Mass.: beautiful re&shore cottages, rented\nfurnished; bathroom, firep'ace: excellent water, hot. cold;\ndelightful climate: long eeaeon. CAPE. 503 West. 124 th St.\nCASINO GROUNDS. Ar<Jslev-on-Hud\u00dfon. fully fur-\nJ nished, seven bedrooms, two baths and eervants\" quar\nters: electricity, gas. steam, heat, open grates, shaded\nverandah 14x68. deta.-hed chJldren'e playhouse, salon 24x\n85. dining room 24x26. newly decorated. Inquire Room\n7w). Ktandard Oil Building. 26 Broadway.\nA LLENHT-RST. i3EAL. AST I'HY PARK.\nJri. Modern furnish** cottas<>a for rent.\nMILAN KOSS AGENCY. Asbury Park. N. J.\nFOR RENT\u2014 Lake Placid. N. V.. the most beautiful\nX mountain lake scenery in the Adiroidacks. large.\nCamp, finest site. TV* seres, with 800 feet shore; cottage\ncontains living room, dlnlne room, rantry. kitchen.\neeven bedrooms, two. bathrooms and all conveniences;\nhandsomely furnished; boat house, boats, launch and\nhouse, etc.; 11.400. Photographs and information sup\nplied on application. S. HUDSON CHAPMAN. 1. 123\nSpruce. St.. Pblladelphi\nFL'UMSHED DOUSE, MOVTCLAIR, .V. J.\n12 Rooms. Bath. L^rge iawn. fine shade tiees and gar\nden; fruit, stable; complete place; \u00bb200 month to de\nsirable faaiily. \u2122 >'- HOLMES & CRAW LEY CO..\nI none \u00bb\u00bb\u2022 opp. wanna 6tatlon.\nTTIOH. DRY AND HEALTHY\u2014 Upper Montclalr. N.\n- 1 - 1 - J-\u2014 To rent, for the summer, to a small desirable\nftonily. fuliv furnished house; all modern conveniences;\n\u00ablx bedrooms, two bathrooms, electric lights, long dis\ntance telephone, etc.: fine veranda* and lawns beauti\nful and extensive views: depot within 5 minutes easy\nwalk; trains, including Ckanwn St. Ferry. \u25a04. . minutes.\nBent $2uO per month. B. W.. Tribune Office.\nANTOLOKINO. N. J.\u2014 For rentT furnished cottage,\nfrontier on Oc\u00aban; two minute* from P. R. R. fua\nt!on ana Harneyit Bay; ten rooms, bath and laundry.\nApply owner. L. PBNNINGTON. 791 nro*d-st_. Newark. |\nARATOGA SPRINGS. N. T niiiilami i iitfaaj\nI prices to cult every one. Apply to O. H OLMSTED\nSaratoga Springe. N. Y.\nHANDSOMELY f irnlshed Hou*e, rear Central Pa*k\n20 rooms, four dressing rooms; unitary, modern;\nprivate family; r*f\u00abrene\u00ab\u00bb; rent or sell KEiATING. 168 flth\nin, Uanhattan. '\nXEW-YOIUv DAILY TRTBUNE. FRTDAY. }fAY 1. 1903.\nInstruction.\nFor Both Sexes.\u2014 City.\nTHE BERLITZ SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES.\nX Madison Square (1122 Broadway). Brooklyn. 73 Court St\nNew Term begins now -Trial lessons free.\nBoys and Young Men\u2014 Country.\n\u2022AfAPLKWOOD SUMMER SCHOOL FOR BOYS. Con-\nJ?JL cordvllle. Pa.: location beautiful: elevated, healthy:\ninstruction combined w'th rural recreation; professor\n\u00bbnd student entering Into social life: small boy? admitted,\nno tobacco. J. SHURTLIDGE. Yale. A. M.. Prln.\n. School Agencies.\nAMERICAN AND FOREIGN TEACHER*' AGENCY\n/V supplies Professors. Teachers. Tutors. Governesses,\netc. to Colleges. Schools and Families Apply to\nMrs. M. J. YOUNG-FULION. 23 Union Square.\nReal Estate.\nThe\nSoundest Investment\nFor New York Funds\n(Personal, Trustee or Institutional)\nis that based on New York real estate.\n$200,000,000\nin New York City mortgages sold by\nthis company in the past seven years.\nInvestors have found these mort\ngages good ones, and have taken\nthem in increasing volume every\nyear. They are so carefully selected\nby those in a position to know real\nestate values, that foreclosure and\nloss of principal or interest are un\nknown.\nSo far as the company is informed,\nnot a dollar of this vast sum. has been\nlost by the investor.\nA large assortment of choice mort\ngages always on hand for immediate\ndelivery.\nTitle guarantee\nandTRUST COMPANY.\nC flPIT su L Rprus. 58,000,000.\n146 Broadway, New York.\n175 Remsen Street, Brooklyn.\nManuf rs Branch, 198 Montague St, B'klyn.\ni.nOYS WILL BE BOYS\"\u2014\n*-* but stronger physically,\nmentally and morally if raised in\nSUBURBAN HOMES.\nGet \" Where to Live and Do Business in New\nYork,\" free on implication at\n' 159 [Broadway,\n333 j New York\nI Or mulled, for 4 cent* postage, by i\nSUBURBAN PASSKAGEH AfiBKT. !\nI I 11.11) llroail wuy, >e\u00bbv Yurk. [\nTo Let for Business Purposes.\nWall Street Exchange\nBuilding,\nNOS. 41 & 43 WALL STREET,\ni\nExteudlng throoKh the Ivloru. to\nJVos. 43. 15. 47 and 4l> EiHiange Place.\nSafe Deposit Vaults, Banking Rooms and\n10 Floors will be ready May 1, 1903.\n25 Floors. 10 Elevators. Bonding always open. Perfect\nSystem of Lighting. Ventilating and Heating. Vacuum\nmISII of Cleaning Installed.\nTHE STATE SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AXD\nTHE NATIONAL. HANK OK NORTH AMERICA\nwill more Into tills building; on or about\nMay J. .\u2022>\u25a0\u2022\u2022\nPlaae and particular* at 41 ft 43 Wall St.\nA. J. MURPHY. Managing Agent.\nTHE OWNER cf plot of ground. 32d and 33d Sts..\nJL near Lexington Aye.. Is prepared to erect a five story\nand cellar building, suitable for a tine livery or hoarding\nstable, factory or storage. Each floor about 8, SOU square\nfeet. May be Increased. Plans have been drawn and ap\nproved, but may be modified.\nJOS. M. ADRIAN,\n472 Grand St.. N. Y. City.\nOFFICES, aIJO suites: river view: offices. $240. $360.\n$4!H) yearly: twelve stories; tlrepioof construction. i\nBEARD BUILDING. 120 Liberty.\nAuction Sales of Real Estate.\nANDREW J. McCORMACK, Auctioneer.\n\"The Halcyon,\"\nMILLBROOK, DUICHr.SS CO., N. V.,\nwill be \u00a3\u2022 id at auction\nTuesday. May sth, 1903,\nAt 12 o'clock noon, at the N. Y. Real Estate Salesroom.\nNo. ltil Broad* ay.\nBy Adrian H. Muller & Son.\nThe property consists of about 22 acres of land, with\nhotel with electric btlla and speaking tubes, two cottages\nand the furniture contained In said Hotel and Cottages\nfour enables, etc.. complete eieotrlc light plant, steam\nheat and approved sewerage, golf links and tennis courts\nAdmirably adapted for a first class hotel, sanitarium!\nschool or home.\nThe property la half mile from station at Millbrook. 22 1 *\nhours from New York City, via New York Central R. R.\n\u00abnd Key. burg. Dutr.hess and Connecticut R'way. Plans and\nfu:i particulars can be hnd of MESS. GIBSON & STAP\nLER. Attva No. 48 WALL ST.. or of th\u00ab auctioneer,\nNo. BS wilLiam st '\nI\nCity Property for Sale.\nINVESTMENT PROPERTIES\nNETTING 3 AND \u00ab PER CENT.\nRULAND & WHITING CO.,\n.i ijfk:::.. i.v ST.\n4 TTENTION'!\u2014 FIv- story \u00bb\u2022\u2014 \u2014 > apartment house\n2\\. the, Windsor. 225 West 123d-*i.. 36.\\MixI0O; steam\nheat, hot water. \u00bbas ranges, all improvements; seven and\neight room*, rental $4,250; price $10,000: terms to suit.\nInquire BABBITT. 140 Bth-ave. ll *\nCity Property to Let.\nA CHOICE PRIVATE DWELLING for rent In \"~Mih '\nSt. between Riverside Drive \u00bbnd West End Aye.\na three-story htch-stoop bron-nstons dwelling IS feet\nwide, in fir' clans condition, with butler's pantry ex\ntension and\" six bedrooms. Modern open piumbln;\nRent reasonable. Apply to SLAWSON Jk IIOBBS. 2&4\nColumbua Ait., near 73d St.\nDUAHO AM) BOOMS.\nA!\u2014 A!\u2014 A!\u2014 ATTENTION!\nAttractive floors, suites, with private\nbath, with or without board; single rooms;\ndoctors' offices; all desirable location*;\nhighest references given. Information free.\nS. C. LELAND A: CO.. 2 Wei Od-et.\nKM MADIHON AYE. ,\u00abd-Rt.>. only one\n,1.-;. from Central Fark.\u2014 Third floor front\nand hall room (cominuiiJcatins;) ; excellent\n1 ii.i. terms moderate; table board.\nCHAMPION. Propr.\n.\".- WEST 20TH- ST. \u2014 Reautlf'illy *ornl\u00bbh \u25a0!\nlarge and small rooms; elegant parlor\ndining room; first clan cooking; refinement;\nr , nces; table boards n accommodMteU;\ntransients.\n11 KAST 24TH-ST., Bear Madison Sqtian\".\n\u2014 Double rooms, with board: table board;\nreferenced exchanged.\n\u25a0BTH XT.. V> WEST\u2014 Tw.. larc-. sunny\nas: privatr bath; parlor floor; ' n ' ril\nBoor, i \"lit. dreasl\u00dfi room; aapei\nTHE FLORIDA.\u2014 2\u00ab Easi l^th- st. \u2014First\n\u2022-Ihfs Vxjardins house; steam heat; soutn\nmuame. isantwhln\" rafaraneaa re\nqulred.\n1 GRAMERCT PARK, corner 21st-st.\u2014\nj,.,._... second i\\rr,r rooms; table board;\nprivilege of park: reference.\nST. ALBANS. 7 EAST 31?T-ST.\nRooms. sins.\". en suite, with private\nbaths- doctor's office: dlnins room, parlor\nfloor: electric l'ght ; excellent table bnani.\ni;;i.l.l.Vl(l> AM\u00bb FOOL TABLE*.\nMaTcUFACTITRERS of M'llard \u00abnd pool\ntables; high grade bowline alley l.v.ii ers:\nlowest prices MARX RROSi. -4 Union\nDRESSMAKING.\nDRESSMAKER.\u2014 At B. Altman a Co.'s:\ncompetent and experienced titter: good\ncut an.l style; $2 a day. Address DREss>-\nMAKER. 253 West 14th-*.t.\nDRESSMAKER. Accurtomed to hich class\nwork; excellent fitter and designer; by the\nday or at home; city or country. 273 West\n121?t-st.. O'Brien's bell\nTAILOR MADE EVENING GOWNS.\u2014 La\ndies' own material: satisfaction gunran\nteed; reference?; models; home or out by\nthe day. Mile. SMOLIK. 4<\u00ab West 35th-st.\nGUARANTEED SILKS, Mark, white, col\nors, direct from looms; factory price saves\nyou J5-. to 4\">c a yard; mail orders Oiled;\n10c. brine--\" samples and men)fnto. LENOX\nSII.K works. 1.139 Broadway. New York.\nEMI'LOVMiSNT AGENCIES.\nSTL IfrPiTi&p.p^W'i\nEMPLOYMENT BUREAU.\n211 \u00a5>ft 42d-st. First class domestics are\nsupplied: also manaclng housekeeper*, ma\u2014\ntrons, poverneyses. tutors, etc\nFIRMSHbD Tt005\u00bb9.\nMAMIATTA.V-AVE, 109 (near 104th-s0\n\u2014 Ivtrge, sunny front room; newly fur\nnished; suitable for one or two; select\nneighborhood; private house.\nRESIDENTIAL. \u2014 Whole Cf part of excep\ntionally beaut<fu> second floor; three l\u00abr^,\n!!ght rooms; all conveniences; new. substan\ntial furniture; dean. Qoiet neighborhood.\n244 Lenox-ave.\n(MTH-ST.. 38 WE3ST.\u2014 First ftoor; hand\nsomely fum!sh*<J parlor and bedroom;\nprivate bath; all conveniences; for one or\ntwo quiet gentlemen: references exchanged.\n72 WBST BBTB-ST. \u2014 Lanre second floor\nrooms, slnsly. suite: through current of\nair; private bathroom, lavatories; desirable\nfor party of four; moderate: references;\ncentral.\n4.--TH-ST.. 27 EAST, corner Madlson-ave. \u2014\nAttractive large corner rooms, with\nsouthern exposure and all conveniences;\nemail suite, references.\nI2TTH-BT.. 7 WEST. \u2014 Newly furnished\nfront a'cove; alsr> hack parlor, sultible for\ndentist or physician: reasonable.\n71ST-ST.. 253 EAST.\u2014 I^arse. \u00abmall fur\nnished rooms: large closets; hot and cold\nwater; clean and well kept; private house;\nreferences.\n21ST-ST.. 38 EAST \u2014 Desirable eecond\nfloor suite; bath' hall room; back parlor\nFulte for family; first class house; we.l\nkent. reflneri homelike: referenres.\nFI'R.N'ITI'RE.\nBRASS BEDSTEADS AND BEDDING,\nalso dressers and chiffoniers In all wo^lj,\na.t majiufacturer's prires. F- W. EVERS,\n226 4th-ave.. near 18th-st.\nHERALD Square Salesrooms. ISO West\n.\"?4th-st. \u2014 Antiquities and modern furni\nture bought, sold, exchanged, restored, re\nfinlshed. packing, shioiiing.\nCARPET CLEAXIXG.\nJ. & J. W. WILLIAMS,\n353 W. 54TH ST. c \u00a3\u00ab\nCARPKT CLEAN. NC. Established lsls.\nW WILLIAMS & SON.\nCarr=t cleansing. Send for circular.\n333 Fulton St.,\nBrooklyn.\nORIENTAL RUGS repaired, washed, by\nexpert specialist. HAIG S. ISKIYAN*. 5*\nU. f , - r\u00bb-\u00ab inference, the H. B. Claflin\nCompany.\nCARPETTS AND RUGS.\u2014 Carpet cleaning;\ninnovated, dytd, equal to new. ALEX\nANDER MORLE. 339 West BDth-st. TeL\n- ima \u2014 C< 1 imbue.\nCAREFTTL CARPET CLEAVING CO \u2014\nCleans t>y compr\u00absted air. steam, hand or\nm floor. I.SSS Broadway. 421 'Cast 4Sth-Bt.\nCOE A BRANDT Tel. 132 SJ'h.\nRUG! RUG! RUG! \u2014 Oriental rugs, repair\ning, washing, cleaning specialty. SEVEN\nTATOSIAV BROTHERS. 70 West 39th-st..\ncorner fith-\u00bbve. ES*tablt*ned JWW.\nSMITH & ENOKI>. reliable lawyer?. 309\nBroad way New-York: accidents, domes\ntic difficulties quickly a<H\"\u00abu>ri- consulta\ntion free.\nPAWNBROKERS' SALES.\nJOS. SHONGOOD & SONS. Auctioneers.\nsalesrooms No. 94 Bowery.\nMay I\u2014Men's1 \u2014 Men's and women's clothing,\netc L. Rosenthal. 103 West 31*t-\u00abt.\nMay IJewelry,l Jewelry, watches, diamonds, etc..\nAlbert Freund. 1.933 3d-ave.\nMay 44 \u2014 Jewelry, watches, diamonds, etc..\nL. Schieber. 1.629 2d-ave.\nMay \u2014 Men's and woman's clothing, etc.,\nL. Bruckheimer & Co., 788 2d-ave., D.\nBrucKhetmer & Co.. 2.235 3d-ave.\nMay \u2014 Men's and women's clothing, etc,\nHeilbrun Hros.. 1,674 lst-ave.\nMay 7 Jewelry, etc.. Jos. Koch, 184\nAvenue A. W. H. Gentzllnger. 05 Amstcr\ndam-ave.\nMay 7 \u2014 Men's and women's clothing, etc.,\npledged to April 24, 15*02. D. Sllberstein's\nsons, 10 6th-ave. ; Sliberstein Bros., \",407\nBth-ave.\nCENTRAL AUCTION CO.. M. Sheehan.\nauctioneer. 152 and 154 Canal-st.\nMay 4 \u2014 By est. John Simpson. 173 Bow\nery, watches, diamonds. Jewelry, etc..\npledged to No. 7.101, March 1. 1902. and old\ndates.\nMay s\u2014 By J. Slmjwon & Co.. 225 Park\nRow. diamonds. Jewelry, etc. pledged to\nNo 47.870, January 1. 1902, and old dates.\nMay s\u2014 By I. Alkus. 9 Beige*-**.. Brook\nlyn clothing, to April 25. 1902.\nMay 6 \u2014 By M. Weil St Co.. 2.217 3d-ave..\nclothing, to April 25. l!>02.\nMay \u2014 By S. Lehman. 292 Columbia-Bt..\nclothing to May l, 1902.\nMay 8 \u2014 H. McAleenan, 194 fith-ave.,\ndiamond*, watches. Jewelry, etc.. No.\n16.000 to 30.000. and goods held over.\nMay \u00ab \u2014 By P. Freel. 100 Grand cloth\ning to May 1. 1902.\nL. L. FIRUSKI. Auctioneer. 70 Bowery.\nsells, 10 a. m. :\nMay I\u2014 M. Sell* & Son, Jewelry.\nMay 4\u2014 By C. Lang & Co., 68S tith-ave..\n.diamonds, watches. Jewelry, nil pledges\nprior April 24. 1002. all older dates.\nMay \u2014 By M. Bruckheimer. 181 East\n10Sth-st.. M. * E Bruckheimer. 2.108 3d\nave., diamonds. watches. Jewelry, all\npledges prior April 2S, 1902.\nMay 6\u2014 By J. J. Frlel. 1.473-75 Broad\nway, OS7 Myrtle-aye.. Brooklyn, diamonds,\nwatches. Jewelry, all pledges prior April\n20. 1002, a!! older dates held over.\nMay \u2014 By J. GoldschmlJt. 1.137 2d-ave.,\nclothing:, etc., pledged prior April 2\u00ab. 1802\nMay \u2014 By Wm. Simpson. 91 Park Row.\ndiamonds, watches. Jewelry, all pledges\nprior March 7. IPO2, and all Nos. to 13.825,\nand all Roods reserved from previous sales.\nThis sale will include fine assortment cut\nglass, bric-a-brac and fancy chinaware.\nalso fine assortment silverware.\nMay S \u2014 By H. Stern. 51 West 31st-st..\ndiamonds, wati-hes. Jewelry, all pledges\nprior April 28. 1902. all older dates.\nMa> B\u2014By8 \u2014 By L. Cahen & Sons. 41 Canal-\nSt., diamonds, watches. Jewelry, all pledges\nprior April \"ft, lfttC. from 5.000 to 8.000.\nMay \u2014 By M. Levy, 45 Carmtne-st..\nclothing:. etc., pledged prior April 28, 1!\u00bb2.\nELI BOBEX* Auct.. OS Bowery, sells 10\na m., goods pledged to April 25. IMS.\nMay 1\u2014 By V. Fisher. women's gnoiis\nMay 4 \u2014 By K. Berger. 480 llth-ave. and\n460 West 42d-et., clothing, dresses, shoes,\netc.. pledged to April 25.\nMay s\u2014Jewelry,5 \u2014 Jewelry, watches, diamonds etc\nF. Sobel & Son. 1.428 2d-ave.\nAnderson A Mlntz. Aucts.. 64 Bowery, sell\n10:30 May \u2014 By Max Bernstein. 271\nWest 125th-st.. and Louis Pernsteln. 2.6**\n\u25a0tr-ave., all clothing pledged to April 20.\n1802.\nI'IIILA. PAWTTDKOKBRS' SALES.\nTHOrT^B^LOVATT\" * SONS. A^cttoneerT\n430 Sr.uth-st.. Phll\u00bb<lelrhlii. Perm.\nMACHI>EKY.\nAT RKDUCED PRICED \u2014 60r\u00bb m\u00bbe\u00bbna hand\nwood and Iron working machines, fully\ngudr*nte\u00ab<}. machinery bourht and \u2022\u00bb\n\u00abiuuj\u00aba.l GJCO. a. EDDT. SOS Ma4Uon-\u00abt.\nBANKBOOK No. 340.716 \u25a0\u25a0' th\u00ab Union Dime\nSavings In\u00abtitut!cn is missing Any r.-r\neon havlntr \u25a0 claim to It Is hereby called\nupon to present Ike same, within ten days\nfir submit to hiving \u00bbaIJ passbook cancelled\nand a new on\" Issued.\nROLL T O v\n(TTi rg #S !Y7 (*??\nOFFICE\nFUKNITUIIF.\nin great variety\nof style and\ni rt< \u25a0\nT. G.\nBKLX\u00a3W\n111 Fulton St.\nHKSTAIItASTS. ___^>^.\nGIBSON'S RESTAURANT, \u00a3\u00a32\nLane. New- York. \u2022 \u00bbpen S a. m. [\u25a0\u2022 5 p. m.\nFOR LUNCH.\u2014 The Woman's Noonday\nClub. 37 West U\u00bbth-st.\nENGINBERS WANTED, licensed tugboat,\nto takw places New\u2014 Harbor Hay I.\nJ. I- J.. Box 185, Postofflca, New-York\n\u00ab-*)ty.\nMEN WANTED.\u2014 By (Joins an easy work\nyou can travel to England for $7. to Ger\nmany for 51\": also tree transportatidn pro\ncure.i. return passaK\u00bb-. ATLANTIC\nSHIPPING OFFICE. 115 lst-Bt.\nWANTED \u2014Competent railroad ma<\nand bollennakets I r M of \"own: go\"d\nwages Apply betwan :\u2022 a. m. and .' p. m.\nt\" GEO. H THOMAS. .'4l CoenUai Slip, one\nfiigllt Up.\n\u2014 Salesman to visit manufactur\ning trade; must furnish best of refer\nences. A Idresa UNITED OIL SPECIALTY\nCO.. Cleveland. Ohio.\nWANTED.\u2014 newspaper and book\ncanvassers; one of the moat attractive\npropositions ever presented In New-York.\nApply to WILLIAM H. GUTELIUS. Trib\nune Office.\nFemale,\nAS HOUSEKEEPER.\u2014 Gentleman's coun\ntry place within 40 miles of New- York.\ngolnfr throufjh<jut the year; family small\n/(adults;, two mills and coachman era\nployed; party must be thoroughly compe\ntent; no objection to \u25a0 widow with well\nbehaved child Address, with fullest par\nticulars, references an'l remuneration ex\u2014\npected. C. C. Box 20. Tribune Office.\nWANTED. \u2014 copyist; must be accurate.\nAddress, with references. B. 8.. Box 27,\nTribune Uptown Office. 1.3*4 Broadway.\nWANTED. \u2014 I^a'!y to take charg\u00bb of <-ook\ning. baking and sweeping Ln a small fam\nily: pl\u00bb-a\u00bbant home assured; moderate wages.\nAddress N. L- M.. Os\u00a3ining-on-Hud=i.n.\nFemale.\nCOMPANION & M A .-.-i: USE.\u2014 lady\nof refinement to elderly lacy; graduate\nfrom Stockholm. 3\u00bb\u2014i-r. Answ\u00ab-r MU\nSICAL, 2 Court-st., Brooklyn.\nCOMPANION.\u2014 CuItured Swiss lady. 2&.\nexpert linguist and travelling guide, aa\ncompanion, Koverness, chaperon; competent\nand experienced. .Vrr.e. VILLIERa. lv\u00bb\nWest B\u00bbtn-st.\nCOMPANION or SECRETARY to literary\nperson, by an educated young woman;\ncan use typewriter; has a knowledge of\nlibrary methods; excellent New- or\nPhiladelphia references, ii C. 12 South\nBlot-st.. rhiladelphla.\nCOMPANION. &c.\u2014 Cultured Swiss lady.\n20. expert linguist and travelling guida,\nas companion, governess, chaperon: com\npetent and experienced. Mice. VILJJKKS.\nIDS West B>Uj-et.\nCOMPANION. &c\u2014 Hy Intelligent, faithful\nyoung woman, in confidential capacity or\ncompanion to lady of means; references\ngiven. RELIABLE, Box 12. Tribune Up\ntown Office. 1.3\u00bb!4 Broadway.\nCOMPANION.\u2014 Young Southern girt as\ncompanion to a lady going to Europe;\nmutual references. Address P. O. Box S9l,\nlUcbmond, Va.\nCAKI'ET EEWING-\u2014 fly widow woman.\n11,1 ith-ave.. .ing b\u00bbll twice.\nEXPERIENCED lady returning to England\nIn July or August would Ilka care of In\nvalid or children for passasre, good sailer;\nreferences. T. P.., Box 275. Tribune Up\ntown Ot\u00dfem, 1.\"64 Broadway.\nHIGHLY respectable English woman, posi\ntion in dentist or doctor's rooms; willing\nto make herself useful; can furnish best of\nreference. DICKdON. 219 Harrison-st..\nBrooklyn.\nJAKTTBESS. \u2014 Woman wants place, one or\ntwo houses: part rent for nice place; best\npersona! reference. Mrs, SHEERIN. 334\nEast tUtb-tt.\nSTENOGRAPHER.\u2014 Two years' experience:\ngood education; desires p.-sition on ac\ncount of closing present office; moderate\nsalary. Miss HALL. Room 818. Prudential\nBuilding. Newark. N. J.\nSTENOGRAPHER and TYPEWRITER.\u2014\nKnowledge of German; thoroughly under\nperience; be?i reference: $I<>-*l2, H.\ni-TAHU 241' South 3!-et.. Brooklyn.\nSTENOGRAPHER ar.d TYPEWRITER. \u2014\nSmith Premier; 5 years' experience; ref\nerence; nc agents. E. A. MACKIN. 110\nWest lOlst-st.\nTYrHWRITING, 30 cents 1.000 words.\nWARREN. 165 West 23d-st.\nTELEPHONE OPERATOR on private\nswitchboard: also typewriter. Miss M.. 19\nMarlon f'lace. Jersey City\nSTENOGRAPHER and TYPEWRITER. \u2014\nThree months\" experience; can furnish\nrood refei ences Address Miss J. RKILLY.\n106 Sands\u2014 St.. Brooklyn.\nTELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD.\u2014 By young\nlady; experienred. Address Miss ANDUIEi\n70 Greenptunt-ave.. Brooklyn.\nLAWYERS\nWOMAN PHTSICIAX, ipeciallst in ner\nrods '--sires to trays] with a\nratiirt or farr.llv: interview; references.\ni X 108 C ilnmhns stsl\nYOUNG woman* desires a position of re\napo .slbUlty; city or country. M. U. CIFJH\nHAKDT. *)1 East 16)\nf.SFFVL COMPANION to elderly lady, by\nreiined Christian woman; food reader;\n\u25a0 t ho: Tie preferred to tar-ge salar>.\nCall or address COMPANION, 7 W.-st\nr.'-t- si\nMate.\nARTIST. \u2014 Toung man. exjierienced In pen\nand ink or wash, will work for $10 a\nweek. Address K. \u25a0;.. M2S East I4th-st-\nBAKING POWDER an! spies n-.nker wants\nposition; frlx years with last firm, best ref\u2014\nA. G. PORTMORE, 274 West\nM.'ti st.\nBASS .-' >L* UriT. \u2014 <>pen for church quartet:\naN^ eoocari Wi rk Address R. 8.. 624\nriatbuMh-a\\e. , brv.-.:'kiy..\n!!\u25a0 'V, 17. on a wa;on. or at anything; will\ning to work. T. J. irCARTHT, 708\n\\\\ aahlngi\nCOLLECTOR.\u2014 By an honest and reliable\nman; has 2 years\" experience In that line.\nAddress C. St.. 167 Monltor-at.. Brooklyn.\nCOATMAKER \u2014 First class cutter. A.ldre-\u00bb\n.TOR HARILLA. National Hotel, Erie,\nPa.\nDRIVER. \u2014By married man; honesty an 1\nsiiirtety unquestionable; understands\n\u2022btpplng; drives single or double; Al refer\nences. lIEXKY KRL'OER, \u25a0\u00ab< East 3th-\u00bbt.\nortU'KR oi, any kind \u2022>'. wa\u00abDn. CHA&\nDOBRAVA, I,^:h; lst-a.ve.\nELECTRICIAN Sober, tndoMHaw; high\nreferee \u25a0. . In botel or\nnot nfr\u00abi ! \u2022 i *ri rk. HTNYSFVKFJ. Notary\naye.\nFOREMAN.- Painter and der.-mt.jr; ni'-n\nng \u25a0 \u25a0 r take chargv of\nill r-ranches; (rood\na SMITH. IT.- Weal 47th-et.\nGOOD second violinist wishes rnnr\u00bbra\u00bbn::\nnot union music. MttSIC SCHOOL. 145\n24th st., Brooklyn.\nMARIXK ENGINEER \u2014Tug enrln'-r\nwant<\u00bbfi for Ircsl work; steady err-p'.oymer.t\nand gooii wares. Apply to H. C. K.VLK.\nRoom 7. Stevena Hous\u00ab, 2! Broadway.\nMANAGER or su^.Tinfendent or Bparfments\nor hotel; conversant with all details:\ndona buyer; familiar with handling of\nwhite and colored help; excellent engineer\nand electrician- hotel experience; -highest\ntestimonial:\" < v \u25a0\u2022;; I \u2022\u2022<-;'' \u2022-!\u25a0\u2022\u2022 high class\nservices, ad-ire-s IKTBCKITT care of\nUaMon. 313 w 42d-st.\nMAN, 85. experienced In st^ro and .>\" Ve\nwork; neat appearance: fjood penman,\nquick at fi\u00abures- unquestionable references;\n\u25a0mall salary. op. WALKER, 5 Charles-\nSt..\nPRIVATE SECRETARY <-r CONFIDKN\nTFAL CLERK.\u2014 Stenographer and type\nwriter; best city references. C. P.. 449\nWest 123.1-\u00abt.\nPAINTING and DECORATING cf every\ndescription; estimates given. G. SBK\nLJR Xc SON. 13 Manhattan-st. : 'phone- .1.029\nMorns.\nPORTFSR\u2014 By TOUt! marrwd man: In\n, v \u00a3 h \" ! \" a ^ h< or anything else. OEO.\nvuoei^. s^z ioth-\u00abve,\nPORTER.\u2014 Man. 3? h a nlv toolT\nHotoke^N J VOI/rER 21 = XoJt:\nitEPATmNG. * C .-Work \"TonT'at your\nhome at mechanic's wages; One furnltuix\nrepairing, -nattresse. mad* over, carpeta\n'\u2022 MAS - h nR - \u00abtn-e.ve.. furniiure.\n\u25a0tor*.\nI.OSi.\nOFKIC \u25a0 n II\"* IT! RK\nM.'.l- WAMKU.\nb^LP V<A.\u00abED.\nWUI'K \\VA>TEi.\\\nWORK WASTED.\nCOACHMAN. wV\u00bb thoro\u00abirMv . .der-tan'is\ncare cf carriage- and r~ .vi horses fomi\ndriver: can fti-n'sh be\u00ab of reference: city\nor country- 44 East 76th-st.\nCOACHMAN \u2014^Thorouchly understands th\u00bb\nbusiness: city or country: strictly sokar:\nhonest and Industrious. \u25a0 rood references. C\nP.. Box \u00abC Tribun* Uptown Ofl!re, 1.364\nBroadway.\nCO AN . \u2014 MarrW; 34 years In last\nplace: best city reference.; last employer\ncan be- seen: city or country. CLINTON. 4.H5\nA mst*rdam-av\u00ab_\nCOACHMAN. Mr*!*. 35; JO years good re\nference: respectful and trustworthy;\ncountry err- \u25a0! : employer can b\u00ab seen\nM. C Box 1 Tribune.\nCOACHMAN \u2014 American: married: na fam\nily; gtxj.l appearance; c\u00bbn guarantee very\nb\u00bb\u00abt of personal or written references:\nwife Brat rla*i laundress for fir* dredge*.\n\u2022 K lrte, i\u2014'ltara.i \u2014 'Itara. <-u(Ts: *!<*> stood seamstress.\n,\\.!.lr\u00bb-<t\u00ab M. A.. SM West 34th-s*.\nCOACHMAN\u2014 SingIe; -> - \u2014 t references;\nexperienced rlty driver, no objection to\ncountry. JOHN. 152 East 41st-st.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 Seed appearance; 12 years*\nflrwt i'las\u00ab raeo\u00dfuaanaaUotia as to tm\u00abt\nworthiness nnd capability; la\u00abt and former\nemployers can be seen: mar fled, no chil\ndren. Call er afldrrss 10< K;\u00bb\u00abt !Qd St., pri\nvate stable.\nCOACTIMAN. \u2014 City or country; ttoroujcftly\nexperien.-ed in ear\u00bb of hor\u00abe\u00ab an* car\nriages: best tvr.t*\u00bbn and per\u00abona! refer\nences. UMTI BM C6!umbr\u00bb-iv\u00ab.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 Scotch: married: seven\nyears\" flrrt cl.ts references; city or coun\ntry: la\u00bbt eirp:o>er can be seen. J. S.. tflrt\nWest\nCOACHMAN.\u2014 Ten rears* hest d-v refer\nence: two last employers can be seen:\naged 33 J>Mrj. h\u00bbirht .', feet 7 Inches;\n\u25a0weight 108 pounds: ware* S,V) a month. Ad\ndress C J.. Box 75. Tribune Uptown Office,\n1.364 Proadway.\nCOACHM .\u2014 Married, no family. aired 31;\nmedium sli<\u00ab: in orlvate. family: personal\nreference. SPENTLERS. C 52 Rut 32<1-st.\nCOACHMAN and GROOM \u2014 \"Mr.*!-: thr\u00bbr\n<>u\u00abh!v competent: m\u00ablliim sin*- fnera'ly\nuseful: country jreferrpd.: pen^na'\n\u2022\u2022rn-e from preaasH -ni;.>\\\u00bb- T. F . <-\u00bbr\u00ab\nKe-lev. 414 Wr\u00bbt Srtlh-st.\nCOACHMAN. CoIored; married; wife, as\ncoo* or toon itra\u2014; rood city reference.\nAd iress JANKINa. SO Ua.lia\u00aba-a\u00ab\u00ab.. Flush\ntnc. tvwi\u00ab Island\nHOHK W*\\TKD.\nMa If.\nSALESMAN and COLLECTOR\u2014 Gentleman\nof eduratlon and addresa. 27; experienced;\nwhere knowledge of line is not as essential\nas grit, pluck and salesmanship. 1.. Box\nM, Tribune Office.\nSALESMAN \u2014 Yotrn* college man. a* sales\nman, understand* photography; anything\nnot mrnial. X. LATTARD. Jr.. 123 Waal\nIMth-st.\nSHIPI'ING CLERK and PACKER.\u2014 Yoan*\nmarriefl man: \u2022.'r.ris'tlitn; exp\u00bbrl\u00bbnce<l; ref\nerence. ERNEST KTRENC. 4l< W. 47th-?t.\nUPHOLSTERER. \u2014 First e\u00bb\u00bbsj -: ai;\nbranches; hls<\u00bb at trtvate re*i<ien-e\u00ab: out\nby day: klip \u00ab\u00bb\u2022!\u25a0 and all uph\u00ab.!s*>^y\nwork don* satisfactorily; referea'- \u00abtiven.\nISLCMKNTHAL. 450 L*nox-ave.\nYCI'NG colored man an! w!f\u00bb; take c*t* of\nprivate boose or apartrp\u00abT.t for .timrrvr\nor longer: Lest personal r\u00bbfer\u00bb-iv\u00bbs. EL H..\nBox \u00ab0. Tribune Uptown OfAcs I^liM nrr^.i\nway.\nYOUNG MAN with private family tn the\ncountry: understands the car\u00bb of horses;\nalso lawns and aardm work Call or write\nE. WEIDEMA.NN. 34 East 7th-st.\nyo'v; t: m. work 'n j itmmtr.\n\u25a0 ' HEIBECKKB. ZV> B\nYOUNG MAN. IS; office work, light driving\nor anything wt*ti \u00bbno'\u00bb for \u00bb<ivanc<ni^nt;\ngood penman. WILLIAM 'HT.Ft' H. .T42\nEast 51st-st.\nYOUNG MAN. 22. practical printer, pap-r\nbuyer, to take r-har\u00bb\u00bb of printinsc matter\nof lar\u00abr\u00bb concern: order r>rk. EDWARD\nBF>JKKR, 21 Flllm\u00ab>re Place. Rro./<lyn.\nTOTTNG MAN. 2.1. at anything: chanre for\n\u00bbdvan'nn\u00bbnt: ntronsr and willing. Alltfrual\nCITARLE-S UNOLD. -\u25a0\"\u2022'> Mor\u00aban-st.. Tntnrt\nHill. \u25a0\u25a0 J.\nYOUNG MAN. % with Home reliab!* flrrn\nwh^re he eouM Advance himself: refer\ner.ces. H. H.KNSKi., 4^2 Waal 36th-\u00ab.\nYOUNG NORWEGIAN at anythtnsr. lately\nlanded- no objection to oS!ce work. Please\ncall R. STOKNESS. 132 D\u00bbgraw-st..\nBrooklyn.\nYOUNG MAN. 21. ws assistant shipping\nclerk or porter: can fnrrilsh b\u00bb*t of ref\nerence. HOEOOKR. 110 SuTHvan-st.\nYOUNO MAN. 17. tr office where there\nwould be a chance to advance: can fur\nnish best of references. Address J. N..\n214 WilloUKhby-av*.. Brooklyn.\nTOtTNO MAN. 2TI. irr\u00bbskins; s\u00bbv\u00abn lan -\npiiafres and writing a few of them, wants\npo\u00dflti.in of my k'ni: best of references.\nAddress B:-:RKO. 20 Avenue A.\nDOMESTIC SITVATIO-MS WATTED.\nHal*\nATTENDANT or NURSE to Ir.valii; high\nest references from employers and prom\ntrent physicians. FRANK REI'^HHARDT.\n'.;\u2022\u25a0 West 2Sth-st-\nBUTLER. \u2014 Kng!!\u00abh; competent, rober and\nhonest; city or country. ENGLISH. 1\"\u00ab\nEast 55th-si.\nCHEF. \u2014 Colored. in country hot*!; under\nstands a\".: branches of meat and pastry\ncooking. Call P. J. 8.. 431 West 42d-et-\nCARBTAKKR. \u2014 By man and wife; Ameri\ncans: will take charge of private house,\nsummer or longer: best of references.\nLJUL.Y 31 West \u00ab9th-st.\nCARETAKER.\u2014 By respectable colored\nman and wife, for private family, coun\ntry preferred; man can fake care of horse.\nAddress EI*A.INEI \u2022 Lafayett\u00bb-\u00abt.. Brook\nlyn.\nCARETAKER. \u2014 Respectable couple, no\nchildren, to care for gentleman's house\nfor the sunrrreer months; best reference. US\nEast 33U-*t.. care Mrs. Bastaln.\nCARETAKER.\u2014 Man and wifa. no children,\nto take care of house for summer; best\nreferences. Address A. M. C. Box 37,\nTribune Uptown Office. 1.3*4 Broadway.\nCARETAKER. \u2014 By man and wife, no\nchildren, to take care of. house for sum\nmer; best references. Address A. M. C\nBox 37. Tribune Uptown Office. 1.364\nBi oadway.\nCARETAKER. \u2014 A respectable coupl\u00ab. M\nchildren, would like the care of gentle\nman's hou^e for summer months: best ref\nerence. 113 East 53d-at.. care Mrs. Bastaln.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 By middle a*e\u00bbl German:\ne<.mp\u00ab\"tent and reliable; iwelve years w.th\nlast employer. SCHOORES, I.9ST Amster\ndam-ay\u00ab.\nCOACHMAN.\u2014 Married: understands his\nbusiness; Beat appearanc-; country pre\nferred. KEARNEY. 223 East 32d-st.\nOOACHMAN. \u2014 By younc Scotchman: s^vvj\ncity driver: thoroughly undrT\u00abtar\u00ab\u00bbs his\nbuslress. Address J. G.. 133 Wast 55th-\u00abt..\nprivate stable.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 By German: married: wife\nAl lau:idre*>\u00bb: city or country; ten years\nlast place. WRiJAMLM Columbus-aye.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 Good appearance; first claes\nreferences from last and former employ\ners; sixteen months In last place, ten year*\nin former, tout years In previous: married:\nno children: aged 40; height \u2022\"> ft. 10 In.: !s\ncompetent and respectful. Call or address\n10S Ksist n '-ft., private stable.\nCOACHMAN. Competent driver *nd rider:\neight years* reference: last employer can\nbe seen. K. S.. 5 Ea\u00abt ,\"lStr-st.\nCOACHMAN and GROOM \u2014 By middle \u00abge.J\nsteals man; thorough hor\u00ab\u00abman in all its\nduties; will be generally useful In private\nfamily: city reference. COACHMAN. Box\n2*. Tribune Office.\nCOACHMAN \u2014 Youner man, married, no\nfamily: good appearance ; best of refer\nence: last employer can be seen. Call or\naddress \u00a35 East Wft st\nCOACHMAN end GROOM\u2014 Rr middle axed\nsingle man: thorough horseman In all its\nduties; will be generally useful in private\nfamily: city reference. COACHMAN. Box\n23. Tribune Office.\nCOACHMAN.\u2014 Swede. 23. si\"g>. under\nstand* care r>f horse and driving CAR\nLIN. IPS 4th-ave., Brooklyn.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 By vounemar: married ; no\nfamily; moot appearance; best of refer\u2014\neil\u00ab\u00ab>; ia\u00bbt \u00abmpl\u00abv\u00bbr ran be seen. Call or\naddress .V. East SM-\u00abt.\nCOACHMAN. Ry competent mar: tlw\ne*J\u00abMy understands care horses, h\".rress.\ncarrtae'*: willintr: city or u\u00bbl\u2014li\u00bb. forrrer\nemployers can >^c seen. IV. R^t 373. Trib\nune IVwn Offlc?. 1.3(14 Broadway.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 American: marrt-.-' 29:\nheight 5 feet 6. weight IKS: st Haft and\ncareful driver: extra rt\u00bbat apnearlny in '\u25a0\"\ncry: su!tpb> for \"mail cabrtnjet; gert'*\nirmi pivine up horse* ; two y^ars in present\nplace: ploys* can be se\u00abi: Spa years' ref\nerence- from rther city families: vnvn not\nless than ?BO per month. COACHMAN.\n2.302 Broadway.\nCOACHMAN. \u2014 Head manager m s'lper'n\nter>dent of a gentleman's place or club\n\u00abtfiM\u00bb\u00ab thomusr v !v tinder-tara* all duties\npe-tain'n\u00ab- to SBiWf; can be M?My rsOVS\u00df\nr>\u00bbriW for BjMnty. trnstworf hin\u00bb<\u00ab9. etc. :\nFn\u00bbl)ah; aged sOr no en mm bran Ad\ndress J. C. H-. 107 West Sl\u00abt-st.\nCOACHMAN. C-\u00bbtnred: first cla\u00bbs city\ndriver: thoroughly understand' MM car*\nOf fine horses, harness and carriages; per\nsonal ref\"\"-*r\"-\u00bb\u00ab from present e\u00dftnloyer\nAiM\u00bbw COACHMAN, car- W. M. Kllnert.\n2T!9 West KM-st.\nCOACHMAN\u2014 Married; good references:\nwMiinjr to m out in country. EL T.T.\"N\nDEU* 4\"2 But!\u00bbt^-st.. Brooklyn.\nCOACHMAN \u2014 B\u00bb gentleman for Ma man:\nthoroughly understands the martas-\u00bbm\u00abnt\nof first class staMe: married; no family.\nH. BL, Box 41. Tribune TTptown Os%\u00bb\n1.3*54 Broadway.\nOOMKOTIC \u00bbITlATlu>\u00bb W \u00bb JUll\nCOACHMAN.\u2014 Mairtad. 32 no to-.\nfirst elasa man; city or country ca^J o '\"'\nchar*, of centleman-9 r.r: at\u00ab VtalS\" *5\nyears with last employer- car TtaTLtafi?\nwomnnnw. A-Mr-ss T O*aWl\u00ab\u00ab^ji\nCOACHMAN -By flrst ss\u00dfaa-a* \u2014\nbest of r-frr-n. -\u00bb; ar.<l-r SS 3 M, W^.- T IS\nfour-in-hand or tandem. MAr. ita^Jj 1 *\n\u25a0\n-\n\u25a0 \u25a0 \u2022\n\u25a0\nCOA'.'HMAN-North of ireUrvJ Vt^*\n\u00bbnc-. Call or adir^sa 147 West Z*in~*t.\nCOACMMAX -Y^un, man.\nramlly: good appearance; v^ry b^ji' it JT\ner-n.>-: last employer can be . wn rlfl,'\n\u25a0saaaj\n-\n\u25a0\n\u2022 ; \\ ?\u2022\u2022 r- \u25a0 : -.\nSECOND MAN.\u2014 Your.r m\u00abn. \u00a3i \u25a0- \u0084,,.\nprivate f-t.-nl!y; b\u00bb%r. roVren-es: En\u00bb- '\u201e\nman Apply w-twe-r. 10 and 12. at j'-^i\nEa.\u00ab! <.*t;i\u2014 st.\nSFJX>SI> MAN.\u2014 By yo.jr.^ man. 3X ,3\nij-vkl priVHt- family; best r\u00bbf <\u00bbren\u00bb-\u00bb3 \u2022 Ec\nlis'nman. Apply, between 1 Hunt' y ,\u2022\n123 East 7r.tn-*f.\nUSEFUL MAID.\u2014 Half jemwn r o |r>r~J z>*i\nto be U!\"*ful ir. a 1 1 mi\u00bbi I >liTo w->,!*\u00bb famUr\nfcr care of chiMn-r:. JACK3ON Xili r .v\u00bb^r\n41\u00ab-st.\nCSEFUXj MAN nr WATCHMAN.\u2014 B* tthb\n*r man; French; ..\"trictly bliuipc. \u2022\u2022\u2666>\u00bb\nreliahl\u00bb; with e^o.! bu\u00ab!nes!\u00bb house- tras*^\nworthy. ADVERTISER. 1\u00bb Concort-*'. .\nBrooklyn.\ntL\\ S\nUSETTL. MAN.\u2014 Cy married man. \u00bb\u00bb\u00bb\ncountry Pace; car milk c?r\u00bb hn-!\u00ab\u00bb<\u00bb sr d\ndrive; eon-rally Baaftd ma;: *nn<iT wtti\ncarpenter's tnolar two years' reference last\nplace. WILLIAM \u2022nJOITP^ON. 22 Locu?t-\nJ. W . re Th\nVaI>RT. \u2014 T--.~z man. who is a f.rst <r!a\u00ab\u00ab\nathletic Turk!\u00abh nr.l ItoT.an bath opera\ntor, has several years' f!rx>* r l aT \u00ab'+ as *uc\\\nin the m\u00ab prominent athletic <-!uh\u00bb\nthroughout th\u00bb Stat\u00bb. \" -\u00bb\u00bb an en*asss\u00bb\nmerst with r\"~.' '\"- will trave!; -\u00abf\u00bb\u00ab_\nence O. K. TR.\\INER. 46 East 9\u00abtn-st.\nVAL.RT \u2014 Th.-womhly eTperierred: SrM c!a\u00ab\u00bb\nreferences; mansaw if r^q-;ir\u00bb\u00abi: 'la.t\ndiploma; can share. P.IvOMQL'TST. 1\u00abS T.*t\n6Cth-st.\nDOMESTIC SITUATIONS WASTED,\nTmtsmMm.\nCARETAKER \u2014 Mother and 'aur 1 -\u2014- wouM\nlike care .* house; best reference*. M*\"\u00ab.\nHEINZ. 131 Eaat S\u00abth-\u00ab.\nCARETAKER. \u2014 A middle er\u00ab<? <y>X*-\u00b0.i\nwoman would Mm to take care of hou\u00bb\u00ab\nf>r the season or gentlemen's ar,artTr.\u00bbr.t\u00bb\nor in a family of two. ANNIE JOHNSON.\n159 West ftlst-st.. John3ton'\u00bb bell.\nCARETAKER.\u2014 By Scotch Prot\u00bbstar.t;\nmother and daughter: willlrsr to fc\u00bb v?.\u2014\nfnl: neat: absolutely tnwtwortftT: hlafttat\nreference: or as Janitor. CARETAKER. \u25a0 \"\"\u25a0\nWest 49th-st.\nCHAMBERMAID\u2014 Lady br'aklna: up hoti.\u00ab\u00bb\nwould like to pla - her chambermaid; *\nyears' reference. Call 64 Weat ttUMt\nCHAMBERMAID an.l WAITRESS.\u2014 3y \u00bb\nyoune girl: thoroughly computer.?; Brat\nclass personal references; no cards. BtTRN.->.\nCOS West 4Kth-et-\nCHAMBERMAID and I\nan \u2022\u25a0.\nferre-1 AMress JOHSSC . \"\nCOOK. \u2014 Competent rci<Mle us- ' woman !rr\nprivate family: city or country: \u00ab^t*\nthree servants are kept: best city tmfermem.\nKOEIIL. 202 St Nicholaa-ave.\nCOOK. \u2014 By first c!a\u00abs coo*: cn < 1<?T\u00bb-arMi*\nall branches; reference. SHERIDAN. \\. r ~<*\nEa.t 83th-et-\nCOOK. \u2014 First class cook; iriZ*ri>ta.r. J\u00bb a.!\nbrar.r^-^. reference. SHERIDAN. Ti*\nEast 9th-st.\nCOOK. &c. \u2014 Competent German woman as\ncook and caretaker, wirh n\u00aby 13; heat ref\nerences: country only. S^> East 83tfi f.\nCOOK. \u2014 By \u25a0 good cook; f.r<\u00bb' r!T\u00bb<\u00bb r:tr\nreference: $25; no cards. MOONEY. 7'\u00bb'\u00ab\nCo!umbu9-av\u00ab., top Cwr.\nCOOK \u2014 B-- ttm I sag hfesd - \u2022\nsrart \u25a0 \" '\u25a0\nCOOK.\u2014 Coiore\u00abl wosbsjh as :\n-\u25a0' - '\naye.\nDATS 'vTriRK \u2014 Rs\nRTEDT.\nHOrSEKEEPSR \u2014 By -Me'ly Gmmn\nwoman: city or country. MRS. WTNKFiL\u2014\nVAX. 9.M Summtt-a*\u00ab Jersey Cry. N. J.\nHOCSECUEAJCKfG *<-. \u2014 An >J1\nwoman to do hous^vVanirp nr was^ir.s\nIn or out of hotise: eoori referer.ee. Mr*.\nYOTTNG. 340 West 2^t^-\u00ab.. rear hons<\u00bb.\nHOUfrEWORK. \u2014 T<vjT!ir eir!. ;s*\u00bb'.v fcrnrVit.\nto Ar, e\u00ab\u00bbr!*r=i! kaasew Miss Gir.NET.\n2\"-l Kinssland-ave.. BrookTTn.\nLADY'S M\\IT\u00bb.- A !a\u00a3y w'she* DtMtttDll\nfor a reTned yotm\u00ab- wnman. formertT !rt\nher emp'oy. as useful corrrrtanion cr laiij\"*\nmail Apply at 51 West 525-M.\nLADY'S MAID. \u2014 Ev German PwHWUlft\nwag\"\" J--. Call 219 \"W>st 3SC\u00bb-aC; car\u00bb\nRev. Law.\nLAST'S M^rr\u00bb. \u2014 By Gerr^a-* Pfngsfnt\n215 W\u00abl S.\"th-sf.. care of R\u00abv. Jlr. I-a:2.\nMAir>. *- \u2014 R^T!ab?\u00ab y^uns rri as ml?\nand \u25a0'. \u2022> ww'rj; wtllllijl ant >\u2014 8\nof re'ererce^: wazes S2O to J\"V no uMn<\ntlon to travellins- O'CONNOR. 98 Eart\n114*1 M\nMAir*. \u2014 B\u2122 competent yc\u00abn\u00bb Tady: \u00bb\">cl\nseatr\u00abtr<\u00bb\u00ab<i- thorr.u^H'v A fire\u00bb\u00bb\nM!.\u00bb JttStAM. 414 Smith--?.. ClwMiU,\n!fl HMK to invalid: persona! raftorvMrw \u25a0\u2022\u25a0\n<ibTe<-ri^n to country: \u2014 \u25a0 mo.!i>rs!\u00bb. ***\nWr.sh!nston-st., near IVsbros?**-**..\nfloor.\nNT'TtSK. \u2014Pv -roxtr.g girl- assist with o-^\u00bbr\nwork. 44 1 * 4th\u2014 ave.\nNT\"K\u00ab^\"RT OOTtTKTie\u00bb a ._ Py C*r\u00ab\u00abr'v\u00bb\nrentlewor\"\u00abn. \u00abccn<rtr>m\u00bb^ tr> re-*\u00bb-\u00bbJ\nImim. saeatssjl nearer r a**!*t vim m^T?\u2014\n.. *<*'>? 4 ftnamrhnM : ur.r deities net\nm*nl\u00abI: .-.,..^\u00ab r y rreferr-d: 0 X A..\nTrl*'CHe Offles\nXfPSE. \u2014 French: nUX\u00ab \u00ab\u00ab\u2022?: tn M\"*\u00bb\nfull c v >\u00abr\u00bb\u00bbt re'\u00bbr\u00ab\u00bbtv\u00ab\u00bbn: ci'y nr rwcrUT*.\nM. 11.. .'\u2022\u2022. TT\u00bb\u00abt Ml\u00ab SI\nNT*Tt\u00a3E rr>-\u00a9fe*!\u00bbion\u00bbr\u00bb desires eryrtreme-r*\nt<-> t'*ve! with s f*mn?\u00bb rnrv >'-\u25a0\u2022-\u2022-\u2022\ntntorrtiloua or noumfjr patent- h ! <h\u00bbal\nrefer\u00bbr>c\u00bb-*. Miss M. K. ?M!TK. r\u00ab tmn-\n>, \u2022 vrs\u00df f-\u00bbr hr \u00ab\u2022' I ,-vr aa-ed r e^.%r\u00bb. \u00bb>\u00bb\u2022 mk?\ndT*> ared S<-.-.tc* wW\u00abih\u00bb. >\u2022\u2022\u2666\u00bb \u2014 fereT?c\u00bb:\nr'rr or funtrv. 1\u00ab* WV^t I<vv-\u00ab\u00bb.\nNT*P CI T nr- NTT>cr\u00abTST \u00ab-;o\"'* 1 \"'. 0 N t: - < '<\u00bb.\u2014 P\"*\nr\u00bb\"ne<J V >r* v O\u00bbrman. fiim rr,--\u00bb\n\u201e\u201e,\u00ab.-.\u00bb,\u00bb-\u2022, v-<^ . '.\u00ab a \u2014 >-\nfnil rtirw of chtl<!r\u00abn \"ver \u00bbHr\u00bb>\u00bb: ~'\n\u25a0*\u25a0\u25a0 -e\u00ab \u00bb \u2022.\u2022:-\u2022\u00ab\u2022 IT. I*. \u00ab\u25a0* \u2666\u25a0> TOEW\nNT'HPK. \u2014 Thom-apMv exT\u00bberter>p<Hi. \u2014\"\u2014 '\nNort^ r^et^yian : entire oh^^sre of c^^^-'e^\nt*\\*r three: spoek* \u00ab\u00bb>r>.l Kre*\u00bb-*?: r*t* '\"\nTr!Sure Vptown Office. l.S*4 Broail-way.\n\u2022 -w aaj\n'nv\u00bblli* or n.z**i mm \" \u25a0\u25a0\u00bb; N\u00bb\u00abt twturwacH\ncity or country. !.\u00ab\u00ab VT<-9t I<V?.\u00bb-\u00abt.\nthe stole or ntfer.l an in\u00bb^T!.l !*d\u00bb- C\" 1 *\nMitfr; >>e\u00abt r*!rr*r\\c-\u00bb Addrenn M. H.. 4 1 *\n\u25a0\u00ab:-\u00ab' lf.th-st.\nNt'KJWKf OOrCRNT'S. \u2014 r\u00bb-~~1\u00bbnce*:\nFrench- take ertire ch\u00bb\"n\u00bb f^^>*w <wer\nthree: oft T r-'\u00bb*\u00bbpo\u00bb. MAPCMOt?2LL^\nT> . ?.\".! West tart, \u00ab.\n7rr\u00bbW*l to t\u00abT<\u00abll^: s T>lt.^ - evertenc*?\nT\u00bb<\"\u00ab\"nnt >>^ \u25a011im \u00bb: r.n objection* *<*\ncountry. \u00bb4? West TOth-ot.\net. h\nTT ' \u00abh t vo. ,vo. \u2014 TmuMi woman la <*\u2022> \u00bb*\u00bb!\u2666\n\u2666n* iro*\u00bbin^ i\u00bbVfli\u00bb\u00bb\u00bb\u00bb%\u00bb *t ,\u00ab*v or w\u00ab\u00ab\\* r*f*\nerero\u00ab\u00bb. Mr*. OATTVTT. 4*\u00ab W r^V\u00abt.\nV. Wf\u00bbrs< .~,\u00ab muH w*T*i -\u00bb.->^^^.\n\u00bb\"ira!i t> rr\u00bb m>\u00ab hv tie \u2022*\u2022 wit* I *'\"* \u00bb*\u2022\nfront\"* xnl ref^-ence V-\u00bb V C T?E\nWASHING \u00bbn\u00ab IROVTNO\u2014\nOwn w<wb\" by t*\u00bb ihf; r\u00bbf*r\u00bbTie*\u00bb\n\u25a0Urn. SCHATZX.ETV. SMI Vast TUV-s*.",
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"text": "THE MARKETS.\nTOTAL DOMESTIC RECEIPTS TO-DAY.\nNew-York. April SO. 1003.\ni\u00abMes. T,srs . . Lard, cases SK>\n\u00a3%t*ax. i i*\u00ab 2jSte*rtne. :\u00bbcs SO\ntTT,,. white, bbls.. 2f. Ta]io\u00bb. P kg- am\nZSoorr. biles.... 57! Grease, p kss 142\nFtour bbls 9.340 Butter pice*. 4.530\nT-^ur sacks ;.\u2014 15.\u00a397| Cheese, pkgs 4.003\n.aieaL bb1*. ..'.... Z^lEscs. cases 12,600\nCorr.nieal. feacs -\u25a0 766 \\ Dressed poultry, pkps. \u00ab75\nHOTJinv. pkgs 4C\u00bb:Live poultry, crates.. 400\nO-troeal. bSi\u00bb. 2\u00bb>*\\ Orange* ,<-\u00bb:>. cases.. 12..V.9\nTThe&l. bush... I2T>.TJ! ; I^moai iCal), cast?.. L 376\ni roU- hush ..- \u00bb\u00ab.30i Apples, bb's 2.6T.U\nJclr bush. 30.000, Potatoes, bbls 4.(\u00ab)8\nRTr\" bush 2,925i0nt0n5. bbls -\u2022\u25a0 1.050\nrea\u00ab bush - l.\u00bb 70; Spirit* turp. bbls 150\nTi\u00ab'ler bush 1.175 Pitch bbls li\nitali. bush. B.OOV.Tar. bbls \u00ab5\nrice, bbls 4rtO'Molafses. bMs 275\nKlce! pkt* . - .-\" s Oilcake, pkp- 6.272\nHay, tons I.**-\" 1 i Peanuts, baps 1.0H3\nStraw tons 275 ; Tobacco, hhds ITiO\nllillfeed tons 2\u00ab\u00bb Tobacco, tlercee \u2014>\nOMB \u2022\u00bb\u2022\u00ab*\u2022 *>\u00ab\u25a0 80 1 Tobacco, P* 11 * 8 S * i< \"\nBaas, hales 40, Whiskey. M!s \u00ab34\n\u00a3\u00a3g7 tbls aS|Cotton. bales 8,130\nBe<\"f <eanne<J>, oases. S.4S|; Cottonseed meal, ha*rs \u00ab<\">s\nI\u00bbo- k bMs -\" Quicksilver, flasks.... 1\u00b0\"\nBams, pksry 2!\u00ab4 ] Corper, pieces 207\nBacon. r>kS* \u00bbl\".Leaa, pigs \u2022 v '\"->\nCot meats, ;.fc\u00a3!=. .. Leather, side* 3.0.V>\nLerd tierces. - :>\u2022..>\u25a0 bales '*>\nLard, kf-ss f..26o|Wine (Call bbls. .. 2.050\nEXPORTS TO-DAY.\nC \u2014 hash. - \u2022 4.Slo'Tar. bblf - 11\nCs-.s. 84.44:. Refined pet. gals. . .3.319,272\nT\"fBS bus!... . \u2014 ..-. 66 (Cottonseed oil. pals. V&3.1\nPeeriJ bush... 735 ! Lubricating oil. gate 62.070\nri^ur. bbl\u00bb T. 664 Porl bbls ..... \u00ab83\nFlour, sacks . . 1.976. 8eef, bbls -. . m\nComsaeal. t0..... 480|Beef. les H\u00ab\nF\u00abi \"> \u2014 \u2022 9.000 ! Bacon. To ll.ics\nBr*r.. Ib 9.72o;Hams, Ib \u00abS.\u00bb\u00bbi\nHay. bales _ 4(ri|Lar<l. n 13h.\u00ab0\nOi'meal. R\u00bb 2\u00bb\u00ab.i: Lard oil. pals -500\nfpirlt* turp. pa>.. \u00ab4fl!Buttrr. n> \u2022\u201e\nKosin. bMF S33|cbe\u00abae.,lb 46.020\nritch. bbU 7|\nCASH QUOTATIONS.\nIron. Nor. No 1 fdy.SiS 25 | Cotton, middling $10 75\nInm. 30. No 2 soft.. 20 75 Coffee, No 7 Rio 55 1 *\nft**: rails \u00bb\u00ab8 | Sugar, granulated *\u2022\nLake copper ingot.. 14 C 24 \u2022 Mola\u00abs*-s. OK. prim* 40\nTM 30f\u00ab5 JBeef, family *1^505\u00bb13\nJJx'-hanpe lead . 4S7\u00bb*'Be\u00ab>f hams \u25a0 - *\u2022 75\nhr\u00bbiter 675 j Tallow, pri me - \u00ab V*\n\"Wheat No 2 r*\":... H ? i.Pork. mess IS 50\nr->m. No 2 rr.lx^J . . Ml Hors. dressed. '\u2022m rt,. \u2022%\nOats. No2mix-1... % JLa^d, prime . . \"\u25a0>\nFlour. Mpk. patent* 430 |\nGENERAL MARKET REPORT.\nNew-York. April 30. BMB\nCOJTFKK. \u2014 Tho cofl\u00bb\u00bb market yesterday opened stead J\na; unchanged prices but turned easier again and closed\nf\"H- at a n\u00ab\u00bbi decline of I points after a day appar\nently lacking either feature or important business. Total\nFales were reported of V.'X *) bngs. The opening eteadi\nu\u00bb>ss w\u00ab\u00ab larelr due to the lair response made by the\nTuropean markets to th* New-YorK advance of We<3r.e\u00bb\nobv. Hambara- was unchanged to '\u00bb pfgr higher, while\nlla\\re tdva.Tic\u00ab-d J -\u00bb@^s franc. Tb\u00ab> primary markets re-\nTr.t-.'.r.fi fteacy at unchansed prlres. but the receipTs\n\u25a0tore cr.lj moderately full. Still there was very little\nccmaiKS lr. the market, and there was some off\u00ab ring for\nlocaj accour.t. chiefly from buyers before the late ad\nvance of WeOnesday. and prices F<y>n showed a sag\u00dflng\ntendency- I\u00ab Is now expected that the world's visible\nfurry will fhow a email decrease for tho month of\nApril, and local authorities tirure the amount at about\nJ.Vi.OOO ba^s. This exerted little effect on eentlment.\nJiow-ever. for It is generally e?;p^ct\"d that the crop next\n\u00bb<-. rna.rket wili prove a. monster one. ad as It is gen\neralty n>ported to b* an early ooe. arrivals from It are\n\u00ab-->oa\"espected to ex\u00abrt an influence on the market. The\n*r*ot market we? quiet, with quotations on the basis of\nf'tc Ut Rio No 7.\nThe range of contract prices in the local market to\ncst was as follows:\nYester-\nOpenin;:. High. Low. Close. day.\nUpra - .... \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 BSO\n'\n\u25a0Mar 3\u00ab> 3.8S 3.50 3.75'y3.50 3W>\ni u^ _ \u2014 3.fcsfr3.f\u00abO S.\u00bbO\n*- v r v \"11. 11l II \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 896*4.00 4.00\nAsstsat \u2014 \u2014 4.05-54.15 4.10\nBestemter 4.20 4.2\" 4.2>\"i 4.15&4.20 4.20\n<>ctot\"r 4.-5 4.^' 4-2S 4.1^.04.25 \u00ab-25\nNovember .4 *\" *4\" 435 4.30&4.35 4.35\nJtecember 470 4.70 4.70 4.6T.@4 7rt 4.7\"\nJanuary . \u2014 - \u2014 4 70-54.75 4.75\nJ-ebruary \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 4.7564.5T, 4.84.\njja^ch 4*v> 4 \u2022>\u2022 4 \u2022\u00ab\u2022 4-ST.@4. 10 4.90\nForelcn Cn?Te\u00ab Markets\u2014 Rio\u2014 Coffee market steady;\nNo 7 Rio. 4f150; exchango. 12 5-S2d; receljts, 6.<KW bags:\n<ieared for tiie Vni:<*i States. 2.<\u00abs.> bag?; clearei for\nKuror-e. 2.oiX' baps; stock. POO. OOO t.aps. Santos \u2014 Coffee.\nmarket quiet; eokl a\\erage Sar.t^s. :3m>o; receipts, 16,0n0\nb\u00bbe-^ ; stock. BM.OUQ biips. lliin-.burg \u2014 Coffee market\nopened pfK blgtaer; \u00abt itSQ p m was net unchanged to\n!\u00bb pfg hipher; sale?. \u00ab2.00U baps. Havre \u2014 Coffee market\nopened quiet. i\u00bb^i 4 franc higher; at 12 m unchanged;\nat 3 p ru quiet ar.d unchanged; at S:SO p m vas ur .\ncharpec; totnl rales. IT.uuo ' HP\nJanuary 3X25! July . - 31.7. .\nJ>bruary *wi>i : Aupmrt K -< <<i\nMirrii 33. I.i, September - \u00ab2.J.>\nApni \u2022'\u2022i.-'i October \"^5\"\nMar 51. SO 1 November ?i.7T>\njunV ol.sx\u00bb:i)efembe.- 33.00\nThe Etatis-ticEi position of Braii!'J.n co!Te\u00ab Is as fo'\nliros:\nLast Last\nj\"<ws;:y. week. month.\nN\u00ab-w-Tork dfcllATies IZ.Zl't 25.4KT. IS.IT-9\nIlaltim^r- ilel!v\u00abries 4:V. M !f'l\n\u00bbw-Orleaiis deliveries.. \"4\u00ab.14^ &G7 *Mrj\nTots] deliveries jV..2>2 24.440 14.0T.0\nrtodt 2.089.653 2.11'-,,2.\"S 2,041. !\"\u00ab\nBaltimore stock 07. 1W 70.478 6f\u00ab.t>l7\nNew-Orl\u00abar.s stc-ck 1M.160 06.900 SC.4l'4\nFtork at an porta 2.211X0S 2.2<-3.5:4 2.1^7.247\n-\\2oat :joe.st\u00ab\u00bb 515.40U \u2022 4*4.600\nVisible sspply 2.512.10H 2.. r ) !\u00bb'\u00ab.914 2.C51.747\nFame time IMS 2.341.9\"i> 2.305.4*3 2,3C3.5tK)\n\u2022Including 5T',327 ex ship.\n' DTI \u2014 FhMt\u00dfattana in to-day's co' ten market\nconiparati . ely broad ard violent. Speculation was\nnot \u00bbo a<\"tiv\u00ab- as ir frequency tlie case, but for all that\nth\u00ab\"r\u00ab rras cor.siderahie excitemeiit. and at one time prices\nv.ere \u25a0nithin a very few points o: the best or the sea\nson. The rr.arktt opened ttu:idy at \u25a0jnchani;ed prices to\nar- advance t.f 4 potntF under better Uverpocl cables than\n\u2666\u25a0xpected, ard unfavorable weather rtpons. notably from\nNorthern Texas and Oklahorr:*. where frosts were reported.\nAfter ruling rather ln-fg-u!ar for a time, however, there\nwas considerable liquidation, ar.d prices declined to a\nJe'vel net 1 r-cir.t lower ta 2 points higrher. a? compared\nwlifc th' doelnx nf Wedneaday. From this the market\n\u00bbi! rallied sharply, partially as a resuit of renewed pool\nFrpport and i.artially owir.fr W cutiide buying orders\n\u25a0n-hir:li v.ere attracted by report? cf crop damage and pre -\nffiction of small rt-cipt? :n the n^ar future to the new\nc;-op optlor.s. This buylns start*! ftctlve coverlr.j by\npirjfesyjonals. an<s for a time values were worked rapidly\nupward, reaching a level ret 7512 point? hi^hfr. At this\ntinje Slay sellir-sr a*- i&Mc was within 3 points c* the\nI*Ft pri^e yet attained for the season. August sold even\nT-ith th\" previous record. ivhl!e July was -nithin - points\ncr\u00bb It But. toward the close, there was a rammed wave\n'of liQUidation, notwithFtarcinp lare\u00bb exports for the day,\nft\u00dfKNjntlnc to 41.343 balea; the small receipts, which were\nf j 0\",4 bales, apainst 11. \"1\" last year, and predictions of\nF-iil colcer ivratt\"-r in th\" So-jth. This= caused a de\n\u00ab-'.!ne altr.oFt equal to the ailvaif\". and the rrarket was\nfinally oasy ar a. B*t advance of but 235 points, this be\u2014\nir.Z a decline from ttw best of about 4SH points, with the\ngreaxest lc.*s recor<3-d in July, wfalcta came In for the balk\nat the late f^r.ins. Total tales futures estimated at\nIsc\u00abxto bale-- Notwlthsta idir.s the advance In futures.\nthe' spot cotton markets of the South, while held firmly,\nr\u00ab-.pirted littie activity with th* exception oi New-Orlear.s.\npn ,i nhnr th>- talk of a oe^-rea^d movement was In evi\nen w it ie t'> ba noied that estimates or the into s!crht\nfor the week l.avt t~--r. rais'^l from th<^ 5>5.000 bales cx-\nP-'-teQ eani-T to 103.0\u00ab.<f\u00bb. wnich will compare with an\natual l;-st jmr tit M.7f\u00bb7 te;es.\nTh* rantre' of contract prices In the local market to-day\nT-^s as follows: _\nlester-\nOpenintr. HipK Lf>*. Cl\"se. <3ay.\n, p \u00bb / _ _ _ \u2014 \u00ab \u2014 30..V)\n>\u00ab\u00bbv 14.3] 1O\u00abV\u00bb 1O.4? 10.6T^rlO.M 10.B\"\njtf... i\u00ab.\u00ab2 J<\u00bbo2 10.<2 ;0<'.Tf210.05 JO.OI\niul\u00bb *\" \". ...KMM 10.14 l\u00bb.O3 lO.OSfi \u2014 10 02\nAngus**\" PC4 5.74 1>.\u00ab4 9.W@- ?\u00bb.C7 \u00ab4\n\u0084o- be- FU \"5.70 RC2 Rfi.iSS.67 K6l\n>inW7.!! s^ \u00bb5..\"7 5.r.7 B^3\u00a9 B.M s.r.i\n3M^*-Tnb\u00bbr 6.*>4 6.5\u00bb g.51 B..VJ& 8.r.5 8.5..\nJaimxry \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 fe.-Vig 6.54 8.4 M\nFpot COttOO plofM quiet. w!;h quotations 5 pclnts higher\n\u00ab-r. the ba^\u00ab <f 30.75 c for middling upiar.d and He for\niniddlins Golf. Ssi^s smount to 171 bales. tbera\nf pv. niarketr wore telecraphed \u00abf folluws: McMle nominal.\nVT>chan*rod at 10c: sales-. 500 bales. Savanah quiet and\ni;rm. uncliaaK*-d at IOe; saley. 1 bale. Charleston firm.\n\u25a0unclianpi-d \u00abt lOc. Wilmlncton firrr.. unchar.gf-d at V**c.\nNorf oOc firm. unch\u00dfEKe4 at lf>c; tales. 29 bales. \" lit -\u2022\nroorr n'\u00abm:r.a:. unc+ianir-1 at lo**c. Galveston firm. -1-lCc\nMsrher at l'iH'-: sr>6. 2T^ bale*. New-Orlean* \\ery Srm.\nTir;rhan\u00abto<l at lOTi-lCe- Fales, I.COO t*>F. Augusta firm,\n\u2022..\u2022nchanped at 10%*'-: sale*. 2?r> bales. Estimated receipts\nat Xew-Ori>-aiib for to-morrow are I,'2>>>> to 1,800 ta'es.\n'\u25a0omrarfd \u2022c.ith 2.014 ba>s actual last week and 3.013\n}'K\\~f a year apo Ga!ve>un exp?cts 4.0r\u00bb0 to ;MO ball.\nscainsrr h.<>::\u00bb bjiles last ar\u00abek an<l. 2.CT: bales last year.\nAt Houstra for tomorrow l.f^o to 2.000 ba!es are ex\nj-~-tr4. comj:>ar< i 's with 2.5C7 taJes last week .\u2022>?:\"; M*\ni*!*i\u00ab f. year air\".\nReceij.ts at the ports ar.d Interior points to-day com\npared with th\u00bb same day last w\u00ab-ek and last year:\nLa*t Last Tresent\nPorte To-flay. week. year. stock.\nGalvwrv, 3.*_-J3 S.OSI 2.343 K6.W57\nNea-Orlea-i\u00ab 4,2f\u00ab 1.00.1 131,315\nMobiie. 3*4 160 S *.!**\nKa^anaat \u00abW Ml **l \u00abJ. 7\u00bb\n\u00ab:harleEton 1 2\u00bb U 3.f*>f>\n\u2022Wllir.'rcton . 1 1 \u25a0<\u25a0 8.6< 1\nNorfolk 4<vt 434 isL* J*.r.4O\nKaiaascre, \u2014 \u2014 7 JS S.^>4\nNew Tork - \u00ab BW \u00ab7 -\nBoston BM \u00bb\u00ab \u00abJ .-1=\n.J& VZ\nVarious --\u2022 \u2014 3 - 4 4.905 \"-4.<!>\nTo , i\u00ab, \u2014 *.r/A 10,012 11.010 23.533\nInterior:\nAugi-sta 13 1'\u00bb \u00ab\u2022 --2*\nm^s \u25a0 g S:^\nCl. J\u00ab._.S \u2022'\u2022 .\u00ab\u2022\u00a3\u00bb\nf^nctcnttl 3.X* 0.>3 \u00ab4f> j^.osj\nHourtcr. .....i.276 1.322 1.G22 18.274\nCotton Exchange epeci&l Liverpool cables \u2014 Spot cotton\nfair demand \u00ab' till rate* sales. >-.i.*Ki beles-. speculation\naod export. 1.000 bales; American. 7.000 bales; receipt*.\n7.W\u00bb ba.le\u00bb: American. 7.00t> bales: middling upland, 6 64d;\nfutures opened very eteady. partial 1 point advance;\nclosed Quiet, net unchn;:i:\u00ab--i to 2 points higher. May.\n5.534i6.34<i \u2022 May-June aa<3 June-July. 6.33 d: July-Aueust,\n* 32d; Aucust-September, 5 21d; September-October.\n4.53&4.84 d; October-November. 4.<\u00a3 d: November-December.\n\u00ab:,\u00bb Deeasstar-Ja\u00abMafT 4-5 C- January-February. 4.55\n\u00a94.504. 34anche\u00abter \u2014 Yarns move slowly. Cloth* \u2014 Some\nbusiness at low prices.\nFLOUR AND MEAL \u2014 TTithoat ahawlng any change, the\nflour market was steady t.ii<3 quiet, buyers holding off\ntor furrier development* In wheat. \u25a0\u00a5\u2022 quote: Spring\nMU BU, t* 15&54 \u00ab*: winter \u2022tralrhts. \u00ab3 &o\u00bbs3 60; Wn\nilkt patent*. J-J T<l\u00abs4: spring dears. $3 26**3 4<\u00bb; extra\nNo 1 winter. $2J^>3s3 10; extra No 2 winter. t2 80\u00a9*2S5;\nrw! doe. 520 60\u00a9J21, to arrive RYE FLOUR\u2014 Quiet;\njruoted: Fair to itmxJ. $2 SOSS3 2.\". choice to fancy. $J 3\"\u00ab\nfS&O . .CORNMEAL\u2014 Steady, quoted: Kiln dried. *$\u00ae\nIS 10 a* to brand . . BAG MDAL. \u2014 Lull, quoted: Fine\nwhite and yellow. $1 35\u00a9$1 40; coarse. $1 04651 06\nPEED \u2014 quoted: Ppriiwr trta. spot. $17 60; sacks.\nto** arrive, 200 TL. f168516 50; spring bran, middling.\n\u00bb16 754W2i. in 200 Ib ssicJcs; city ft\u00abd. $17 50ff|18: tinted\nat cake 527: hominy chop. 118. to arrive; ollns\u00ab-al. $\u00bb 50.\nGRAIN\u2014 WHEAT- Pajirg more attention to he cola\n. \u00bb \\.er than at any time since the cold wave developed.\nI r\u00bb\u00ab steady to fim a\" day. and clowsd H\u00a9 4C net\nricher. While G\u00abc?r*l eei-timent waa apminst acy n\u00bb-\n(Jatnage to the crop by low temperatures, \u00ab>\u00ab*\u2022\u00a3\ntr>avorable news came in from the Southwest. notably\nffi*\u00bb~~. wbara wb4\u00bbU ta >*M to a* \u00aboi\u00aba4/ ><*cto4 t\u00ab\nJrstlfy a reduction of short accounts and to keep the\nmarket from Retting below the previous night's level.\nAfter the opening:, strength abroad added it!\" influence to\nthe Western crop news. Part? showing especial flrmne\u00dfs.\nwith the close. 10630 points higher, followed by HOVad\nnet advance In Liverpool. Around rnldday the market\nreached its lowest intorval as a remit of moderate un\nloading, large Interior reieipu. light clearances and In\ndications that the export business would be light apain.\nIn th\u00bb afternoon, when crop damage talk became most\npronounced, the market recovered this less end closed\nup rather firm. Toe cold weather extended practlcany\nover the entire wheat country, except States in the\nEastern Ohio Valier. and these were threatened with\nvery low temperatures by Friday morning The export\nbusiness In New- consisted of two loads No 2 hard\nwinter, and five loads No 2 red; at outports there were\nthirty loads, including twenty -five loads Duluth wheat.\nworked late Wednesday afternoon. Total Western re\nceipts were 541.000 bushels, compared with 273.000 buehels\nlast year. Seaboard clearances were a little over half a\nmillion bushels wheat and flour. Quotations of cash wheat\nf. o. b. afloat basis, were as follows: No 1 Northern\nDuluth. 86=540, to arrive. No 1 hard. Manitoba, SO*\u00abc;\nNo 1 Northern Manitoba. Ps^ic. and No 1 Northern Chi\ncago, 86c. all to arrive, and. No 2 red New-York. SSc,\nnominal CORN \u2014 corn was also affected at\ntimes by cold weather, it was rot strengthened like\nwheat, and after \u25a0 rather unimportant business ail day.\nclosed net unohanpe-J in this market, Besides the weather.\nbulls called attention to the small Interior receipts, which\nwere behind those of last rvar. without St. Louis, al\nthough the outlook hi far an increased movement before\nlong. The Liverpool market was 'id higher, export busi\nness small ar.d seaboard clearances disappointing. Only\none load of corn was taken here and two loads at out\nports. No 2 corn closed I\u00bb4Vic elevator, and 53c fob\nafloat; No 2 white, f>4V\u00ab-\\ and No 2 yellow, 54c. both\nfob afloat OATS \u2014 At best prices of the day. oats\nin Chicago were lie higher than the previous nlsht,\nwhlla at times they soid as low as '*(\u2022 under Wednes\nday on May. will: September relatlvclv firm. The close\n\u00aba> lie net lower on May. bat K#lae higher on later\npetitions. Cash sales here were SO.OOO bushels. No 2\noats closed 3- No 3. 37c: No 2 white. 40Hc; No 3\nwhite. 3SV4c; track mixed, nominal : track white. 3S@\n45c, and standard whit*. 40c RTTs\u2014 Market quiet.\nNo 2 Western (We. fob afloat; Ftatn rr\u00bb. c\u00abig'Sf>o\nBARLEY-!-Mar'*\u00bbt steady Feeding was Quoted Sic, and\nmalting. B2C\u00abBe. both c ! f Buffalo.\nNEW-YORK PRTCFS.\nYester-\nWtaaH Opening. Hieh. Low. Close. day.\nMay BMI 50 74 SOH Ro i \u00bb4\nJuly 76? i W% 76\u00bb-lB 76% 76*\u00bb\nLep'tember 74 1 3-I*s 75 1-18 74 ? i 75 74\nCorn.\nMay MS MS S4H 84-2 r.4 1 --\nU ]v ,_.. 61M ST-* Sl* r\u00bbl 3s3 s 81%\nSeptember .:..-. \u2014 \u2014 60H - VIS \u00bb\nOats.\nMay _ _ \u2014 \u25a0\"\u2022P 1\"*1 \"* spI '\nCHICAGO TRICES.\nWheat.\nMay 77 77U 7R*i 77-4 n%\nJuly :.... T2>-1 72 5-18 71T4 \u00bbJ* 71 *\nSeptember ....\u201e 70 70* 60 15-16 70H 69%\nCorn.\"\nMay 44\", 44S 43% 44 44%\nJuly \u201e 4.\". 1-16 4f.\\, 44** 45 44\u00bb\nSeptember .... 44\u00bbi 44^. \u2022*\u00ab 44% 44%\nMay 3rt 5 i 33H 33 33^ S3H\n5,.,;. 31% 32 31 13-16 31% 31**\nieiAember\".::::: 29 2?S 29 -*'\u00bb \u25a0 \u2022\n\u25a0 :-:::::: J^2:: W \u00abS* #* 'l^\nrr.r.::52\" :a ssi :r :a\n\u00bb^\u2122-::Sa. i?S && SS* SS\nas follows: Bar-\nFlour. Wheat. CWn. Oats. Rye. '\">\"-\nChlr-aen \u2022- \" \u00bb .t* \u00bb \u25a0'\u2022-.\nMilwaukee * C A 7 \u2014 __ \u2014\nMinneapolis \u2014 *>- \u00b0 _ _ _\nDuiuth --\u2022 \u2014 12 47 11 .-\u2022 _ \"\u2022;/\u25a0 \u2014\nKan:as City \u2014 \u2122{ V. '\u00a3 _ _\nIWedo Z 8 7,, 20 - \u2014\nDetroit \u2014 I \u0084, a- \u2014 \u2022 \u2014\nI'eona _\u2014 _^ \u2014 _\nTotals -\u2022\u25a0 10 442 215 310 - 8 62\nShipment* from these points:\nChicago M \"J 6'6 ' 18 ? = I\nMilwaukee 11 \u2022> \u2022 \u2014 _ _ \u2014\nMinneapolis ~ *\u00bb \" J_ & _ _\nDuluth \u2014 \u00ab\" ~ \u00ab;\u25a0_-'-.?_\nKansas City \u2014 C 3. \"5 8 1 \u2014\nToledo \u2014 5 *JT _ _ \u2014\n\u00a3>etruit \u2014 .. .- 14 \u2014 \u2014\nPeoria _\u2014 10 _lf ' _\nTotals \u00bb \u00abM 270 232 1 6\nReceipts at Atlanta ports:\nNew-York 2C 128 M 30 _3 _1\nBoston - l r2 '\u201e, \u2014 \u2014\nPhiladelphia 15 \u2014 \" j M 7 _\nBaltimore IS \\f .\u25a0\u2022 \"4 \u2014 \u2014\nNew-Orleans 3 3\" --\u00bb -*_ _ __\nGalveston --\u2022\u2022 \u2014 _^\nTotals \"S S\u00bb 244\" 113 10 1\nExports from Atlantic ports:\nNew-York ......... \u2022 - 4 \"\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 _ -\nEostor. - \"r - .. n \u2014\nPhiladelphia \u2014 ] ' ' _ _ \u2014\nBaltimore ? \u2014 -_2 . _ \u2014\nNewport News \u25a0\u2022\u2022\u25a0 \u2014 __ _ _ _\nNew-Orleans 1- \u2022>\u2022'* ,\nTc(tals 62 301^ Ssl 43 \u2014\u201e ~\nMETAL*- TlN\u2014 Spot tin declined 17s 6d to \u00a3136 17s 6d\nr r C w^l P oJ\nmmmmm.\nS 15 s.\nIKON\u2014 lron closed at SSi 64^^n bwjow. a. j fouadrj -,\nin Middlpsboro. Locall> th\u00ab P\" 1 -,,,.,^'.^ r 0 - v o 2 fouu-\nNorthern, was recced 25 pomts^o $^$- -0 f^^^\n$22. Warranta are n \u00b0\"3^4 & _ M oU\u00bb B es was Brm, with\nMOLASSES AND SYXHj*Tj aioi d hu , iute t and\nprice- as last Quoted . soid at 16c to\nunchanged. A lot of C^ \u25a0**'\u00a3:? bls national at IS*\nborne trade. Ifew , t lo 2w? aa ? ? W bbls Bpreckel* at 17c.\nQuotations 14516-;: n\u00a92lc: prini< ~5-'- N ;-.\n. 24c; fancy\nssss\ntor tonnage for foreign / tr&ne . Quotations: To\nNewcaa\n. . :torcaru.\na p*-\u00bb- OOtUBI\nBritish\n.. May;\ntoll to ir.r . - rttisb steamer.\nElotterdam. pr!%a-e\n... kalnlt. B\n.^^r^is and coke. A^twe^ to\nTampico. 9s ttd: Br \", bh T E >^-iJh stelmer. 2.006 tons, fuel^\ncastle to Tampico. lA. Bnj-h^wam Bteamer _ I>SO2\nCardiff to St Lucia. l*.\u00bb c '- \u2122\u00a3. BrU i sh steamer,\ntons. coal. Swansea ,to Q u f.^ M ntreal; Danish steamer .\n1 ]4?. tons, same, os fc\"J. oru o y nre trade, one, two or\n\u00bb044 tons. Hamburg and st Lauren c ' \u00ab West Uidi*\nthree tni\u00bbs, 3s: British rttlsh steamer. 1.481 ,_\ntrade, one round trip. E\u00abW; \u00bbtk isn \u00ab . a T.e. six months,\nsame. fo^s: Bnti.h steamer }^*\u00bbta\u00a33toa bark. 3T-8\nLTBrttaln or East IxjJan^\n'\u2022\u25a0 : '\u2022 \u25a0 U co^l Philadelphia to Charle.t^.\nfc 7; aw erabte artlvit, In prime summer\nOlLS\u2014 Tbere was conaJde^we .\nportant change. K ' nae ?,P:\"d oil moving rather slowlj.\na moderate demand. n f^ lc \u2122 c ,* o te: petroleum.\nsnd is still steady at .,^ \u00ab'\u00ab\u00bb\u2022 Philadelphia, bbls. $>- 30.\nbbls. fSSo *\u00bby? r VtoVacaM9. New-York. SIO 50. Cot\naiia in bulli. J5 *\u00bb: r;r ;2 n^ a< sd\"i5 d \"i m ni\u00df. 84H\u00ae35c; prime\ntonseed P \" m e JStc-' off summer yellow. 3S\u00a93^c;\nsummer >-\"'' r) JI-^ '.:. n - wbt\u00bb, 46\u00ab*47c; prime winter\noi:: ot town. ra\u00bb. \u2022>--\nP^sion \u00ab*\u2022\u00ab ~ -o^g\nPORK\u2014 Stead J1 - bke Steady. Quoted:\nPORK\u2014 Steady. ,^.l-.-, BEEF- Steady. Quoted:\n$19 snort clear. ?'.;\u2022<; S-^ --.o. o .;\" packet $10 5*K\u00bb\n*\u0084\u00bb!. l\u00bbe\u00bb\u00ab>: f , arnl!y^* J Vlfals\"l' REEF HAMS\n\u00a3rS\u00bb extra :n.t:a %\u00a3\u00a3;, ,* \"\"''pressed HOGS\n* (steady; 0 u( \u00ab? a R *?n? n \u00ab S *ei\u00a3 180 \u00bb : --' r; Jfip 9 Yi\nSteady. Quoted: ~CCT MEAT\u2014 Pickled\npigs. lu^iji' i\u00b0,t, \u2022 loVe X' In. \u00bbc; 12 \u00bb.\nnuoteA. Si A.-nerlcan. $10 TO: Cor:;ne: t\n* 10: B =?Kf^- QuXd: Oieo. Ih&*c- City\nfine grades here^^ \u00ab\u00ab \u00bb \" Quototions follow: Domestic.\nta-TOOrrow <J^W' a^, o \u00bb7qnota4 sre net to toV\ncoarse and extra fine -f^'t/tae gVanulated. 2 Tb car\neoarai \u00bb\u00bbJ \u00ab\u00abra fine \u00ab^ in \"\" 1o1 of r f. n , * K ranu!a-.ed. sc: Ea^ie\ntons. 2lb b . a \", k n ,. a a rd r y an ulated and diamond A.\nflne ranulated, *-an<tar gra^ ud 3- 4*100; No\n\u0084 confertlonere A. V^4!kc-^e '- 4.40 c; N. S. 4 B.V;\n4 4&5 c; No 3- \u00ab\u25a0\u2022\u2022 fc -. No 6. 445 c I\u00bbc: No tt 4.15 c; No\nNo P. 4.SCc: No 10 - 0 ; \u00a3?. No 10. 4c; Eagle powdered.\n13. 4.10 c; No. 14 \u00ab\"f \u00bb-\u2022 *-^\u00a3 c \u00bb N T.u\u00dfc The London beet\n6.15 c; crystal I \". o^^ unchanged, with April and\n\u00abugar m.tWwu SSTworM^ visible supply of sugar\nMay at *\u00ab\u2022 S\u00bb*d. , .%a^irt\u00ab> tons last week and 3.440.\n5 no 000 tons. \u00b0*\u00bb 1I '\u00bblM* a T market Is fairly steady and\n000 tons last year. Th'Jocal market\nunchanged, with refj\"\u00ab^ \"^t, 1, quoted at S li-l\u00abc :\nSu^'\u00ablc C Z^f. al \"\u00bb \u00bb- \" : - \u25a0' and mola.se. EU gar. 8\u00bb\n1 test, at sV _^\nCOUNTRY PRODUCE MARKETS.\nNew-Tork. April SO. 1803.\n\u0084~.v-o iVTi PEAS\u2014 Buyers showed very little interest\nBEANS AM> rartSTr^SSnt ex.eelii\u00ab!y quiet; nothing\nto-day, ann the n^arKetr no r of advices from the Interior\nIn the receipts I ,^ r .rL change In line of values, and quota\neeems M \u00bb-arrant \u00bb n^ mm O ur out*lde figures. ho\u00ab\ntions are about \u2022\u00bb,.?* tt veryv cry choice qualities. We quota:\never, represent l *g.,,y | rr ?^-* $2 \u00ab: a \" medium.\nBeans, marrow cb _ o e - jlfLjg^j 22H: do red kidney.\nii^rfc'-iu \"**\u2022\u2022\u25a0 w\u00ab^\u00bbi *\u00bb \u00ab-* t-u. a,,*\nNEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, MAY 1. 1003.\n$2 60\u00ae\u00ab2 70; do yellow eye. $2 \u00ab'?\u00bb: 50; do lima. Califor\nnia. *2 706*2 75; do Imported giants. $1 75552 10: do\nItalian medium, $1 95\u00ae$^ 10; do other foreign medium.\nfl 75651 05; do foreign marrow, duty paid. $l_SH)\u00ae*2 30;\ngreen peas, Scotch. bags, prime, per bush, $1 70.\nBUTTER \u2014 Trade proved to be quiet most of yesterday\nand a little stock was left over; this made an unsettled\nfeeling at the opening, but later in the day the. feeling\nbecame about steady on the basis of 22VjC for fancy\ncreamery; occasional sales of very high scoring lots\nbrought a little more. Other grades range from 22c\ndownward; perhaps the average quality Is a little better\nthan heretofore, owing to a larger amount of new milk.\nState dairy i* ruling quiet, and outside figures extreme\nfor the choicest selections. Imitation creamery, fresh\nfactory and renovated are quieter and a little easier In\ntone. We quote: Creamery, extras, per Ib, 22Vac; do firsts,\n21\u00a922 c; do seconds. 10#20c; do lower KraAea. lS@lb^c;\nState dairy tubs, fresh, fancy, 21 >i \u00a922c; do firsts, sn-9\n21c; d\"o common to fair. 17\u00a910 c; Western imitation cream\nery, finest 19c; do good to prime, 17\u00ae18c; do lower\ngrades 10@ltic; renovated extras. ISHc; do good to\nChoice l&Sl7*ic: do common to fair. U'\u00ael4c; do Western\nfactory, fresh finest. 15Hc; do good to prime. 14^tH5c;\ndo lower grades. 13\u00a914 c; do helJ, finest, 15c; do lower\ngrades. 13gl4Hc; '\u2022oils, fresh, common to prime. 13\u00abl*c;\npacking stock, solid oacked. 13315 c.\nCHEESE \u2014 Old cheese continues in f\u00bblr demand, and\nprices firmly held. New cheese gradually increasing In\nsupply, mostly small sized colored, and with quality\nIrregular sales are slow at the quotations given. New\nlarge cheese not so active !\u25a0- export as early In the\nweek, and prices a shade \"easier. !-klms continue plenty,\ndull and weak. Llverp-ol cable, '*\u00a3. We quote: State,\nfull cream, old. \u25a0Bait fall ir-a-le. colored, fancy. loo ;\ndo white fancy. 14*ic: do colored, choice. 14\u00bb*gi4:uc;\ndo white, choioe. 14'.i@14V4c: do good to prime. 13^,\u00bb\n14q; do common to fair. 12<Stl3c; do large, fall mad.-,\nold. colored, fancy. 14 1 ,-i@l4%!c; do white, fancy, 14'~\u00bb@\nli-*c; do colored, choice. 14 ! .ic; do white, choice. 14\u00ae\n14^0; do good to prime, 13H@13%c: 6:- common to fair.\n12913 c; do small, new. choke. 12%@12>*c; do fair to\nprime, 10S12e; do colored, choice. 12%#13H0; do white,\nchoice. 12*ic: do light eklms. choice, 9c: do part skims,\nprime, 6&@7c; do fair 10 good. 5%\u00ae6c; do common,\n3(j?4c: do full skims, 2c.\nEGGS \u2014 Although arrivals are somewhat lighter, the\nofferings of average grades have been liberal, with some\ntendency toward accumulation. Price* have weakened\nfee except on fancy s\u00bblecUons. which are quoted Ib.ei\n16\"* c. Dirties quiet. We quote: State. Pennsylvania\nand nearby, fancy, selected, white. 17c; do firsts, 16c:\ndo Western, storage selections, fancy, 16\u00ae16'*c, do\nnr\u00abts 15Hc; do seconds. 15c; Kentucky, firsts, lo^c;\ndo seconds. 14'-\u00abilsc: Southern, firsts. 15c: do _ seconds.\n14<t?14%r; dirties. 13i813'ie; checks, 12gl2Vsc; duck\n\u00ab-gg 1 -. i6@23c: goose eggs. Be.\nFRUITS FRESH AppIes in light receipt and firm for\nanything showing attractive quality. Pineapples moving\nfairly. Strawberries In larger supply and tower out\nmeeting a good outlet. We quote: Apples. Spltzenberg\nprim-, per Kb? %- 3OWW 50; do King. *150g\u00ab\u00ab\u00a3 do\nMissouri pippin. $2\u00aes2aO; do Ben Davis, $2 2~>415~ 50; do\nBaldwin. tZ9\u00ab2B\u00bb; do Greening. $2053; do Russet. $-3\nS2 7.V dc common. 50<f7&c; pineapples, Florida. per case.\n$3\u00ae*3 75 do Cuban. $150\u00aeJ2 25; do Porto Kican. $1 i**a\n$2: strawberries, Charleston, per quart. 124f3\u00bb0; co Lake\nCity, and other South Carolina. 10G12c; do North Caro\nlina! \u00abi#l6c; do Norfolk. lO&l^c.\nFRUITS \u2014 DRlED Evaporated apples held steady when\nstrictly dry. but anything unattractive urged for sale at\nirregular figures; in dried quiet and easy; chops steady;\ncores and skins firm. Small fruits scarce. California\nfruits jobbing moderately. We quote: Apples, evaporaud.\n(an \u25a0 per Ib, 6^*\u00a97^c; do choice, s%'at\u00bbc; do prime, Sc;\ndo common to fair. 3fe@4!sc; do sun dried, quarters. 3%i'5\n4-^C; do chopped, prime to choice, per li\u00ab) It. $2 87ff\u00bb2 BO;\ndo common. $2\u00ae5225; do cores and skins, $1 2o'gsl 52;\ncherries, per IS Hs93tfc; raspberries, evaporated, 223230;\nhuckleberries, 17\u00a9lbc; blackberries, BVi\u00a9oc; peaches,\nCalifornia, neeitd. 12916 c; do unpeeled, 44f8c; apricots.\nCalifornia, Moorpark, 8912 c; do Koyal, 6Vi@sc; prunes,\nCalUomla, i@t>v\u00bbc.\nHOPS \u2014 A little buafMM was acompliahed with brewers,\nbut dealers were \\-ery indifferent. Such sales as were\nmade were on the basis of. about former prices, but the\nfeeling is still rather easy, and very little stock is fine\nenougn to command our top ngures. We quoto: State,\nUNI2, choice, per In, 23924 , do good to prime, 2ia\u00ab2c;\ndo common to fair, i.*y^.K.: do rjtrt, cnoice. Ice; do\ncommon to good. 16017 c; Pacific Coast, MU2, choice, 219\n'JT^c; do good to prime, ly&iXw; do common to fall, lid\nIn:; do 11*01. choice. 18c; do common to good, 15@17c;\nState and Pacific Coast, older giowths, figluc.\nPOULTRY ALIVE: \u2014 Receipts to-day Included 2 cars\nby freight a:. a a few scattering coops by express. With\nd. large accumulation of fowls is dealers' hands and -\nmore cars to come to-morrow, the market Is weaker, with\nfowls declining to lie and old roosters to tic Spring chick\nens very slow sale aid decidedly lower. Turkey very\nlight. Ducka and geese unchanged. Live pigeons steady.\nWe quote: Spring: chickens, nearby, per Ib, 25c; do South\nern, 20c; fowls, 18c; roosters, 6c; turkeys, 10911 c; ducks.\n.Western average, per pair, 80c9<l; do Southern and\nSouthwestern, 7o@ouc; geese. Western average, 51 l~'<t\n?1 37; do Southern and Southwestern. 9Oc@sl; live pigeons,\nSo<fl3sc I>R\u00a3SSKX> \u2014 of fretn killed fowls\nwere rather larger to-day and, with only a moderate\ntrade, the tone was a shade weaker. Nearby spring\nducks in moderate .supply and only moderately active.\nTame squabs about steady. In frozen poultry, turkeys\nand geese continue Blow, but other descriptions have a\nmoderate peddling outlet at about steady prices. We\nquote: Fresh killed (iced) \u2014 Turkeys, average best, lot;\ndc fair to prime. 13@14c: do old. lti<3l7c; broilers. Phila\ndelphia, 3 to 4 Ib to pair, 8&940 C; do State and Perm-\nEylvania, 3 to 4 Ib to pair, 25\u00a930 c; fowls. Western,\nscalded, small, fancy, li>^\u00abl4c; do dry picked. 13i;@14c;\ndo heavy 13Vic; do oouthe.n and Southwestern, dry picked.\n13i&13^c; do scalded. IKe; old cocks, loc; spring ducks.\nnearby 22*:; squabs large, prime, white, per dozen, fZ <\u2022>;\ndo mixed. $225; do darst. $1 50**1 75. Frozen\u2014 Turkeys,\nyoung hens. No 1, lbc: do youne toms. No 1, lie; do\nyoung mixed, No 1. 17*\u00ablSc; do mixed averse I.e.\ndo old toms, 16\u00a917 c; broilers, dry picked. No 1. 1V 3.11 ,\ndo scalded. No 1. lt&lbc. roasting chickens, large and\ntoft mealed. lti@l7c; do average No 1, 15c; do No 1 109\n12c; fowls. No 1, 13h:c: do No 2. Italic; capons, large.\n18920 c; do medium size. 106170; ducks, No 1. 16S1SC.\ngeese, l\\o 1. 11\u00ae12c.\"\nPOTATOES AND VEGETABLES*\u2014 OId potatoes In fair\nden End ana steady; new potatoes plenty and weak; ewect\npotatoes lower. Egyptian onions weak &x.d lower; otnei\nonions held firmly when choice. Asparagus in larger\nsupply and lower. Beets and carrots dull. Cabbages\nlower. Cucumbers weak. Eggplants lower. Peas in lair\ndemand and steady, though some show poor quality ana\nrange low. KaUit-ues and rhubard more plenty and lower.\nString beans dull and easy. Turnips steady. Tomatoes\nIn larger supply and easier. Other vegetables range about\na- auoted We quote: Potatoes, bermuda, new. prime,\nrer bbl S4ff?li: do B^conds. $39*S&0; Florida, roam. new,\nprime, $3 60\u00a9\u00bb4 20; do seconds. $2gs3; do red, i:ew. Prime,\n*a25t;\u00abi75; do seconds, S2tifci; Long Island, in bulk\n$175&1212 Maine, per sack, SI 76\u00a9*226; State and\nWestern, in bulk, per 189 Ib, |IBO9Wdo per M 8 ft\nsack, fl 50991 HO; do Western, per 150 It, saclc. 91 409\nSI 50; awaot potatoes, per bbl, $2 254J18 .0. do per basket,\nJ1\u00bb5125; asparagus, colossal, per dozen bunches f s Bi*s\n\u00bbi\u00bb do extra. $2 sl>@:>3; do prime. $1 75@52 25; do\nshort $1 25\u00ae|1 75: do culls. 75eCSl 25; beats. Charleston,\nrer 100 bunches. Sl&s3; do Florida, per bush crate, 800\nSki- do old per Lit.. 40060 c; carrots, Charleston, per\nWO 'bunches. $16*2; do old. per bbl. 60c991; cabbages.\nCharleston per bbl crate, $1 60; do North Carolina, \u00bb1\u00ae\n$160; do Norfolk, per bbl or crate, TBc9sl 25- do old,\nDanish peed, -er ton, $3@slo; cucumbers, Florida, per\nbasket ;_;\"\"\" do per crate. SI SOC92 26; do hothouse,\nper dozen 35\u00ae Kfc; celery. Florida, per case. *1&$4; egg\nplants, per box, 919(3; kale, nearby, per bbl 40360 c.\nlettuce, nearby, per bbl. 9150992 60; do Southern, per\nbasket 75c\u00a991 25; onions, Bermuda, per crate. $1 4.j<\u00bb\ntTeOi do Egyptian, per bag. 9236&92 40; do Connecticut,\nyellow per bbl. $2(J$3; do red. 91992; do Orange County,\nred per bag 75c&$l 50: do State and Western, yellow, per\nba\" \u00ab99175: 00 double head bbl, $I@sl 60; do red, per\nbag! 9l\u00ab$15O; peas, Charleston, per basket. 7iicSsl 50;\nda EJflerton \"er one-half bbl basket. 92992 00; do per\nbush basket, 915099X75; do other North Carolina, per\noce-half bbl basket. 9123992 28; do per bush basket. SI\n\u00a9SI 60 do Virginia, per bush basket. 9180991 i 5: pep\npers Florida, per carrier, 91991 \u00ab>; parsley. Bern per\nt>ox' 91992 60; parsnips, old, per bbl, 40960 rhubatu,\nnearby per 100 bunches, 75c\u00ae91 50; radishes, nearby, per\n]00 bu'ncacs. 75c\u00ae*l; do Norfolk, per basket, 40\u00ae.5c;\nrom.'.lne. Southern, per basket. 51: do Bermuda, per box.\n91; spinach, nearby, par bbl, 9150992: string beans.\nFlorida green, per basket. 91&0992 75; do per crate. $1\n05225- do wax. per basket. 92993; do per crate, M 609\nS- 75- 'sauash, Florida, white, per bush crate, $13 SI 60;\ndo Cuban white, per one-half bbl bos 9160993. do Hub\nbard old per bbl, 91991 BO: turnips. Canada Russia, per\nbbl 9199*125 do oeirby, Russia, 91; do North Carolina,\nwhite t>e- bbl crate. 91993; tomatoes Florida, prime, per\ncarrier 93093 50; do poor to good, |l@?2 50; do Cuban.\n91 90@$3 do hothouse, per Ib, 10\u00ae20c; watercress, per\n100 bunches. 60&991 50.\nHAY \\>:D STRAW \u2014 HAY \u2014 Receipts again run la\nbuyers' favor, but the quality of the bulk of the otfer-\nItks is too low to make marked clfferer.ee in prices for\n.',,, grades. In tho face of the liberal arrivals thus far\nfor tie week, prime hay has recovered its $1 20 quota\ntion and that stiffens the asking prices of full grade\nNoa 1 and -. Common hay Is much neglected, even the\nWest Indian export demand is making a small showing\nthat la attributable to this mature. The tone of the\nmarket Is good and for desirable lots a ready market is\nassured. We quote: Prime. Urge bales, per 100 Ib,\nII 154. 5 i 20; No 1. 9109991 10; No 2, We s9l 00; No 3,\n72'siiS7 I\u00bbc;I \u00bbc; small bales. 5c less than large; clover, mixed,\nprime 70S\u00abi>c; clover, clear, prime, 60@7uc STRAW \u2014\nWith 'the cec(de.lly full offering of long rye buyers can\nmake dlctadan for much of the supply. Really good to\nstrictly prime marks are offered freely at .\u25a0\u25a0->\u25a0 Com\nmon parcels very irregular in price Receipts of hay and\nsot 1- tons, reported at the Produ.-e Exchange at\nr.oon 'to-day: Hudson River Railroad. 450 tons; Erie.\n230- Penn\u00abylvnla. 10; Delaware. I^aokawanca ur, 1\neaten 00; West Shore, 17&; Lehigh Valley 50; Ontario\ni.-: Western. 80, Central of New-Jersey. 100; Baltimore\nand Ohio. 30: river boats. 470; total. 1.6\u00bb tens. Receipts\nof straw, 275 toes. \"\nLIVE STOCK MARKET.\nNew-York. April 30. 1903.\nBE EVES\u2014 Receipts. 4 cars or 76 head, mainly con\nsigned direct. No sales reported. Dressed beef steady;\ncity dressed native sides, extreme range. 7&S-.-C per Ib.\nCables last received quote genera] sales of American live\ncatMo Pt IH-@l2c. dressed weight; refrieerator beof at\nBe per it.. Reported exports for to-day: The Pomeranian,\nfor Glasgow, 2u3 cattle for I<oud &. Keifer. and the Pre\ntoria, for Bermuda, 44 cattle.\nCALVES\u2014 Receipts, all for the market, were 29 head,\nmaking, with the additional stock on tale a total offHring\nof 154 head\u2014 l 37 at Jersey City and 17 at SlXtleth-Si\nThe market rated steady and the pens were about cleared.\nVeals sold at *i\u00ab-*6 60 per 100 Hi; a few head at 5.. City\ndressed veals general sales. 76 10c per rb; country dressed\nuncommonly dull and lower, with 567^0 th\u00bb range, not\nincluding occasional eales at Sc. \u25a0'_ ; _\nSales Tobln & Shannon: 125 veals. 121 Ib average,\nat S st Juddi &\u00b0C^.': 7 veal* 150 Jb. at $6 50.\nNewton & Co.: 2 veals. 140 It., at *0.\nHarrington & Co.: 8 veals, 150 IT at $7.\nAndrew Mullen: S mixed calves. 120 rb. at 55.\nSHEEP AND LAMBS\u2014 Receipts. Including 2 cars direct\nto slaughterers, were 6*l cars, or 1.531 head, making,\nwith th\u00ab \u00abtock carried over from yesterday, a total of\n10^ cars to be sold, all at Jersey City. Sheep ruled dull,\nand sales were rated %@Sic lower than yesterday; lambs\nalso were slow end weak in price. About 3 V\u00bb_ cars of\n\u00abtoek were unsold. Clipped sheep sold at 84 75985 per\n100 Ib; a few head at 50; unshorn sheep at 88; clipped\nlambs at *5 sO\u00aes7 2.'.; dressed mutton. 7Vs@K'Vac per It ;\ndressed lambs. lOSlS^c; country dressed spring lambs\nBt Sa7es S Judd*& C Co.: 101 clipped Buffalo lambs. 59 rt>\naverage at S5 50 per 100 Ib; 89 unshorn and clipped do.\n65 Tb. at 8680; 122 clipped State lambs 63 tb. at *3 23:\n\u00bb2 clipped Western sheep, 63 \"'\u25a0 at 94 75; 24 Buffalo do,\n113 tt at $5; 17 unshorn do. 101 It>. at 95; 36 clipped do.\n\u00ab Tt, at $3. & Co.: 185 cllnped State lambs. \u201e _ at\nHarringtor. A Co. : 186 cllnped State lambs. 77 IT-, at\n97 25: B clipped State sheep, lor rb, at $5 50; 26 clipped\nState sheep and cull lambs. 67 Ib at Mftft.\nKerns Commission Company: 282 clipped Buffalo lamba.\n62 Ib at 95 50; 89 clipped Western sheep. 11- It., at 53.\nTobin & Shannon: 226 clipped Ohio sheep, M rb, at\n$4 HAGS\u2014 12% cars or UN head; about Il*I 1 *\ncan. on sale allva. Market sllgUtiy easier. Geaera sales\nof State and Pennsylvania hops were at $7*o per 100 It.\na few head reached $7 45*17 BO; a car of Western brought\n56 60 Country dressed almost nominal: heavy to light\nwe'giits auotad SJZTBr^ Estate ho.s \u00ab rb aver^\nK\u00abil\u00ab_j H Hume ABr > i State hojf\u00bb 1* !b aver-\nag?iTs7\u00ab pe?100 \u00bb\u2022 I rough. 230 rb. at *8 35; 2 stags,\n5& 5 at $4: <lat\u00ab yesterday) 0 SU'\u00ab bogs. ISS ft. at\nJ7 \u00ab?\u00b0 T n *A *Co \u2022 2 Pennsylvania hogs. 130 Tb. at 97 50;\n14?We\u00abte\u2122 dlT'i23 Ib. at 60: 1 rough. 300 ft. at $6 60\nii<-Phers-i n A Co.: 64 Penn\u00ab>lvanla hogs. 188 ft. at\n\u2022 7 Harrin^ U on b & SM SaShl- 210 R>, at 97 40.\nf a Curtlf ft Son Hate yesterday): 4& Btat. hogs. 14\u00ab\nVnd/e 77 w 5 \u00b0Mu 1 nr nn a fr.\u00ab^i?erday $ )V \u00ab Bute ho*,. 287 Tb.\nat itSO; M do. 134 It. at $7 43: 1 rough. 880 ft. at 98 60;\n\u2022 d* 2\u00bb0 Th. at 8\u00ab \u2022: I boar 888 Tb BuS hcg. 137 Ib. at\nH H Hottto -late yesterday.: \u2022\u00bb\u2022\u2022 Mate bogs. 13. Ib, at\nt7 \u00a3bln rinannonVte^erdar): n S tar. h^ 1\u00ab\nIb at $7 60; \u00bb rough* 300 Ib, at $\u00ab 50; 2 \u2022\u00ab\u00bb\u00bb. \u00abft tt, at\n\u2666s&a. >'!-.\u00a3?? \" '\u25a0\nOTHER MARKETS-BY TELEGRAPH.\nChicago. April 30.\u2014 Cattlo\u2014 ReceSpti. J>.of>o head. Includ\ning 600 Texans; heavy steers 10\u00ael5c lower: others \u25a0\u00ab\u2022\u00ab \u25a0 \u2022\ngood tc prime steels. $5S$5 50; poor to medium.*. -J'*\nS3; stoci.e.-j and feeders, f5994 CO: cows. 91 sO<ss4 y\nheifers. 92 50e95 23; canners. 9160992 SO; bulls. 92309\n*4 50; calves. \u00ab2 50\u00a99\u00ab- Texas ted steers. 94094 75. Hogs\n\u2014 Receipt!* to-day, IS.OUO head; to-morrow, 15,000; le-t\nover, 5.500; market steady to Be higher, close- \u00ab\u2022*':; r^\nmixed and butchers', *ot-o\u00a9s7: good to choice heavy. 3.ST\n$7 15; rough heavy. $CBO\u00aeS6 95: light. $6 60\u00ae98\u00ab0; bulk\nof sales. $BKi\u00abs7. Sheep \u2014 Receipts. 9.000 head; she\u00bbp\nand lambs 10@15c higher; good to choice wethers, 94 JhW\n96 50; fair to choice mixed, $3 75\u00ae *4 60; native lambs.\n54 sup*rt 75; Western lambs, $4 50@\u00bb6 75.\nCincinnati, April SO.\u2014 Hogs quiet. $5 40993 93. Cattle\nsteady. S2 7*3K 10. Sheep dull. lower; $3354 35. Lambs\nsteady. 94<fz$\u00abw\nNew-Orleans. April 30.\u2014 RecelpU. rosin. 86 barrels.\nEast Liberty. Anrtl SO. \u2014 Cattle steady; choice. $5 40-3\n\u2022Saw; prime, $5 2u@s3 35; good. 95995 20. Hogs lower;\nprime, heavy. $7 20; mediums. 97 20(f$7 22 '\u00bb ; heavy\nYorkers and light do, $7 2O; pigs. $7 20997 25: roughs\n$:.^s6 vSO. Sheep steady: beat wethers. 94 80@95: calls\nand common $2 50; choice lambs. 96 40996 66; veal\nvalves. IT' 30<895 67.\nKansas City. April SO. \u2014 Cattle \u2014 2.300 natives;\n300 Texans. Calves \u2014 Receipts. 35 Texans and 65 na\ntives; beeves, strong to 10c higher; quarantine firm;\nheifers steady cows week; stockers and feeders steady:\ncalves dull; choice export and dressed beef steers, 94 65^\n$.'. 25- fair to (rood. $3 So\u00a9s4 35; stockers and feeders. $2 75\nSss- Western fed steers. 93 sOwfss. Texas and Indian\nsteers $4 50354 75: Texas cows. $2 50\u00ab\u00bb4: native, 93 50*\n94 60;' native h*>ifsn\u00ab. $4 25*54 90; native- cows, 91 W\u00bb9\n$3 75- bulls. $2 500*3 90; calves, $3\u00a9s7. Hogs\u2014Re\nceipts. 7.sOOhead; market opened actrv*. higher; closed\nweak- top $7; bulk of Bales. S6 80-B*6 95; heavy $8 87\u00bb,\nes7-rn\u00a3e<i packers. SO 72Vi\u00a9$8 9S: light. 65\u00ae98 SO;\nYorkers. $6 75e*<J *\u2022>: pips. $5 75\u00ae56 60. Sheep\u2014 Receipt^\n1700 head; market l(\u00bbc higher; native lambs. $4 .\u00bb?\nhi Western lamb\u00ab. 94\u00ab6\u00bb0: fed ewes \u00bboe\u00abs 35;\nnative wethers. J4'fT9s 65: Texas clipped \u00abhe*n. $4 06\u00a9\n98, stockers and feeders, 93 70*094 20.\nTHE STATE OF TRADE.\nBuffalo. April 30.\u2014 Flomr steady. \"Wheat\u2014 Spring\nstea-Jv No 1 hard. S3*4C; No 1 Northern. SlUc. carloads;\nwitter. No 2 white. 81c; No 2 red. 80c. Corn steady. No\n3 yellow. 50c. Oats quiet; No 3 white. 33 Vic Barley\u2014\nSales, c 1 f. at SSc for choloe. Rye\u2014 Spot quiet; No 1.\nc i f, 57c.\nChicago. April 30.\u2014 leading futures ranged as fol\nlows:\nWheat. No. 2: Opening. Highest. lowest. Closing.\nfail ::::::-2u|72u 72u\u00ae72H 71& 72^72%\nSeptember::\"-::: 70\u00ae704 70%63T4\u00ab70 70*\u00ae7<Hi\nCorn. No 2:\n\u25a0ig :;.7.v.::v.v.v. ttmm *1> \u00abj **?\u00ab!*\nJuly 45645H M 44\\ 45\u00ae 4S .\nSeptember..... 44V. 44\u00bb\u00bb 44H 44-,\nOats. No. 2:\n\u00a3\u00a3v l .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.\"'.'.'.'.'. >\u00ab. m 33 pv.\nJuly 31-/i\u00ab>32 32\u00ab32\u00bb\u00bb 31%\u00ab\u00bb31 T \u00bb U%\nSeptember 2&\u00a929% 2JH. 27 *%\nMess pork, per bbl:\nMay $18 00 $19 00 $1780 $17 SO\njutv .....:: - ITI2H 17 2\u00ab ITI2H 17 16 .\nSeptember 16 82\\i 16 82% 16 75 18 77\u00ab\nLard, per 100 Ib;\nMay 932^ 9 32*4 0 27% \u00bb 37%\nJuly \"...Z..S.S. \u00bb42*, \u00bb45 840 940\nSeptember 8 Uhi 9 47\u00ab \u00bb 42H 45\nShort ribs, per 100 f>:\nMay 952 V. 862H \u00bb 52^ * S2H\nJuly 850 \u00bb52',\u00bb \u00bb474 680\nSeptember 8 45 8 47* \u00bb 42* 8 45\nCash quotations were as follows: Flour quiet and steady;\nNo 2 spring wheat. 78% c; No 3. 74c; No 2 red. 7fi%U77\\ic:\nNo 2 corn, 44c; No 2 yellow 44c; No 2 oats. 83c; No 3\nwhite, 32Va3\".c; No 2 rye. 4834J*c : barley, fair to choice\nmalting 48935 c; No 1 flaxseed. 07; No 1 Northwestern,\n$1 10; prime timothy seed. $3 55\u00a953 60; clover, contract\ngrade. $12 50; mess pork, per bbl. 917 37%<\u00a9517 60; lard,\nper 100 Ib, 9\u00bb 2--~Q4\u00bb : short ribs, sides (loose). $8 40\u00ae\n$9 50; dry ealted shoulders (boxed), $5 60@*8 62*; short\nclear sides (boxed), $9 75-359 whiskey, bacis of high\nwines, $1 30. On the Produce Exchange to-day th\u00ab butter\nmarket was easy; creameries. 17@21c; dairies, ltS^Oc.\nEggs easier; at mark, cases included. 13?i@14i i ic Chess*\n\u2014 New firm. 13\u00a913Uc\nililwaukee. April 9.\u2014 Close: Wheat steady: No 1 North\nern. 79>\u00bbc; No 2 Northern. 78\u00ae78%c: July. 72^72*c Rye\nfirm; No 1. 52 l ie. Barley firm; No 2. 59S\u00ab0c; sample.\nlOQfini Corn \u2014 45 He.\nMinneapolis. April 30. \u2014 Close: Wheat \u2014 Cash. 76c; May,\n74Vic: July, TS'JTSHc: en track. No 1 hard. 77c; No 1\nNorthern, We; No 2 Northern. 75c; No 3 Northern. 72\u00a9\n71c Flour \u2014 First patents, $4 nr>ss4 15; second patent\",\nf3i>sSs4 first clears. \u00a32 85@$3CS; second dears. $2 45.\nBran, in bulk. \u00bb11.\nPhiladelphia, April 30. Wheat quiet, but steady; April.\n50#S0Vic. Corn steady, but quiet: April, SOviSXaOVso.\nOats firm, but quiet; No 2 white, clipped, SU@4os. Butter\nquiet, but steady; extra Western creamery. 23c; do near\nby prints. 24c. Eggs stea-ly; fair demand; fresh nearby.\n15?i@16c:'do Western. 1691 SHe at the mark: do South\nwestern. l(ic at the mark; do Southern, 15@15Vjc Cheese\nscarce and firm; New-York full creams, choice, small.\n14 s '*(S'lsc- do fair to good, 14Vi\u00a914 l -c; do choice, large.\n]+ : W-'mc. do fair to good, lar^e, 14\u00a914 l ie; new. choice,\n1S&014C. Receipts \u2014 Flour, 5,000 bbls and 1,924.000 rb. In\ntacks; corn, 19,000 bush: oats, 10.000. Shipments \u2014\n\"Wheat, 600 bush; corn. 3.000; oats. &.OCO.\nNAVAL STORES.\nThe market for spirits turpentine was steady but iul<\u00ab.\nwith machines quoted at about 48% c. Rosin was eteady\nbut quiet. Tar ruled firm. We quota.\nSPIRITS TURPENTINE! OiI acd machine bbls. 48\u00ae\n48 He.\n\u2022 TAR\u2014 Pine bbls. ?2 2Z*is2 30: oil bbls, $4 40.\nROSIN \u2014 to good strained. $2 10: IX $2 20J>\n9228 E, 25; K. 92 30; G. $2 S3: IT. S2 55; I, $3; X,\n$3 39; M $3 70; N, $3 80; W G. $3 90; V, r W. 9*.\nSTOCK ON HAND.\nRosin I 18.266 bbl\u00bb\nSpirits turpentine - 384 : 0.3\n\u2022___. 1.&75 bbls\nWilmington, April 30. \u2014 Spirit* turpentine \u2014 Nothing do\ning; receipts. -5 casks. Rosin \u2014 Noting doing-; receipts.\n7S bbls. Crude turpenUM quiet at 92. $3 25 and $3 50;\n:\u25a0 tl] ta, 44 bbla. Tar firm at SI 65; receipts, 91 bbl?.\nSavannah, April Ju. \u2014 Spirits turpentine firm at 45e; re\nceipts. 6\u00ab/.' bbls; sale*. 493; exports. 112. Rosin firm; re\nreceipts, 1,170 bbls; sales, 4*3; exports, 1.625; quoted:\nA. K. C. D and E. $1 85; F. 91 SO; G. $1 0\u00bb: H. $2 25; I.\n92 85; X, 98; M, 53 10; N. 88 15; W G. $3 25; W W. *3 33.\nCliarleaton, April 30. \u2014 Turpentine nominal at 44c. Kosin\nnominal; quoted: A. B. C, I> and E. $1 C 5; F, SI 7\u00ab; G.\n$1 73; II %1 15; I, $2 76; X, wj. M. \u00ab3; N. $3 05; \\\\ G.\n$3 15; W W. S3 25.\nLondon. April SO. \u2014 Turpentine \u2014 Spirits. 42\u00bb 84. Rosin \u2014\nAmerican, strained. Gs 6d; fine, 10s.\nSOUTHERN COTTON MARKET.\nMiddling. Net. Gross. Sales. Stock.\nGalveston, flrro 10% 8,203 3.-J93 232 50.!><37\nNorfolk, firm..- 10H 404 401 \u00bb 8.340\nbavannah. quiet & linn. 10 f '*6 iM \u2014 -l.i-J\nNew-Orleans, very flrm.. 10 3-16 4,001 4.301 1.600 131.315\nMobile, nominal 10 3t>* \u00abft* \u2014 6.ast>\nMemphis, firm \u00bb 027 1.027 1.000 38.127\nAususta. arm 1094 \u00bb 13 \u00bb f^--*\nCharleston. tir.n li' 11 \u2014 , R..\u00abJ<l\nBt. Louis, holiday \u2014 36 1.34^ \u2014 !\u00ab.\u2022\u00ab\u25a0\nHouston, eteady 10^ 1,278 1.276 120 MUM\nCitations.\nrnHE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW\nYork, by the grace of God free and independent. \u2014\nTo Thomas Angus, Agnes Angus Anderson. William N.\nAngus, Jamca -\\isbet. Jessie G. N. ilunro. liobert H.\nNlsbet, l^wis D. Nisbet. William D. Nisbet, Helen N.\nR.OSB Catherine N. Allan, David Morrison. John Mor\nri\u00dfon'. Jessie Gordon. Isabella Tulloch. Thomas Purden.\nSusan Skidmore l\u00bbckle, Isabella Taylor. John Angus,\nAndrew Angus, John A. Livingston. Jessie Livingston.\nIsabella Livingston, Cecelia Livingston, Mary Livingston.\nJames Angus. Mary McLuckie Anguit, Catherine Morrison\nAngus. William Angus, Alt-xander Wright Angus. David\nAngus, Jessie Myrtle McFarlane, Walter Cecil McKarlane,\nStewart Alfred M Farlane, (Charles James llcFarlane.\nHarold Albert McFarlan<!. Jennie A. Fen ton. William\nHatley. John Angus H-tl.y, Mary Jane Hinea, Gladys\nHalliiiay. Margaret Thorn. David Provan. If living, a\nnephew of deceased, and if dead, his descendants, heirs\nat law and next of kin. if any there may be. all of\nwhoa, names and places of residence are un\nknown and cannot with due diligence b\u00ab ascertained:\nJohn Provan, if living, a nephew of deceased, and if\ndead, his descer.dats. heirs at law and next of kin. If\nany there may be, all of whose names and places of\nresidence are unknown and cannot with due diligence\nbe ascertained; and any and all other heirs at law and\nnext of kin of James Angus, late of the County and\nState of New York. deceased, if any there may be.\nwhose names and places of residence are unknown and\ncannot with due diligence be ascertained, the heirs and\nnext cf kin of James Angus, deceased. Send greeting:\nWhereas, John A. NlsUet and Thomas T. Allan, of\nProvidence. Rhode Island, have lately applied to th\u00bb\nSurrogate's Court of our County of New York, to have\na certain instrument In writing, dated June 26. 1888. re\nlating to both pea! and personal property, duly proved\nas the last Will and Testament of James Angus, late\nof the County of New York, deceased. Therefore- you\nand each of you are cited to appear before the Surrogate\nof our County of New York, at his office in the County\nof New York, on the 23th day of June, one thousand\nnine hundred and three, at half past ten o'clock in the\nforenoon of that \u00ab'.ay. then and there to attend ti:\u00bb\nprobate of the bald last Will and Testament. And such\nof you as are hereby cited, as are under the age of\ntwenty-one years, are required to appear by your guar\ndian If you have one. or If you have none, to appear\nand apply for one to be appointed, or In the event of\nyour neglect or failure to do so. a guardian will be ap\npointed by the Surrogate to represent and act for you\nIn the proceeding. \u2022\nIn Testimony Whereof, We have cause* the Seal of th.\nSurrogate's Court of sold County of New York\nto be hereunto affixed. Witness, Hon. Abner C.\n[L. S.l Thomas, a Surrogate of our said County of New\nTack, at said County, the 21st day of April. In\nth* year of our Lord one thousand nine hun\ndred and three.\nJ. FAIRFAX MLAUOHLIN.\nClerk of the Surrogate's Court.\nCHARLES P. KALLOCK. Attorney for Petitioners. 2.067\nBoston Road, New Tork City.\nrnHE PEOPLE OP THE STATE OF NEW\nYork, by the grace of God. free and Independent,\nto George Henry Warren, Whitney Warren, Lloyd War\nren. Harrlette W. G-oelet, Bdita C. Miller. George Henry\nWarren. Whitney Warren and Lloyd Warren. Executors\nof the last will end testament of Mary C. Warren, de\nceased Jean Percy Coleman Alden. George Henry War\nren Alden, the Glrard Trust Company of Philadelphia,\nancillary guardian of the person and estate of George\nHenry Warren Alden, and the Law>ers* Surety Company\nof New York, and to nil persons Interested In the estate\nof Emeline W. 1). Warren, late of the County of New\nYork, deceased, as creditors, legatees, next of kin or\notherwise send greeting: ! Ton and each of you are hereby\ncited and required personally to be and appear before\nour Surrogate of the County of New York, at the Sur\nrogates' Court of said County* held at the County Court\nHouse In the County of New York on the 2\u00bbth day o\u00bb\nMay 1803, st half past ten o'clock In the forenoon of\nthat day. then and there to attend a Judicial settlement\nof the account of proceedings of George Henry Warren\nas Administrator of the goods, chattels ana credits uf\nsaid Emetine W. D. Warren, deceased, and such of you\nas a-a hereby cited a* are under the age of twenty-or,\u00bb\nyears are required to appear by your guardian. If you\nhave 'oce or if you have none, to appear and apply for\non\u00ab to be appointed, or In the event of your neglect or\nfailure to do to. a guardian will be appointed by the\nburrogate to represent and act for you In th\u00ab proceeding.\nIn testlraonv hereof we have caused the Seal of th\u00ab\nSurrogates' Court of th\u00ab said County of New York to\nbe hereunto afi^ed.\nWitness. Hon. Aimer C. Thomas, a Surrogate\nof our said County, at the County of New\nrp\u00abal 1 Tork, the *th day of April, In Use year of\nour Lord on* thousand nine hundred and\nthree J. FAIRFAX McI*AUGHL.IN.\nClark of th\u00ab Surrogate*\" Court.\nA DVKRTIsnJIENTS and subscription* for Th\u00bb Trltun*\nA. received at their Uptown Office.\nXJ- nrcei >O I^JO4 tilt OAU WAY.\nAdvertisements will be received at Use following branch\noffices at regular ortc* rates until 8 o'clock p. m.. v!i. :\nit!i* Htii-at a, \u00ab. cor ad-*'-; 13J Utb-ave., cor.\niiii,-*.. tta tavsl I4CU-\u00abt,t -67 W\u00bb\u00abf43d-\u00abt.\nRailroads.\nPENNSYLVANIA\nSTATIONS foot of West Twenty-third Street and D\u00bbs\nbrosses and Ccrtlanilt Streets.\n;. T The leavins tim\u00bb from i\u00abe\u00bbhrn\u00ab\u00ab*\" \u00bb\"\"<\nCortlandt Street* is five mlmatei later than\nthat civfn below for Tnenir-thlrd Street\nStation, except where otherwise noted.\n7.5.1 A. 91. PAST MAIL \u2014 Limited to two Parlor Cars\nand Dining Car New York to Pittsburgh Sleeping Cat\nPutsburi* \u2666<\u25a0> Chloagr,. No Coaches to Pittsbcrjc.\nS.r.r. A. M. FAST LINE. \u2014 Plttsburg and Cleveland.\n\u00bb..\"\u201e-. A. M. PENNSYLVANIA LIMITED . \u2014 Pu!lB\u00bbaB\nCompartment Sleeping. Dining. Stnokln* and Observa\ntioa Cars. For Chicago. Cleveland. Toledo. Detroit.\nCincinnati. Indianapolis. Louisville, St. Louis.\n1.8.1 P. M. CHICAGO AND ST. LOUIS EXPRESS.\u2014\nFor Toledo. Niishvllle (via Cincinnati and LoulsvlJe).\nIndianapolis. Chicago. St. Louis. Dlntne Car.\nC.55 P. M. ST LOUIS EXPRESS. \u2014 For Fittnburg, In\ndianapolis. LouijrUle. St. Louis. Dining Car. For\nWelch. W. Va. (via Shenandoah Valley Rout\u00abV _\nUs? P. M. WESTERN EXPRES3.\u2014 Chicago. or\nToledo, except Saturday. Dtnlr.* Car. .\nT.BS P. M. PACIFIC EXPRESS.\u2014 For PHtsbunr awl\nChicago. For Knoxville. dally, via Ehenandoan Valley\nRoute. Connects for Cleveland except Saturday.\n8.i.-\u00bb P. 31. CLEVELAND AND CINCINNATI EX\nPRESS For Pittsborr Cleveland, and Cincinnati.\nWASHI.V.TOX AM) THE SOI TH.\n7.55. 8.23. 8 5.'. (Dlnlnx Car). 10.10 (Desbresses and r^rt\nlandt Streets. 10.20) (Dining Car). 10.55 <Dtnlnjr Car\u00bb\na. m.. 1153 (Dining Car). 2 10 (Desbrosses and \" l lsn \u00b0*\nStreets. 2.20). (3 23 \u2022'Congressional Limited.\" all P\u00bbr\u00bbr\nand Dining Cars'). S .25 (Dining Cart. 4 25 (IMntng tar).\n465 (Dining Car). 0.25 p. m.. 12.10 night. *\u2122<!*T\u00b1*;-*1\n855 (Dining Car) 10 38 (Dining Car) a. m.. 1255 , (Dtn\nCar). (3 25 \"Congressional Limited.\" all f\u00bbg>S. Jsa\nt>!n!ng Cars). 3 25 (Dining Car). 4.28 (Dining Car). 4.80\nCDJning Car). B.S p. nv. 12 10 nljM. \u201e\nSOTTHERN RAlLWAY.\u2014 Express. 3.25. 4.25 p. m.. 12- 10\nnight dally. . o \u00ab.\nATLANTIC COAST LINE.\u2014 Express. 853 a. m. and \u00bb-3\np. m. dally. ._ \u201e _\nSEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY.\u2014 Express. 12-\u00bb p. m.\nNORFCLK A^ 'WESTERN- RAILWAY.-For *\u00ab-\u00bb*\u00bb\u2022\nCHE3APEAKE ea 4*'oHl0 r RriLWAY.\u2014 T.33 a. \u00bb. *\u2022\u2022*-\nFOR OLD POINT COMFORT and NORFOLK.\u2014 1.53 a. \u2022-\nPnndays. 7.55 a. m. Through \\.stibu!e.l Trains Burr\u00ab\nSundays. 7.55 a. m. Throush \\estibule.l Trains. Bu~\u00ab\nParlor Cam and Standard Coaches on e \u00ab k -?* \u00a3 a ?lr4\nlor Smoking Car. parlor Cars. Dining Car. and stancaxo\nCoaches en Sundays.\nCAPE MAY.\u2014 12.15 \"fork and \"Bran\"* Railroad (Tm\nFor points on New fork and I^n* Bran-Ji Railroad <-\u00a3*\u00a3\nWest Twenty-third Street Station). 8-t3 a. ra.. \u00bb^\n8.25. 4.63. and 11.25 p. m. week-days B4 ?l!usiSt\na- m.. 4.E5 p m. (from Pesbro\u00ab.e\u00bb \u25a0 \u0084_2r ^Ji\nStreets). 0.00 a. m 12.20. 3.40. B.l'}. and U.ao p. cl-week-anys.cl\nweek-anys. Sundays. 9.45 a. m.. 5.75 P. m.\nFOR PHILADELPHIA. \u201e _\n6.10 (T\u00bbesbrosses and Cortlandt Streets \u00bb\u2122 J^jfj':^\n8.25. 8.55. 9.25 (MS Penr.a. Llral'.ed). 10.10 bl^S^\n\u00abnd Cortlandt Streets. 10.20> (Dining Car). 10.^3 *ur\nn Cart. 11.56 a. m.. 12.5S 'Dining Car). 1.53 \u2022 \u00abDtnla\u00bb;\nCar). 2.10 (Deebro\u00bbses cad Cortlandt Street*. -.20). z.oo.\n8.25 TMr.ir* Cur,. 8.55. 4.3.\"i. 4.25 nMnlng C *& IS\n(Dining Caf>. LH fDlntn* Car). T. 85. S-p- \"\u2022??\u2022 *_\u00a3\nr. m.. 12.10 night. Sundays. 6.10 7.53 rt\" I n \u00bb* % T .:\u00a3Z\ncoaches). 8.2T.. 8.55. 855 (Limited). \u00bb &. I S, ( \u00b0 L fi\nCar) a. m.. 12.55 (Dining Car). 1.55 \u00ab*? ln SSl?>\u00ab,>\n(Dining Car). 8 55. 4-2 T. (Dinir\u00df Cart. 4.5;> (Dining Csr>.\nK.r-i (Dining Car). 7.65. 8.25. 8.53. 9.25 p. m.. 1-10\nTt-k\u00bbt onees, HH 4\u00ab1. 1354. 113 an.i 281 Broadway: 132\nFifth Avenue (below 23d PO: 263 Fifth Avenue (corner\n2\u00bb-h St.): 1 Actor House: West Twenty-third *\u00ab\"\u2022*\nStation, and stations foot of Desbrosses ard \u00a3\" rt ]\"\"?*\nBtreets; 4 Court Street. WO Fultpn Street. 390 Broadway\nand Pennsylvania Annex Station. Brooklyn: Station.\nJersey City. The New York Transfer Company will\ncall for and check bagirsge from hotels and residences\nthrough to destination. ff'^et\" for pe\u00dfnarlra\u00dfla\nTelephone \"914 Eighteenth Street\" far Pennsylvania\nRailroad Cub P\u00bbrrlc\u00bb. _._-\u00bb\u2014.\nVT. W. ATTERBr-RY. T. R. WOOD.\n<-;\u00bb--\u2014 \" -\u2022--\u20223**r f?en'l Paiwngw Ag\u00bbnt-\nSurrogates 1 Notices.\nTTERRICK. JACOB HOBART.-IN PURSU\n\u25a0^ A_NCE of an ord\u00abr of Hon. Abner C. Thomas, a Sur\nrogate of the County of New York. NOTICE Is **?\u2022*\u00a3\ngiven to all persons having claims against JACOB\nHOBART HERRICK. late of the County of New Tor*,\ndeceased, to pres-eut the 6arse, with vouchers thereof, to\nthe subscriber, at her place of transacting business, at tr.e\noffice of J. S. & H. A. WISE. No. 2\u00bb Broad Street. In th.\nBorough of Manhattan. New York, N. V.. on or baton th.\nIst day of l>ecember next.\nDated New York, the Ist day of May. 19f>3.\nMARIA AMELIA HERRICK. Executrix.\nJ. S. & H. A. WISE. Attorneys lor Executrix. 20 Broad\nStreet. Borough of Manhattan. New York. X. Y.\nT AFLIN. JOHN PHILBRICK-\u2014 IN PURSU\nANCE of an order cf Hon. Frank T. Fitzgerald, a Surro\ngate of th\u00bb County of New York, notice U hereby given\nto all persons having claims against John Philbrlck Laflln.\nlate of th\u00ab County of New York, deceased, to present the\nsame with vouchers thereof to the subscriber*, at their\nplace of transacting business. Room 20C, No. 66 Br^afiway.\nin the city of New York, on or b\u00abfor\u00bb the Ist day of Oo\ntober next.\nDated New York, the 24 day of March, 1903.\nMOLLIB SMITH LAFLIX.\nHENRY V. LESTER.\nBEARD &. PARET. Attorneys for Administrators. *13\nBroadway. Borough of Manhattan. N*w York City.\n\u2022DALDWIX. PAULINE.\u2014 IN PURSUANCE\nof an order of Hon. Abrer C. Thomas, a Surrogate Of\nthe County of New York, notice is hereby given to all\np\u00bbrscn\u00ab having clt'.ai against Pauline Baldwin, late of\nthe County of New York, deceased, to present th. same\nwith vouchers thereof to tie subscriber, at his place of\ntransacting business. No. IS. Broadway. Borough of Man\nhattan, in the City of New Yo-k, on or before tise nfteenta\ndas of September next.\nDated New York. March 3d. I!*W.\nKADCLIFFB BALDWIN. Executor.\nMORRIS & FAY. Attorneys for Executor. 135 Broadway.\nNew York.\nTN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HON.\nAbner C. Thomas, a Surrogate of the County of New\nYork. Notice la berebj given to nil persuns having claims\nagainst Francis H. Vail, late of the County of New York,\ndeceased, to present the same with vouchers thereof to th*\nsubscriber at her place of transacting business. Room\n1 003. No. 277 Broad *ay. la the City of New York, on or\nbefore the 13th day of Autr-iit rex;.\nDated New York, the 2th da} of I ebruary. 1908.\nMARY A. WALL.\nAdministratrix of Francis 11. Wall, deceased.\nHARRIMA.N & FJfiiiSSNX>eN. Attorney* lor Adminis\ntratrix.\nTN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HON.\nFrank T. Fitzgerald, a Surrogate of the County of\nNew York, notice is hereby given to all persons bavins\nclaims against Anna C McCreery. bat. of th. County of\nNew York deceased, to present the same with vouchers\nthereof to th* subscriber, at his place of transacting\nbusiness, at the offlce of William C. Orr No. 51 Chamber.\nSire\"t in the Borough or Manhattan. City of New York,\non or before the first day of August next.\nr\u00abt\u00bbd New York, the 28th oay of January. 19C3.\nDated Ne\u00bb HENRT FORBES McCREEKY. ExSCUtor.\nWILLIIM C OKK. Attorney for Executor. SI Chambers\nStreet. Borough of Manhattan. New York City.\nTN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HON.\n-*- Abcer C Thomas, a Surrogate of the County of New\nYork -otice Is hereby glv-r to all persons navies claims\nagainst Sigmund Welgner. late of tin County of New\nYn*t- deceased to present the sims with vouchers thereof\nto the subscriber at his pUce of transacting business at\nthe office of Benjamin F. Foster. No. 83 Nassau street,\nin the City of New York, on or baton the first day of\n\u2022&ntember 15*03. n\u00abxt- Dated New York the 24th day of\nV\u00abrlsr\u00a3 IWC. ADOLPH WEIGHER. Executor.\nECXJAMIN F. FOSTER. Attorney. 82 Nassau St.. New\nYork City.\nTN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HON.\nFrank T Fitzgerald, a Surrogate of the County of\nHew York \"notice\" is hereby given to all persons narlag\nclaims against Lewis A. Abbott, late cf the County of\nNew York deceived, to present the same with vouchers\nthereof to the subscriber, at his place of transacting bust\nness at the offlje of G\u00abo. F. Brownell. No. 21 (.'ortiandt\nStreet, in the City of New York, on or before the ann\nDated I 'New e ?orJt, the 26tb day of November. 1902.\nGBO F BROWNELU LEWIS L. ABBOTT.\nAttorney for Administrator, Administrator.\n21 Cortlandt Street. New York City.\nTN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HON.\nABNEf. C. THOMAS, a Surrogate of the County of\nv.tt York, notice is hereby given tc. all persons having\nTagab\"* Daniel I. Ebbets. late of the County of\nv\u2122 Yori deceased. i<> present the same with voucher.\nthereof to the subscriber, at her place of transacting\nbusies the office of Carrlngton & Pierce, No. 113\nBroadway Borough of Manhattan in the City of New\nYork on or before the 15th day of August next.\nDated New Y'rk. the 11th day of February. 1000.\nl>atea \u2014 RITA W. I>E VOE.\nAdministratrix with the will annexed.\nr-A-RRIVGTON & PIEKCE. Attys. fjr Administratrix.\n115 Broadway. N. i- Our.\nLOW, J. NELSON.\u2014 IN PURSUANCE OF AN\norder of Hon. Abner C. Thomas, a Surrogate of las\nCounty of New York, notice is hereby given to *1! persoes\nhavirir claim* against J. Nelson Low. late of the County\nc* New Yurie deceased, to present tfes same with vouchers\ntfe'reof to the subscriber, at his place of transacting bu\u00bbl\nn^ s It iHe onlce of Underwood. Van Vor.t A- Hoyt. No.\n\"5 B-oad Street. In th* City of New Tork, on or before the\n80th day of June next. Dated New York, the 23rd day or\nDumber. IWK. JOS EPH T. LOW. Executor.\nT-vriT-p-WOOD VAN VOPJIT & HOYT. Attorney* for\nt4 Executor. 25 Broad Street. New York City.\nTN PURSUANCE OF AN ORDER OF HON.\n\u25a0*\u25a0* Frank T. Fitzgerald, a Surrogate of the County of\nNew York notice Is hereby given to all persons having\nclSnw against Ouatave Blument.'.al. late of the County of\nI Tork deceased, to present th\u00bb same with voucher.\nth.?eof subscriber, at hi, place .f transactl\u00dfS busi-\nDated New lor ' A , BERT BLCMENTHAU Executor.\nKTERN * RUSHHORE. Attorneys for Executor. 40 Wail\nBtrait. Borc\u00dfgb cf Manhattan. New York City.\n-pORTEK. DANIEL M.-IN PURSUANCE OF\n\u2022*\u2022 an crder of Hon. Abner C. Thomas, a Surro\u00aba.t\u00ab of\n.v rVH-^v it New-York, notice 1.1 hereby given 10 all\nthe Ct^-y-T-L claims sialnat Daniel M. Porter, late\nJTTK*c\u00a33bwV New^TSx. N. V.. deceased, ... present\n?h-\u2014 m'\u00bb with Vouchers tnere.->f, to the subscriber, at\nthe ofttaT'of ota \u00abt->ni.y. Louis >'. Dodd. No. 32 Broad\nway rforough of Manhattan New York City, on or b*\n^ \u00b0.f\u00ab. f \u00ab N \\ v . e r r r^f 4t4 t 1^-\nLite.. N\u00ab* * \u25a0 CEOBGB ROSE^DALE. Executor.\nTj-iT-m F DODD. Attprae* for lixecuror, 12 ttroadway.\nN\u00abw Tort City. Borough of Manhattan.\nTTARVEY. ALEXANDER.- IN PURSUANCE\n\"of an order of Hon. Frame T. Fitzgerald, a Surrogate\nof the County of New York, r.otlc* U hereby given to all\nriri^ns hiving claims aga!n*t Alexander Harvey. law\nTf Yn. rojnty of New York deceased, to present the\nmime with voucher, thereof to the subscribers at their\ntnw. Nt transacting business at the office* of Curtis R.\nR\";;' >-\u0084 2.1 Broadway (Manhattan), in th\u00ab City of\nV.irTark' on or before the 3rd day ef October r.\u00ab-\u00bbt.\nDated New York, the 2rd day of Arrtl. IMS.\nJOHN B* 9LTDAM. HERBERT L BATTERLEE* E\u00bbec\nrnjrf^'R UATHEWAY. Attorney for Bxeeators. 120\nBroadway (Manhattan) New Tork City.\nADVERTISEMENTS and subscrtotlons fer Ta\u00bb Tribune\ni-Bcetved ft\u00bb their Unto\u2014 OfSee.\nno. i..tiS4 nno.vmvAY.\nAd- urtisements will be received at the following branch\n\u201e\u00ab,.. at regular ..Wee rates until (\u00bb o'clock d- m.. viz :\n;..; uik-iTe.. \u2022 c. '-or 2Cd-\u00abt.: IT..T Uth-mr.. for\nF'th si- US K\u00ab\u00bbt 14th-mt.: 857 \\\\>\u00abt 4^\u00abl-at.. be\ntweeT' \"In and *th ayes.: a\u00abJ3 \\X*a\\ 123tfc-\u00abtl I.UB\nSVslJiave. r*tw\u00ab\u00abn 76th and 77tn \u00bbta. : l.u2<J 3d-\u00bb\u00bb c .\nn-\u00ab- -Ut-su. 1-TOH l\u00bbt-aTe^ near \u00ab;Hh-\u00bbu: 157 East\niaRtJU-.lst.iT6o I\"r\u00abiiM\u00bbiit-aTe.i \u00ab*O ad-srt.\nRailroads.\nJNEWYOEK\n(extral\nV\u2014^ 4 HUDSON RIVER B. B.\nTHE FOUR-TRACK TRUNK LINE.\nVIA NIAGARA FALLS.\nTrains arm* and depart from Grand Central Station.\n\u2666Id Street. Now York, as below:\nNorth and west boi-sd tram*. -:xc\u00abpt these leaving linil\nCentral Station at M 11 JO A. M- 2.\u00bb. 3 30. **\n1J.30 P. M.. will stop \u00bb\u25a0. ;1V- St. to r-c\u00ablv\u00ab j\u00bbs\u2014 aW\u2014\nten zninntes after leaving (iraad Central Station.\nAll southbound trains, except tne \"20th Century an 4\nthe \"Empire Btat\u00ab E-\u00bbpre\u00bb\u00bb.\" mm Sot M \u00bb.nd * w.a\n\u2022to\u00a9 at 123 th St. tei. minutes befors *h.lr antrssv t\u00bb\u00ab\nat Grand Centra! Stetion. _^ _\nI** 1 n A. M.\u2014 \u00bbm:i .vi ;ht EXPRESS. d\u00ab\u00bb Araany\nI \u00ab_. I U 353 A M .. fisl> A . M . n\n7.54 i.H 'STRACCSE LOCAL, Stop* at all rn\u00bb\n' \u00bb\u00ab~ A^ j\u00a3\u2014 ' tEM\u00b0P*R\u00df STATS EXTRBS3- Ms*\nB^o A. M\u2014 *KMPIR\u00bb ?T\\T\u00abJ FXPRBML MM*\n\u2022\u00ab'-' \u2022..., , train si th\u00ab \u2022 iM Dv\u00ab Buffa.o \u2666\u2022\u00ab\u00bb.\nNiagar-. Fall\u00ab \u00bb-4\u00bb P. M. \u00ab..-.-\u00ab.\nD 4.X A. M.\u2014 'FAST JIAfT.\u2014 24 \u00bbotjr\u00bb to Chteaga.\n\u2022 n '*' Doe Da*r>ilf. 7.10. Nla\u00abr\u00bb Fills 5.8..\n10.30 A - M.\u2014 tDAT EXPRESS. Slakes local \u25a0\u00ab*>*\nlu>vJ Dae Bu.TV..-> 1.13 A. M. _. \u0084 _,\nII OQ A. SI\u2014 tRUTLAND EXPRESS. T>J\u00bb KutUad\nI I.OU 755 p M\n12 50 I*. M.\u2014 \u2022HTTFAI>o LIMmCO. Do\u00bb Burfato M\nI t.JU p_ M N ia Mr , Fs:i\u00ab It\u00aba P. M. __\n100 \u2022*- \u00ab.-*SOUTinrESCEP.N LI3HTEI> \u00ab*\u00bb\u2022\nI .UU Cincinnati 10.30. lcdUr.apotls 1' $\u2022 A. SI.. St.\nILoot* *tt P. M next day. _\nOf) P. H.\u2014 \u2022CHICAGO UMrrST>. 2* lwort *<\u00bb Clll\n\"uu cagn via Lax - \u2014 2\u00ab\u00bb- via M. C - --\n7 4.T P M-\u2014 -THE 20TH CSNTCRT tnCTTO.\n\u00ab..-r^ 2O hour train to Chicago via Lais Shore, fc.ee-\n330 trie light* aw fan TROT FLYER. \u2022\u00bb. J^r\n330 P M\u2014 tALEAVT and TROT FLYER. 1>\u00bb* M *\n3.35 r*SM&SS F *&T\u00abr\u00ab\u00ab. i-\nA fin *' M^DETWOIT. GRAND RAPID* *S3\nIf\"*:** CHICAGO PPECIAL. _^,\u2014^ -- v\u2014.\n\u00a3 Qf) P. -LAKE SHORE T.IMTTKT*. 24 'i\u2122\nJ>OU train to Chicago. A3 Penman C*r\u00bb.P^\nClet-\u00bblan3 7.25 A. M.. r\u00bb<-lnaal 1 :w>^, l '\" 5\"\n\u2022polls a 10. Chicago i?.l>. St. T^uls \u00bb* F - *\nfi\" DH P M.\u2014 \u2022WESTERN ETFRKSA 23 boot* \u25a0\nU.UU Chicago via hr.. L. S. aT , M. C.\nf? OK P. M-\u2014 \u2022MONTREAL EXPRESS *1\u00bb \u00a9. * K.\nu.OvJ or p -! an ,\u00bb\n\" Of! P. M\u2014 \u2022ADIRONDACK AND MOJCTRSAfc\n'\u2022 JU rXPREPS.\n\u00b0' -' I've Bu<T-' 723 A. SI. TORONTO Falls S. 4*.\n\u2022\u00abw I>b\u00bb Buffatr 7.23 A. M-. XUpr\u00bb Falls 8.43.\nToronto 10., V\u00bb A. M. _ -,__(-.\nQ^l g P. r M.\u2014 'SPETIAL MAIL LDtTTSTX Slsawlnsj\n9 Of) P. sc D -^\u00bbs\u00abor-AT' : v^TT!:K>f special. J^*^\n\u2022<-\u00ab clnnatl 7 '\u00bb\u25a0\u00bb Indlanapoll. 10.10 P. *.. St. Louis\nQOH P- -\"PACIF ' EXPRESa. Chl<^ur> 34 hoor\u00bb\nJ.OU b y Mlcfclariin Ontral. S3 hours by Lake Shor*. _ , , ;\u25a0:\n11 Of* r M\u2014 'CHITA GO THEATPE t*ain cap*\nI I.UU '-\u0084 . .. . Osiensbcrs. Buffalo. Detroit \u00ab=i\nChl-as-x\n\u2022Dally. tExcept sis\u00dfskw \u2022'\u00bb!r'^it\u00bb VnodiX.\nHARLEM BRANCH. _..,.\n\u00bb 08 A. 51. and 8.34 p M. dally. except *m\u00abay. to FIK\u00bb\nfI\u00abU ami Nortn Ada-nii. Sunns'- at \u00bb2o A. It\nPrrrnun cars en eft \u2022'\u2022renrt train*.\nTralna lOmalaa>\u00bb-! wl\u00bbh Plntsch light. ,_\nTicket offices at I^7 2\u00ab1 415 and t?l\u00ab Broadway, 3\nUnion S3. TV . 275 Cblntnf-u* A- - 133 West 125 th St..\nGrand Centra! Star!on 12Stn S\u00bb. nation and '*\u2022\u2022*\u2022 -\u2666 \u2022'\u00bb\ntoon. N>w Torlc: 3!N and 72* Falron St. and \u00ab)\u2022 Brs\u00ab*\n\u00abay. E. D.. Br->sk!yn. . _ .\nTe!\u00abphor\u00bb \"SCO 2Sth Street\" far S\u00bb\u00bb T\u00bb\u00bbfk Onrra! Ca!\u00bb\nService. nagjrage checkeii frotn hotel or residence by\nWe\u00abtrott Express Company.\nNew York Central Route\nBETWEEN\nNEW YORK, BOSTON\nAND NEW ENGLAND\nVia gortngflsld and the\nBOSTON A>D AL.llA.vr RAILROAD.\nOB*w York Central * Hudson River R. K-. L\u00ab ns<a>\nTrains leave Grand Central citation. Fourth Avenue ana\n42d Street. New York, as follows\ntd.OO A. M- ti&on noon. \u00bb4.00 P. ST.. \u2022'.'. 00 P. M.: \u25a0\u00a3\u25a0\nrtve Boston 3.3<\u00bb P M.. 5.40 P. M . 1\u00bb.\u00ab> P. M.. \u00ab 13 A. M.\nLeave Boston *9 00 A. M-. tl2.flrt noon. \u20224.P0 P. M-.\n\u202211 00 P. Sf.. arrive New York 3.20 P. M.. 40 P. M-.\n10.01* P. M.. &14 A. M .-\nTickets at New Tork Central ticket office*, 413 and 121\u00bb\nBroadway, an<l at Grand Central Station.\na. H. SMITH. GEORCE h OA?<rEU\u00bb.\nGeneral Supertetendant. General Passenger Ag*nt.\nWEST SHORE\nRAILROAD.\nfSexr Tot* Central A Hudson River R. H-. Xjum >a.>\nTrain. lea\u00bb* Franklin St. statloa. New York, as *ss\u00bb\nlows, and 15 m!n. Inter foot of West \u00ab2d St.. N. R.:\n\u2022T 10 A. M. \u2014 hitermediate points to Alb*ny.\ntil- 2\u00b0 A. M. \u2014 '1\u00bb Saratov* an.* Mohawk Express.\n\u20221.00 P.M. \u2014 Chicago Express. \u25a0\n\u20222.25 P. -T-r.t. Ltm. for D-trolt. Cist. * 9*. Lost*.\nt8.45 P. M.\u2014 O For Hud\u00bb\u00abn River po!nt\u00bb and Albany.\n\u2022B.COP M. \u2014 For Roeh.. Buffalo. rii\u00bbv\u00bb!ar)(\u00bb and Chicago.\ntT.4SP. M.\u2014 For Ro\u00bbh.. fhiTalo. Detroit ami St. Louts.\n\u2022*15 P. M \u2014 For Syra.. R<vh.. NU\u00abrara Fa:;.*. Dst, * Cht,\n\u2022Dally. tDalTy except Suniar. Leaves Br\u00abviklyn Ann*xt\nm at tia4f\u00bb A. M. (2) at t\u00bb45 P. M. Leav^i Jers-T\nCity. P. P. R. Sta-t rt> at tll.2f> A. M <2> at HI P. M.\nTime tables at principal hotel* \u00abid offlr*-. B\u00bbg\u00bb\u00bb\u2014\nchecked from hotel or residence by Westcort F.rnr-sa.\nA. H. SMITH. \u25a0\u25a0 C E. LAMBERT.\nGeneral Surerrntendcnt. General Passenger Agent.\nREADING SYSTEM\nSEW JERSEY CENTRAL R. R.\nLiberty Street and Sooth Ferry MM from\nSouth Kerry five minute, earlier than *auwn t\u00abi>wi.\ne*.\u00abto:v BFTHLEHEH. ALLEITOVI A?ID\n18A1 < CIII>K\u2014 tA.OO :IS Easton nr:y>. *. 10 a. to..\n1.20. 4.4 A. B.'^O f5.43 Baatoa only) p. m. Sunday*. i4-ZS\nWLKEViS'.umB \"atd -ir\u00dfAvro-v\u2014 t >*>. an\n, m 51x1 t>. m. Ptm\u00abl*T\u00ab. T4.SI a. m.. 1 n. m.\nB\\R?KG \\T-i4.oa \u00bb40 a. m.. l.\u00bb> A 4O. x 4.10 Lake\nwood 'and Lakehnrrt only>. 3.00 (x 5.53 Lakewood oal7>\nt> m. Si-ad 'fie*> a m.\nATf'**Tlf* CITY\u2014 \u00ab*.4\u00ab i. m. *\\4O p. m.\nVIXELASD AVD BIIIIJCETOX\u2014 I*4.OO a. ra.. tt\u00bb\nL n\\r, mttvciT. A^nrnv pirk. oct:*-*\ncn*nx\"F. point pi,r.*\u00ab\u00ab4XT jitn \u00abiT:A\u00abnnnn\nPOIVTS 14.00. \u00ab 3*. 11.SO a- m. * \u00bb.1 BLSB \u00ab-3O p. in.\nc, TT ,r\u00bbaTS rxr*v* Ocean fir**** J> 00 1 m.. 4 p. m.\n\u2666-no \u2666\u2022no -ftOOi, tm(V*. \u00bb!l.flo a. m. tl*B\u00dfl \u00bb1.c02\n11. so! no.\" t3.o\u00ab>. \u00ab4 \u2022\u00bb. \"J.M. \u00aba *r.Ba J3.no pi \u00ab\u25a0.\u201e\n\u202212 mdt. _^_\n\u202211*\u00bb> A a. NnT. \u2022iod t\"S W. \u20225.00. \u2022*.\u00ab:* \u2666*.\u00bb' p. t\u00dfaj\nnrfnivo!\" w*T\u00bbwT\u00abtTiT-Rn. i\u00bbott*viy.t.tt \u2022\u25bc!\u00bb\nwiLi,i*MsPonT\u2014 4.6H \u00bb4.25. ts.oo, '\u00bb in (10 00.\nll.Ort \u00ab Ml. P\u00bbi:l\u00abnr cn!y> till. oo. tnw. \u2666? <\"> \u00bb- \"-\nReaitns' Pettsnrin* \u00abr\u00bb4 Harrf\u00ab?mrr \"rl? 1 . ** \u00abO. tS \"\u2022\np m. xFnra I.P>\u00bbr?v etre-t or:v. \u2022Dai!- \u25a0\"->,;>. -\u2022\u00bb -\ne-rt Snnday. ttmi^mf only. jParJor ear* only. !|vli*\nT\u00abir.l<ia\u00bb. xSatwrdavs.\nOf!ce\u00bb- Lfr-rtv St Ferrr. \"^nt?\u00bb Ferrr \u00ab >stf>r TTwi\u00ab\u00ab\u00bb\n11,1 'Ml 43*. \u2022\u2022\">\u00bb\u00bb '.r<4 '\"^\u2022jr I^2 Sth At. \u00bb C\u00bbV^\nP<\u00a3\u00abre 'West. IS3 Fast ISBM St.. 2TS West T3tji \u00ab 24*\nColumbrt!. at.. \\>w Tork: 4 r ft St.. \u00bbM. \u00bb\u00bb Fnjtorv\nSt.. Krookrrn: \u00bb8 Brr\u00ab<Jw\u00bbr. WllTlatrsfburc. V-w Tor*\nTrs-isf^- Co. mVm fer and ehee>r\u00bb bar-*** \u2666<\u2022 -'\u2022\u2022\u2022ri.tloa.\nW. O. FESLETR. C M. J? T 'HT\nVie. P:es. and Ore. Sfgr. < *\u00b0- Pass*r Agt.\nKOTAL F.LIJE urn\nHsCW JERSEY CENTRAL R. R-. PHILADEL\nPHIA PJBsl RssViaMN IT. and DAt-\nTIMORF, A>D OHIO R. R.\nLeave south Ferry. Lih^rtT St. Terrr*\nB\\LTO^W\"ASHI><iTO>.t 8.25 am \u2666 \u00ab.B>-am BufT*t\u00bb\nI^ALXO.-^VASl^l>CTO'^.\u2022lo.\u00bba^a \u00bb10.K>\u00abni DtMr.\nBUTO.-H ASHIM.TOI '11 Mam \u2022l!..Tf'\u00bbm Diner.\nB\\I>TO.-^VA < \u00bblll^\u2666iTO.'V.\u2022l^-.V!pm \u2022l.onjm Piner.\nxRUI* tL LIMITED\" * 3.33pm \u2022 S.4opra Dta\u00abr.\nBALTO.-W4 li \u2022 4 Mom \u2022 \u25a0 OOatn Dlr.er.\nII -\\LTO.-^'A\u00abHI.\\OTI\u00bb\\.\u00bb 6.Wp=\u00bb Mfldni BuS*t.\n8A1.T0.-WASH!%KTOt \u00bb12.1 int. Sleepers.\n\u2022Daily. \u2666Daily except Sunday. ! un<Ja\u00bb only.\nOfflc-s: Liberty St. F\u00bbrr,. Soutn Ferry. * A star Hou.\"*,\n113 261 434. !So*\u00bb. 1.134 Biw4\u00ab\u00abT. 182 B\u00abl Ay\u00bb. \u00bb\nUnion Sjjaare Went. .53 *a\u00bbt JKth ft. 573 xr\u00bb*t t\u00bbt>\u00bb\nSt. 345 Co-'umbus Are. Sew York; 4 Cnnrf St. ' 14. 88\u00bb\nFulton St.. Brooklyn: \u00a3* P:*!w\u00bbv. vrnitnmsburc- S\u00ab\u00bb\nYork Traiisfar Co. ealU ior and checks -baig\u00abs\u00bb to <\u00bb\u2022\ntlratlon. _________\u00bb\nBALTIMfI^\" A nw'Q PBIIRGAD\nLeave New- York C.t> : South Fernr. Liberty St.\nClilcasio. Pltt\u00bbbnrcr. ...*:- nt. 'liii el\nChlrsffo. ColDnibns. .. .*12.5.\".pn\u00bb. \u2022 l-COprx Vtn*~.\nFittibarg. I'lerelaaii. .* S.. < Wr>n\u00bb. \u2022 9.40p\u00ab\u00bb- Lisa* 18\n'\u2022Plttab.rar Limited\"...\" e-CSprw \u2022 7 OOpci. Buflee\nCincinnati. St. Loaf*. .'12.10 nt \u2022:.' -8 nt lkwa\u00abs>\nCinrlauntl. \"t- I.onl*. .\u2022H>.2flaia. 3Uam. Wawr.\nClurinaatl. St. Lo at \u00bb..\"\u00ab..V. prx \u2022 * \u00abpm. Bu!T\u00bbt\nNorfolU ............. ..*t2.s3pn\u00bb. tl-\u00abp\u00bb. Dt\u00df\u00abr.\n\u2022Dairy tr>a!!y. except Sunday |3unday cn!y.\nOffl'-es: 112. 261. 434 1300 T<roa<*way. \u00ab Astor H\"n\u00bb\u00bb.\n\u00bb Union Square W.. 391 Grand St. S T.- 543 Fnltot\nft. Brooklyn: Sooth Ferry and LJ^rrr \u00bb\u00ab- Wg\u00ab\u2014\ncheeked from hotel or residence, to d#!\u00bbtrnatloa^ _\nLuckawanna Railroad.\nLeave New Tork. foot Barclay and Christopher St*\nt;.i\" A. M. \u2014 For Binghamto\u00df and gytacu**.\n\u202210.00 A. M. \u2014 For Buf!al<x Chicago and St. Louis.\n\u20221.40 P. M \u2014 For Buffalo an.i Chicago.\nft 00 P. M. \u2014 For Scranton and Plymouta.\n\u20228.10 P. M-\u2014 Foi Buffalo and Chicago.\n\u20228 49 P T'tlc*. \u00ab>\u00ab\u00ab' It\u00bb?\u00abca. DufTala.\n-\u2022\u00bb en A M.\u2014 For Chicago\u2014 s?*ep\u00bbr\u00bb f>p*n \u00bb P. M\nTicket* at 113. 429. 11W r.r^MJwsr. N. T : 8\u00bb Fultctl\n\u25a0t.. Brooklyn. \u2022Dally. tEscept Sunday. _________ _\nLEHICH VALLEY.\nFoot \u00bbf w<M tM A . Cortlaadt sod De\u00abnrqsM\u00abe Stress) ft\n'Daiir. i Iticept Siiatlsj. aaodaj et-\u00bb - ;\u00bb: cXIi d 12. a.\n\u2022 TOO. b5.25. \u2022\u00ab\u00ab. X 3.0.\n_ Knot . A,Lfirm\nBoffalo Local !*\u00a3 5 * 3TH 2 * *\nMso-b Chunk a*pr-\u00ab\u00bb \u25a0! *\u00bb\u00bb*\u00bb!\u2666\u00bb\u00bb\u00bb*\nBLACK. DIAJgOuTO iXPB-TSS ... .\u00ab\u2022'.<'_.**\u25a0\n.iiAucQ <.'hunk \u25a0\u00bb\u2022 B\u00ab:\u00abmi Local. -...-\u00bb r m\nWromlng ViUej I*\"*1 *\"* E3 \u00abSsr*i tt.ravit\nEiKonlLoeal Hllnj \u00aba?\u00bb\nChica*\u2122 *nt TMVt VeitTbule Express.... -n? \u00bb'3*^*'\u00ab\nTHB BCTyALO TSAPX ' \u25a03\u00bb !\nTicket* \u00bbnd Pnlitra\u00df srrommoaatluas \u00bbt : la. jBl . a*. js% \u25a0\u00ab; \u25a0\"\u2022\n1554 B-\u00bbd\u00ab^T. !*i \u00aba v.\u00ab a Pnion \u00ab<jwe Wan, Ms Cotosii&na\nArt. >' T Ja> FolUiii St.. 4 C ir -*t . * Ifn-adwar sad Ft. Kuiu-i\nS^rSrooSiya. S. T. Tracker Co. will cat! fur aasfcaecfe DafMP.\nSteamboats.\n1 mvm & 1\n3OATS lea\u00bb\u00bb Pter 43. N. R.. \u2022\u00bb\u2022\u00ab\u00bb w\u00ab\u00bbsl day. \u2022 P. la.\nPublic Notice.\nHELP WASTED.\n|] TED FOR U. si AiiMY: ABLE BOD\nled unmarried men. between itn if 21 and J3: irlU\ntens of \"nited States, of grnxl char\u00bb.-ier an<l :ensa*\u00bba\u00abs>\nrsblts. who .-aa mibX read \u00abnd write Erg!t\u00bbh. For Infor\nmation apply to Recruit toe: OBcw, 23 Tfttrd At*.. 2.3<5<1\nThird A.?. M \u00abUta Aft.. S. T, \u00ab 88\u00bb Fuitoa 6U.\nBrock\n11",
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"text": "32\nIRREGULARITY IN STOCKS.\nTRADERS SELL THE MARKET WITHOUT RIG\nRESULTS.\nMovcv Rntrs Em* and Sterling E xchange Firm am! Higher Heavy\nGains in Set Earnings.\nClosing prices yesterday of the principal active\nsecurities and net changes from Wednesday's\npotation. were :\nSTOCKS.\nAmaJ Cepr\u00abr.... C 4 -1 INaS of IJexicc- 21H -1H\nA3 Smeltln?...W \u2014 HlNerT & West.... .C*\u00bb \u2014\nAt Top & S F.. 61S \u2014 VJW <5 &_ c \\%& Ziu\nwS. * 0hi0.... M. - %'P\u00abaaad W C \u00ab= - \u00ab \u2014\nR T-- \u00ab>S ReaJmg .\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 &\u00a3* g\nCanadUn Pac..-lSl\u00bb* \u2014 IJi! do l\u00abP~ f %\u00a3 ZTL\n\u00ab hes i- Ohio ... ** z * \u2014 H Bock Island *J% .*\nril&\u00ab P....1WS \u2014 : ft 1. AS F- J5 *\n\u00ab\"i! C Gt West... :t4 \u2014 ttl dt > 2d P l ' l IX- T'\nteidto =*\u00ab2 -II s*!Southern5 *! Southern By SOj, -r_U\nCorn Products.. 82\u00ab\u00ab \u2014>\u00ab <So pref ; -\u00abg ~ \"\nc?} 1 1^::: \u00b1 .Texas & Pa=sfle.. \u00bb;* \u2014 \u00bb\nDel fc 8u6\u00bb\u00ab1..16T i , j Texas & Pa=lSs- f-'H \u2014 \u00a3\nr\u00bb-tra!t South Ik \u2014\u00bb\u00bbTSt L& W. ... -6 l>\u00bb\nErfe S*S -\\TwInCRT....Ij2 \u2014V\u00bb\nG\u00ab ttoESZilm + x v S Realty & C. 21 > \u2014 $\u2022\nOnset* OntrsJ. 1354 -IV _*\u00bb pr^ Eg _ 7\nL*at\u00bb & NasS\u00bb..li:^ -r*'|C 8 Etwi gg 1 * \u2014 H\nMet str**t Rr-.181\u00abi + J\u00ab WaASSfa^...-.... j-^ J^ v\nMcx Ceatrsl 27=* \u2014H ! do pref.... \u00ab\u2022\u00bb *\nSI k& T 255, +% do pref 4*- 1 i - \u00bb\nda pref . Ml \u2014Hi\n\u2022Ex iiriaecd.\nBONDS.\nNo.- Pac 3s 31\u00ab 4- >\u00ab:Webash D 8i.... .st\u00bb + *\nTHE DAY'S OPERATIONS IN STOCKS.\nTradir.?: In yesterday's stock market -was dis\na,proir.t:ng, so far as the volume of business was\nconcerned, but there was reason for encourage\nnest In the character of the transactions, buy\nlag coinlrig- from excellent sources and repre\nsfr.rln? Ceallng\u00df for the account of people who\nh\u00ab,v\u00ab the common sense and available capital\nto buy when prices are cheap. Much of the\nday\"B celling- -was by the local trading element.\n\u2022which apparently was unfavorably affected by\nthe absence of a goners! public demand for se\ncurities, also by the strength in sterling ex\nrhacjre and unimportant adverse crop weather\nreports from the \"West. \"Winter wheat could\nsuffer great deterioration and yet make an\nenormous yield, as the crop has advanced to a\npoint where only the severest adverse climatic\nchanges could cut down the harvest to a ma\nterial extent. Good exports present no reason\nfor alarm. Shipments if made will be small.\nand the local banks are thoroughly able to take\ncare of such a movement without upsetting the\nmonetary situation. Irregularity was the chief\nfeature of the day's movement of prices. Early\nfigures were generally strong^ but thereafter\nvalues moved In an erratic manner, with the\ntendency much of the time in favor of a lower\nlevel. Declines, however, were insignificant.\nwhile at the close quotations showed a fair per\ncentage of net gains as compared with the last\nfigures of the preceding day. There were no\nstriking changes among active issues. Call\nmoney ruled at 2\"~* per cent, while sterling ex\nchacg? was at a level at which gold could be\nshipped to Paris at a prof.: There is no fast\nFt?arr.*T sailing for France until next Thursday,\nani \\n tike meantime conditions in the exchange\nmarket may -move aeainst gold exports. Rail\nroad earnings received yesterday showed\nfurther heavy K\u00bbbm in ?:ross and net receipts for\nMarch.\nThe Jmrir.sic worth of railroad securities as\nm*asurrd by railway earnings is rapidly in\nrr*>r>.*iz\\g arid running fsr ahead of current mar\nlt\u00bbt quotation?. Improvement in traffic receipts,\nespecially in npt income, is striking, and from\n*}*, indications! in various parts of the country\nearr.lnps throughout the present year will ex\nceed Umb best records of preceding years. Net\nearnings for January showed an Increase of\nover B per Best, r.s compared with the cor\nresponding period la IMS, while in the short\nmonth of February a pain of nearly 3 per cent\nwas recorded. In March the expansion in net\nearnings was truly wonderful, \"the gain amount-\nIng for roads so far reporting to upward of 17\nper cent, notwithstanding a substantial in\ncrease in operating expenses. The growth of the\nnet profits of the American railroads ought to\nattract an active investment demand for rail\nroad stocks and bonds, particularly for the at\ntractive low priced issues that are selling under\npar or slightly above this level. Industrial com\npanies are also reporting enormous gains in\njrross and net earnings. -while Interests identified\nwith the industrial activities of the country find\nIn conditions underlying business many reasons\nfor predictions of continued growth in Saratoga\nthroughout the next twelve months. In many\ncases Industrial companies have orders on their\n-books that win keep their works active for\nmonths to come. This is especially pronounced\nArsons: the car budding companies, as. for in\nstance, the American Car and Foundry Company\nand the Pressed Steel Car Company. The stocks\nof these concerns are heid by people who do\nnot care to sell at the present level, and if a good\nsized bull market develops in the course of the\nnext few months this class of industrial se\ncurities will doubtless move toward a materially\nhigher quotation level. Good buying is reported\nIn the shares of the Corn Products Company, a\nconcern which has recently placed Its common\netock on a 4 per cent, dividend basis, and which\nis earning heavily in excess of its dividend re\nquirements. Careful market judges are con\nvinced that excellent opportunities are afforded\nfor profitable purchases among th\u00bb industrial\nscares.\nIn the last two days buying of stocks has been\nfor the account of substantial market interests.\nSentiment is growing more favorably disposed\ntoward the bull tide of speculation, and in all\nquarters of the Street the opinion is generally\nexpressed that the period of liquidation is over\nand that Improvement in values will be the lead\ning market feature in the next sixty days. Con\nditions in the money market, in the agricultural\noutlook and in The general business situation are\ncertainly in favor of rising .values. The assur\nance from the Russian Imperial Government\nthat its Intentions in Manchuria are entirely in\nthe interests if international peace ought to\nexert s favorable'lmpression on the foreign mar\nkets and indirectly on the loral market. Ac\ncording \u25a0\u2022 advices received by foreign banking\nhouses, investors abroad are beginning to show\na more friendly spirit toward American securl\nti\u00abi. and it is believed the: an active demand\nfrom foreign sources will soon develop. Already\nthere has i\u00bbeer. a quiet absorption cf firstclaps\nrEil^ay bondr. end bankers Bad no difficulty in\nplacing securities with European house*.\nTHE DAY'S OPERATIONS IN BONDS.\nGOVERNMENT BOND?.\u2014 Market *:rr73 Final\nquotations Bs\u00dfaar:\nBi<s. AOttii BH A\u00abkeJ.\nC 5 i :aso.r*K 1\u00b0\u00ab Jf+siV.S. 4r JDoT.cca Ilo*i 111%\nL' 6 2*. WOO.-Cou '\u25a0'\u25a0\u00bb\" l o ** '\u2022- ** :\u25a0'-\u2022 r-r ; 8 IST\nL''fi' is J&o*.reK.lOT'-i lOf^^i U.S. 4#. lSlS.cou 137 13&\nr'B Zn ILOS.eou.IOB I f * V.*. St. 19OU*C.1OS3 ;uJ'4\nCfi' Sn-iw^.eml.ior. 1 * \u2014 i U.S. \u00a3s. l&o4.fou.UtS\u00bbi 104*\nCsi4f.l9CT.ree.il'> 1 !* 111 1 ! ! T)iet. c: C. 2-6:*. 12 i \u2014\nRAILROAD BONDS.\u2014 Market irregular. Total\ntales imount\u00bb-i in par value to UM \u25a0\u25a0 against\ngfj4s.a>- cd Mnesda.v. The heaviest dealings\nwere in th\u00bb aS^BBBBB \u00ab*r.ei 1 la. Baltimore and\nOhio prior H\u00bbn 3H?. CMeagn and Alton C\"^\u00bb. CM\nca*o, Burlington and Quincy 45, Mexican Central\nfirst and second Incomes. Northern Pacific 3s. Ore\ngon Short Line is, Pecria and Eastern income 4s.\nReading genera) 4s. St. Louis and Iron Mountain\ngenera! ss. Southern Railway first ss. Union Pacing\nconvertible 4s and Wabash debenture Be. Col\norado, Fuel and Iron convertible 5s were also\nactive. ,i ~.\nSALES AT THE STOCK EXCHANGE.\nBONDS.\n20000 O SURtf WOT.110%! 10000 NT Cent L S Col\nWOO do 4s Con i\u00dfoT.lll -\u00bb%.??fcV\"ii!ia\u00aba\n55 Am Cot OH 4*a\u00bb. V-K-, 3000 N \\ C&stL is -\\f.?\n4000 An, DA Imp S.. 11 3^ 1000 do 10LJ\u00bb\nlfioOO Am H4 L. 65... 61 *>'**> d \u00b0 K'i. rfii\nIMAT4SF m j 10000 NYG & E t_H^j\n4SOOO do CAn 48 MM j 5\u00bbX> HJ O& W Kef\niisiiiiiiil\n=000 dj>Pl.E**r w 1000^W^-6cnU.llH\n9000 do Prio;-S %B \u00ab H !S Kcr\u00b0 Pao-Gen 3,;; TIS\n\u00ab2jXft Ml-M 1 -- '\"\" do Prior 4 102t\u00bb\n4so do S^a sUi\".\" SSHiIOOC* OR & N Con 45.101\n12000 Bkin Un El Ist.. 101 ISO-*. Ore ft Iv 4. 9- .\n1000 Can So Ist 65... 10ft 1 \u00ab00 do -.---\u2022\u2022 \u2022\u25a0\u2022 \" \u0084\u00bb!.\n602 c^f laMtoc. S> XOOO Pac of Mo l\u00dft.-..103H\n10000 COf X J Gen 59.152 1000^ \"\u00bb SS:: \u00a3\nWOO C& O Gen 4H\u00ab.-1O4\u00bb\u00bb .15000 \u00ab\u2022\u2022\u2022\u00a3\u2022;-;-\"\u2014 Siw\n\u00ab \u00b02S & A!t 3HS :: St S r^^. l\u00dft . 4fl ::: Bft\nicooo \u00a3;!::::::?. Si! 88 2S :::::::::::::%\niriV^> rin 'B'Si OOC\u00bb\u00ab GO '2' l\nHSMC *EX Gen S..m \u00bbJOO Reading Gen 4... \u00bb.%j\nnooe cB & c .it 45.. 93\u00a3 12000 do B.S\n1^ d O j-c-cii-;;:: I=h\ni\u00ab/tf\u00a3 rin .101%!22\u00abv> Rio G West let 4a 8S\n6000 C R t * P Gen I 1000 R W & O Con Ss. 118*\n6000 CRI * v ce \u00b0 105 j iseo st L4I Mt Gen n\n2000 Sl\u00df***.:: :\u2022\u00ab 5s 11-^\n2000 CMC Ter Tr 45.. Sgi G- 000 do 11- 4\nSOOftCol &50 Ist it. PWi 1000 do H r l4\n-C*> Col Fuel 6? ... 112 I 6000 do 45.... .- . ---_ 8T\u00bb\nICOO> Cot F& I Convt 1000 St^U &S . Gen 127%\nBSBSaaaa Tob 4 ? : ::::: \u00ab*3 I<*W> Bt d l Re* 4 \u00bb :4.:: 4.: p\nSOOO (Ja ..?: 62S !(\u00abW Stl,9wn Con 4s. S^i\nsfl\u00ab> E T V 4 G Con 1<\u00bb 8 A * A P 4\u00bb\u00ab.. St\n5 i ltSKj BOM do feJH\n1000 Erie Ist Con 4e. . 8\u00ab4 14000 do .- \u00ab\nSOOO do Gen 4s 65% 1000 So Fa? 4^B. 0\u00bb\n10000 do 58 I StX)O do aTr 45.-... 01\naOTO Ft A- D C l\u00ab.:iO 23000 South By Ist. \u00bb\u00bb--lJ\u00ab L 4L 4\n\u2022>rxv> T* TV x- R G Ist. \u00a34 J 7000 do llr> ,\nMM \u00abO ' ?..-. 84% 10000 l1 \u00b0 St L. Dlv *\u25a0* 5S\n2':f.o H*. T C G\u00abl 4\u00bb. 10000 -io 4 J\u00bbS\n7f<nn lowa Cent Ist Ss.llS%l 1000 Third Are Con 4\u00ab. fl^i\n18000 KCFS& M4s 86 ! 2000 do \u2022-\u2022\u2022 \u2022''\u25a0\u00bb\nIWft f*h & \"vT B Gtfl 1 1000 TStbt W 4\u00ab. .- 75\n4U S .....101;, Union Pac Ist 48.1024\n1000 I> &*N\"' Gen \u00ab?.--HfiH. 5\u00ab0 do J\u00ab*\n1000 Mcx Cent Con 48 T9 ! 11000 do \"'\"\u00abS?\n100 ft do 4',s fl4\\i! 10000 do \u25a0 W\u00ab4\nI.^OOO do is? Inc. 2^167000 do ronvt 4... -102^\nIMM do 2*4 14000 do .- V'iSSS\nanooo do 3\u00abfwo do \u2014 >io2\u00a7\n30000 do 3d me l< a * 1000 do o^u\n.',OOO do 17% 15S000 do ;U 10^\nr/W> *o IT 15(XV> rRRof 9t L Ist\n5000 do !\u00ab% :\u2022\"\u2022\u2022 \u2022\"\"\" *2\n!000 M ft X let Con ! lPOon r X R of ? F 4s>. - ;_\u00ab\u00bb*\n6. 11SH lOfHJO do \u00bb\nSOOO M&St T. 3rt Ref \u2022 WOO Va, IC * C fls. . . - .* l *\n4 g ..10014 s><W> Wabash Ist 5s 11 \u2022 *\n2000 110 X*& E 15t.. .108 '80000 do r>eb B *\u2022\nSOOO MX & T Ist 4s. 85800 do \u2022\u00bb\u00bb\n10000 do 2d 4s *2 50000 do \u00bb*\nSfOO Mo P Ist Col 104** .',2000 do 7W4\n1000 do Sfl 7s lIIH^OOOO do Jm\n;inno do Trust 58....104HJ15000 do \u2022\u25a0\u2022\u2022\u2022\u25a0\u25a0\u2022 ,\u00abJ*\n1001 do 104 MNVMt Shore \u2022....\u00bb\n6000 do 104%] 2000 do l<W-i\n2000 X T C Gen 3HS-102 ! 1000 TV & L. E Ist Con\n2T-00 do L. S Col 3Hs 82 lii\u00bbw^\u00ab-*\u00ab::::\u00bba.\n10000 do Rep 90 iTOOOTT&St P24....115H\nTotal \u00bba!es of bonds. $1,675,500.\nFOREIGN BANK RETURNS.\nLondon. April 30.-The weekly return of the Bank\nof England shows the following changes: Total\nreserve decreased \u00a337.000. circulation increased \u00a3449,\n000. bullion increased \u00a3411.469. other securities in\ncreased \u00a32.582,000. other deposits increased \u00a32,853.000.\npublic deposits decreased \u00a3313,000, notes reserve de\ncreased \u00a3124.000; government securities unchanged.\nThe. proportion of the Bank of England's reserve\nto liability this week Is 48.30 per cent, as compared\nwith 51.60 per cent last week. The rate of dis\ncount unchanged at 4 per cent.\nParis. April 30.\u2014 weekly return of the Bank\nof France shows the following changes: Notes In\ncirculation increased 1*4.625.000 francs, treasury ac\ncounts current increased :5.4C3,000 francs, gold in\nhand decreased 6.975,000 francs, bills discounted in\ncreased 192 .425.0<* francs, silver In hand increased\n2.075.000 francs.\nAMERICAN SECURITIES ABROAD.\nLondon. April 30, 4 p. m.\u2014 The market for Amer\nican securities was dull and irregular at small final\nchanges. I^ast quotations follow .\nLondon New-T\u00abrfc New-York\nclose, equivalent, rlose- Change?.\nAnaconda .\u00a3% Kg* l \u00ab --%\nCanadian \u2022paV.VAV.VJIsfs 152;. 132H + %\nSt. Faul 168^ m% 1.1. + :*\nErie 35> 36H -^ l : \u2014 *s\ndo first rref (OK m -, \u00ab8H \u2014 J\u00ab\nIllinois Centra! 14\" mM '''\u25a0' \u2014 '*\nLouis & Null 121J4 118% 118 Ji + \u2666\nN X Central 131S 131 I|lU \u2014 *\nPenniij-lvania \u25a0 70 l \u00bb l*\u00ab '-', \u2014 \u2014\nBeadinc 24: ' .>*\u25a0* \" \u25a0\u00bb + ,*\nSouthern Par 571, iS6 50^4 - **\nUnion Pacific 85U \"<\u00b0 T - PI 1 * \u2014 **\nC <= Steel 36 1 * -\"-%% 3SH \u2014 '*\ndo pn( - 87 -ii \u2014 J4\n\u2022nx dt-\\-l(Jena.\nMONEY AND EXCHANGE.\nMONET MARKET.\u2014 Money on call opened at 2U\nper cent: highest. 2V\u00bb per cent: lowest. 5 per cent:\nlast loan. 2's per cent: closed at ':'<) 2\\-, per cent;\nruling rate, Zhi per cent. Time money was quoted\nat 41;4 1 ; per cent for sixty to nlr\"ty days and 4'i per\ncent for four, five and six months. Commercial\npaper was quoted at s\u00a3Stg per cent for sixty to\nninety days' indorsed bills. SH?K\u00bb; per cent for\nchoice four to six months' hills and 6@6*4 per cent\nfor others.\nFOREIGN EXCHANGE.\u2014 Market closed firm.\nActual closing rates follow:\nCable?. W\u00ab*t. Sixty days.\nBterUlW.. . 4.SSHe4.BS^i 4 S7'ia4.\u00abS \u00ab.84%5>4.84%\nFrancs. \u20225.15C5.15S '.VlO'igvUS'i \u20225.15 5 / S \u00a7s.lS i\nR<?irhym - Ks. \u00bb6it\u20ac\u00abs 5-lfi 85 3-16@\u00abJ\\i 04%ef\u00bb4 s i\nGuilders.... \u2022\u00bb\u2022'\u25a0\u25a0\u00ab '(\u2022\u25a0+\" :.-IC, 40 l-160.4f\u00bb3-lS\n\u2022!>=\u00ab? 1-1 C\nBankers' pasted rates were:\nSixty days. Demand.\nSterUax 4.85 #.BSH\nParis francs 5.17H 5.1.'.\nBdelma fr&Dcc 5.18** 8.15%\nSwitzerland francs 5.1S * 5.15S\nGermany reichftnarks P4 7 \u00bb \u00bb5->\u00bb\nHoi'^nd gTiildfrs 40% < a \u25a0\u00bb\nDOMESTIC EXCHANGE.\u2014 New-Orleans \u2014 Com\nmercial. We discount: bank. $1 premium. San\nFrancisco\u2014 Sight. 5-<-:5 -<-: telegraph. lTJic Boston\u2014\nHe discount. Charleston \u2014 Buying, par: selling. l-Wc\npremium. Chicago\u2014 2sc to 40c premium. Cincinnati\n\u2014Between banks. 5c premium: over the counter,\nBOc premium. Savannah\u2014 Buying. 50c discount; sell\ning, TSc premium. St. Louis\u2014 SOc premium. Minne\napolis\u2014SOc premium.\nBANK CLEARINGS. \u2014 New-York \u2014 Exchanges,\n\u00a33.7,632,743: balances. $10,318,742. Philadelphia\u2014\nchanges. $17,43^.255: balances. Hf.lsJ.ttT Baltimore-\nExchanges, $3.4(3,53): balances, J465.&59. Chicago-\nExchanges. R7.455.520: balances. 51.943.455.\nFOREIGN MONEY MARKET.\u2014 CaII money In\nLondon, \"\u25a0.''s4 per cent. Open market discount\nrate for long bills. l%dM 7-16 per cent; for short bills.\n3 T-\"'s'^- : 2 per eenl Berlin discount rate. 2 T i per\ncent for three months' bills and 4\\-s per cent (for\nsettlement) for short bills. Berlin exchange on\nLondon. \u25a0 mark? tS\\i pfennigs. Paris discount rat\u00bb,\n1% per cent: Paris exchange on London. 25 francs\nIf, centime?.\nFOREIGN SECURITIES. \u2014 British consols for\nmoney. '-. IMS: for account. Pi**. French rentes, 97\nfrancs \"'- centimes.\nTHE\" SILVER MARKET\u2014 Bar (Over. l\u00bb%c: Mex\nican stiver dollars, OVic. Bar silver in London closed\nat 24* s d.\nGOLD PREMIUM.\u2014 Madrid M.M Lisbon, 25 00;\nBuenos Ayres, IC7 C 7.\nGOVERNMENT RECEIPTS \u2014 Customs receipts\nresorted from Washington. KD6.6CI; laternal reve\nnue receipts. (574.49; miscellaneous receipts. $488,282.\nReceipts for the day. J1.519.033: expenditures. JL2OS.\"\n009. Receipts for the mouth to date. $43,3:6.100; ex\npenditure*. W.7C.000: n\u00abfi of receipts. J1,564.100.\nReceipts for the year to date, $}*>>. 419,501: expendi\ntures. J431.'C\u00ab.177: excess of receipts, pVJgUM. Na\ntional hark notes received for redemption. $545,374.\nSUB-TREASURY\u2014 The Sub-Treasury was debtor\nto the Clearing House $170,151.\nNEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MAY 1. MOB.\nRAILROAD AND OTHER STOCKS.\n\u00ab!,,\u201e, I I Actual Bales Fin. I BM.|A\u00bbk.\n,ol\"! I. n^n I High. Low.! Fin. I Bid s -\u00ab\n' \u25a0 Adam\u00df Expreiis.l-\u2014 i\"-~i \u2014|: is\n: Albany &\u25a0 Bns.. ; - i \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \" fi ,-{/\nAUis Chalmers.. j \u2014 \u2014 | \u2014 \u2014 1 \u2122 J\n\u00a3w 'AmSlcw^M \u00aeH \u00abi \u00ab\u00bb \u00ab ! f* U\nAmer Ai?r Chem \u2014 | \u2014 \u2014 \"~ j _ w>\nIJO prcf \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 \u00abq _\nMo pref - \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 *->\nAxner Bicycle. .. \u2014 I \u2014 - f- 1 111 j l\nagfU\u00abfir\u00bbr\u00abrV \u00bbv\u00ab \u00abf\u00bb \u00bb? g?5 2??\nICO do pref........ '\u2022\"\u25a0\u2022, \u2022\u2022\u2022il.i 1 . :\"'\u00ab: \"'\u00ab vl '* .'' *.,:;''\n- \u2014 American Coal.. \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \" -\u0084, rg\n300 Am Cotton Oil.. 42 42 42 142 ! 1. 43\n; do pr^f \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 1 \u2014 (5& -7\nAm\u00abr Din Tel.., \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2022'- \u201e\u2022\u00ab\n-lo^n er G? S T^n c : m ,v t r^! WU-1B \"I si .\n;Am Hide *I- ..j \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 ..i\" ; .;,,J\n\u00ab0 Mo pr*>f I 3fi M ST.^I 35% 35% \"''\nI'Araer Linseed.. \u2014 i \u2014 ~ \u2014 \u00a3\u2022\u00ab ' i-i\n! 'do pref \u2014 \u2014 - \u2014 *?\n100! 'Am Loromotlve 2T-M-SJ 27 -.1 -\u00ab\u2022 t *'*\n300| \"do pref | 03* i 03% U3% \u00ab3vfcj TOi \u00bb**\nI* Amer Malting..) \u2014 I \u2014 \" ; \"T,. ,;* \u201e}[ *\n100 'do pref.......i IW4 r J9H r i ? :\n010 'Amer Smelting. 80 jSO 4S>% W -^ \u00bbJ4\n211 'do pref 96 195 95 M p.- 1 J5\u00ab,\n'American Snuff \u2014 j \u2014 ) \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u00a3 '-jl\nll r Pr &r.V:.!l2\u00abiill26%il2S^ 123^ 125JJ 12\u00ab\n\u00abdo pret \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 ' * 19 \"|*sJ\nAm Tel & Cable \u2014j\u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 \" ?r\nAm Tel & Tel.. I \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 1---J ,'.\nfAtaw Tobpref... \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 14\u00ab . j\u00bbJ^ .\n\u2022Amer Woollen.. \u2014I\u2014 1 \u2014 \u2014 J** i :.*\nT*UjS2eE\u00a3':::::\\v* 103 103 103 11031 103 m\nzz^ o^ ;.v.v.-. \u2014 \u2014I - \u2014 \u25a0'- - \u00ab\n.io r r\"f I - I \u2014 - I- - I g \u2022 m\nAaso ker Ist pf \u2014 I \u2014 - \u25a0* \u0084\nIS,\u00abtf Atehlson I S2H KH SIS MS 81% ] 61%\n\u00ab80 doprec fiT^ *T% \u00bb7>* \\ Vn% 97J4 B^4\n'Am St! Foundry: - i - \u2014 i \u2014 \u00bb\u00bb% JW*\n- do pref * j \u2014 -; : '\" ,.\n8455 Bait A Ohio. 69% WVi 82% 92\u00bb4 S2\u00bbi \u2022-'\u00bb\nltXi do prff I 03.*) \u00abW4 \u00ab3V4 93% W M\n17.740)8'k1yn Rap Tr.'.! 65%] 66^4 1 Co% es%\\ \u00bb5! <\u00bb%\n17 74^ Bklvn Rap Tr.. 65% 1 66% 66% 68%1 \u00bb% \u00bb%\n300 Brunswick iU% 12 11% 12 Jl2 12%\nBuff R & Pitts- \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 J3| 1\u00ab%\ndo pr^f : \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 1\u00bb 15\"\ni-Buttertck C 0... \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 ! \u2014 4\u00bb \u2022_>-\n100 Canada South... 71' ? HHI 71% 71^ .1 .\n4.600 Ca;iadlan Pacific !l32\u00bb4il32U ' 1 '\u00bb ' I .. 4 131 V\u00bb 131\n1 Central of NJ. -- I \u2014 - j \u2014 1 \" ' ''\u2022\nB6O ICIMS & OM-5....! \u00ab CB% 44% 44% 44 I 44%\n600 Chicago & Alton I 31 V 31-% 31 ! 4! 31%: 81 I 3U,\n___ I do prof ! \u2014 , \u2014 ! \u2014 I \u2014 69 % \"\u00b0\n100 Ch & E 111 prof. 1 185 ISS 183 13.-. 1133 140\niChic Bur A- Qy.' \u2014 \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 I\"' l '-IK' ,\n300; Chic Ot West...! 22\u00bb4 22? i! 22% 22% --'\u25a0> -- -'\n1 do pref A ;\u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 ' 75% \u25a0*\n200! do rref B 138 ISB 137 37 37 ; 3.\u00ab 2\ni do deli i - I \u2014 I \u2014 I --.\u00a3\u2022s; 88\n15,300! Chic Mi! & Ft Pi 162 !162>\u00bb 160% lWvs 160% l'\"\"i\n412|Chie & Worthw. 181% 181% 180 180 180 181%\n\u2014 ICh St PM& O| \u2014 ; \u2014 - \u2014 135 is\n\u2022 do pref I \u2014 \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 n^ n |l yr '\nlOOiChic Term Tr. 17 17 17 17 ' MM 17\n- do pr.-f I \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 29* 30 4\nChic Union Trac \u2014 I \u2014 } \u2014 \u2014 >> 7 * &*\ndo prcf i \u2014 i \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 30 \u2022\"-\nCCC ,v mL..I \u2014 I \u2014 i \u2014 \u2014 !US 190\n! do pref I \u2014 \u2014 | \u2014 ! \u2014 115 117\n\u00bbClev X, & Wheel - \u2014 \u2014 I\u2014 . SO 90\n' do pref .:.....- \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 < ' 1 90\nClev & Pitts....! \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 185% I!*\"\nI0it!Col Fu<>! & Iron 65 I 68 SB i 65 I 64Va 65\n2<\"\u00ab>iCol & Southern; 237*! 23% 23% 1 23% 23H; 24%\ni do Ist pN( \u2014 1 \u2014 ! \u2014 I \u2014 ' *\u25a0\"' ' m\n1001 do 2d pref : 37 ! 37 I 37 : 37 ' S6H \u00bb74\n200iCol & H r. &- Tr. I 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 2\u00ab%\n[Com Cable \u2014 \" \u2014 \u2014 - 1\"\u00bb 186 i\nOodsol Coal \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 88 85\n200l<\"onsol Gas .. 211 211 210% (210% 210 211\n- I'Cont Tob pref. I \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 114*4 113\n80S Corn Products..! 32% ' 32% 32% 32% 82% 32%\n1001 do pref IM- 81HI SIV Si% 81% 8-%\n.00 Del A .\u25a0l<s7^!lG7-\\lir,7i*il(>7^ i 'lf.t3i3iir.7H\naW Del La- *W. i i. .'\"> : , I'\"\"\", \u2022-\u2022\"\"'. ! 250V250 254\n100;Denv * Rio Gr. 36% S6%i 36% 367s 35% 36%\n! do pref ' \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 85>4 f7\n\u2022 \u25a0 D\"nv & South w. ' \u2014 \u2014 ] \u2014 , \u2014 5 |25\n! do pref I-- I \u2014 \u25a0 \u2014 ' \u2014 i\" I; \"\n___ |Dcs M& Ft D..1 - - !-\u25a0 I \u2014 \u2014 40 142\n100! Detroit Southern 15 ' 15 ! IS ! 15 ! 15U 1.\".U\n\u2022JOO do nref 1 81% mi.,; 31 !31 ' 30* 4 ;;1\n34.\". Del rntted BR 1 -1 :: - Sl%l 81% 1 61% M% '-i 7.\n[Diamond Match \u2014 If\u2014 j \u2014 j \u2014 135 137\n800 \"Dirt See Cor... 29% 1 29% 20', ! 29% 2!> '\u25a0 29%\n\"P'i> So S A AM -- I - \" \u2014 I \u2014 I 14V I\"' 1 !\nISO -do pref ' 22% 22% 22% 224! 21% 1 --';\n25.1501 Erio I 355 : 35% ! 34% I 34% 34%! -34%\n7.K00! do Ist pref I fiS% 68% 67 167 !67 j 67%\n5,310' do 2<J pref 5\u00ab 1 56% i \u2022\u25a0'44 T * ! 54% I .\"4'-. ! 55\n- Evans & T H...i \u2014 i \u2014 J \u2014 \u2014 I \u2022-\"\u2022\"\u25a0.\u25a0 \u00ab7%\n' do pref ! \u2014 j \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 ,M 85* 90\n*IPt WA D City \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 i '' J \"> _\nGen Chem C 0...- I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 / 65 : 70\n1 do pre f I \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 ' \u2014 !99 101\n110 On ESeetric Co. 193% 193% 193% 193 193%\n!Gt Northern pf. ! \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 185 200\n:Homestake .... : \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014I\u2014 1 \u2014 68\n2SO niiiois Central.. l\".\" : 135% 135 186\n1 do Leased 1.. . ! \u2014 i \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 1104 108\nlint Paper ! \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 ! 18% 16%\ndo prof i \u2014 -j \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 I r ' : * i 70%\nSoOi\u00ablnt Power \u25a0 13% 44' 2 4.\"\" : 44 !44 ' 44\\\nMO Ir.t Steam Pump 46 ! M I 4,\".' : 45% 45% 46%\nj do pref I \u2014 ' \u2014 i \u2014 ' -- I 80% 80%\n200 lowa Central... 35 35% 1 35 354 35 188\n- do pref ! \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 B\u00bb j6l\n'Kar.a & Mich... ! \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 3\u00ab? 40\nKan City & So. \u2014- : _ ! \u2014 \u2014 80% 30%\ndo pref ..... \u2014 ' \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 ' 52% 53\n500 Ik CFS & M pf ; 78% 7SH 1 78% 78% 78 78%\nKeok & Dcs M.-i \u2014 j\u2022- ! \u2014 I \u2014 35 !37\n68! do pref - ... ! . .4 s ! 54% 54% 54%' 55 60\nLa-lee? Gas ! \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 187 ! 101\n1 do pr\u00bbf ! \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 100 !ll<>\nI. E & Western.- \u2014 ! \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 I 40 | 11%\n__ \u25a0 do pref i \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 106 'HO\nLong Island '\u25a0 \u2014 '\u25a0 \u2014 '\u25a0 \u2014 \u2014 !70 74\n1.300 Units A >:ash....llS\u00bbsillS\u00bbii!ll7ii 117% 117% 11**\n- - M.in Beach ... : \u2014 I \u2014 ! -\u25a0 I \u2014 ! 10 1 12\n11,335 ; Manhattan E1... 141% 141% ! 141% i 14114 1141'\u00ab1 141'\u00ab i 141H\n\u25a0 - M.I Coal pref. .. j \u2014 \u2014 I-- \u2014 '100 125\n100 :\u2022 Met Sec Subs. 104 104 102 102 102% 103%\n5,200 \"Met Street Ry. 131% 132 131 131% 131% 131%\n- ! Met WP of ChJ \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 124 127\n! do pref i \u2014 | \u2014 \u2014I \u2014 172 7H\n2.5001 Mexican Central 1 27 i I 27 4 27% ' 27%] 27% 274\n- Michigan Cent. . ; \u2014 1 \u2014 \u2014\u00bbI \u2014\u2022. 125 130\n100 1 Minn ft St L... ! r>o I no i 90 i r>A 1 so Xi\n- __ 1 do pn=r : _ ; _ I \u2014 \u00ab _. j \u2014 112\n100 M St Pft S 6 M '\"'.\u00bb' i \u00ab\u00a3>' i! 69%| 6!\u00bb.;i 68% 69\n300; .I. pref 124^1123 124% 125 125 '126\n100 Mo Kan * Tex.; 25-% ' 25% 25%! 26% 2.'.'-. 1 L,',*i\n800 do pref | 58 '56 ! 55% 55% 55 i 56\nE1.02S 1 Missouri Pacific 1 IO\u00bb T 4 1110%1 110% 1 lCif)'^ i 109*41 09% ' 109%\nNash & Chat... I \u2014 '< \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 '108 ! 111\n200 'Nat Biscuit ... ' 43% 43% 4.\"'- 4?.'-i! 43^,1 4:'.\"i\n100 \u00abd.-> prof ... . ; 105% 105% 10.-1; iaiv,!i\u00abi.\"iv\u00bbii'>\u00ab\n100 \u2022National L^ad.i 24% 24% -\u25a0*-. 24% ! 24 1 25\n\u25a0\u2022- ! \"do pref. . . !-- \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 IDO j J)2\n\u00bb.200iNat RR of Mcx 2'% 22 1 * 21% 2! \u25a0. : 21\u00ab 21%\n8.700 do pref 141 I 41 i! 10 j4O j '\u25a0\u2022 | \u2014\nNat Enam AS. \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 i 33% 3.\"?*\nj do pref ! \u2014 ] \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 ' 87 i R9\nN V Central . . I \u2014 \u2014 ! \u2014 i \u2014 i 47 I sl>\n\u2022N V Air Brake! \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 ! --- 165 170\n2.35\" N 5 Central 131% 1 181% 130 1 130 1130 131\n100 N V <-h & St L.. ! 35 \u25a0 33 i 35 ! Si \u25a0 34 ' '.r>\n! do Ist pref .j \u2014 I-- I \u2014 \u2014 10\u00ab 118\n; do 2d pref ' \u2014 | \u2014 I \u2014 -- i 75 !80\n-NY Da . . ' \u2014 - ' \u2014 I \u2014 20 ! M\n1 do pref ....... j \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 I \u2014 I i.. 54\n281 N T N H \\ H. 200 V 2 n <l', 200 Ci>o 200 '201\n2.300!. V V Ont &- W.~ ! 29Ts ! -\u25a0<'* i -V -.! 2\u00bb ] -\u25a0'- 294\n3.400 Norfolk * West] 71% 71?*: 70% 70S 70% 7- \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u00ab\n1 flo pr\u00abf -......!\u2014 I \u2014 ! \u2014 i \u2014 i *si,i ';\u2022 -\n100 ' North American P3%l &B%i \u00bb8% 98% 98% 100\nOntario Silver...! \u2014 ! \u2014 j \u2014\" j \u2014 i 5 j H%\ni Pacific Coast \u2014 j \u2014 I \u2014 \u25a0\u2014 59 ! '\".2\n-\u2014 1 do Ist pref ... \u2014 ' \u2014 ' \u2014 | \u2014 i Ml fi\n\u2014I do 2d prof ! \u2014 \u2014 - ! \u2014 \u2014 fBS 72\n100 (Pacific Mail I 38% 33% i 33% [ 33* 4 ! 33 I 35\n46.ril!Penn R R '137\u00ab i 13?% 135% 135% 1 135% 136\n2.800 do rights ! 3? s ' 3% 3%l 3V \u2014\n-\u2014 - iPeoria & East...' \u2014 ! \u2014 \u2014 ' \u2014 ! 30 | 3S\n4.850 Peo Gas * Coke. . |105%1104% 104% I<M 5 104*4\n770 Pere Marquette. ' 85 i 86%! So\"! K6'-! $8 I V 7\n200 \u25a0 Philadelphia ....' 894 89% 59% >-r<\\j -- ; \u2014\n- P C C &\u2022 St. L.I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 \u2022 \u2014 ! 7S KR2\n! do pref ...\u00bb \u2014 I \u2014 \u25a0\u25a0; \u2014 - \u2014 ! 100 ! 105\n-\u2014 |P Ft TV & <-h...! \u2014 I\u2014 ! \u2014 I \u2014 ( isa. 191\nPressed Ptl Car. \u2014 ! -- I -- I -- ' \u2022\u25a0\u2022\", iii\n300: do pref .. : 02 ! 02 ' 92 ' 92 ' 91% 92\n1 Pullman P Car. ' \u2014 ' \u2014 I \u2014 - 1 \u2014 215 220\nR R Se<nnitie\u00df. .; -- !-- I \u2014 \u2014 !Wi j: 1\nlfiSi'lJy Stl Spring. : 32% i 32' r:;; . 324 31% \"-'i\n301 Mo pref ! 83% P5% 55% | S.M. 1 vk \u2022\u25a0 -.. .\n20,050' Reading . ' \u25a0\"..\">\",, 55% 1 54% 54%! 54% '.4 :: ' t\n100: do let T.\u00ab f . ' 83% '\".'i ' R3% R':* 4 *\u25a0:;'\u25a0'\u25a0 53%\n! do 3d pref . ' \u2014 ! \u2014 '\u2014 \u2014 I '\u2022\u2022, ' ! 87%\n- IRens ft Sara ... I \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 | -- 205 ' - '\n-Re;, Iron & St! ! If* ' 1C ' 19 I 10 \u2022 18% 10\n430 i \u00bbdo pr\u00bbf , . . 1 77' ii 77% 77% ' 77 -' 77% 7*\n12.800 Rock Island . ' 445,! j,s,\" 1.. a 43% 43% 43%\nmo;, do pref . . : 7\u00abV4 ! 7<n^ . 1 76% 76' 2i2 i 7t> I 76' i\n\"Rubber Goods 25* i 25% ' 2.>* 4 \u2022 25% \u25a0\u25a0\u2022\"\u2022'\u2022 2 i 2'i\nSO \u00abdo pref \u25a0; MV <\u25a0\u25a0\u2022'\u00ab MUI *1^ : 73 I *1\n106 Rutland RF. pf 58 !58 :58 !5S '\u2014 \u2014\n- !St Jos ft Gd 1..! \u2014 I \u2014 I-- \u2014 . '11 !12\ni do Ist pref....' \u2014 ! \u2014 i \u2014 I \u2014 ! 4.< I 51\n\u25a0-\u25a0 i do 21 pref ... \u2014 ' \u2014 ! \u2014 ! \u2014 ! 20 ! 22\n1.700 st I> ft San Ft.' 75% 75. 75 j 7.\". I 74% 75\n800! dn (si pref. 'SI jS2 ic l !82 ISO | f-2\nHOO do 21 pref. . ' 711^! 70% 70 ! 70 ' 69% 70\nlOOISt L\u00abiil\u00ab SouthW 24%| 244 1 24', i 24'il 23 \" i 2314\n100! do T-ref I 53 i 53 i *iS ' \\ 55 J 54 ! 56\n800 gloss St X- Ir] 63 i 6.'{ :61 ' '',1 161 162\n- \u2014 1 do pref. I \u2014 I \u2014 ! -- i \u2014 I 91 I 8-1\n7.l2o' Southern Pacific 56'- 1 56% l \"\".U 1 B.V 55% 5\" T 4\n\u2666.700 1 Southern R R...1 31%, 31% 30 7^| Xi%\\ 30UI 31\n200' do pref I 92% r '2', fi\" l^! 92 / 4 l 92% f^^l\n1 do M &\u25a0 O ctfs -- \" \u2014 I \u2014 ! \u2014 *! m'< 04\nland Rope. &\u25a0 T - _-!_!_! 4^| .-\u00bb\n!Tenn Coal \u00a3 Ir. ' -\u25a0 \u2014 --- I \u2014 I \u20ac4% 14%\n3.0001 Texan & Pacific, i OS. 36% l ::5% ; 33% 35% \u25a0\"<\n1 do Land Trust -- ' \u2014 ! -- ' -- I 37 i 40\nIflOtThlH Are P. P.. ' 121.,: 121^ 121' 1: V !2O '122\nTo! Peo ft \"W...t. \u2014\u20221 \u2014 - ;\u2014 '\u25a0 - - I 19 | 23\nTol Ry\u00bb ft LlKhtl \u2014 -!\u2014!-- I \u2014 i 34%\nI.IOOITo] St L ft WV.j 24%! 2'! I 24% 2; '\u25a0 2\u00ab ! :\u2022;\u2022;\n1 to pref i _!_;._ \u201e \u25a0 42% ' \u2022 >\n100!T CRT ed l%pi 112 1112 112 112 1111%1112'i\n! do pref !\u2014 I -- !-- ' \u25a0-- 154 ' \u2022'\u25a0<\n.W>!\u00bbT'nlon Haj? & P ; li I *' 11*4 1 11 '11 ' i.n. 11\n! VJ,-, pref I --!_;.-.!\u201e! 71 % 53\n[United Fruit Co. j \u2014 \u2014 I\u2014 ! \u2014 li'\". [ 104\n25.r\u00bb12! Union P icllSr. ... ! ni' 4 ! 91\u00ab\u00bb i W\u00bbi W)%l OrtUl '. i\u00ab(\ntoo do pref ' fir.:, '..r-, 90U fir, : !>o%l Ol'i\ntoo Un Ry Invst Co. I in\") l'< 1 it> \"! 19 | lftu 10\n10O! do prcf I 57' 4 i :.t- : I 571 i 57U! :7 \"i -7-,\n\u2022\u25a0\"\u00ab-. \u00bb1 SC IP i F 12 I 12- 12 ' I2T, 12 1.1\n200! \u2022<. ft 1 .'..' I .'..\u25a0?\u25a0, 53 ! \u2022-\u25a0;\u2022. -... | -1\n\u2014 - IJ P Express ! \u2014 \u2014 h\u2014 1 _ 123 ! 182\n3.2onj*U S Leathei 14-. 14, 13% I 14 I 13% 14\n!.-::, \u2022\u25a0-lo pref . | ;\u2666;, ! ;,.-. !Ml '.4 I .' 04 U. in.-;\n3/lOo l l' 5 Realty ft C 21 r -.l 22Vi L\"'. 21' 4 ! 2IU! 214\n\u25a0;r\u00bb. 00 pref . i - :<i ', r.S',' \u25a0:?\u25a0. <\u2022-- . r.\" ' r.7*2\n- im; s Red ft R^f < \u2014 ! \u2014 I \u2014 ! \u2014 I .vt I .~\u00bb\n! 'do pref ...... I \u2014 t \u2014 I \u2014 | \u2014 | :\u2022!-.%\n40\" !I' S Rubber 1 14%! 14-, 14'^' 144' 1 41^: 3\n1 do pref ...... ! \u2014 I \u2014 ' \u2014 ' \u2014\" ' 491 .-,!.\n2.400: i* S Steel . I 35 \\, ! 35% i XV , 1 r..',i^ | 35^ .r,';\n4. 4701 do nrer ! fS%) <<5' t ( Sl',! P.\". I --,7, \u00abTS\n\u25a0:'\u00ab\u00ab VarCaro Chem.: l S3 I 03 ' \u00ab.'. 1 \u2022;.; | c: i 1 \u25a0-.\n300! do pref.. .. I2S 1 125 1125 125 : 122 1 125\"t\nVa Iron C & C.l \u2014 i \u2014 ! \u2014 ! \u2014 ' 83% ,1414\n300 'Vole Detinning-. I \u2022-'\u00ab%, 1- I 2S\u00abil .\u2022-\u00bb. 27 i \u25a0\u2022S\u00bbI\n200! \u00abdo prrf . I 79% 1 70%! 79\" 79%! 78 ! 7.*\n200 Wabas] i 27%! 27,1 27-. 27\". 27' 27%\nB.loo' do pref I 47-! 4s '\u25a0 4V, 4ft% 4rti,i 4,' \u25a0;\n-! Wells. Fargo Ex. \u2014 \"j \u2014 I - I \u2014 ' !2f-0 ' 1220\n780 1 West fnion Tel. I 83 1 -. I S4',l fir. t Rfl I f.y<\nW\u00abstli --li life \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 I \u2014 ifio Hf.7\n,1 <Jo Irt prd , 1 \u2014 | _ | -- \u2014 1 ins 210\n400 Wheel i I- R . . . ' 2',% I 23% \u2022 23 I 23% I 23 i 2 Vi\n6 Ist i--f .1 \u2014 \u25a0 \u2014 I _ ' _ I\u00bb2 144\n].\u00ab> do 21 pref .. I 33% a.;'. 33% I .-..V,! 33 !34\n1.675 Wisconsin Cent.! 24\u00bb | 24*;! 23% 24 I 24 I 241;\n250J dO pr\u00abf | 4S%| 18% 4^4! 4B'\u00b1! 47 j 4^'i\nS, r .7 <\u25a0\u2022;\u00ab Total Ml\u00bb\u00bb for the day. \u2022Unlisted.\n\u00bb\nCONSOLIDATED EXCHANGE SALES.\nBONDS.\nI I Open- I Hl\u00dfh-l I-.w- I tJiHt\nsa!e\u00bb. I I mis I apl I e\u00bbt. I sale.\n116.000 1 Toi? it } 62%' rt2*\u00bbj 62% \u00ab2%\n10.0001 Wabanh .l*b B. ! 7.'.'.: 755 1 T:.'\u00ab | 75*\u00ab\n126.000 TuUI eales.\nSTOCKS\nFharesl I Open- I High- I Low- I Last\n.^o!d. I I ing. I e\u00bbU | est. 1 sale.\n10.0301 Amal Copper | \u00abVH| \u00ab%i \u00ab*.. : \u2022\u00bb\n30 Am C* X 1 4\" j \u00bb j \u00ab\u2022* W\u00bb^\n90 \\m Cotton 0H... 42U 424 ->-*; \u25a0\u00bb-'\u00ab\n* km Ice :\u2022'\u2022; '\u25a0\u25a0\u2022 \u2022 ' J\u00bb,.\n160|Am StPClttng \u2022\"\u2022\"^ &\u2022\u00bb'\u00bb \u2022\u25a0\" 4 \u2022\u00bb? \u00ab\n1.200 ' Am Sugar 12f.*\u00bb 12U?* 12&H 12' n\nS.43rtiAt Top & 8 V... 82* --': 81% M>\nSO I \u2022!\u2022-. pref 117 7*7 * \u2022\u25a0'7\"\u00ab \u00bb\u2022\u2022\u00bb *\u00bb2\nMTOf\u00dfalt & Ohio. I S\u00abS, \u2022.<-V*. \u00ab5 \u00bb2*\n7.380 Brooa RT \u00ab\u2022 - 66 1 * \u00ab\u2022'\u2022\"'\u2022 .\u2022?\nli\u00ab. < a. 1 Pacific .. : 131 7 IS2'\u00bb 131 tt 13JH\n|fl|Ches & Ohio *6> -i'v 1 * -\u00bb\u2022\">,. . 4 \",\n50 Chi Gt V\\--st ; 22% 22H 22% ,-.-\n13.370 Chi Mil &St P... U'2'x I\u00ab*H I* l ,. |M .\n10 Den &R is i SB*.! \u25a0'\u2022\u25a0> 36\u00bb, \u00bb\nX Tsn &|r. .-..\u25a05\",, 35 . M* \u25a0\u2022\u00bb'\u25a0<\n240 .1,-. Ist pr\u00bbf \u00ab* \u2022\u2022'- . I\"**! \u00bb\u2022\u00ab\n!io tin 2.1 prel .. . .*.\u00ab'\u00bb 86** \u25a0\"'\"\u25a0'\u00ab \u2022\u2022\u2022' <\n401111 Central MS* 138* IW M 8\n160 Louli a Nash.... 118* IW* US llsl >\n1.2.\"..' Manhattan 1 141 343 4 141 141' 4 l*r>\nMO j Met Rtraal ISI4 182> '}&>% 131 ,\nSO Hex Ontral ' 2\"'\u00bb \u2022-7'i '-7\"i 27 -i\n/ Id, Mo K& T prr-f 554 55 l\u00bbil \u00bbi K\u00bbJ\u00bb 56 :\n8.980! Mo Pacific : inn** HO* I\u00abS)|4 l'\u00bb\u00bb*'\n970 Nat X R or Mex. 21 T \u00ab 2.\"\u00ab 21 '\u25a0\u25a0\u2022 21 1 .\n20 do pref 41 1 41 40 10\nSCOIN v Central : l.\"\u00bbl 131' ii 13\u00bb 7*7 * 13OM\naOO N V Ont & W 20 s ; SO j 2\".\u00bb% ; s\u00bbtl\n140!Norf A West 71% 71% To 1 * | 7\" \u25a0\u2022\u2022<\n6,460! Pennsylvania ' 137\u00bb\u00bb 137* 135* \\\u00bbM\n1.3601 People's Gas : l<V>*i 105* I'M': l*; ;\n\u00bb,\u00bb(\u2022! RfHrtinj? i or.'\u00ab 55 S | \"4 \u2022\u00bb \u25a0*\u2022*.\n2\" do Ist pref ' Bt* S3H '-S'j MM\n1.9-0! Rock Island \u25a0 44% 44N! 43* 4 43' i\nlOSt L& S F i 7\".', 7-\". 1 * 7.\".U \"5^\nlOSt LSO W ' -4% 2414 24** 24\n2,96o Southern Pac \"\u2022'\u25a0* R\u00ab*\u00ab \u2022\"\u25a0\"S : *** ;\n410;5.-.uthern Ry ! SIM 3i ! 4 3O'/\u00bb \"i\nKM do pref ! M* 92*; 5*2*4! f'2\u00bbi\n200 : Ten n Coal &- 1.... I \u00ab4 s ;l \u00ab4*4 \u00ab'i W.\n2110 Texas Pacific ; S6S . 88* \u2022> | -' 1 \u00ab | \u2022'\u25a0'\u25a0'\u25a0\nB.. .<v>U*nlon Pacltic 01 \u00bb*. ! M% \u25a0\u00bb* s*o**\nBitO I\" S Leather I It 1 * 14 ; \u00bb! 13% l\". 7 i\n\u00bb\u00bb! d\". pref \u25a0 {.4 7 \u00bb 1>4 7 \u00ab R4 1 \u00bb ?U< ;\n2.010! U 8 Steel ' 3.-.S Ss*\u00bb \u00bb* \u2022\"\" i\nISO do pier I \u00ab:\u2022\u25a0'-. 85% 94* M*<\n201 Wabash i M I IS I 27** 27* i\n620 do pref I 47% I 47\"\u00bb 4<5\u00bb4 j 47\n20! v.\"is Central I 25 i 25 1 24H| 24':\n101.200 Total Mleo.\nMINING STOCKS.\nhare\u00bb| | Open- I High- \u2022 Low- j La?t\nsold. ! | ins\". I est. I est. I sale.\nChollar I .20 I .26 I .26 I .2t>\naOOiComstock .0\u00abH -06^J -W-j' .<\u00ab' i\n2.nriri rr,rnsto,-k bonds.. 1 .07\u00bbii .07% I .07V '>'\"*\u25a0\n400jCoo Cal & Va 1.35 ' 1.88 I 1.30 I 1.3\u00bb\n.VirtlElkton ..\u201e ! 40 I .40 ! .40 ' --\u00bb\u00ab\ninojlsabella 1* ' .1? I .IS .18\n1.00();Justlc8 ' .12 .12 .12 .12\n1.000 Mollie Gibson ! .OS I .OS .OS ' .0*\n200' Portland 1.42 ; 1.42 I 1.42 1.42\n\u00abOOjPotosl ' .21 I .21 ; .21 ' .21\n6.500 Total sales.\nWHEAT.\nSale* I ! Open- I High- I Low- ! Last\nhush. I | inc. I eat. I est. i sale.\nS2s.ooo|July option I 72% | 72*4 i 71%! 72\nWAIL STREET AND EXCHANGES.\nFOREIGN TRADING.\u2014 Foreign houses dealt In\ns.\"<v> shares in the local market, mostly sales. The\nLondon consols wen steady and dull. The copper\nstocks showed considerable strength, but the Mexi\ncan issue? raped off In sympathy with the further\nreaction in bar silver. In view of the May 1 holiday\nthe volume of trading all around was very light.\nMoney was a trifle firmer in Berlin. The Bank of\nKngland did not change its rate, and made only a\nmoderate showing in the weekly return, in spit* of\na fair Rain in bullion.\nSTOCK LOAN QUOTATIONS.\u2014 quotations\nwere: Amalgamated Copper, Anaconda, American\nIce. Atchison common and preferred, Brooklyn\nRapid Transit. Baltimore and Ohio common. Cana\ndian Pacific, Colorado Fuel. Delaware and Hudson.\nErie common, first and second preferred. Louisville\nand Nashville, Manhattan. Missouri Pacific, New-\nYork Central, Norfolk and Western, Metropolitan\nStreet Railway, People's Gas. Reading first pre\nferred, Pennsylvania. Republic Steel preferred.\nRock Island, St. Paul. Southern Railway preferred.\nSouthern Pacific, Sugar. Tennessee Coal and Iron.\nUnion Pacific common and preferred, United States\nSteel common and preferred. United States Leather\npreferred, Wabash preferred and Western Union.\n2Vi per cent.\nMAT DISBURSEMENTS.\u2014 \"The Dally Stock\nholder's\" compilation shows that Interest is due to\nday on \"bonds having a par value of $1,076,272,905.\ncalling for the distribution of $23,910,50?. against\n$21,420,919 last year. $19,151.093 In 1901, J15.752.703 hi\n1900 and $18,433,719 in ISM. Dividends are payable\nduring the month on stocks having a par value of\n$1.94R,577.978. amounting to $44,062,726. compared with\n$37,223,034 last year. $17,930,771 in 1901. ?14.?n3.57S in\n1900 and $12,774,765 in 1899. Combined dividends and\nInterest payments, $67,973,323. against 565,64&tt3 last\nyear, $37,112,170 in 1901, $33,n56.5?l in 1900, $31,208,51-1 in\n1899 and $27.524,338 in 189 S.\nNO EXTRA PEOPLE'S GAS DIVIDEND. -On the\nauthority of a director or the People's Gas Light\nand Coke Company it may be stated that no in\ncrease in the dividend rate is contemplated at; this\ntime. Rumors to the contrary, he said, are mis\nleading. Those who ought to know what is going\non in the stock say that the recent buying has been\nof sterling character, and has been largely for the\naccount of persons who know exactly what they\nare doing- It is said that something may soon be\nheard about gas that will bear out this assertion.\nWABASH PROSPECTS.\u2014 An officer of the Wabash\nsays thai the volume of. traffic Is so heavy that\nthe company is pressed for equipment and that the\ncar shops at all points are being pushed to their\nutmost capacity. Extraordinary activity has of\ncourse, been indulged In so as to have the road\nready for the opening of the Chicago-Pittsburg line.\nThe company has placed orders with other com\npanies for a large number of new cars, but this\nwill not furnish sufficient equipment for all the new\ntrains which new lines will demand. Arrangements\nhave been made for lighting the yards at Toledo\nby electricity to facilitate the night work.\nCHICAGO. MILWAUKEE AND ST. PAUL.\u2014 There\nis no diminution in the volume of business on lines\nof the St. Paul, and its officers are predicting heavy\ntraffic .ill summer. The loaded car movement thus\nfar for April has been fully equal to that of the\npreceding month, and operating expenses are said\nto be materially less. Officers of the road explain\nthat all difficulties that arose between the railroads\nand the Minneapolis millers are in a fair way to\nadjustment, the latter having the promise that the\ndiscrimination in rates on wheat as against flour\nwill be made right at once.\nBRIE\"S EARNINGS.\u2014 Erie's big net earnings in\nMan '.i point to a big traffic business and reflect ex\n\u2022 management, n largely increased volume of\nbusiness being handled with a comparativelj small\nincrease In the expense of transportatloa Tlie\noutlook for a continuance of large by raases In\nErie's gross ' 1!cl liOt business In the three iim.mMh\nof the fiscal year is favorable, and it is likely that\nnirpltu will be shown from the coal com\nbably In the neighborhood of SBQA.OOQ or\n\u00a3 00, a .\u00ab compared with 51.700.f100 In 1902. The\nI hal Erl\u00ab la abi ut to build \u25a0 lin<\nown to Pi ttsburg appears to be without foundation.\n\u2022\u25a0 with Pittsburg and Lake Km\nfor an entrance to Pittsburg ire satisfactory, and\n: la perp* tual there i^ m \u2022\nwhy it should noi t ontinued, Brie would not\nla \u25a0 ontrai i if II could, and could not If\niuld\nA STOCK JOBBING LIE.\" Pennsylvania offi\ncers say thai th< rumor that the dividend will he\nreduced \\- pimplj a *sto I. lobbing Be.\" The divi\ndend question will be con Idered bj the board to\nday. Th#> regular dividend will \\-\nNOTU BOF RBMOvAI -The Wall Btreet offlce\nof Tii- New-York Tribune is now In the Corn Ex\n. No. l.\" William-st.\nWINTER WHEAT CROP.\nSpecial reports to \"Dun's Review\" reenrdiner\nwinter wheat \u2022\"i in lon from branch office? of\nR. G. Dun & ' \u2022>. in the Important winter wheat\nStates. fJiow continued Improvement .since th-*\nspecial report published <>arly in April. Then has\nh.'pn trifling injury by frost iii some of the Central\nw. -i,,. states, and from excessive moisture In\nIsolated sections, the growing grain having tuned\nyellow, but the losa will be small, if anything, as\nthe improvement since has been very marked.\nIn the big winter wheal States west of the Mis\nsissippi the grain continues to grow luxuriantly.\nTexas reports boom injury by drouth, and It la\nprobable that some wheat land in Texas will he\nploughed up for other props. but Twcas is an unim\nportant State. In wheat growing. The latest re\nports a.\u00ab to acreage Indicate as large an area as\nlast year. No prospect of damage by the Hessian\nfly is reported In pome parts of Ohio a few BaMs\nare showing yellow from cold, wet weather, but\nlocalities are scattered. In Indiana conditions\ncontinue most satisfactory, and the acres is\nequal to or la excess of last year. The cold. w*l\nweather has retarded th* growth somewhat In\nIllinois, hut the crop is thrifty and promising. In\nMisssouti some reduction in acreage is reported,\nbut from present indications there will be a good\nyield, owing to exceptionally good conditions. In\nKan the acreage la less than last year, but the.\naverage condition Is almost perfect, and far higher\nthin usual. Very little of the growing crop was\nwinter killed. The\\\u00ab\u00bb ar\u00ab the important winter\nwh?at. States.\nFORM A BROKERAGE FIRM- Everett I*\nCrawford. Grorge J. Dyer and Henry B. Cannon\nhay\u00ab formed a stock brokerage copartnership\nunder the firm name of Crawford, Dyer & Cannon.\nA NEW STOCK EXCHANGE FIRM.-The part\nnprship of Sternbach & Co. has been dissolved by\ncommon consent. Th* partnership of Popper *\nStern baa also been disso'ved. A n\u00abw firm ha*\nbeen organized to succeed the two firms men\ntioned, nmlcr the title of Popp\u00abr * Sterne. at\nNo. 30 Broa<i-!>t. It is composed of Kdward Hopper.\nSydney M. Sternbach and Arthur W. Popper, who\nare all members of the Stock Exchange, and Simon\nHahn. George. W. Stern retires from active bast\nii.-s to take \u25a0\u00ab long needed r<\"!\u00abt. Ado'ph Hoeland.\nformerly of Stern & Co.. retires from artlve\nbusiness.\nHEAVY NET EARNINGS.\nRailroads reporting net earnings for Marrh show\nthe follow Ins gains as compared v,!th the same\nmonth a year aeo:\nI^hi\u00ab?h Vall-v ..: $\u00bb72..\".71\nReading (all companies) \u00ab\u00bbn.4 r \u00bb4\nKrie 012.2^^\nI'nlon Pacific 261. \u00ab73\nCanadian Paflfi.- afO.Mft\ncentral Georgia U\u00bbI4A\nAtlantic. Coaal Line H.< \u2022\u2022><\nSouthern Railway JJfiS\nSt. Panl 'i!'??s\nB'iffa!<\\ Rochester tad Pltwburf? .. \u2022 *-?fj\nCh'-sapeakc an.! Ohio 1 *- \"';!\nciilca\u00dfi and East Illinois \u2022 \u2022 \u25a0 T'' - S\u00bb\nNew- York. Su?.jnehanna and Western 'V . -\nWisconsin Central 1,22\nChicago and Alton '.' - *\nNew-vork. Optarto and Western 1T55\n\u25a0 >'-.rjrl-i Southern and Florida T-'Sa\nTUlnois Central '\u2022 ._:\"\nWaba\u00abh iiii\nCleveland. C.; c. and St. L ; oS?\nHiking VaKey \u2022 Jj - *\nPeorla and F:a\u00abtern .- 1L1.\u00ab ft'orv\nrinclnn New-Orl\u00ab\u00bbn\u00ab and Texas Pacific \u00ab>-ii\nA talama Great Southern \u2022\u00ab&.'<<\nAtchison \u2022\u2022>\u25a0{ tc~\nMinneapolis and ?\u00bb. IV'ls .\n--r,7c r e,.e\nCOMPETE FOR EASTERN TRUST STOCK.\nNo further action was taken yesterday by the\nEastern Trust Company Interests opposed to con-\nROiidatton with another trust company. Represen\ntatives of the Van Norden Trust Company, be\nlieved by some Wall Street men to be Interested in\nplans to secure control of the Eastern Trust Com\npany for purpose* of consolidation, *\u00abjj\u00abf >'-,T d\nterdav that the Van Norden Trust Com a \"> did\nno i desire such consolidation. It was reported\nthat the Windsor Trust Company wa\u00ab ***\u2122\u2122**\u00b0 l\nobtaining control of the Eastern Trust C nmpw.\nand yesterday afternoon many of the \"t^Kholriers\nof the latter company received copies of a circular\nsigned by a E. G. Goodrich, stattnar thai he could\nobtain 193 for the company's stock, and ', \"' l ' < ' ; l\nwell to see him before selling at a =mnl!.-r .flsu^.\nThe offer made by th* supposed r\u00ab\u00bbprejentati% ea of\nthe Van Xor.'.en Trust Company was figured at \u2022\u2022-\ndirectors* of the Eastern Trust Company will\n.^end out a monthly statement to-day. which may\nhave some effect on the decis on 01**\u00b0?**?%?'*\nto retain their holdings or sell to t hose /\u00a3*\u00bb\u00a3<>\ncontrol Many of the stockholders have declared\nthat the company Is in a way to acquire an ex\ncellent business under Its present <*\"**\u00a3\u00ab\u00a3?\nmanagement, and they are opposed to any plan ror\nconsolidation with another company.\nOUTSIDE SECURITIES.\nSpeculation in outside securities \u00ab\u25a0\u00bb\u25a0 dull. The\nmarket showed a generally easier tone, although\nthe variation\"? in price? were confined to a narrow\nrange. Aside from the strength dex-eloped in Cen\ntral foundry shares there was little feature to the\nmarket. There was a good Inquiry for these Issues.\nalthough the amount of stock brought out was\nlimited. The common advanced over *i. the pre\nferred 1 p.r cent, whilP the 6a gained 2% per cent.\nNorthern Securities opened firm, but on lisht\nofferings declined over ! per cent from the last\nclose In the subsequent dealing? they recovered\nnearl\\ all the loss. International Mercantile Ma\nrine common whs a shade firmer. Electric Vehicle\nshares were steady but inactive. American \\\\ rlt-\nIn? Paper preferred declined nearly 1 per cent on\nlipht offerings. Standard Oil advanced 8 points.\nAmerican Can Shares, under light selling: pressure\ndeclined '< per cent for the common and over 1\nper cent for the preferred. The copper shares were\nweak Greene Consolidated lost % per cent. Mon\ntreal and Boston % per cent. Tennessee Copper - 4\nper cent: I'niteil Copper sold down 2 per cent, asM\nlater rallied I per cent.\nMISCELLANEOUS SECURITIES.\nSTOCKS.\n(FurnislH . -\u25a0 Frederic H. Hatch. No. 30 Broa* ?\u2022>\n\u201e\u201e\u2014 - 1 Dlv.l Dlv! ) J\nI rate. I period. I Bid. lAsk'd\nAmerican Brass ! \u00bb~~! Q^ I I\u00bb | 14.\".\n.\\meri.-;)n <\"an I \u2014 I I \u2022 I \u2022 *\nAmerican Can pre* | \u2014 j 4 -\u00bb I 4:i\n.An.eri<:in Bank Nnte ... i \u2014 I \u25a0\" i 7-\u00bb 58\nAmerican B-x-k Co i \u2014 \u2014 133 14\"\nAmerican Chicle I 10 Q-J I 116 I 120\nAmerican Chicle pref I \u00ab <J-J M I f-\nAmerican Thread Co. pref..| S Q-D ! 3'i \u2022\nAmerican Graphophone I 8 Q-t> 4 \u2666\u25a0*\nAmerican Graphophone pf..| 6 Mo 8 | *\u00bb\nAmer. Press Association I \u2014 81 95\nAmer. H---.ii Foun. com. ...I \u2014 \u2014 3 6\nAm. Soda Foun. it pref 1 \u2014 \"\u2022'. : no\nAm. Soda Foul '3d pref.... 1 4 I Q-J I 18*; -1\nAmer. Typefounder** I * I Q-J \u25a0\u25a0\u2022> I 41\nAmer. T>pefounders' pref...| 7 Q-J ; M | 100\nAmer. Writing Paner, pom.\", -r i i \u2022\u2022\u25a0\u00bb! i\"\u00bb\nAmer. Writing r \"r r ref . . i \u2014 | - - | -\" : '-'\nBarney &S. rai \u0084r..f... I \u00bb ! Q-M 1 \u2014 \u25a0 132\nBay gtat\" Gas. ...... i \u2014 I \u2014 I 5-16; tS\nBorden*s Cbnd. Milk pf i <> I i I<'. 1 H\u00bb>_\nBritiFh <v.lumbia r-.pper 1 \u2014 I I 4S; \u00bb T -\u00bb\nCasein CO. cf Aaserica i \u2014 | - - i 12'; i.-'i\nCasein Oj. of America pf.. 8 ! Q-J \u25a0 f \"'\nCen. Fireworks com \u2014 F& A -\u25a0 24\niv,,. Fireworks prrf I \u2014 \u2014 '''I\nCen. &So Am Tel I * | Q-J ISB I l<>-*>\nCbesebrongh \\lf_-. . . .V I Mo 1 4*\u00bb 4&>\nClallin (11. B.) Ibl pref I S I QF : \u25a0 | l->\nClaflln (H. 15.) 3d pref I 6 I Q-J ! 100 I 105\nCompr^sse'l Air ......... 1 \u2014 j I '\u25a0' 2 4\nCon. Car Heating ! V F* A I \u00ab\u25a0\u25ba j \u00abm\nCrampsS. & E. BMg I 311 To\nl''>minion Securitif^ . . . . i \u25a0\u00bb\u25a0 J 5 I 2<>\nElectric Loa.l Reduction .. 1 i ! I 1:!I 1 :! I *\nBlectric Boat com . \u25a0 -- I 2S 1 2s\nElectric Boat pre* ! \u2014 . \u2014 - : \u25a0'\u25a0\u2022'\u25a0 4S\nKlo.-trlc Vehicle com i \u2014 j \u2014 \u2014 - 11% ' 12'\u00bb\nFTlectri.- Whicle . r*f i \u2014 I \u2014 ! i- 1 * 1 I\u00ab'*\nKlei-tro-rnrumatic I \u2014 j *\u00bb '*\nKinpire Steel \u25a0\u25a0ni j -- 14 I M\nEmpire St-^I prer 1 \u2014 \u00bb I \u2014\nGreene Con Copper i \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 22 u j; S3\nHall Signal j \u2022 Q-J 110 I 113\nHackensack Meadows.. 1 \u2014 * 12\nHavana Tobacco I \u2014 I 47 ! 4S\nHavana Tobacco pref I -- ! 89 6O\n. Hall Marvin I \u2014 I \u2014 \u2014 i 2' 2 3'^\nKerrine-Hail- Marvin Ist pf.l \u2014 I ' 38 4<>\n1 Hall-Marvin 21 pf. \u2014 \u25a0\"\u2022 10\nHorwken F-rry I \u2014 lO.> \u2014\nHolxiken Land & Imp I \u2014 | M \u2014\nHudson River Tel ! \u2014 Q-J J>s 10^\nInter Rap. Tran?. \"Opcpd.' \u2014 101 104\nIntf-r Rap. Tran\u00ab. full paid. i \u2014 1..1 | i>*4\nIn;--r Mci Marine com.. 1 \u2014 --- I<> ! 11\nInter Mer Marti pref ; \u2014 | I .\u00bb SI\nInternational Hanking I \u2014 I ] ISS 205\nInternational P;ilt I \u2014 | j \\(* 12\nlr.tTn*t\\>.m\\ Silver pref. ...J -- i \u2014 I \u2014 \u25a0\nJ. B. Stetson com I 15 1 J & J ' \\<V> \u2014\n3. B. Stetson pref ...-I \u25a0 I i a .i I 14<\u00bb I 160\nLJgW F. v<i V. Co. of W. Va ! \u2014 ( \u2014 I 31 { 31 'a\nLoriUard pref ! 8 | Q-J I 138 j 12-^\nMddtson Square Garden . . I \u2014 ! i M \u2014\nManhattan Trans I \u2014 [ | 4S IJ4\nMontreal A Boston Copper. I V 1 l\"\u00bb 1T\u00bb1 T \u00bb\nMerKenthjiler Unotjrpc I 1A | Q.I IS.I |Ml\nN V *E. R. Kerry I 4 ! Q-M *2 1 \u2666\">\nX. Y. Loan & Imp ! 4 j Q SB -\nN. V &X. J. Tel I 7 Q I I\u00abS 1*55\nmem-Pond com 1 I Q M | 138 \u2014\nNorthern Securttl* ....... ' \u2014 ] | >\u25a0> i I\u00bb*U\nfitis Elevator I \u2014 ' ; 42 | 42'\u00bb\notis Elevator pref i \u2014 j O.V 3 i PH\nOld Dominion S. S. . ..... I I ! Q- I 120 \u25a0 -\nPacific Parkins .<- Sax. com \u2014 I _ IIS\nPacific Packing & Nat prefi _. . \u2666 I\nPratt & Whiter pf, new 1 ft Q-F I a> ( \u2014\nProcter. & Gamble '. 12 ' Ana f 340 S3O\nrr.Tter & Gamble pref ! 8 ! Q-.T !-. .\u2022> ! 21\u00a9\nnr^al Bak'ns I'-'wJer pref.. : .-. | Q-J \u2022 103 | I-\"\nSafety Car Heat \u00a3 I>isht...i \u2022> j Q-J > 1\u00abS ' 1\"\nSeaboard Air U\u00abe I \u2014 ! \u2014 i \u2022.\u2022:.% 3\u00bb<i\nSeaboard ' Air LJm pr I \u2014 ; 12 \\ \u00bb-' ' j\nSimmon* Hardware c0m....| 8 An-F 133 I 1\u00ab\"\nSimm.-iis Hardware Ist pf-. \u2014 __ 133 \u25a0 M.i\nSimmons Hardware 2d pf..\". \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 133 145\nSinger Mfc. Ob \u25a0 '\u25a0- Q-J \u2022\"'\" S*>\nStandard Oil ' V I Q-M ! BJS | \u00ab\u00ab?\nStandard CoupJer V Q-M ;-\u25a0\u25a0.- \u25a0\u2022.\u2022-.\nStin.lar.l Coupler pref I S J & J ! ]::>> : 140\nStandard Flour Milling I \u00bb;\u25a0 . *\nStandard Flour MIU. pf I \u2014 27 | .'<\u2022\nStorage Power j \u2014 I % 1\nSwift & Co \u2014 \u2022 1M 11!>\nIf>th \u00a3 2.'M Str\u00abw\" Kerry 1 \u2014 Q-J I \u25a0\u25a0\" | 70\nTe;ine\u00abH.\u00bbe Copper i \u2014 | 2S ! -*> ' \u25a0\nTonopah Mining of Nevada. \u2014 9 I '\u2022\nTrent. ni Pott-Ties com I \u2014 I 2-- J \u25a0_\u25a0\u2666\nTrenton Potteries new pf...i $ Q-M M 9i\nTrow Directory, new t \u2014 1 - lit \u2014\nCr.ion Ferry I \u25a0 ! Q-J 37 | 4<>\nColon Switch A Signal I . \u2014 I 1\u00bb\nUnion Switch & Signal pf. \u2014 \u2014 210\nUnion Typewriter com i \u2014 115 i 11\u00bb'\u00bb\nL'nlon Typewriter lit prel 7 A*\u25a0 \"\u2022 us J 122\nUnion Typewriter 2rl pref...: S A It O 11* j 1-2\nITnlveraal Tubacco c\u00ab-m ! -- 2 5\nKnlverral .Tobacco pref ! \u2014 r. *\nIT. s Enrtlope com ... I \u2014 ' 10 20\nIf.\" S.\" Envelop* pref I \u2014 TO 73\nV. S. i-.las-s !\u25a0\u00ab>\u00ab I \u2014 .\"\u00bb4\nV .- Gla\u00bb pref I \u2014 -ti. !'. ,\nU. \u2022;\u25a0\u25a0:- ! * ! 73 \u25a0 \u00ab2\n1! S. St\u00abel .*.\u00bb \u00ab\u00bb*\u00ab! W4\nWCBtlnirhouse Air \u2022 the ...I v Q \u2022 \u2022:\u00bb\u25a0\u2022 | 3rii>\n\\V..rthin=ton Pump pref ! 7 ! M .v N ! I 3\u00ab I 123\nWhite Knob Copper i \u2014 ! I 12S! I:*.\nBONOS.\nl im-.j. t'iv.~j 1 \u25a0\nI nil I period. | Bid. [Ask.i.\nAmerican Writing Paper '\u2022? I \u2022\"\u2022 1 J * J I 75 | 77\nHarney & FiiMth Car I \u2022* I* J 110\nCarnegie Steel 5s i \u2014 110 113\nC. & O drain Kle\\ator Inc. ! \u2014 15 25\nP. \u00ab O. Onli Elevator I 4 A A <\"\u2022 S5\nHf-cker-Ji.nrs-.leweil I \u00ab M a I M io\u00ab>\nHoboken U\u00ab I I 5 MAN 105 _\nInter. Mat Marino I -- \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u2014 \u00abV\nInternational Silver -I \u2022 .1 * D i \u00ab\u00bb Ni\nUadlaon Sq'.iaie Cnrifn Ms. \u00ab MA N 75 \u2014\nMaine steamship I \u2014 70 so\nMetropolitan Kerry Ist \u25a0 MAN IM \u2014\nN. .1. Steamboat.' ...IS MAN 0O Jls\nN. V. aN.J. f. i' 1 I 5 M* M l'V> 103\nNew-York BkirnK I I MAS 11* :\nN. Y. A N. J T I 5 J & J 112 \u2014\nStandard Flour Milling I \u2014 7rt 7*\nSwift & Co. l\u00abt 5 .i * J 101 \\\u00abl\nTrenton Potteries Fda ctf\u00bb.' 4 J * J 71 : 75\nlOth A 23d Street Ferry 6 J * J I 102 , l\"rt\nT\u00ab-x\u00abs ,<\u2022 Pacific Coal lata... \u00ab a & o I itm lift\nV?nlon Ferry lati t 5 M * N ft* 07\nV. S. Envelope.. I * J4 J I 10i ! 113\nGAS COMPANHS.\nNEW YORK.\nBM A\u00bbk\u00bb<i I 3 ,\nCan b Oaa .\"-\u2022. '.\"\u00ab\u00bb 111 I'STAERJ, \u201e *??\u2022*\u2022\nf',r.^bj..... li'\u00bb IM I -i\" stnrk . '.I JU\n\u2022Kd Ist Con 5\u00bb.11.\"V 113 Standard . \" lift !J*\nMutual 3ni\u00bb 320 ! \u00ab!\u00ab p,.f JIIISS ri.\n\u2022N Am O\u00bbt 5* l\"7'j |0\u00bb4; \u2022\u2666> i\u00ab .1* .... 1 jj;\nOTHER CITIES.\nAm L. * Tr fj \u2014 I \u2022.. p.\u00ab [\u0084 .Vi m m...\n<\u00bb<> pr\u00bbr. oh !4\u00ab> ,1 v o \u00ab o *;.._. \u00abi *\nlia't (Vmvil 7. 74 UNtl Qtst\u00abi a\ndo I\"' S\u00bb 112 1!.'\u00ab !Ind 'lan '. 7* % . .\n\u2022Bingn Gai .\"*.. or. '*\u25a0\u2022 j <j o \u2022\u2022\u2022 \u00ab, jOlj ol im\nBurtalo \u00bb;as 7 !<\u00bb ! Ja-lc ..M!^h> c, _ fJJ\n\u2022Jo 5\u00bb 7a 7>> \u2022(!/\u00bb.'!\u25a0 ma ,?,\u00a3\n\u00ab;ii Cor. Ist .v\u00bb .I'll 1 \u2022\u2022 J*K C Oas Co s<\u00bb 10t> liv.:\nl f: 11 1,1 M (Laf <Ja\u00bb t\u00ab \u00ab,.. .'\u00ab V *\nlot \u00abs Wj IOC it,*'.VVli[\u00bb,. ;,| _\nrh P <\u2022;*'\u2022 i\u00bbt ;\u00abm .'. \u2022-.\u00ab. tut *\u00bb.io\u00abi 115\n\u00ab9 M IM \"\u25a0' * IN i Con\nd024\u00abl 1\"! I'^4 : Cm\u00bb Co * t\u00ab\ndo \u00ab'\u2022-\u25a0.. fid 117 125 104 Inil Gas *\u00bb. :,2 g\u00ab\n\u2022\u25a0\u2022 c <; r*f .V...ia% no ! pat & Pas Ga\u00ab. 2n 2%\nCcjlarn fsa\u00ab . r \u00ab..l(i\". lf>S ' l irt!\u00bbCm -la\u00bbss.ti\u00ab?\u00bb \u2022\u00ab\u2022\u2022\n\u2022 \u2022nn dof XJ... \u2014 !\"\u00bb ' *Pt Jo r,\u00bb r\u00abi. . \u2022>.', M\n<lo 5s 8* 92 I -St P Gas <-on .^\u00bb SS \u00abl\nDenver Oas.--. 2T .41 ; 9 \u00a3c, e^n m!f \u00ab-* !. 4 n.%\n\u2022do a 5. . .. 7<> \u2014 I *.*\u00bb L * Tr .\"\u25a0!\u2022 . *7 r>\nFt \\v Ist \u00ab\u00ab \u00bb2 *J i'syr Gs\u00bb l\u00bbt Sa. 3s wv*\n\u2022An<l interest.\nGUARANTEED STOCKS.\n(Qnotatlena fjrr.tshed by Joserh Walker * Sens. JJOI 9\n\u25a0ssal <\u2022 \u00ab\nI Dtv.i Div. I I\nI rate. I period. I Bit lAiir-j.\nAlbany A- Snag <D* II | \u00bb i J A 1 2r.f\"Z\\~2i2~\nAlb ,t Vertnoiii 1 D Ji il> :'. 1 M*c N I 1\\ _\nAl!e\u00bb A- West R P. V r>.. \u00ab J A J 147 _\n.VI * Cnari A L (9a I R\u00bb. .; 7 . MA 3 I.V\u00bb iWo\nAugu\u00bbta & Say *C of aa>...| -*\u25a0 .1 A J 117 \u2014\nAGA Mt M iE-t\u00bb RR> -! \".'i: I A I ' is! -\nEeerh c'k .N T A IRKRi i ! Q-J , I~i | _\nU\u00abrk\u00bbhire \u0084V V N\" II v H>. ! * i Q J ; IC2 _\ni>l*\u00bbcke r Jt A KFiM S Jo. I I'a J \u00ab J i XI _\nTV-.\u00abt A Albany >N T \u00bb'\"> ; * ' Q-M ' 2V\u00bb 2T.7'i\nCost A Lowell -B A Mi. .. * J & J 242 2it\nBost A Prey iOM Colony \u00bb..| 1O ; Q-J , 2:*.', j,jo\nttro*l\u00bb\u00ab\u00bb*S Av(JlSt(i..i 1\u00bb> j Q-J I 243 | \u2014\nBrooklyn Cl\u00bbr RR 'B RTI-, 10 \u25a0 Q-J \u25a0 2Vt ! 244\nCam A Bur Co <P RR> '. \u00ab \\ J&J .W4! _\nCatawij\u00aba F: X l^t pf \"PAR\u00bb 3 ; M ...\nCatawtsaa It K2l pf <P4H 5 ! MAN ' \u25a0^\u20226.,\nCayuga & Sun (D i. A W)..| J\u00bb J * J i 212 \u2014\nOrtrai cr RRCo<M ri R>- -I 1\u00bb> Q-J i 240 -\nCentral P N A V. R R \u25a0 C\u00bb!\n01 a R> ....... I \u2022 Q-J 212 \u2014\nOiatt A Gulf Cof Oa> I \u2022\u2022 J A t 135 \u2014\nCneatnijt HIM (P AH, . \u2022 -\u25a0 \u00ab\u00ab-M *> \u2014\nC AI M com ISLAar etf j 4 J \u00a3 J 91 \u2014\nCAvlpt<S LA SF> It.. \\ 4 Q-J j 7<\u00bb \u2014\nCttrirt A l\"th St iM S R>...l \u00bb I Q-J I 175 _\nn\u00ab\u00bb & .... ni ! 1: q-m [m tn\nCol A Xenia <P R P.. I \u00bb I Q-M 10 I 2l:\u00bb Z2T,\nConrorrt A Mont ;3 A M'-.: 7 ', Q-.T I'<S [ l>i\nConcord * Port (Conn it \u25a0>. I 7 ] J A J j lt>7 \u2014\nConn APP.pf <B * '.' \u2022 I \u2022* ; FA A I !\u2022\u00bb j -\nCcn River 'B AMt I W !JA J i 2.\u00ab5 [2M\nr>av A Mich pf (C II A V). J 8 ! Q-J ! 2'J5 ! \u2014\nDel A Bound Bk <P ,v R) - . S ' Q-F , 20?>H\\ \u2014\nD*t H .<- S W\u2022L.- A \" ?)- \u25a0 I 4 [JA J5 ; 163 I 1\u00ab*\nDry nock (E r; AC, I \u00ab ! Q-F j 121 130\nHast Mahanny ! \u2022'\u2022 ' J & D I srt | -\n\"as- Perm 1f1*.., I \u00ab 1 J A J i 724| 75' i\nEastern Maine (Me Cent] ' 4 ! i M \u00ab >\u2022' I kM \u2014\nElmira *. W com \u00abN C\u00ab*l 4..V?. M \u25a0 N I lf> \u2014\nElmira A W pref \u2022: Cent). .[ \u00ab.2\u00ab' J& J I 155 \u2014\nEri-! * Kal it SAMS I 10 ! F A A ' 2!-O \u2014\nErie & Pitt? -\u2022-- Co> i 7 1 Q-M ' l.^'j \u2014\nFitchburz pf -B A M : 5 ! Q-F ' Ml ' I*2 : 2\n\u00ab2d St vG?t ViM R.-.-i IS \u2022 Q-F 400 ! \u2014\nFt \u25a0\"\" AJ pf <t. SA M S>. .'\u25a0 :i: i M&9 IMI I 152\nGa R R A B Co (A C I- A ! 1\nCAN. ! 11 Q-J ; 233 \u2014\nCoshen A Decker 'E B R)..| 4 April ! *> 1 \u2014\n-and River V 'Mich Cent;. 5 JA J 13] I*> - \u2014\nGreene n r .r> L\u2022. W)....| * J4 D | 14.' ! -\nHPMr.r Al. \u2022;\u2022 R R>. \u25a0\u2022 ! \" JA J ! 10ft'; ( \u2014\nHart A Conn W iC.VER). 2 lr*A3l| 2\u00bb> , \u2014\nHerref 'Ma;-.- Centra -I I ! MA N ! \u00bb1 | -\nIllinois Cen L.LHCRRi.I 4 ! J v J IMH] 107\nJa'-k I. A 8 (Mich <~entral>. J 3 f i] MAS! S3 \u2014\nJol A Oi'.c (C Aa R\u00bb ... I 7 ; Q-J IS7 \u2014\nX A AOK<L S A M S>...| 5.90- A A 0 ! 143 I \u2014\nXC F AMpfiS L a SF)| 4 Q-J \u25a0 7* $9\nLake Shore g a (1-9*31 Si 10 IJ&J I\"- \u2014\nLittle Miamt .P'-C AS Li. iV Q-M [ 225' t\nT. - N F; v XC-P A R'- - i \u25a0 ! ' A ' '2 to\nLo AUs R .\u2022\u25a0\u2022*%\u2022. i 7 \u25a0F A A 1\u00abA i 157-,\nLykens Valley (.Nor Cent).. l 5 Q-J j 4O \u2022 \"\u00b0\nMahon Coal pf \u2022:. SAM S>.l \u25a0'. I I* .T ! 100 ! HO\nMan A Uwrran -B A M.-.! 1O IMA v; \u00bb\u2022 -' '\n>!\u00bb\u2022\u25a0?\u00ab Valley i.'& P X li). \u00ab IF A A | 19\u00ab \u2014\nMine HI IA3H <P A R>.-| '': : '- J ; \u25a0\u2022'\"i *\u2022\"'\u25a0\u00bb\nMob & Wrna pf 'So R: ... ; 4 iJ * J M \u2014\nMob A Ohio <S Rtr ctf.\u00ab0...1 3-4 !A A O PO | 05\nM -C \u2022 BCo mm r. vr. ! 4 ! -\u25a0 A a \u00ab3\nMb* Cft B Co pf \u2022!. v R>...! !\u2022> i FAA ! IP-3V -\nMorn. & nw\u00abDL*w): 7 ; Ja j i t^ \u25a0\u25a0. m\nNashua A Lowell .8AM...! \u00bb MA X 262 .2*?.\nNash A De^atur 'L A N>. -I 7!j: J A J M\u00ab | \u2014\nNaagatoch (N V N II A H>l 10 I J A J 1 2.0 . \u2014\nN J Trans Co (P R X) 10 2,3 \u2014\nNew-London Nor \u2022\u2022'\u2014. V>.. \u00bb Q-J 210 \u2014\nN V R A M B pf 'L. . . . I A A O 8(> \u2014\nVTft H IC A H R). . 5 4 J J AAO \u00bb'. 405\nXTLAW O> L A \u25a0\u00bb>.... * Q-J J35 13S'\u00bb\nNinth Av.ti. \u00abMet M Ry>.. \u00ab ! Q-J \u00ab\u2022\u2022 \u2014\nNorth Carolina (So Rv.....| 7 jF & A 170 \u2014\nNor rrof x j *Erte> \u00bb 4 ! Q-M . \u2022\u2022 , -.\nNor Perm <Ph!l AP. Rv>...l \u00ab Q-F l\u00a3J'i IW>*\nNor \u00abNH\u00ab R R B*3ie>.. <\u00ab ' Q-J ' !\u2022<> ftW\nNor & TV\" rf ' TXII4B) 1 * ' Q-J (230 232\nO!,1 Colon v INTSII4HI..I 7 ; Q-J 206 '*\u25a0\nOsw A Syrarnse -P L A VT, \u00bb |F A A 23> 232\nPat ft Hod River <Erie> 1 S tJ A J J* . \u2014\nPat A Ramapo <Erle> \u00ab JA J W \u2014\nP-o &F. Val (C RI A P>.-.! <* FA A . 20* \u2014\nPhil Ger ft Nor <P A R)--- 12 I rA J 1\u00ab\u00ab* 169 \u00ab\nPhila A Trenton (Penn>. I 10 Q-J : 2.5 \u2014\nPitts Be\u00abs A L Ertecorn(B \\ I I\nft LE A Caracxic \u2022 \u00bb>-.. I A&OI 34 I Z<%\ndi. pf ft I> * CCo).. I J* D \u00bb \u2014\npFtw A C ger.l iPer.n)...| 7 Q-J 1?5 i*>\nP McKAY (PALEALMS>. \u00ab Ja J 1\u00bb \u2014\nPitts ANoA<B AA> I 5 JA J \u25a0 I^s \u2014\nProv A Spring iNew-Er.\u00ab). -\u00ab I Q-M3l 10* -;\nPrm-iTVIxTNHSHI..! 1O ! Q-M 2\u00bb.. ! 29.\nQuinrr Bri.l e <C B A Q>.-| 1\" \u2022J \u00a3 J J^ -_-\nR-nf ft Sara 'D A H Co>..| S '3ft 3 2^ T *\nKorh A Gen v (F.rle* I \u2022 I J A .r : 125 i \u2014\nRoma A Clinton 'Del A H>. \u00ab% J* r ;2 ,^\nRome WAOr -N to- \u25a0 I Q-F f 13->H 13\u00bb\nRut & Whitehall .R A 5)... ! \" I Q-F 15 I IM \u2014\nSara. A S (Del A Hud> I I 3 *J. I ITS \u2014\nAharon Ry .Erie. \u2022IM *S | 11J \u2014\nSo'.irrtw iGa) (Cent of (\".\u00ab>.. 9 ! .TAT I 113 1--\nS-puvten DAMIM(N TO- 8 J& J I -WV \u2014\nStork APCXT XII &H).. ; * Q-J 15 V. \u2014\nSecond Avenue .MS \u00ab> 9 Q-M 213 \u2014\nSixth Avenue ,M S R\u00bb 7 Q-F 175 ;\nsn\u00bbast earn ! 34, q-f \u25a0 \u2014\nTroy- A Green WTO I 7 \\5 A D r\u00a3 \u2014\nTwenty-third St (M S R>...! 1* Q-F W -\n'- n'r Rft c co .pr r>.: v* : q-j ->\u2022:*>\nI'ppf-r (\u2022\"\u2022>\u00ab (Maine Cent>...! * MAN 145 \u2014\nrti-a AB R R V.- ft 0>... 7 jJI&SJO IS3 \u2014\nUCiSVipLft VI-) * MAN WW 163\nvc a \u25a0 <r> an> .i P4AP n: -\nValley of x v d L ,<- VT>.. 5 tJ A J ! 125 1 \u2014\nV\u00bbrmcnt A Mass 'Fitet R;- - aaO 7, 172 \u2014\nWare River (B &A) 7 JA J l.*> \u2014\nWarren \u25a0VJ>(D L & W>.. 7 A.v O !$.\u00bb \u2014\nWilton 8H AA O 24-1 \u2014\nWorcester (Nash AR) \u2022'\"*' JA J 142 \u2014\nAmer Til & Cable \"\u2022 Q-M W \u2014\nCommercial Union t JA J 11-> i \u2014\nCom I'nlon of Maine \u00ab I 113 \u2014\nFranklin Telegraph 24 MiX 4'> \u2014\nGold A Stock Telegraph \u2022* Q-J 11\u00bb \u2014\nInt-r Ocean Telejrraph. ...... \u00ab . Q-J 113 \u2014\nNorthwestern Telegraph 1 8 1 J4 J 113 1 \u2014\nFac A Atl Telegraph I 4 I J A J 75 \u2014\nSouthern *.- At: Tel I 5 { AAO: \u00bb \u2014\nTRUST AND SURETY COMPANIES.\nI I Dividend. I I\nNam-. j Capital, i when j BM Ask?<i.\n1 payable. 1 !\nAlltar.ce- Realty. . '$3. WO.ooo: * Quar. J. | lO> I I*3\nVmer Surety C 0..! 2.500. .\u2014 \"> \u25a0\u00ab Quar. J. | IKS ITS\n8.1 A Mts Gr Co. 2.e\u00bbW00 l.v Quar. J. I SOO I \u2014\nEowtinp Green...: 2.5\u00ab.H>.00nj . 243 I \u2014\n- . \u2022\nBrooklyn i 1.W0.000- 14 Q'jar. J. 1 44.. J 4.f\u00bb\nOnturv Hlty Co.' l.\u00abv*U\u00bb\u00bb; *J. i J. ! 1\u00bb I \u00ab\u2022;\nOntral ! l .... .... .<\u00bb\u25ba Quar. J. 2.4>.'0 >2.\u00abV>\nCm. KBd i TCo i*oo,oan 16 J. &J. \\ -,: \u2022 j *-\u25a0>\n,'i ty ! 1 000.000 ' *T. v A. i am I 3SO\nContinental : I.ttXM>\u00abj| * Quar. J. j \u00abv> \u2014\nColonial : 1.000.W* l ft J- & J- 3*\u00bb ***\nEquitable ' S.o*V\u00bb. ( >\u00bb * J. & D. Tr*> \u2014\nEmpire Stm\u00bb.ir. 1.000.0001 175 1\u00ab\nEastern ' l.\u00ab*>O.rtO>V _._ . \\ I<V> !\u2022\u2022>\nfarmers' L. & T.. l.<*w>.oo<> *\u00bb Quar. F. i 1.400 1.5\u00ab\u00bb>\nFifth At* Tr Co. 1.000.000 17 Quar. T. 1 .'.7.1 | \u00ab0\u00bb\nF^at^us\u25a0n ' 3081,000 5J.4- J. 1 2OA : \u2014\nFranklin ; I.Uo*oW>| 12 Quar. J. | 37i> j \u2014\n..Juarnntv Tr Co..^ 2.iW.\u00bb.oi\u00ab\"> \u00bb Quar. J. 7rt> 725\nGuarrtlan ' \u00bb>0O.p\u00ab\u00bb '\u25a0 \u00bbJ SW\nHamilton I -m.. 000 * Quar F. \\ 32S \u2014\nlTuo?on R*altv... ; 1.00O.O\u00bb0, SJ. 4J. 10rt 12\"\nInter Uk - Corp... 3..XX1..HX) i \u2014 1\u00bb5\nKlntrs Count v. . ..; SMUOCO !\u2022> Quar. F. ; 415 \u2014\nKn!,s.'rt. ...i 1 '\u2022\u2022 \u2022\" 7J. v J. '\u2666\" \u00bb\u2022>\nLawjera* T A Ins; S.oon.ono -F. & .\\. SW \u00bb\nI, lwv prs' M 1 *~0. I 2.snft.\u00abX\"\u00bb .% J. *D. l\u00abf> I*>\nLone Is! L. & T.. I.iVO.\u00ab\u00bbX> 10 Quar. J. \u25a0 ZIO ! 3^\nIJnroln j o<lO.'W j 370 j *>\u00bb\nM.Vickar X Tr. . 300.000 J 2*> 27\u00bb\nManhattan ' I.O\u00abiO.iXV\u00bb l<> .T. AJ. ; SOO \u2014\nMerewUla ! 2.0\u00ab0.0iX> SO Quar. J. : I.U\u00bb 1 1.175\nMorton 2.0i\u00bb.n\u00ab0 -\u25a0\u2022 }uar J. I.W L<MO\nMerchart< i sflft.onO| } 300 < 32\"\nJTotrorolitan ! iOOO.OUrt: 10 j. .<- J. \u25a0 **5 | iW\nMutual I 3J\u00bb!000 * J AJ. \u25a0 I!*> j 219\nMutual Ainsir.ee. . ; .vm.om | 2*> ' 2\u00bb>\nS*f\\ Surety Co.\" 50\u00abMW\u00bbl l'\u00bb F. \u00abA. : ir> ! 1*\u00bb\nNorth Am Tr Co.: ..... 7J. AJ. ! *V> Z'.O\n.%%-,\u00ab,.! : .W.W 1 rt F. &A. ' 25<> I \u2014\nNVI.In JI Tr.. l.(W>.oo>v *> j. Ar\u00bb 1.220 [l.S<*\nv A S*curtt> A T l.onrt.m>> .12 Quar. F. IKS ' 1.37>\nN V Jtta tk See.\"; \u2022..\u00ab..\u25a0\u00bb\u00bb> -. .1. *J. 125 ;' I\"**\nPeople- \u00ab ' 1.M0.0001 12 Mthlv J. ' XS3 \u25a0 a>s\nK<\u00bb^l E\u00bbt\u00bbt\u00ab T Co! .-,00 .W> J-> J. AJ. ' KM 41^\nRealty A**x-ia?os! S.OflO.lWO! ', 113 | 13*\nStandard T ' 1 .\u00bb^,>o.> \u00ab .T. AJ. ! 57.% i 4t*\u00bb\nTitle Or Jt Tr O\u00bb \u00ab^ts.\u00ab\u00bbi 12 Qtsar J. ' *:\u2022> 9* 1 \"*\nTit!^ 1 \\\\* \u00bbf N V I.dOiX.IOO 13i> 1\u00bb\nTrail \u00ab'\u2022> \u00abt Am.. 2..'^>.\u00ab\u00bb^ 7J.A J. 2*> i\u00bb7^\nTr <*n ,^f Republic' 1 ...\u00bb. ,\u00bb.> 105 11\u00bb\nInion ' i.m>O.o\u00abv no Qwr 3. l.*2i> I.4*>\nI' \u25a0; M * T Ce\u00bb.~. *\u00ab\u00bb.COO 111 J. * J. 178 40\">\nmite.l state* 1 rooaonoi :.<> j. ,v j. i.\u00ab<\u00bb i.***\n\\an Nord\u00abn nl.\u00ab\u00bb.OOftj 2\u00bb 2*\u00bb\n-^Va^hineton I Vn>.oi\u00bbrt: 12 Quar. J. 4.\"\" 410\nWltliamsburs ....', \u00bbaOOO J. AJ. ! 27S j \u00bb\u00bb\nWim!\u00bbor t l.rtVi.OlO: ! 23* 2?<>\nWi\u00dfTftM Co\\ aia.\u00ab\u00abi .. \u25a0 \u2014 | tiw I \u2022\"'\nBOSTON STOCKS.\n\u00abFurntshe<i by R. f \u00bb Day &. Co.. X<x 3 Nassau-** >\nApr. \u00bb Apr. 30. i Apr 29 Apr 3&\nBom * Albany.. 2T.7 257 ILn Shoe Macb... I* 1 : *;\u2022\u00bb\nnmirr *M- ITI 177 i do pref .\"\u00bb >\u2022*\u2022\nIfewtcn E!ev IW 14\u00a3MAtlaattC Mm 12 \u2022-\n<-J K*V SV I \u2666!>\u25a0\u2022! IIS*\" Arcadian Mm 3*, \u00ab\u25a0\u00bb\nFltohburtr \u25a0' HP. i\u00bbv>- ptn s ham Mtn ...31 'I\nNYN H A H.~.a\u00ab! 2i\u00bb iral &. UkU \\! 325 9W\nOH Col*nv -\u2022>\u2022\"\u2022 3\u00b0\u00ab Centennial Mm.. 25H **?\u2022\nWest Erul St Ry BS \u00ab2 ;Copj* r Hans* M. *\u00bb'\u2022 ~,**>\n<J> pref ...til 111 iFrar.k:in Mm '' n > '?*\u00bb\nMass Eloc Oo\u00bb.~. 3' u j SI V.a\u00ab\u00ab con Msn... *\u00bb*\u00bb .\u00bb;\u00bb\ndo pr*f \"*7' t <\u00bb7i 3 MohawH Mln MS Hi\" 1\nlaTHI T Co. MB !<M \u2022>,\u2014 Mia ***\u00bb *\nStrm Fin TW...IM 13S |OM [<om Mil II B\nW IV! A T O\u00bb. M *21 Parrot Mtn 2? 1 \u2022 \u2022!\nrlo i\u00bbrrf fs\\ \u2022.'rt>~ \u2022 Qu'.ncy Mm It* ;1 *\n\\\\>*ting F.lec... m \u00ab8 ramar\u00bb.-k M!n...14.\\ \u00abv\n.Jo pref . to \u00bb 'Wolverine. Mtn... 71H \u00a3''\nDm Iron \u2022 S\u00bbtt. .TO 3*> It' S Mining 2**\u00bb r*\"2\nDsssk\u00dfkSS Coal..lW\u00bbi lf>6 |U S Otl **\u2022 \u25a0*\u2022\n\u2022 I *\u00bbd.",
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"text": "PHILADELPHIA STOCKS.\nBid. Asked, t Bid. A*V\u00bbd\n_ HlNorth Perm 10S IC9\nA*a\u00ab -V ]47 60 , i'hlU Co 44H 44%.\n>\"\u2022 Fern Ota- \u00ab% Perm R8 C 0.... 68 CSV,\nCon L S -JP ra 27 :7>siPena Steel oom.. &\u2022\u2022 M\ndo \u00bb,^ <te\u00abi'i 244 -*ii do pref 82 04\n*\"S*-\u00bb irj \u2022 E P*\u00ab S veto Co. \u2014\nCon Tr or \u2022 \u2022 \u25a0 . d 0 , vref __ ,\nl-fJitaifo' - 7 * Phtla Elec C 0.... 7^ 7\u00abi\nKJC -^L?* 1 72 74 Pnila R T 12S 12\u00bb.\nd 0 fjiir, >i* * Phila & Erlp \u2014 \u00bb\nr '*\u00b0 Srlf T Co! 24 =\u00ab =u\u00bb Iron & Steel. 2>4 2K\n> ' in *A^!f V A.' 2*-* \u00bb*%_( Tidewater Steel.. 3* 4\nXo VSJ Kav Tl \u2022\u00bb D Cos of N J... \u2014 rT7\nPiJifS VaJ R*R 424 43 Union Traction... 4<s\u00bbi MX\nLenJfh *\u00ab X \\% 3 c Oas , mp C 0.. .1074 107%\ng_U,i' a \u00bb\u00bb %'Weteb.ci Co 25 M\n\"do pre' * 2 '\nBONDS.\n. m fno ( Am 5i \u2014^i 22 Vi Newark Pass 85.114 iMjfc\ntSrwS coas.lo7l\u00bb 103i\u00bbiFecple-8 TTac 45.103H 103**\nl ? j Con > ..it.7s ** i Union Trao \u00ab....\u00ab\u00ab W\\i\nI_t AsT>balt 6s. \u00ab \"|_\nRAILROAD EARNINGS.\nEEABOARD AIK LINE.\nlwos. i\u00bbce. 1801.\nt-vird w\u00abeh la April... $ZH,HXi\u00bb $237.Cia $225,077\nEa/Sas^vriia. io.-&i.6i2 MtlMi b.\u00ab&6.7i\u00bb4\nATLANTIC COAST LINE.\nOr^^tSr^T\u2014 -\u2014\u2014- tLMmjm $752,914\ntlpwlnns e^*a*es.... Wi.a. \u2014*.\u00ab<\u25a0 4-SXOa\nNet e_xnlr.c- $4*05,07: J761.656 \u00bb34t\u00bb,i53\nV''v 1 m fsaccfa 31 \u2014\nCru~ .::,.:.\u00bb,.... S-X.a\u00dfe.as* $12,361 844 $5.50\u00bb,\u00bb7S\no;wrallng ei4.\u00ab:.ses . . . . b.54_i.W17 i.Mit.K7a ci,^li..3i\nNet earning. 8 nut.. $6.44tf.7<>7 $4,715,072 $2,^(1,243\nCIIICAOO. sttHrsUJKM AND ST. FAUU\n;t!^7...; t!^7... C.571 C 542 0.387\nWill earnjc.s $3.95*. .l2> $5.74v.0(^ $3,63\u00bb.'.5<U.\nCi^r-uai circuses.... ...... J.i i>. HI i,a>u,ioi\nNet earnings <s-g_BJ.TM \u00ab1,5e7._:0 $1,240, 7i4\nJmy i u< Ai*rca 31 \u2014\nCro_* ssous\u00abs- 536.0t3.241 $54.t>17.1*3 $32,50f1,C3i\n_\u00bbi<raUC\u00a3 *_^onsea.... i-..\u00ab<\u00ab\u00ab.\u00bb\u00abs \u2022!%\u00bb\u00bb. \"sW aw.fci\u00ab\u00bb.i\u00bbil\nNet \u00abo.rr:ng\u00bb 9 m05..513.i6^5\u00bb3 III HT \u2014 $11,700,723\nLEXINGTON AND EASTERN.\nG^r^L^\"-. MM $33.05 i $29,404\ncpciskuwj txi-ente*.... l<u\u2014 iu.nua l.,\u00bb^>\nNet eanuCfe-8 *i'i.,4US\u00ab *14,t>21 |U.w\u00bb\nig\u00a3\u00a3\u00a3iZZZ\u00a3Z. niub \u2022\u00a3.\u00ab* \u00bb*SS\ni_i\u00bb- ..Mt ana taxes... 30ajJS iv>-\u00ab >\u00ab\u00ab\nNet eaiJT.ii.ffs \u00bb \u25a0\u25a0. *iw>.<\u00ab>a tllijWl $y7,tii>J\nUNION PACIFIC.\nMor.-h of March\u2014\nJlrSr\u00abam_\u00ab_ M.oi*\u00bb.i^- $3.47\u00ab.\u00bb^ im-^\n_^iV\u00abui\u00ab\u00bb \u2014 ua ut-e* .-.\u2014-..u0l i.\u00bb\u00bb.x.^-\u00ab\nNet carting* ... |Lt)4^.Usl \u26661.\u00abu,4\u00abl CMKMbW\nT^\u00a3Z\u00a3Z!2\u00a3!si&uia \u00bb\u00bbi\u00df_C4os j3_y^\u00abB4\nNet ssjjs>ssji i) \u2014 tiTJgaflT fUjmUtm $14,4*0.\u00abk.\nILLINOIS HOC I*HhTWW\n_yj3 tIMB. CUangtb.\niwd 31. iioi*i m tac i*-\u00bb'-\nKSsV-K\u00abJB%at. ONTAKiO AND \u2022vBS'X'KBX.\nMonth of Marcn\u2014 _ JSM.7P9\ni aoo urn* <^,j\u00bb\u00bb^ \u2022>\u00bb aa * t> i\u00bbo.^\nv caiTjUigs' .... ' \u00abVisVs>si IVaMisl Inc. M\u00ab.\u00abJ*\nO-^r \u00a3\u00ab\u00a3\u00ab -\"-^ \u25a0*'\u25a0\u00ab\u00bb' *^J______i\nTotal income .... $I<*\u00ab*9 Ji*' Inc. |\nCkaaajes - '\u2022'\u25a0>\u2022\" \u2014 \u25a0\"\"\u2022 iU ~ T\u00b1\"_\nS urp.us IVMa. eW^\u00bb Inc. >3i,wa\nG^ e r r^i^rf^.SU W. 358.008 inc. 52.000\nimisjiii smh taxes o.>.a,i\u00ab.^ j.ic.-ia Me. .*o-o\u00ab&\nN..t earnints .. \u00ab1,0...K.T $1.1 ft.'..-.' Dec $W. 7.2\nC'-Jjer sasM BWfcssa lia.sst Inc. Uo.it-\nTotal income .... J1.07a.544 H.se*.TW Inc. \u00bb*-3\u00bb\nChaxses B**.\u00abO( w..w\u00bbo C ___*__-__.\nBsrplm *510.00b IwK^b\u00ab Dec Wi&W\nREADING.\nRAILWAY COMPANY.\nGrSTM-S?.^- 53.105.731 $2.4,0,129 Inc. $065,602\ni._i and renewals.. MMgeeS l.ila,Wl Inc. \u00abJ4-.b-l\nXetearningi t1.\u00bb,M6 \u2022\u2022\u00ab\u2022 Inc. _\u00a3\u25a0=\u25a0\u2022\u00bb_:\nGross t*min\u00ab=ymoE.s_:.t\u00abi..-.w; $2_._ wt .4SJ lac. *T \u25a0*\u25a0 /\nNet earnings 9 mos I\" \u2014 \" 5-.Ui..;.t71 DM. $77^.554\nCOAL AND IRON COMPANY.\nCi^&SK?^. $1.^.041 -\u25a0\u2022>'-'\u25a0' ? ec $74,245\nV\u00abt M rninr\u00ab 533^.\u00ab30 H<.*>l3 lac. *250.f1-3\n_*^s^p_gg_ gf_s as^aaa\nNet eamlnss \u00bbmm J1.tH.7.501 IUBUM Dec. imM\nREADING COMPANY.\n>et :.it\u00abs a nos. I,o_*.tT-tt IH4JMI inc. \u2014 *.-<\u00bb\nALL COMPAXIES.\nyjfSSS^T. SLCCS.3S4 51.022.050 Inc. :j\u00ab0.4\u00ab\nCharges taxes.\" W;l.\u00ab.\u00bbw > '\"\u00b1\": !\"\u25a0-\u2022 11-\"\nInc. 137.26^\nXct\u00ab-r__gi9\u00bbO\u00dfl=.Sl2.44\u00ab ?3.3--'6.5^ Dec. \u2022\"\u00bb\u2022.\u00bb\u2022\u2022\nINTERNATIONAL RAILWAY OF BUFFALO.\nI s ! - a:\u25a0 :\n\u00a3.rr:.::.:: *%S E: *^.S\nc m,i *117.7tS ?-Ci<S3 Inc. \u00bb\u00abo_^\nCasa on hanfi \"'\u25a0' ' \u25a0'- ,\nJ-rofit and loss\ntfurpl ap\u00ab 54C-. l-i\nBUFFALO CKCSSTOWN.\nQuarter er.defl March \u00bb1- 882.47S __.. $.-!2.954\nGrose earnings '^\u2022,1-1 irid in. 20,0*13\nearnings B?.\u00abJ* -*-. Sc S 0\n\u00ab! ! \" c i nconie -:::::: \u00abim $4i i ac -\nSS&T-xi'-* \u2022 1 *< 333 \u2022. 1054 Inc. 85.387\n\u25a0 *\nProfit and loas <sar- _\npl\u00ab> 210..16\n\u2022Dtf.cSt.\nGREENWICH AND JOHSSONVILLU\nQuarter endei lurch 31- Tne ?1 n , 8\nGross earnings 5 t\u00abOS Vnc, Inc. -.--*3\nN\u00ab famlr.es -%- *__^ inc. l-\u00bb\nOther lr.comc <\u2022\u00ab\u2022 4M j, ec . 38\nChargei r ,*-f. S KhJ Inc. 2.4-9\nSurplus ' \"\nTRADE IN CHICAGO.\nlUT TEIXGEArU TO THE TKIBUXE. 1\nChl<_j\u00a3 April 30.-There was an experience of\nISS^S all over the \u00ab*U* Id treez\nmorning as low as S decrees in Kansas and freei\nnggenerally over the Middle West. Yet the wheat\nSrS^Sd only KB* higher. This \u00abnofl _re\neponse by the price to a most abnormal \u00ab\u00ab*\"\"*\nEdition .as interpreted to mean that the leading\nbull interest here had met the bull news vnth lib\n\u00abral sales. May opened at 77c, sold \u00a3\u00bb\u00ab\"\u00a3*\nS7Uc and closea at 77>.ic July closed at .-l\u00bbe. sell\ner^, and the September at TOUc filers. The last\nprices showed Vs%c over yesterday. The predic\ntion was for Breezing weather again to-night an\never the important winter wheat States. The Eng\nlish cables were fractionally higher. Antwerp was\n_U c lower. Paris was irregular. The seaboard\nclearances were BMN bushels. The private\nvatora turned out about SO.OOO \u25a0>\u25a0- contract\nwheat this morning, and there was a cargo or\nrOOCfc bushels of wheat in from Duluth. The specu\nlative trade was hard to follow; but it \u00bb-i the\npopular view that there was selling of May. July\nand September by the Armour people. It is ex\npected that the deliveries on May contracts to-mor\nrow will be light, some winter wheat going round.\nIt is expected that the Armour shipments of No. 1\nNorthern will soon begin to show, Armour already\nhas some boats waiting to take out the M* Ml bush\nels No. 1 North' wheat in the Pe&vey elevator. .\nThe corn _\u00ab\u2014 was indifferent to the bad\nweather. It _ taken for granted that it is too\nearly a, the season for the corn to be appre\nciably Influenced by cold weather. The corn\nfutures closed lie lower to &c higher, the April\nand May showing the decline. There was scat\ntered liquidation by May holders. Armour was a\nbuyer of May and seller of July. The May pold\nat *44*ic and at 4tc bid. and closed at \u2022\u2022\u2014 ' sellers.\nJuly closed at 45\u00bb%c sellers. The Inspection was 102\ncars; the estimate for to-morrow. 185 cars. Cables\nwere fractionally hipher: board clearances were\nKI.9W bushels. Shipping sales from here were\n130.000 bushels.\nThe oats market had the same sort of experi\nence as the corn\u2014 weakness in the May because of\nliquidation, \"but firmness in the July and Septem\nber because of the cold weather. The close was\n*ie lower to *ie higher. The May left off at 23*\u00a3 c.\nthe July at Ma sellers, and the September at 2S^i,c.\nReceipts were 112 cars; the estimate for to-day.\n,I*3. Shipping sales were 73.000 bushels, but the\nEastern demand is poor.\nThe provision changes were unimportant. Pork\ndosed unchanged for the July and September, but\nlie lower or. the May. Lard and ribs closed un\nchanged to 2^c higher. Hogs were &c higher, with\nless her\u00ab than expected. At the Western points\nthere were 45.60 V. compared with 6&.000 last year.\nThe pecking West for the week was larger than\n*laet year. 232.000. compared with MMML Stock*\nher* increased moderately _ lara and ribs for the\n\u25a0mmfft.\nDividend Xoticcs.\nWmslow. Lanier & Co., 17 Nassau St.. N. Y. City.\nTHE INTEREST and DIA'IDENDS ON THE FOL\nLOWING BONDS AND STOCKS ARE PAYABLE AT\nOUR BANKING-HOUSE ON AND AFTER MAY IST.\n1MB:\nAmerican Cotton OH Cte. 4Hn.\nCleveland & Pittsbtxrck Railroad Co. 3%a.\nCambridge City. Indiana.\nConnernville. Indiana.\nGreenfli Indiana.\nGrant Co.. Indiana. Crave Road 6s.\nHarrison Co.. Indians.\nMarlon. Indiana. School 6s. . _\nPitta,. Ft. Wayne & Chic. Ry. Co. ltt & Cd Mtge. is.\nPortsmouth. Ohio.\nRuphvllle, Indiana. Water \u00aba.\nStark Co. led.. Court House Bs.\nMay 4. \u2022\nRochester. Ind., School.\nMay 15. .\nColumbia City. Ind.. Water 6s.\nDearborn Co.. Ir.d., Funding 5s\nNoblesvlUe. Indiana.\nOwen County. Indiana.\nPosey Co., Ind.. Gravel Roads.\nStark County Gravel Road Bond*.\nMay 21\nMarion Co.. Indiana. 3H?r. \u25a0 ______\nCoupons Maturing Hay 1. 1903.\nPayable at the office of\nN. W. HARRIS & CO.\nFIRST.\nIlaker Co . Ore.. School District No. 5, School Building.\nBlk StoaeCo Minn.. Refunding.\nIst Mart-\nSlimS 5 ! .^h^istrict No. 3. School Bu.ld\n;r.g Series \"H \"\nl\u00bb?7s'Pirc\u00ab la.. City R. B. Co . CcnsolWated Mortgage.\nJHiranpro. Colo.. Refunding Water,\nEast Portland. Ore.. Water and Light.\nKe-sn\u00bb pills.. Minn.. In -render,', School District Refund\ning.\nGlen Township. South Dak.. School.\nHawthorne. 111?.. SrliO\"! Building,\nlnd*-pen<\" -nc> e. In.. Electric Light.\nIthaca. Mich.. Water.\nJeffersonvi'.le, [nd. Refunding.\nJerseyviiltf. Hie., Refunding.\nLogan. Utah. School Building.\nLogan* Ir.ii.. Refunding.\nMacon. Mo., Sewer.\nfS22&\u00a3Bt\u00a3\u00a3SSs?\u00a3 Paving; Street Improve\nment.\nNew What com. V.'a^h.. Funding. ....\u2022._\u00ab ._. \u201e\nNorfolk. Vs.. Appropriation, Bond Series A and \"B.\nNorfolk. Va., Refunding.\nNorfolk, Vs., Smith's Creek Bridge.\nmSroU **itahonta\u00ab Valley Rr- Co. Ist Mortgage\nRefunding.\nPalaskj Co., tea.. Court House.\nRoane Co.. Term.. rur,.i:rg.\nRochester. Sad., Water Works.\nSalem. Ore., Funding. ' \"\u25a0*__.. v \u201e\nBait Lfk- Co.. Utah. School District No 2?.\nPhelbyvllle, Mo.. Electric Light Works. -\u0084\n$2tt\u00a3rGJtm-Mm\n(Colvllle).\nToluca. Ills.. Water Work*.\nwSS & W_& S3\u00a3fi&& Ko. 0 (Falouse).\nSSSST^-C^: fchr'Dfstrict No. 40. Funding CMc\nMinnvllle). g E COXD.\nLawrence Co.. 1.1, . **\u00a3\u2122\u00abg. No. = :\nMcna^ha. W )s .. \u2122fig*sgsg:\nPritt, la.. Water Works.\nUenastta. Wls.. Bridge.\nL, al ont. in... w \u2022\nPierce Co.. Wash.. School District No. S (Ternhlll).\nKNI.KERBGCKER TRUST COMPANY.\nCOIPOXS PAY ABIE AT G6 BROAD WAT.\nO> A\\D AFTKR MAY l^T. 1903.\nCoupons may l\u00bbe sent in at once, and Checks\nin payment of name will be ready for de\nlivery a\u00ab 1O A. M. on Mny Ist.\nNew York City 6<3>.\nNew York City 3'iCJ-\nNew York City \u00bb*.\nBay Shore Union Free School District No. 1. 4%.\nCitizen* Electric Company. North PlainfieW. N. J., Ist, 6<?\u00ab.\nColumbaa, Bucket Lake & Newark Traction Co. Ist, Be\nDa Bois Electric I Traction Co. Collateral Trust 3%-\nFort Madison Water Co. Reg. Int. 5%-\nLima OH Company Ist, 670.\nMaahanset Improvement Co. Ist. 5%.\nMarietta, Columbus & Cleveland R. R. Co. let. {>%.\nMexico Commercial Co. Ist. Mi\nMunicipal Debenture Co. Deb. 6%.\nNewburch Electric Railway Co. Ist, s?i.\nNew York Athletic Club Deb. \u2022*>\n}.:nam Manor. Village of. V* Sewers.\nPlymouth Consolidated Oil & Development Co. Ist. 5%.\nRochester Gas & Eiectric Co. Con. . r .~.\n1., ksand Llpht & Power Co Ist. 5\".\nliockv Mour.ta.in Coal & Iron Co. Ist. ovo-\nSafetY Insalaied Wire & Cable Co. Ist, 6%.\nSing Sing Gas Mfg. Co. Ist, 4%.\nSouthern States Lanfl Co. Ist. Mfc\nftDUthcrn Stales Land Co. 2d. 6%.\nWatervliet Hydraulic Co Ist. ST\u00ab.\nDue May 15th, 1003.\nIlan-.mon'Jsport, Village of. N. V.. \u2022%.\nDue Slay 20th, 1003.\nGreat Northern Ry. of Canada, Series C. 6% Equipment.\nThe Following Coupons Are Due and\nPayable at the Office of\nFarson, Leach & Co..\n35 NASSAU STKEET. NEW YORK.\nMAY IST, 1OO3:\nnailmi. Fla. Z'b\"*. 1\nCoanenrrtlle, Trie!.. Water and School.\nIron Mountain, Mich.. School.\nKokoen Ind.\nPeru. Ind.. School.\nPortland. Ind.. School.\nUnion City. Ind., School.\nVan Bven. Ind, BcbooL^ lOTH>\nNew Castle. In*.. Scb\u00a3L y iSTHs\nEwayzee. End.. Vundin^. I7TH|\nPortland. Ind.. Imp. 2oTHj\nSt. Icaaoe Mich.. Water.\nNew York Security & Trust Company,\nNO a\u00ab WALL ST.; NEW YORK\nCOUPONS PAa-ABUC MAY IST.\nA^lilnnd < imU A Iron Co. l\u00bbt Befg. Mt\u00bbe. *%.\nCatlettMbnrs'. Kenuva _ Ceredo \\\\ ater Co.\nChi*-..* Indiana,\"* Eastern Ry. Co. Ist 3lt\u00bbe.\nrft>\"o*f Dallas, Texas. Gen. Imp. Bonds.\nCouncil Illutlk fi\u00bb\u00bb A Ele-c. Co. Ist Mt\u00dff. s^.\nl \u00bb> ml tit 1:1 t:i\u00ab-i-. H. H. Co. Ist Cuns. Refund\niiijt Mtse\nDnll.is City, \u00ab>reiton.\nFondn. Johnstown & Clovernvllle Iv U. CO.\n]*! Con. Gen. Kfd. Mtfje. 4Wc . ,\n\\iacnra l.iu-hi, Heat A; Toner Co. Ist Mtse.\nPeople* \u00ab.a\u00bb A; Kle\u00abtrt\u00ab Co. l\u00bbt Mtge. Mb.\nllenilasloii I*n]>\u00ab-r Co. \u00abJ IlondM.\nvufTolU Gat \u00ab^ lilee. Co. Ist MtK\u00ab-. s?c\nI \"i 1 1: Kelt Line St. K. H. l\u00abt Mtee.\nI liViied Elee. Lt. A: Fuel Co. Cons. 3lt e.\nIV. i \u2022\nTHE AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK.\ni;w Broadway. New York. April 21st. 1903.\nAT A MEETING OF THE BOARD OF Dl\n\u2022<:*- rectors of this bank, held to-day, a semi-annual\ndividend of FOUR -4- :. PER CENT, or. the capital stock\nwas declared payable May Ist proximo, to stockholders of\nrecord at close of business April 21st, 1003.\nreco.a ai ciose oi EDWARD BURNS, Cashier.\nPhiladelphia Co. of Pltt\u00abbursrli.\nCotifol. Mtse. & Coll. Trust Five Per Cent. Bonds.\npOUPOXS DUB MAY IST. 1003. FROM\nthe abovo will be pa.d on and after maturity by\nSfatST 11 Br \u00b0 thfcrS \u00a3 \"gt Tr^^' a\n\" \" AL \" S - CIIAL^w RS yor C k\u00b0 3 i I prS^h. 1903.\nrpHE BOARD OF DIKECTOIW HAS THIS\ndnv rlfired the rerular qu%rter!y dividend of ONE\nAVI^TH -X F. QIATtTEP-P \u00abV r . PER CENT or th.\nPreferred Stock of -'V't'u ,<%s* The P^f\nferred Ptc<-k Transfer Books will be closed at the close\n! \u25a0&&\nSORTUEBS SECiriMTIES^COMPAXV.^^\nrpHERE HAS BEEN 'DECLARED A DIVI\n1 - dtr.(3 cf IK ppr crnt. en the capital stock of this\ncomrinv Symble May 4. IBM. to stockholders of record\n55 B^SSaS^SS \u00b0.. r .n h^ d c^ed \u0084t 3 A. M.\nP . XL April 25 11KC. and reopened ot 10 o'clock A. M.\nMay 5. 0\u2014 \u00a3 T \u2014 mm Se.cretary.\nseibOAKIJ AXK LINE It VI LAVA Y.\n\u00ab1 of e r. Apri] MB.\nrp^O^ONf^S^\nHallway Cocpanj-. 1^ ss H A?tP. Treaaur\u00bbr.\nCentral Trust Company. New ,V \u0084 pAVI3i Treaaurer.\nTh ' ' will^?'l.^ \u00abn and aft-r that\ndate by Baring, Magoun A Coinr^r^ !\u25a0'\u2022 \"'all St.\n<_te BP \u2022 aKuUn * w U ROPERS. T;eM.\nFinancial^Miocting^.\nrj^X^JcirSSSNG^oiTTHB STOCkT\nbe held at the offl of tne J\" n , l j J' m . (Slimed).\non Tuesday. May 6. \"y* p. haVEMETER. aecretaxy.\n\u2014^sr^\u2122^g^- Y[i co. com\nI IlJj \u2022* *. ,_ \u2014- at _ o'clock BOM on Saturday.\n\u2022*\u2022 psny will be cl ; \u0084'..,. t he annual Jfentral nrieetms;.\nMay SI im P^P 2 \" l^ l neftin*. of the jharenolder.\nMi.d to a eperi^l e en> .*i rfcr fe reopened or. Thurs\nto be held June 3J a ' xl >SAliL_3 F. COX Tres#ur\u00abr.\nI <ar. Jaa.\u00abtlw. *.*\u00bb\u25a0\u00bb*\nNEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MAY 1. 1903.\nFinancial Meetings.\nWADAMI RAILROAD COMPANY.\nNOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING\nOK TUB\n\"VOTTCE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT. IN\nSTOCKHOLDERS AND DBBENTURE BONDHOLDERS,\npursuance of a resolution of the Board of Direct\nadopted on or about the 2t)lh day of January. 1903. there\nwill be a meeting of the stockholders and debenture bond\nholders held on Tuesday, th\u00ab fifth day of May, 1903. at the\noffice of Smith & Beckwlth <th<s General Attorneys for\nthe Company In the State of Ohio), on the 6th floor of\nthe Produce Exchange Building In the City of Toledo.\nOhio, st the hour of eleven o'clock A. M.. at which\nmeeting the following special matter will h\u00bb submitted to\nthe stockholders and dfbenture bondholders for their ap\nproval, or disapproval, to fit:\nWhether the Wabanh Rallroa* Company shall be author\nized to Issue Its coupon bonds In a Bum not exceeding\nTen Million Dollars (510.0\u00ab0.(K<0i. the principal of said\nbends to be payable in gold coin of the United States, fifty\n(00) years after date, and bear Interest at a rate not ex\nceeding five per cent, per annum. the Interest thereon to\nbe payable B*ml-annually. on *uch dates as the Board of\nDirectors shall designate. Paid bonds to be ipsiicd from\ntime to time as the Hoard of Directors shall, by resolu\ntion, authorize and approve, but only for the purpose of\nacquiring additional and adequate terminal grounds and\nproperty for the use of the company at the cities of St.\nI/>uls and Kansas City, Missouri, Chicago and Quincy. in\nthe State of Illinois: Toledo. Ohio; Detroit. Michigan\nland such other pom- as the stockholders and debenture\nbondholders may. at said meeting, direct), and erecting\nend constructing thereon such war\u00ab-hous<\u00bbs. freight houses.\ntracks, ar.d other Improvements and facilities as may be\nconsidered necessary In the transaction of the business 01\nthe company: it being understood that said bonds shall\nhe secured by a first or purchase money, mortgage or\ndeed of trust, on all said grounds, properties, facilities,\nand Improvements, and that Mich mortgage or deed of\ntrust shall. In effect provide that said bonds shall only\nbe certified and Issued for amounts equal to the cost or\nthe grounds and property \"\u00b0 acquired or constructed,\nwhich cost shall Include whatever may be necessary to\ndischarge any mortsare or other lien subject to which\nth\u00ab sam\u00ab may be ac.ouired. It being also understood, that\nsuch grounds and properties so acquired shall be convejea\nto the trust** or trustees in such mortgage or oeed of\ntrust and held by It or them us such trustees as equal\nfirst mortgage security for the payment of . all paid MUMS.\nand the Interest thereon, and subject to the Hen a. ml a\nmc-rtcag\u00ab* or deed of trurt. said trustees shall also now\nsaid property In trust for the Wabash Railroad Company:\nThe details relaXlnr to the Issue of sairl bends and V?\nform of said bonds and mortgage to be such as the Board\nof Directors may direct and approve..\nThe Stock and Debenture Mortgage trarisferbooUs of\nthe company will close on Saturday. April fourth. IJO3.\nat twelve o'clock noon, an , reopen Wednesday, May\nsixth. 1803, at ten o'clock A. M. _^_ COMPANY\nTHE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY.\nBy JOSEPH RAMSEY. JR.. President.\nJ. C. OTTBBOK, Secretary\nGeorge J. Goulfl. Edgar T. ~^>^'-\nO. D. Ashley. Henry X- McHarf,\nJohn T. Terry. Russell Sane.\nB. C. Reynolds, Cyrus J. Laurence.\nThomas H. TTr,Hr,ard. JOSCBiI Pamw-y, Jr..\nJames Hazen Hyde. Edwin Gould. _\u0084___,-_.\nWinslow S. Pierce. Directors.\nOFFICE OF\nAMALGAMATED COPPER CO..\n82 Broadway. New York. April 20th. 10U3.\nNotice Is hereby (riven that the stock certificate trans\nfer books of the Company will be closed on Saturday.\nMay 9th, IHO3. at 1\u00b0 o'clock r.oor. for the purposes of\nihe annual tneetin- of the Company, to be held June , Ist.\n1003 and that such books will be reopened on Tueeaay.\nJune M. 1003. at Wj -clod^^^^ BPCretarT .\nBankers and Brokers.\n111LSEY.4C0.\nBANKERS.\nINVESTMENT SECURITIES\nINTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS\nFISCAL AGENTS FOR CIIIES AND CORPORATiONB\n49 Wall St., New York.\nFISK &ROBINSON\nBANKERS\nGovernment Bonds\nand other\nInvestment Securities\nMEMBERS NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE\n\u00bb5 CEDAR STREET 28 STATE STREET\nNEW YORK BOSTON\nred* f . ftlarauand\nS5-S7. lIK9AU STKE_T.\nSTOCKS & BONDS\nFor Investment or on marjjln\n__\u0084,. Nt .taiiiHtU-s. also cliarl\u00df .itiliiK daily\nerencea. \u2014\nFractional Stock of the Mercan\ntile National Bank Wanted.\nWilliam I Nichols & Co.,\nTelethon 33\u00a33 Cortlandt. 15 WALL STREET.\nCopartnership Notices.\nmHE PARTNERSHIP OF STERNBACH\nend Company it this day \u00ab_\u2014 by mutual consent.\n'^SIDNEY M. KTERNBACH.\nMember of the N. Y. Stock Exchange\nAIX)LfH HOELAJJD.\nTh\u00ab Partnership of Popp-jr and Stern Is this day \u00abto\n\u25a0Otr- by mutual consent^ poppE\u00df\nGEO. W. STERK.\nA W. POPPER,\ns \u00ab^i^iiiiSriHS\nCopper st stbici a^tehniuch * co.\nMe-nber Of N Y. Btock Exohangm.\nARTHUR W. POP>'EP.\nMember \"of N. T. Stock Exchange\nSIMON BAHN.\nNew York. April 30th. 1803. _^______\nHANOVER BASK, BUILDING.\n7 Na_\u00bbi York Ma} . x> 1903 .\neWI brokerage and lnve3;m^s^- BALu\nLEEDS JOHNSON, Stock Exch*nir\u00ab.\nMember of the N. V Stock ExchSOM.\nGenera! Partners.\nR \u00b0mS \"of S^^BUK* _**-\u00ab\u00bb\nSpecial Partner.\n\u00ab ft 51 WALL e 6TR ErE T Aprii\nAfR CHARLES KOLLSTEDE AND MR.\n- U HERMAN C. E. HOSKIER retlre^rom^r flrtn^hls\nProposals.\n\"PROPOSALS FOR INDIAN SUPPLIES.\nw s<ssrs c th \u00ab ri \"\u2022 saSuaSSsa\nWashington DC. *_\u00bbr\u00bb rc w anket\u00df , woolen and cotton\ntn^ r9ed ln tVfr? P etc \" a* the case may be. and directed to\nGoods, clothing, etc.. a\u00bb 111 * j N ny_i_] Wooster\nthe Commissioner of Ind an Ar a i 6; \u2022 o . clock __\ncfTrfe^\" May l\u00a3 \u00abW \u00ab\u00ab\u25a0 *m**bi*K for the Indian\nbtokeu woolen and cotton goods, ciothing, no-\nSer\\lce, pianKeui. w\u00ab~w \u00ab~ \u0084 must be made out en Govern\ntlons. hats \u00ab 4 \u00bb^\" u^'vC B ii necessary Information\nen b.dX K wUll^ furnished o S n applicatlonto the Indian\nOffice. Washington. L 1L 1 c V-_' vVrfc rtv \"\u00abtt-\"67 S-juth\n111M21 Voo.\u00ab. h street. U W M . Howard ' 8 ?r\u00abt Omaha.\ngK\u00a3 '^ou^^nth^ueet, St. Louis Ma ,^Co-\nWash.-; th. \u00bb-\u00ab-2r\\S thTW-SfeSSw' inVpri\nitliilisifl\nKn cf'any b?g W. A. JwXCS. Chmmlsaloner.\nQEALED PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED\n*t tf\u00ab o\u00abl~ cf the Light House Ensireer. Tomp\nwmwmmm\np OVERXOR'F'ISLAXD. N. V., APRIL 29.\n1903 Sealed proposals In triplicate will be re\n\u2022^o^ n iot^|hU^y.:em /-'add ed T. NORMAN.\nQ. a. ._.\n(SEALED PROPOSALS. ENDORSED \"PRO-\n~\u00bb\u00ab.i. fnr \u00abte\u00abl Building \" wtll b* received at the\nlirlv niicned for constructing a one-*tory i>tf\u00ab storaj,*\nll\u20acl \u00a71\n\u00a3\u00a3 ,_d nam\"el MORDBCAI X. WXDIOm ChW -\nBurt*u. April 8. 1903.\nProposals.\npXGIXEER OFFICE. C. S. ARMY, ROOM -'.\nCustom House. Norfolk. Vs., April 25, 1913.\u2014 Sealed\nproposals for furnishing and delivering piles, lumber,\ntolls, nut.. washers, nails and spikes, at Fort Mop\nVa.. will be received here utitll 12- m . May 28. IS*-'\", ana\nthen publldly opened. Information furnished on applica\ntion. _______^_\nRemovals.\nNfir York, Mot 1. 1003.\nH. W. POOR & CO.\nBnnkpni.\nHAVE REMOVED TO\n33 WALL ST.\nCity Hotels.\niMARLBOROUGH\nBROADWAY AND 36TH ST.\nRATHSKELLER\nTABLES FOR 400\nOcean Steamers.\n/] j UUIJ!-K_iLiL_3LnJ U \u00a9no IM! June. July\nLJ LLU LMi LJ Lsj LrU U\nj\\Y/|| ar.d August the HAMBURG AMERICAN IASM\nJU U will have four very attractive Cruises to NOR\nfr\\nDnrV7/TW7 way. THE NORTH cape\nK\\ I Ul/ LiU VMJ IPS U AND SPITZBERQEN. of IB\nIyJJ to 23 days' duration, and a special Cruls* of 22\nJ\\J days to the capitals of NORWAY, SWEDEN.\nSn f\\l 3 jTH 1 RUSSIA. AND DENMARK.\nV_A_/_=i''i'Li__iAJ by *\"\u2022 palatial steamers\nAUGUSTS VICTORIA AND PRINZES?IN VIC\nTORIA LUISE. Rates. Including or excluding all\nr-_?s n n /\u00bb C^\u00bb PI /TV elde trips, will be quoted on de\n|LX)LiiJ^)^suZAA\u00abnand. All appointments strictly\nIpA first class.\nUU SPECIAL NOTICE.\nCruise of 43 flays to NORWAY. SWEDEN, RUSSIA AND\nDENMARK.\n$200 and upwards,\nIncluding all expenses, shore trips, guides' fees, etc.. by\nEXPRESS S. S. BISMARCK,\nLeaving; at T. July 4. 1903.\nTar partlculara and other Information apply t\u00bb\nHamburg American Line,\n85-87 Broadway. N. T.\nHAI\u00abiBURO-Aft\u00abEiS<ffiA Wf .tIME.\nFOR PLYMOUTH\u2014 HAMBURG.\nTwin-Screw Express Mai Passenger Service.\nI)etitschUnd...May 7. 2 PMI A. Victoria. Jwa \u00ab> AM\nPretoria May 0. \u00ab PMl\u00dfluecher....May 29. 5:30 AM\nF. Bismarck. 14. 10 AMI P*rnsylVa. .May 30, \u00bbi\u00abAM\nWaldersee May 16. 9 AM|D\u20acutschlan4. ...June 4. 1 TM\nRecord Voyage, 6 days, 7 hours. S^intn.\nBAILS MAY 7, JUNE 4. JULY 2, SEPT. 13.\nMEDITERRANEAN SERVICE.\nNEW YORK. NAPLES, GENOA.\nPhoenicia May 7. 2PM \"Ravenna. ... .May 16. 2PM\n\u2022Ravenna 'belongs to Nay. Co. \"I-.i.ia.\nHAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE.\nOffices 85 and 37 Broadway. Piers, Hoboken. N. J.\noadDD\u00dfTrea csee^g^q^ko ilil([dto-\nFA EXPRESS SERVICE.\nPLYMOUTH\u2014 CHERBOURG\u2014 BREMEN. T ,__\nFROM NEW PIER. FOOT OF 3RD ST. HOBOKT.X.\nKronprlns May 12, 4PM|K. Wm. U-.-Jui.e J3. 2 PM\nKaiser May 1\u00bb. 10 AM . Kronrrias .-July \u2022 \u2022\u2022 2 %\nK. Wm. 11... .May 26. 4 PM K^r. ...... July U. 10 AM\nKronprln\u00ab....June 8. 3 PMIK Wm. 11. ..Ju1y 21. IPM\nKaiser June 16. 10 AMi\nTHE NEW TWIN SCREW EXPRESS\nS. s 8 \"KAISER wmELM ; ii/'\nTWIN-SCREW PASSENGER ggRV ICE.\nPLYMOUTH -CHERBOURG\u2014 BREMEN.\nFrom It \u25a0)\u25a0 Piers, Hoboken, >. J.\n\u2014 J 1 Til I Ha J. 10 AM Lu15e ....... -June 1\u00ab. 10 AM\nLulse Stay 14. noon ; Frledrich June 25. 10 AM\nFrledrlch May 21. coon! liarbarossa -July 2. II AM\nBarbaroe*a. .May 28. 11 AM Kurfuerst July 8 10 AM\nKurfuerst June 4. noon I Uremen July 10. * rM\nBremen June 11. II All\n\u2022To Bremen direct.\nMEDITERRANEAN SERVICE.\nGIBRALTAR\u2014 NAPLES\u2014 GENOA.\nFrom Pier 24. ft. of Amity St.. Brooklyn.\nmrefmar May 2. 11 AM! JWtlmar June 13 10 AM\nK. Albert May 9. 3 PM K. Albert. ... -June 20 .noon\nLahn May 16. HAMiLahn \u201e. June 27. 19 AM\nP. irer.e May 23. 2PMP. Irene July 4. 1 PM\nHonens'n June 6. 2 PMiHohenz'n July 18. 11 AM\ntNaples. Genoa only.\nOELRICHS & CO.. NO. 5 BROADWAY N, T.\nLouis H. Meyer. 45 South Third St.. Phlla.\nDAILY SERVICE.\nFor Old Point Comfort, Notfolk, Portpmouth. Pinner's\nPoint and Newport News. Vs., connecting far petersbu g.\nRichmond, Virginia Beach, Washington, D. C. and entire\nSouth and West.\nFreight and Passenger steamers sail from Pier 36, N.\nE., foot Beach St., every week day at 3 P. M.\nH. B. WALKER, President & TrsJlic Manager.\nLF(DIP PgD[FS(D ffiBOODa\nSteamships of th* RED \"D\" LINE will s_U tot Baa\nJuan direct, as follows'\nS. S. CARACAS Saturday. Hay 2. nwn\nS. 6. PHILADELPHIA Saturday. May 16, noon\nFir freight or pssssga \u00bb;p.y to\nBOULTON. BLISS A- I'ALLETT.\nGc-ae-al Mar.acera. 136 Proatl St.\n(LOKSIE S^SITeSK.\nColumbia May 2. noon ' Anchorla May 18. noon\nEthiopia May 9, noon|Furness!a May 23, noon\nFirst saloon. $80 to $100.\nSecond Cabin. *33 and up: third eases. $2*5 and up.\nFor New Illustrated Book of Tours apply to\nHENDERSON BROTHERS. 17 and 19 Broadway.\nHAWAIIAN AND PHILIPPINE ISLANDS,\nPACIFIC MAIL S. S. CO.\nOCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO.\nTOYO KISEN KAISHA,\nBetween San Francisco. Honolulu Yokohama, Kobe..\nNagasaki. Shanghai. Hong Kong.\nSteame-B leave San Francisco at 1 P. M.\nDORIC May 81COPTIC June 8\nNIPPON MARC May 16: AMERICA MARL.. .June II\nSIBERIA May \u00bb KOREA . . ...June '.!\u2022\nFor freight, passenger and\" general Information apply to\nC 49 Broadway, or I Battery Place. Washington Building,\nand 287 Broadway.\nA\u2014 CUNAfiD LINE.\n\u2022 TO LJVERPOOU VIA UUB.B.MIOIMI\nFrom Pier 61, North River.\nCampania. May 2. 9:30 A. M.ilverr.ia May 16. 9 A. M.\nTTmb-ia ...Uav \u00bb 2P. M.lEtruria . . May 23, 2P. M.\nT - mbna EXTRA TUESDAY SERVICE.\nAurania May 26. 3 P. M. iCarpathla June 0. 4 P. M.\nCarrying Second and Third-Class Only.\nVERNON H. BROWN & CO.. Gen. Agents,\n23 BROADWAY. SEW YORK.\n~T~Z WHITE STAR LINE.\n\u25a0\"-\u2022 NEW YORK\u2014 QCEENPTOWN\u2014 LIVERPOOL.\nOceanic. . . May 6. 2 p. m. I Teutonic May IS. noon\nCymric . May 8. S p. m. : Germanic...... May 20. noon\n\u2022Victorian.. May 12. \u00ab a. m. :Odrir . . ....May 22. 2 p. m.\n\u2022Liverpool direct. $40 and up. 2nd class only.\nPier 48. North River. Office. 9 Broadway.\nA MERICAN LINE.\n\u25a0**- SOUTHAMPTON\u2014 LOVPOJT.\n\u00bb-, _Y<-.rk May \u2022\" . >\u00bb\u2022 a m Si Paul.... May 20. 10 a.m.\nPhiladelphla-May 13, 10 a.m.|New-Tork..Ma.- 27. 10 a, m.\nKED STAB LINE.\nNEW-YORK\u2014 ANTWERP\u2014 PARIS.\nVaderland.. . - May 2. 10 a. m.Z-el?.rd May 1\u00ab. 10a.ro.\nKroonland-.May 9, 10 a. m. I Finland .. May 23. 10 a. m.\nPiers 14 and 15. N. R. Offl-e. 73 Broadway. N. T.\nTT-RENCH LINE\nC COMPAGNIE GENERALE TBANS\nATLANTIQUE.\nDIRBCT USE TO HAVRD\u2014 PARIS (TRANCE).\n*\" Sailing every Thursday. 10 A. M..\nfrom Pier 42. North River foot Morton St.\n,T., T . a n i*,ie May \"'La Oaycogne May 2S\nrj^n'\u00b0tacne... May HI 'La Slvoie June 4\n\u2022La Uorralne May 21iLa Bretagn June 11\n\u2022Twin Sere* BtesJKl*\nGeneral A ?ncy. 32 Broadrrgy. New York.\nTTOLLAND-AMERICA LINE.\nn, New Twin-Screw Bt\u00bbamers of 12,500 Tons.\nNEW-YORK\u2014 ROTTE ROAM via BOUUXiNB.\nSalllne Wednesday at 10 A. U.\n..\u201e\u201e.,\u201e, :::-:^r. 6)Statendam v.v:::.v.v: May 27\n\u00ab f!^?m* :. May t:: Kvndam Juae S\n\u25a0\u00b0;C \"V.-.-May 20!Nocrdam Jun\u00bb 10\nlOt H^LANP-AMERICA LINE. 89 gWAT. N. Y.\nArALLORV STEAMSHIP LINES.\n-\u00bb\u2022'-\u00bb- vmm New York Wedneedayi. Fridays and Saturday*\nFOR TEXAS. GEORGIA AND FLORIDA\nKTItviGHT ant ROUND TRIP Tickets lr\u00bbu*d to alt\nMint, in \"ixa\u00bb Colorado. Arizona. California. Mexico.\n*i oJorcU Florida. &c Delljrhtful Excursions.\nC. H. MALL6RY A CO.. Gen A\u00abt .. Pier 20. E. It. N. T.\nTJED **D\" LINE.\n\u2022*\u2022\u25a0 or La Guaya. Pnertn Cab^llo. Cnraene \u00bbnd Mara.\ncalho via Curacao. c\u00bbll!nK \u00bb'\u25a0*'> at fan Juan. I' R.\nFrom I'ter 13. adjoining W*:i ft. Ferry, rirookiyn.\nc; \u00ab5 CARACAS Saturday. May 2. noon\nS\" I PHILADELPHIA Saturday. May la. aoon\n'The above *leam\u00ab-rs hut* itrpertor -\u25a0 omm, ' n* tut\nP^ a * c \" tiOULTON. BLIPS & DAIJ.ETT.\nparata\u00dftr* General Managers. 135 Front St.\npOOK'S TOURS TO EUROPE.\n30 Tours this season. *225 to $1,000. Including all\nTntvrlllnE Etlx'nse\u00df. Pamphlets.\nTH OS COOK & RON. --<;i & \u00bbS5 Bway. N. T.\n\u00abx a VELOCE\"\u2014 Fast Itullar. Line.\n\"*^ 6alllr;r_ev\u00abTT Tuenday to Naples. Oenca. _\n\u25a0OuJaNEai. HARTr:S\u2014 P * CO.. \u00bb Wai! St.\nSpring Resorts.\nTHE\"ST. CHARLES.\nOn the Eeach, Atlantic City, N. J.\nOpen throughout the year. On* of the best equipped an\u00ab most I\u2014 Tarn of t>* resort hotels ef (a* eoontrjv\nCapacity 40\u00bb\u00bb 50 private bathroom., finished !n Italian mart.'*, with tot and cold sea and fresh water attach\nment* elioiefs etc.. attached to single rooms or suite*. Magnificent sun parlor. ovsr.ooKJng thm fsiarws BoassV\nwaiit and Beach. Illustrated Booklet. Golf Privileges.\nNEWLIN HAINES, FonDeriy of The Chilli.\nHotel Strand,\nAtlantic City. N. J. The Strand Is a n-w. modern. .Ire\nproof hotel, overlooking 'the world-famed Boardwalk and\nocean, centrally located. Sea Water Baths, Booking rep\nresentative. J. L. TIiENCHARD. at Hotel Wellington.\n65th St. end 7th Are Dally from 10 A. M. to 4P. M.\nTHE ALBEMAEIE,\nVIRGrNIA AVK. NEAR BKACH. ATLAXTTC CITT.\nN. J.\nThroiihout the Spring -Seac-'n. th!s elegant modern\nhotel, new throughout. wUI maite special terms of \u00bba.\n|10. Jl2 50 weekly, and up dally, for superior ac\ni nmmiaHnns. lot\"\u00bb Urge sunny front rooms; private balds;\ni.W.n> ft. of \u2022eautlful sos parlors; orchestra; elevator ssr\nvl ,-c. srean Seat, metal beds snd exceptionally good\ntable and r* .ice are features. Booalst. CoTTespoadeaes)\nI J \u00bb __!______\u25a0\nForeclosure Sales.\nV-ETV YORK SUPREME COURT, COUNTY\nof New York.\u2014 Thoma\u00ab O. Carroll sad Mary A.\nCarroll, plaintiffs, against Thomas O. Carroll, Adminis\ntrator, etc. and others, defendants- In pursuance .of\nan interlocutory .ndgment of partition and asia, duly\nni.de and entered in the above-enUtled action D \u00ab*\u00a3_'y\ndate the 16th Jay of April. 1903. X. the wuSenssajeA.\nthe: referee In said Judgment named, wl\u00ab fell \u00bbMJ \u00fcb '' 0\nauction, at the Exchange Salesroom. No. 161 Broadway.\nIn the Borough of Manhattan. City of New-York, on U;e\n14th day of May 1903. at 12 o'clock noon, on that day.\nby Peter F. Meyer, auctioneer. the premiss* directed or\nsaid Judirman* to be sotd. and therein described as follow.:\nAll that certain piece or parcel of land, situate, lying sod\nr-elr.K In the City of New-York. Boreu\u00bbh of Manhattan.\nard bounded and described a? follows: Beginning at a\npoint on the westerly fide cf West Broadway about sixty\nthree (\u00ab3) feet and six {\u25a0) Inches southerly from th\u00ab\ncorner formed by th<* Intersection of the southerly side\nof York Street with the westerly side of West Broadway,\nand running thence westerly and parallel or nearly so\nwith York Street fifty-three \u00ab3) feet se\u00bben (7\u00bb Inches;\nthence southerly and parallel or nearly ao with West\nBroadway forty-three (43) feet eleven <11) Inches: thence\neasterly and parallel or nearly so with York Street forty\nnine (49) feet and eleven (11) Inches to the westerly\nside of West Broadway, and thence northerly alone the\nwesterly aide of West Broadway forty-three (43) feet ele\nven (11) inches to the point or place of beginning, be the\nsaid several dimensions more or lee*. Also all that certain\nothe- lot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being\nIn said City and Borough, on th* southerly sld* of York\nStreet and now known and distinguished by the number\nten (10\u00bb in York Street, bounded and containing as fol\nlows: Beginning at a point on the said southerly side\nof York Street distant sixty (81) feet westerly from Vi\u00bbM\nBroadway: running thence southerly and parallel wita\nWest Broadway, or nearly to. about elshty-seren (97) feet\nfive toi inches: running thence westerly at right ancle*\nwKh West Broadway about twenty-three (23) feet three (3)\ninches- thence nortnerly at right angles with York Street.\nor nearly bo. twenty-one (21) feet: thence easterly ar.d\nparallel with Toe* in*e\u00ab twelve (12) feet one lneh (1).\nmore or less; thence a*atn northerly nearly parallel with\nWest Broadway fifty (M feet three inches (3) to Tor*\nStreet and thence easterly along York Street thirty (30)\nfeet eight ar.d one-half (SH) Inches to the point or place\nof beginning be the said several dimensions more or less.\nAnd the appurtenances thereunto belonging or la any\nw'se pri'ertalnlr.s. April 21st. 1900.\nGEORGE GORDON BATTLE. Referee.\nE. G. I>T-VALJL>. Attorney for Plaintiffs. 277 Broadway.\nBorough of Manhattan. City of New York.\nHILL. bTI'RCKB & ANDREWS. Attorney* for DefSnO\nanls 37 Liberty St.. Manhattan. N. T. City.\nALBERT P itASEET. Guardian ad Utem for Infant\ndefendants. r,\u00ab William St., Manhattan. N. T. City.\nThe followtng 1\u00ab a diagram of the property to be sold\nas described above, the street numbers being 3.2 ana\n\u00a371 West Broadway, and 10 York Street, respectively.\n\u25a0 \u2014 ' ~ West Broadway\nThe. above premises will be sold free and clt^rct all\nbrances. excepting leases covering aU the premises,\n\u2022iplrln? May Ist. 1804.\nDated. New Referee.\nNotice of Summons.\nSUPREME COURT. COUNTY OF NEW\nTORS -Giles G. Melne!!. vs. Mary L. Melnel!. Aa\nmu U. Meinell. Individually and as Administratrix of\nS? Goods Chattels and Credits of Nina A. d. la Tour\nn^le Deceased: Metropolitan Trust Company as Ad-\nSff-liifatcr if the Goods. Chattels and Credits or Nir.a\nA ta ae 1\u00bb T, .u:-\u00ab.-i:\u00ab. 'Deceased: Jean A. A. Le\u00dfoy Baron\nde la Tournelle. Auiru<ius N. Hand as Ancillary Ad\nministrator with the Will Annexed of the Goods. Chattels\nmm!atr!. or of Laura Jane \u0084 MelneU Vlc-jintesa.\nd\"\\v\"el eased; Rene Marie L. Georses Vlcomts\nd-Avenel Mareerite Marie Odette dAvenei. Maria A.\nG^\u00abton \u2022 Caroline Converse. Elisabeth M Livingston.\nKa^? M Melnell <unmarrt-d). Marie M Hemstreet\nJUITr Melnell. John B. Melnell. Mabel Burns MelaelJ.\nr. a _.V x. non CMerhot- Melnell alias Be\u00bb\u00bble Kuttlns.\nO*\"e M. Metcell. Julia M. Sparks. May li. Holden. Mary\na Unherr. -ndlvldaally and as Executrix and Tru.teeoT\n&\u2022 l_lt Will and Testament of Georee J. Melnell. De\ncea4d^Bfs.le L. J. Ingraham. Nadl=\u00ab l\u00df\u00abraham. Frances\n\" Horn Laura M. El t. Ctiartas F.ddy and Charlotte L.\n-.: \u25a0 \u2022= iTI\u00ab w .fe- The Weber Piano Company. Victor Clant.\n\u00a7foB- W. ThonTpson. Samuel Miller. Isaac MWltko^J\ntSwXi J Nolan. Edward J. Leonard. Individually an\u00ab\nm Sole\" sJrvlvtag Partner of Fifth Avenue Carpet Com-\nMnva-dThf Farmers' Bank of ? r\u00ab-rvi:;e. N. Y.\nTo the Above Named Defendants? To'- are hereby sum\nironed' to\" answer the amended complaint In this action\nand to serve a copy of your answer on the plaintiff's\nForney within twenty days after service of this sum\nnona exclusive of the day of service: and. In ease of\nvriur \u2022 'allure to appear or answer. lament will be taken\nacaTnst you by default for the relief demanded to th\u00bb\namended complaint. Trial to he held la the County oT\nFmvYv \"\u2022 ret r.th. PlaliitiTTs Attorwy. OSci and Po*t-\nA PCOTT Plstetrirs Altai\u2014 f, Orf^ and Po\u00ab\noffice address. Sprinfrvllle. Erie County. N. T.\nTo Aususta V. Melnell. Jean A. A. Le\u00dfoy Baron da la\nTournelie Rene Marie L. C.eorirea Vleomte d'Avenel.\nMa'?er!'\u00bb llnrie Odette d'Avenel. Henry M. M\u00abtr.eH.\nJulia M Sharks. May M HoM-n. Frances M. Horn.\nLaura M. Eddy. Charles Ediy Charlctte U Eddy:\nThe foregoing arrended summons Is serve! upon yon by\nnublica'lon. pursuant to an ord-r of Hon. Samuel Green\nbaum dated March 24th. 1903. and filed with th\u00bb amended\nsummons and complaint in the office of the Clerk of th\u00ab\nCvuintv of New To-lt men tk>\u00bb' day.\nEDW*N' A. BCOTT PistofrTs A'*-\u2014 p\u00bb Ode- and Post\nofflcs address, Sprtnsvllle. Erl* County. N. T.\nSUPREME COURT. COUNTY OF NEW\nYORK Giles a. MeineTl. vs. Angara U. HsfeoelL\nIndividually and as Administratrix of th\u00ab Gsods. Chat\ntels and Credits of Nina A <ie U Tournelle. Decease*:\nVfetroiKjlitan Trust Company as Administrator of th\u00ab\nGoeS Chattels and Credits of Nina A. de la Toorne le.\nr\u00a3S_ea Jean A. A. L*Roy Earrn de la Tourn\u00abli a .\nADsmsns N Hand as Ancillary Administrator with U>\u00bb\nW,H \"nnexed of the G<v>ds. Chattel. an-1 Credits of\n\u25a0_\",'\u2014 T\u00bb M I-Lancev Melnetl Vtcomtesj* d'Avenel. De\n7m^d Rene Marie L. Georges Vlcomte d'AveneJ. Mar\n-ttfl Va- \" O*tte d-Avecel. Marl. A G\u00abi\u00bbton. Caxo\n?st. rSnvwrse Eltrabeth M. Uvtmcston. Harry M.\nIV-T^n /_San_\u00bb* Marie M. Hemsireet. Join F.\nX\" 1 Joh\" b! siil\u2014U. Mab-: Bums Me)n\u00bbII. Bemgt*\nN*to? cVlerhr-hn Melnell alias Bessie Knttlnj. OUv.\nM MelneU. Julia M. Sparks. M.y _ Hold\u00abn. Mary\ni T^nhe-' Individually and as Exerutrix and Trustee\ncf the Last Vv-.1l _ Testament of G\u00ab>rce j Me!ne!l.\nrL^VLJi Bowie _ J Ingrshain. Nadlao Ituct_m.ii.\np^\u00ab M H\u2122, Latira if. Eddy, Charles Eddy and\nChaVfotte. U Eddy his wife. Thomas J. Nolan. Edward\nj lmnart IndlvlrJually and a.- Sol\u00ab Snnrtvtnjt Partner\nnf FM'th Avenue Carpet Coiapanv. U. Crist Delmcnicov\nFrederick Moncault and Th\u00ab Farmers- Bank, or Hprln\u00bb\nv!Ji.e - 5L- \\bov\u00ab \u25a0\u25a0_\u2014 I Defendants: Tan are hereby\n*.t?~,rw;Zi \\ o answer the amended complaint In this\na^T and t> \"'\u25a0\u2022 \u25a0 copy of sonr \u25a0\u2014 \u25a0 \u00b0\" th\u00ab\nl^in?i\u00abT*\u00ab att^'nev within twenty days after serrlc\u00ab\nthis \u00abvmS exeiual\u2014 cf th\u00ab day of M rvlce: and.\ntZ m\u00ab\u00bb of vc-ur failure to apixar or answer. Judyraont\nwin hi ken WSS\u2014* you by default for Ui\u00ab r\u00abll\u00abf\n\u00a3ma\u00a3ed \u00a3 the*arnerded complaint. Trial to b. a-ld\nIn the ennty of New 3 ork\nEDwfs- A* SCOTT. PlaintlJTs Attorney. OSe. and Post\n*\" .\u00bb.,\u2022 \u2022,-\u00bb\u2022 \u00abn---.-l!^ Brto County. W. T.\n- ' L_jsM V. Usteea Jean A. A. Le\u00df.iy Baron <!\u2022\n1\u00bb Tournelle Km* Ma-i\u00ab I. Pin-ass Vlcomte d'Avene*.\nV T \u00ab^r. iiarle <\u25a0\"<\u2022\"\u2022- 1 -Avrrel. Harry M _\u00bb:n>U.\n-I- V Varies. May M Holien, Frances M. Horn.\nT^nr. V Edly. Charles Eddy. Charlott* L. Eddy:\n-rV;'* f,-,r\u00abir\u00bbTniC i\u00bbn'tnrt\u00bb< summon* la served upon you by\nBii'-\" cation pursuant to an order of Hon. fiamuel Green\niu,, m H*t-1 March =4th. 1003. and Wed with th\u00ab m_\u2014 d<d\niSomVikl ccmpUint In U>\u00bb offlc. \u00abf th. Clerk cf th\u00bb\nCr-M-t\u00bbof New Tor* ujvm that day\nSrvSrfW A PCOTT. Pluln'tfTa Attonsey, OfISM and Po\u00abt\nofflc* add-\u00ab\u2014 Eprtnyvllle. ZrU County. N. r\nBoard and Rooms.\n1\u2014 as pARK-AYE. \u2014 Large room and hail room; tail*\n. \u00bbad attendee. Brst cia_. tmtmam.\nSpring Resorts.\nHOTEL IPOQUOIS,\nAtlantic CTTT. N. J. SOUTH Carolina AT\u00ab. a^t\u00bb\nBEACH\u2014 location Uodara Bisa-ela\u00bbs hotel:\ncapacity \u00ab00. B*th\u00bb. *Uvator; sun pax^ra. \u2022*=. asscM\nSpring rate*. \u00ab10 U *1T .'jo \u2022Mektr; $2.5*> and uj> d^J^\nDookUt. W. S-. til aw.\nHOTEL PONCE DE LEON.\nVirginia Are. anii th\u00bb Beach. Atlantic City. X. 3. ...\nUsereelled hotel. Unsurpassed location. Cspaety am\nElevator: steam h\u00bb&:. baths: rooms \u00aba salt*: rnajrclac-wt\nporches. Bprlnc rat\u00ab\u00bb. \u00bb10 to Ili weekly; SS \u2022 o *_i\u00bb < I >*\nBooklet. f \u2022 '\u2022 SKAW.\nHOTEL RUDOLF, '\nDIRECT OCEAN FRONT. ATLANTIC CITY. X. X.\nAMERICAN AND CIHtOPEAN PLANS.\nOpen throathout the jear.\nRooms with sea and frash wat\u00abr baths. MT3IC\nN. Y. Reprssentat:vs\u2014 3 Park Place. !!.*> a. >\u00ab\u25a0\u2022\u2022\u00bb\nP. Si. Hot*) Imperial 9 to 10 A. M 3.\u00bb> to 8 ? Ifc\nTelephon* 606* Cortiandt^ C R. ifTM.\nTHE CHALFONTE,\nOn th* fee*,-* a: S -.- CaroUia An.,\nATLANTIC QTY, N. J.\nLEZSB - EAIVZB CO. I\nSEASIDE HOUSE,\nATLANTIC CITY. H. 2. -\nThis Oc^an front hotel \u2014111 b* eon<Jact\u00ab4 ta Its \u00abnsl\nKl_:n-C_*a ibip l \" ll by us ant 11 Nnrunker Ist. 19^6.\nnTj CHA3. _VA>'S A SOX.\nHotel Dennis,\nATLANTIC err. N. J. ?\nDirvetry fsetnc t_* Ocean. Hot and eoid M aiirssi\nin prlTat. utb. Oolf Link P^.__ T __ , BC2BT- j\nThe Garden Hotel,\nATLANTIC CITY. Sfc J.\nOpen toroushout the year.\nAznancss and Suropean Plans\nThe only hotel in Atlantlo City a\u2014ploying \u2014 alt\u00bb \u2022\u00ab>\u00ab\nTie* throughout\nW. I FINCH. P\u2014 ipr. H. J. PEARSON. MsT-^_\nParsonal repres*-tatlT\u00bb Hotel Netawtaaa this wHit eeaj||\nHOTEL TBAYMOEE,\nATLANTIC CTTY. K. J.\nRemarns open throuirhout the year. KvefT know* estn\u00ab\nfort and cunvenl?nc\u00ab for Winter guests. Golf prtTll***^\nRussia*; water la bedrooms.\nTRATJBDRE HOTEL CO..\nP. S. WHTTB rusUsst.\n, \u2014 \u25a0*\nMAGNTFICTNT YEW\nHOTEL AGNEW,\nATLANTIC CITY. N. J.\nAaj-j'.nlP* Boardwalk. Capacity \u00ab00. Sr-\"tal *13 \u00ab\u25a0>\nwe\u00ab?y; JiSO daily; $3-00 over Sunday: lorludlr.jr Sea\n\u2022Water Baths, ewlmm'.n\u00ab Plnnres. Orchestra, au'omnMlev\nBooklet. New York Office. 2*B \u00ab_. Are. PHooe 1?_\u2014 \u2022\nISth. Also 3 Park Place.\nRATES RSDXJCEI^\u2014 \u00bbU> TO tl\u00ab. ~\"\nTHE EITTENHOTTSE, * N> A w t v? n e Sc ey c,*yf n^j!^\nR\u00ab*u!ar rates. $4.00 per day. r\u00ab<aced to i^.s*\u00bb. and \u00bb1\u00bb\nto $18 weekly Strictly SUga-eUJ\u00bb eervte* sad <-utstae>\nmalntalr\u00ab\u00abl. H. O. HALI\u2014 NGER.\nHOTEL HEW EHGLAND,\nBooth Carolina- are and Beech. A:lant!~ City. N. J. finast\nlocation Modern high cl\u00bb\u00bb\u00ab hots!: capacity 350. Rooms \u00aba\n\u25a0alt*, with private baths. ETeTator; sun parlor, etc. WMi \u25a0\u25a0\nlent cuisine. SpeoiaJ Sprtar rate*. BRYAN A WIIXIAMa.\nchesteb LSS.\nK\u00bbwi-Ter\u00bb*T*. nesr Beach. Atlantic City. X. J. Ope\u00bb\nail year. Steam best, Bataa, etc D. atNAI-'gR.\nTHE NEW CLARENDON.\nI Virginia Ay*.. near B*\u00abeh a\u00bbl Steel Pl\u00bbr.\nATLANTIC CITY. N. J.\nOpes all the year. Write for terms.\nM. D- XKIMAN'. Owner and Prrvpr*-' ~-_^\nSummer Resort Guides.\n. _ ,1. 1. \u25a0\u0084..---- - \u0084--- \u2014 - \u2014 _\u0084.._ 1\nHealth and Pleasure\n\u00abn>t\u00df\u00ab ths tot \u2014 ins-ier eaa be bad \u2014 i moderate cos*\nIN THE MOUNTAINS\nof Orange. Sullivan. Cl\u00abter said Delaware Ceoatles. V. T^\non the New York. Ontario A Westam Railway. Payst-\u00ab\nclans Heartily recommend this region as on* of (treat naN&\nural beauty and absolute health unless. -.<\u00bbt> f\u00bbet _vy\u00bb\u00bb\nth* sea. with Pure Air. Pure Water. Pure, Ml!k- X*>\nMalaria or Moequ!toes and within three houry ride frets\n1 New Yoric Send 5 cents tor postage to th* undersigned.\nor call and get free at offices below the SUPERB LT IL\nLUSTRATED BOOK. \"SUaUfSR HOMES,\" of =0O pagea,\nIt elves list of over 900 Ilotals. Fa\u2014 a and Boar\u00abln\u00bb\nj Houses, with their location, raxes of besai factlltlea, as\u00ab\n1 On\"iim.r \u00bbth and auth E\u00bbcur\u00abton tickets at redact\nratS will be sold at _S Broadway. 1354 Broadway\nTerry offices, glrtn* an opportunity of personally \u25a0\u25a0__***__\nI I aummer horn*, and also enjoytnjf a day's CsMnirln\ndeUtatfui region. Ticketa bck*j returnlaa -p to Hsx-wr.\n*B? NEW YORK: ML 1\u00ab. 1\u00ab. **- J Si;J*? t A *7__'\n' \u2014.v- a p\u00bbt* Plac\u00ab 257 4th At.: 245 Colt^nbus Ay. . Mcl\nI Bait' UMbl \u2022*\u00ab\u00ab 1 -:\u2022\u00bb\u2022\"\u00bb at.; uoftsa.\n\u00b0IC>.*1 C >.* S BR^SKLY\" d *^u\u00ab S \u00a3\u00abSWt\u00ab.St.: SOO Br.-ta\nI war: Eagle Office. _. - AN - PZRS\nGeneral Passenger Agent. 3* Beaver S\u2014 , X. T. _\nSummer Resort*.\nSEW-TORK.\nCUNSET PARK INN. (opens m* 28,\nC. \u00a3. LELAHD, Mgr, s^^'yaS at^.\nSOMERSET INN\nAND EIGHT COTTACa\u2014. BEgyABJSVTT.T.T:. N. J.\nOdc_ May 1\u00ab. Close* Oct. IX \u2022> mils* B~ \u2022 Kew-Tor^\no .Vu4 W. R. X.. v\u00aba Barclay or Chr!\u00abop\u00abj\u00abr \u25a0\u20ac.\nFern\" lillliai \u00bb\u2022 feet '-iBOBOB W. TVTTI_. M\u00abr.\nTelephone TB Bern*rds\u00abl!l*. _^\nMINOT HOUSE\nsow open.\nAsbury Park, N. ].\nPEI*ECT SEK'-'ICE. EI\u2014VATOR BATHS\nbooklet: .capt. j. Mixoa,\ncojisccticitt.\nEDGEWOOD INN,\nEDGSTVOOD PARK,\nGreet: wlch toe- Sound). Cana\u00bbcacut.\nWill Open W\u00ab*n-\u00bb<lay. Vay SI. fur t>\u00bb\u00bb Mummer Season.\nA beautifully tocat^d Resort Hotel for select pe.tr -.\u25a0\u25a0#%\nA* rooms sl\u00bba_M \u25a0*_ privat* Ciatha \u00bbnd atrtcUjr mod\n\u2022rn Conditions and furni\u00bbH:a\u00aba. Care : aenrlce la cat\ntleDartxnents.\nA new caano for Indoor a_as\u00ab_ents; superior sfs>s>\neoutpmeat and \"auto\" quarters; \u00bbolf :ia_; tennis court.;\ncood Basis, and a multitude- of \u00bbc.l kept, walks and ei'lise\n\"hrou^a puturesqu* country. Easy distance from poru\ni_ Golf and YacM Club*. r ra.sk T BHCTE. Mans\u2014r.\nAt UaareJ-tn-tJ\u00bb*-Plae*. UUewood. N. J. laattl Maw 13.\nTHE MONTOWESE,\nINDIAN SECK. BRAXTOBD. COHM.\nAt the widest part of Lone Island Sound. Th\u00bb maaS\nbeaattfnl location oo th\u00bb entire coast. Particularly \u2022\u2022\u00bb\niu-aole far taml.l*s. Rooms wtta private be.;\u2014. OolC\nTasini Batii ax Uoatics. Music and otner imim\"\nHotel \u2022ccommodaiaa^S. Send for Booklet.\nW. A. UIA9. \u00bbaaaai\u00ab>.\nA_\u00bb of TH- HAMPTON UIUUC6 S. C\nTETIMO.fT.\nPTIOS-UCT uoiiosEE^\naa4 cotustt. \u00ab*- \u25a0?'-\"\u25a0 Vt.\nAO attractions Rat\u00ab\u00bb $13 to K5 \u00bb w J elt -_ -\u201e. m>^\n13",
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"text": "1\u00a3\nTAKE? RET IX STREET.\nIiKTECTUE 'GETS OS.\"\nbookmakers to Take Racing Law to\nUnited States Supreme Court.\nWhat xras thought to be the first step In a\n:an of bookmakers to make a test case for\nrubmlssion to the United States Supreme Court\nof dM racing law. a recent decision on which\nby the Court of Appeals is taken to uphold its\nconstitutionality, was made yesterday when a\nbookmaker publicly took a bet from a detective.\n\u00abnd submitted to arrest, at Seventh-aye. and\nFortieth-*' _^.\nGeorge Edwards, of No. 316 West Thirty-sec\nond-st.. accepted \u00bb bet op the races at thf Ja\nmaica track from Detective Murphy, of the\nW\u00abal Thirtieth-st. station, after telling Mur\nphy that he knew he was a policeman. He was\n]o/ked up at the Tend?rloln station on a charge\nof violating that section of the Penal Code\nMhich mak^s bbokroakteg outside a racetrack\nn fplony. An anonymous letter had been sent\nto Captain O'Connor, informing him that a man\nvas maktos book in ruin.' at the place men\ntioned. Captain O'Connor thinks the letter was\npart of the run to make a test of the law.\nIi was the first arrest since the Court of Ap\npeals decision.\nSoon r-fter 3 p. m. Edwards appeared at Pev\ncnth-ave. and Fortieth-st. He was well\nproomrd. were his hat well back on his head,\nmd a bis diamond was conspicuous in his shirt\nlror,t. Interfaced between the fingers of his left\nhand were a number of bills of various denom\ninations. In his right hand he held a hand\nbook. Be took a position near the curb, jerked\nhis sleeves up so that his white cuffs showed to\ntheir full length, anal then raised his arms in an\nInviting position.\n\"Step right up ar.d make your bets, gentle\nmen.\" he shouted out in a strong voice.\nSeveral people stopped to watch him. attracted\nby the unusual sight, and In a minute a small\ncrowd stood about him. Edwards smiled\nbroadly. No one seemed inclined to accept his\ninvitation to make a bet, and he talked on:\n\u25a0 Who can pick a winner? Here we are, open\nfor business, gentlemen. Don't hesitate; come\nright up and place your money. Lots of rood\nthings running: to-day; you'd better take a\nchance.**\nEdwards then held up his book for the In\nspection of the crowd. Two men pressed for\nward and looked over the odds for the third\n\"'l'll take a piece of Mollnoa at 3 to V said\none cf the men, as he handed over a five-dollar\nbill. Edwards took the bill and made an entry\nla the book-\nHe had been standing there some time when\nDetectives Murphy and Goldberg, of the Tender\nloin station, appeared. Murphy pushed his way\nthrough the crowd and stood In front of Ed\n\u2022wards.\n\u2022I know you.\" said the man with th\u00ab book,\n\"you are a. police officer.**\n\"\"Will you take a bet from me?\" asked Murphy.\n\u2022\u2022Siire^hing.\" replied Edwards, \"a cop's money\nIs as good as any one's.\" I\nMurphy was taken by surprise. n\n\u2022\"VThafE the lowest bet you will take. Be\n\"SUb* from a two-spot' to a 'century\nplant'\" said Edwards coolly, not a muscle m\nhis face changing.\nMurphy pulled out a J2 Ml \u00a3 \u201e\n\"Put this on Ivernla, in the fifth race, he\nEa Edward S took the bet and reoorteOit.\n\u2022You are under arrest,\" said Murphj.\nEdwards made no protest.\nJUDGE FOSTER WRONGLY QUOTED.\nSays Poolroom Decision Was Not on Ground\nof TJnconstitutionality.\nlu<ie- Foster saM yesterday that erroneous state\nments ha.<l been credited to him regarding his at-\nTit'ide ih\u00ab poolroom law.\n\"1 new said that I would discharge ever}' pool-\nTc\u00abrn' keeper who was brought before me.\" he de\nolsrfd \"I certainly will not. -While apparently\nPtrlnhardfs common that there was no reason\nwhy poolsellers should not operate was confirmed\nr,y Stedeker's discharge, I 2nd that he was re\nleased, not on the broad grounds of the ucconsti\ntutior.zdlty of the law. but on the narrow one of a\ndefective indictment. Mr. Terkins, of the District\nAttorney's office, tells me that the regular printed\nrorm was used, so that all v .a pcolsellers convicted\nIn recent years nave been imprisoned on deCectivo\n\"I don't believe that because of this decision lh\u00ab%\npoolrooms will reopen generally, and I don t think\nthe District Attorney does, either.\nMr Perkins, of Mr. Jerome's ptaff. said that\n-new indictments would be had in short order.\"\nIt war \"only a matter of adding baif a dozen\n\u2022words.\"\nJUST AS MANY RTTM SHOPS AS EVER.\n!\u00abo General Tailing Off in Demand for\nLicenses.\nAlbany. April .\u2014 IJiqucr tax returns received at\nthe State Excise Department to date show little, if\nr.vy. falling off In the number of applications for\nliquor licenses due to the increase In the tax under\nthe law passed at the recent session of the legis\nlature. To-morrow Is the first day of the new tax\nyear, er-d to-day's figures would have shown any\nchange due to the new law.\nMORE LICENSES THAN LAST YEAR.\nEchenectady. N. T.. April 80.\u2014 County Treasurer\nTelverton announce* that thus far there are forty\nthree applications for liquor licenses in this city\nin excefs of last year, despite the increased tax\nfrom $350 to SJ2S. Many more applications are ex\npected.\nHOME NEWS.\nPROMINENT ARRIVALS AT THE HOTELS.\nAM BRIDGE\u2014 R. E. Chllcott, B. N..\nEngland. FIFTH AVENUE\u2014 Jeremiah Curtin.\n\"WashinEton. GRAND\u2014 Colonel F. A. Smith, U. S.\nA \u2022 Captain I>. M. Britt. IT. S. A., and Amasa\nClarke, of Brookline. HOFFMAN\u2014 A. J. Dupont.\nof W'irr.i-.grion r>fl.. and Congressman George X.\nBouthwlck of Albany. HOLLAND\u2014 Baron Rolf, of\n6t Petersburg. IMPERlAL\u2014 Professor R. S. Wood\nruff cf Trenton; B. Harrison Wagner, of New-\nHaren. end Colonel L. C. Read, of Texas. WAL\nDORF-ASTORIA\u2014CoioaeI H. >L Boles, of Scran\nton.\nWHAT IS GOING ON TO-DAY.\nMilitary Touraansent at Madison Squara Garden.\nI>4icatlcn of new pavilion of New-Tork Ey\u00bb ar.d Ear\nInfirmary, afternoon.\n25\u00bb*:ir.ir of the Tammany executive committee, evening 1 .\nJuwiinir of the \u2022 . c-tarltn Society and acrirewi by Al\n''\u2022 5 Tongue on \"\\>getarianl\u00bbia In England.\" No. 64\nM2<slsw>-ave.. Sp. &\nNEW-YORK CITY.\nThen* will be a reading by F. Hopklnsrm Smith\nIn thw St. Marks Club room. No. 234 East Elev\n\u2022sHh-Ft.. on Tuesday evening at 8:30 o'clock, for the\nbenefit of ;he Kast Side Aid Society.\nTh\u00ab> thirty-sixth annual exhibition of the Araert\noan Water Color Society. Instead of closing: yes\n-.erG\u00a3>\\ as announced, v.::: be continued through\nSaturday. Slay ?- The tales to date number twen\nty-six work?, s^gresatlns M.300.\nHEARING ON TROLLEY EXTENSION.\nThe plan of the New- York and Stamford Railway\nCompany to extend Us road beyond the limits of\nI^archiEont to Ncw-Roehelle was explained yester\nday to Frank M. Baker and Jof;h H. Dickey,\nf-L&te RaiJroad Commissioners, at a hearing at the\nFifth Avenue Hotel. The route of the proposed\nextension fcoes through property of C Oliver Jselln.\nIt has been asserted that the New- York, New-\nH*ven and Hartford Railroad la behind the plan.\nIt \u00ab-v explained that the New-York and Stamford\nRailway Company proposed to carry passenger*\nfrom LArclimont to Xew-Rochelle wlthoat a change\nat \"cars and for five cents one fare, whereas\nunder present conditions passengers were compelled\nto change cars and the trip cost them 10 cents.\nSeveral residents of Xew-Rochelle and Larcfamont\nlUitJ^ed that the extension would benefit those\n\u2022gSr- .. \u2022 Colonel Heft, of Bridgeport, \u2666ronn.. a\ndirector ,' the Ntw-York and Stamford company.\n\u00a3ShM that tti iJ\u00abw-\u00a5ork. K\u00abw^Hav\u00abn aad H*rtr\nTheodore B* Starr\nDiamond Merchant,\nJeweler and Silversmith,\nMADISON SQUARE WEST\nBetween 35th and a6th Street*.\nBstabliubftd 1682.\nIS yemn on John St. at Starr * M*reui\n8\u00a3 years \u00abs abort.\nSPECIAL NOTICE.\nNo connection with any ethor\nhouse in this Un\u00ab of business.\nford Railroad Company did not own any stock _ In\nthe New-York and Stamford company ana that\nnone of the directors or officials of the New-Haven\nroad wore directors in the New-York and Stamford\nroad He denied that the extension was to be built\nfor the benefli of the. JJew-Haven road.\nOpposition to the plan will be heard on May 16.\nMUST PAY OK GO TO JAIL.\nJudge Holt Fines Lawyers for De\nliberate Contempt of Injunction.\nA decision -was handed down yesterday by\nJudge Holt, in the United States District Court,\nadjudtrins Charles I*. Hoffman and Charles <~i.\nF. Wahle. of Hoffman & Wahle. lawyers, of No.\nGL'o Broadway, puilty of contempt of court, and\nordering them to pay a fine of $100 each within\nthree days. They were also ordered to get from\nthe City Court, within three days, an order re\nleasing Michael Fortunato from a fine of |580\nimposed on him by that court. Failing to do\nthis, the two lawyers must pay the fine in addi\ntion to the $100. They are ordered committed to\nLudlow Street Jaii in case of failure to obey the\norder of Judge Holt.\nJudge Holt characterized the action of the two\nlawyers as \"deHfoerat>. contempt\" in violating a\nsweeping: injunction granted by United States\nDistrict Court Judge Adams In the bankruptcy\nproceedings of lonio Fortunato. This Injunction\nrestrained Salvatore Torio from further prose\ncuting In the Btate courts for a year an action\nagainst Fortunato in which Torio obtained in\nthe City Court a judgment against Fortunato\nfor $550 by default.\nIn last September Fortunato filed a petition\nin bankruptcy, and hi\u00df counsel obtained the or\nder from Judge Adams restraining Torio. A\ncopy of this was served on Hoffman & Wahlc\\\nand they made a motion before Judge Adams to\nvacate or modify the restraining order. This\nmotion was denied.\nIn February Hoffman & \"VTahle obtained an\nex parte order in the City Court for Fortunato\nto appear and sign his testimony in the supple\nmentary proceedings. He obeyed under protest.\nhis counsel pleading that the injunction acted\nas a bar to all proceedings. Tn April Hoffman &\nWahle got an order signed in the City Court\nadjudicating Fortunato in contempt for dte\nobeying the order of the court, and ordering him\nto par $5801. the original judgment, with *SU\ncosts added. To this Fortunatos counsel again\npleaded the injunction as a baJ^jujd made m\nmotion in the United States District Court to\nhave Torio. Hoffman & Wahle and Henr -A.\nF-iedman. a clerk employed by Them, punished\nfor contempt in violating the injunction\nJudge Holt exculpated Torio and the <Mprk.\nSEEK WILL A WEEK.\nTiwt of Warren B. Smith, of\nYonhers, Finally Found.\nThe will of Warren B. Smith, the carpet manu\nfacturer of Yonken. who died in Algiers, leaving\nan estate which has been estimated at between\n1-0 000 000 and 530.000,0(0. was found yesterday, after\nsearch of a week. It will be filed with Surrogate\nSilkman at White Plains to-day. The will was dis\ncovered by Theodore Fitch, of lookers, counsel for\nthe Smith estate, in a private safe deposit vault of\nthe Mercantile Trust Company in this city. It was\nfirst thought it might be necessary to blow the\nvault open. The will eras drawn a year ago. The\nwitnesses are two business men of Yonkers.\nThe main heirs are a sister of Mr. Smith, Sirs.\n\u2022William F. Cochran. and several nephews ana\nnieces. Mr. Smith had apartments In the Rutland\nFifty-seventh-st. and Broadway, and search .is\nfirst made there for the will. Finally Mr. Fitch re\nmembered that it had been placed in the vault. It\nis reported that St. Johns Hospital and other\ncharitable Institutions in Yonkers and this city re\nceive large bequests.\nADOLPHE OPENHYM'S WILL FILED.\nValue of Estate Said To Be $550.000\u2014Be\nquests to Relatives and Charity.\nThe will of Adolphe Openhym was filed by Mor\nris J. Hirsch. attorney for Augustus Openhym,\none of. the executors, in the Surrogate's office yes\nterday. The value of the testator's real estate is\nstated to be |SMW. and of the personality upward of\nHOMM.\nMr. Opcnhym leaves $12,000 to the United Relief\nWorks of the Society of Ethical Culture, and $5,000\neach to the Mount Sinai Hospital, the Montefiora\nHome for Chronic Invalids and the Hebrew Benev\nolent Orphan Asylum. To ms Widow, Christine, ho\nleaves a house at No. IS 1 * West second-st. and\nits contents. The residuary estate is divided into\nthree parts, of which one Is left in trust to his two\nsons. Wilfrid A. and Georpe J. Openhym. until\nthey reach the npe of twenty-five, when the prin\ncipal Is to be paid them. The third sharp is left in\ntrust for Mrs. Openhym. who is to receive the in\ncome for life. On her death the principal is to be\nequally divided between his two sons.\nMr. Openhym appoints his widow, his brother\nAugustus and Robert B. Hirscb as executors. By\na codicil Insurance policies aggregating JV),CWO are\nleft to Mrs. Openhym.\nD. B. IVISON'S WILL PROBATED.\nHackensack, N. J.. April 30 (Special).\u2014 The will of\nDavid B. Ivison. of Rutherford, for many years\npresident of the American Book Company, has been\nprobated by Surrogate Pell, of Hackensack. Th-> es\ntate is valued at about $1,500,000. To the widow is be\nqueathed $250,000 In cash, all horses, carriage\nhousehold effects, etc., and the premises No. 18\nWest Fifty-first-st. and No. 12 West Forty-eitThta\nst.. New- York. To William C. Ivison, a son. is left\n$150,000. To another son, Henry, is left BJO.OM con\ntingent upon his payment of a note of VMM held\nby the testator against him. The income of Jl'-0.000\nin trust Is to go to Henry C. [viaon and his wife. In\nequal parts. A Bister, Jane I. Hoadley. g\"ts $20,000.\nA daughter, Sarah B. Ivison, pets the Income nt\n$100,000. Another daughter, Mrs. W. W. Hill, pets\n$100,000. Mary Brattan receives $3,000 and Charles\nMartin $1,500. Both are servants. The residue of\nthe estate goes to the widow, Emfline M. (vison,\nwho is an executor with William C. Ivison and W.\nWallis Hill, a son-in-law.\nTHE MAYOR VETOES MAGISTRATE BILL.\nMayor Low yesterday vetoed a legislative bi'l\nwhich would make any dark of a police maari*,\ntrate's court who had served seven years \u00ab-ligih.*\n\u25a0or appointment as a magistrate. It was said that\nthe bill was drawn in the Interest of Philip Bloch.\na clerk in one of the courts.\nThe Mayor gave a hearing OH a bill providing\nfor three additional magistrates in The Bronx.\nHenry C. Henderson \u25a0 i posed it on the ground that\nthere would not be ennuph work in The Bronx for\ntwo. much less three.\nFOR FLATHOUSES, NOT THEATRE.\nNo theatre will be built on the site of the old\nWilliam M. Bvarts house, at the northwest corner\nof Fourteenth-st. and Beeea<l-e.ve. It was an\nnounced sonif! months ago that overtures to pur\nchase the property had beon made by a theatrical\nsyndicate. This report caused considerable dis\npleasure, as many persons thought that this fa\nmous bouse should be bought by the city, and\neither preserved as a landmark or improved in a\nmanner which would please the public.\nThe plot Is 76x103.8 feet and or. it will be built\ntwo flathouses by N. Feller, who lias bought th\u00ab\nproperty from Adolj>h Mandsl through I^cskowltz,\nkr&B\u00abr U Lev*.\nIv-RVT-YOKK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. MAY 1. 1903.\nCall me early. Mother dear, for if\nI'm to be King of the May, Mother,\nI need \u2014\nA Stetson soft hat\u2014 that costs\nfrom $.5 to $12.\nI.ow shoes of new last; $3.50 or $5.\nNegligee shirts of May Day\nshades; $1.50 to $4.50.\nAnything man or boy neds to wear,\nwe have.\nRogers, Peet & Com v.\n238 Broadway, opposite City Hall.\nfi < 2 and 7 and 9 \"Warren st w* \u25a0\u00ab one,\n842 Broadway, cor. 13th. \u2122 c fil i J^\u00bbll\nand 140 to 14* 4th Ay*. or mall.\n1260 Broadway, cor. 32.1.\nand 54 West 33d St.\nLO.9T MONEY; TOOK LIFE.\nCuban Planter, Friend of President\nRoosevelt, a Suicide.\nBernardo Bueno. once a wealthy Cuban supar\nend tobarco plantation owner, who lost his\nmoney in sugar speculation, committed suicide\nyesterday afternoon by shooting himself at No.\n813 \"West Fourteenth-st., where he had a fur\nnished room. Bueno lived in Santiago de Tuba.\n\u25a0where his widow and child live now. Tie left\nthere last December, and he corresponded regu\nlarly with his wife.\nBueno had large plantations in Cuba, on\nv.Tiich he grew sugar chiefly, and some tobacco.\nHe went into sugar speculations heavily. He\nlost a great deal of money, but still had large\nestates left when the Spanish-American War\nbroke out. Bueno had been a military man, and\nhe took .i captaincy in the Cuban Army. He\nwas helpful In various ways to General Wood.\nHe was at Santiago during the campaign in\nthat part of the island. President Roosevelt,\nthen colonel of the Rough Riders, came to know\nBueno. and the Cuban intelligence, knowledge\nof the country and the conditions there seemed\nto make him a man to the liking of the colonel.\nAfter the war Bueno went on with his busi\nness, but his speculations were not successful,\nand he lost nearly all he had. He came. to New-\nYork with a view to getting back some of his\nfortune by further speculations, but. so far as\nIs known, he had not made any successful vent\nurea.\nBueno lived quietly in a furnished room in\nthe same house with Julius Pacacio and Misses\nNina and Lola Aeramonte. also Cubans. They\nsaid he had never shown any signs of being\nmuch disturbed by his losses, but seemed firmly\nto believe he would recover his money again.\nBueno was talking for awhile with these\nfriends in the parlor of the house yesterday af\nternoon. Then he went to his own room. Two\nshots were heard, and his frW-nds rushed to\nBuenos room. He was found on the lloor with\na bullet in his head. Another had been shot\ninto his mouth, blowing his brains out through\nthe top of his head. He was taken to the New-\nYork Ho\u00dfpital. where he died soon after his\narrival.\nEdward Agramonte, a brother of the sisters\nof that name, said he had known Bueno for\ntwenty-five years. He said Bueno h:id some\nestates left, but they were tied up in litigation\nand he had lost a lot through unpaid taxes and\nburnings in 188S, at the hands of General\nWeyler. Bueno had four hundred hands on his\nplantations around Santiago. CuVm. on which,\nwas machinery valued alone at $100,000. Bueno\nhad been an intimate friend of General Wood,\nand when the Santiago campaign opened\nEueno's regiment was in it, and he was with\nColonel Roosevelt's regiment In the Pan Juan\nHiil charge.\nIn 1899. Agrnmont\" said, when General Garcia\nwas arrested. Bueno had also been arrested. He\nwas held by Vnited States Commissioner Shields\nfor trial in the federal court, but he was ac\nquitted. On leaving Cuba in December Bueno\nhad letters of introduction from General Wood\nto .T. M. Ceballoa & Co., William K. Grace & Co.\nand other large West Indian trade h\"iise\u00ab. He\nhad como here yiartly through disappointment\nat not receiving an appointment by the new\nrepublican government of Cuba.\nCOMMERCIAL TRAVELLER DROPS DEAD.\nA:, mm, N. V., April 30.\u2014 A. OtnierJonk, seventy\nyears oM. of No. .\"46 West One-hundred-and\nfortleth-*t. New- York, dropped dead this morn\ning in the lobby of the Hotel Osborne. He v.as a\ntraveller f<r a wine company. Cerebral hemor\nrhage was the cause of death.\nXLIGENCE.\nMARINE\nMINIATURE ALMANAC.\nSunriee COOTlllMnt fi:. r ,r, ' Mcwr. **;s U:lT|MeO\u00df*s ago 4\nHIGH WATER.\nA M Sandy Hook 10:11, Gm. Islan.l lO:4S|HeU Gar- H-JS\ny M Bandy Honk 10:30 Oov. Island ll:li;Hell Gate 1 :0o\nINCOMING STEAMERS.\nTO- DAT.\nVessel From. Line.\nNauplia Stettin. April 8 Hamn-Am\nNicolai if* Copenhagen. April 27 Scand-Am\nrittad! Genoa Naples. April 17. . .Italian\n\u2022City of Washington. Nassau, April -.< N. Y. & Cub*\n\u2022Deutschland Hamburg. April 23.. Hamb-Am\n\u2022Troian Prince St Michaels. April 22 Prince\n\u2022Pathfinder\" ......San Juan. April 25 * T & p R\n\\f--.ominee \u25a0 I\u00bbndon. April 20 > At Trans\n..'\u25a0,-. la \" ...Plymouth. April 20 Hamb-Am\n.ir^voie ' ' \u25a0*.\" Hay \u00ab. Af ril 25 French\nv \u25a0'' :,' ' \" ...Copenhagen, April 13 Scand-Am\nlioltr-i V'i\"\u00ab'v\" .. .Swansea. April 17 Bristol City\nlYashlnirtaD.. Naples. April 17 Italian\n.(\u2022^rkc'a ...r.,rt Spain. April 23 Trinidad\nr I*.-\": \u25a0;;;.\u25a0 Ualveston. April 25 .._ \u2014 Mallory\ni lt .l\" Vvann&h .. .Savannah. April 29 Savannah\nSATURDAY. MAT 2.\n..,,_, York ...Southampton, April 25 American\n\u25a0\u2022vmric ..Liverpool, April 24 White Star\n\u00abt Andrew\" \" \". .. Antwerp. April 19 Phoenix\n\"ilXv&na ' Havana, April 2i\u00bb N V & Cuba\n.\"nVanrlie\"..'. Jacksonville. April 20 Clyde\n.. '\u0084'.,(\u201e Genoa, April Hamb-Am\nI, .'.\".,., '\".' Liverpool. April 2.\" Cunard\n\u2022Horatio '.*. liarbados. April 24 Booth\n\u2022iMv of \\V:iehlnnt on. Nassau, April 28 Ward\n. frlnldad P.ermuda, April 30 Quebec\nSUNDAY. MAT 3.\n--\u0084.,__ . .. San Joan. April 28 N V * V II\nr . ';\u25a0 mei ne '- Havre. April 25 French\nn<,rert ...Glasgow, April 30\nT-atria. \" Oporto. April 2*'\nIT ltlo.V Oalvfston, April 27 Morgan\n\u2022Brines mall.\nOUTGOING STEAMERS.\nTO -DAT.\nVessej\n....... For. l>ine. Halls close. pally.\nKlaxara. Tauipico. N. Y. \u00ab ' ''\u2022''\u00ab \u2022- 12:tX>m 3 \"\" P!M\n; an iC- \u2022\u00bb. Mobile, Mallory - 3:'\u00ab> P m\ni, \u0084.\u25a0 | CSiarleston, Clyde . .i:i\u00bb>pm\nS Anne. Norfolk. Old Dominion. -\u2014 - 3:00 p!11\nSarat., K \u00df. Colon. Panama \u00bb:30 a m l:\u00ablpm\n.-AT; AY. MAY 2.\nCksspai a Liverpool, Cunard 6:00 a m ft;-;\u00bb ip.\nVadSXnd AntwVir Red i.tar S:f\u00bb)am 10.-00 a m\nWeimar Nfa Lloyd 8 :0\u00bb a m 1 1 :0 i\u00bb a m\nfvTumbla, QlMgow. Anchor i.:Soam 12:00 in\nMlnnetunka, London, At Trim ;.. B:Ot) a m\nColorado. Hull. Wilson \u25a0\nBritish Empire, Antwerp.. ::::::::: *\u00bb* sg|\n.f.ra'-aj.. Porto Rli i. Bad I> ,s?, s ?' ilm I--* 1 \"\"\nAltai Jamaica. Hamb-Am 0:30 am 12:0o m\nAthoa Hajrtl Hamb-Ain 9:30 am m\nMorro Castl\u00ab Havana, N V a. Cuba . .10:00 a m 1 :<M) p m\nEtona. Argentine, etc, M. : >am ll|:or, m\nMaracas Or\u00bbna4a. Trinidad m.-hi m 12^0 m\nOllnda, Havana, Mum- m 1. :30 pm 3:00 pm\nEl Val'.e. GeJveston. Morgan .i:(nip m\nI'omua New-Orleans, Morgan - S:oopm\nLampasa*. (lalveston, Mallory ;; \u25a0\u25a0\"' i\u00ab m\nMonroe. Norfolk. Old Dominion 3:00 p m\nMONDAY, MAY 4\nAparh<\". Charleston. Clyde - \u2022\u25a0:.\"\" p m\nHamilton. Norfolk. Old Dominion .... \u2014 3:oi\u00bbpm.\nSHIPPING NEWS.\nPort of New-York. Thursday. April 30. 1908.\nafIUUYSD.\nSteamer Neckar (Kef), Harrassowttr, Bremen April lh.\nto Oelrtch* & Co, with 168 cabin. 601 steerage passengers\nand mdke for New-York. 3? cabin and 1.\u00ab2fl steerage i.tt'\nsencea and rndse for Baltlrcoro. Arrived at th\u00ab Bar at\n\"\"itaanllsr Prlo\u00ab WilleM HI ODutcn). Jutt\u00ab, raxwnarlbo\nR^ I^I^pNEfbPNITURE\nNEW DINING-ROOM DESIGNS.\nANTWERP OAK.\n\u2022 A new finish, not as dark as the Weathered,\nnor as light as the Golden. Beautifully pol\nished, showing to great advantage the exquisite\ngraining of the wood.\nSideboards, $30.00; China Closets, $2G.00; Cel\nlarettes, $26.00 (complnto, with on\u00abj dozen\nglasses, biscuit jar and decanter); Side Tables,\n$14.00; Chairs. $8.00, leather seat Extension\nTables made to order for any design and any\nr size.\nTo have artistic, furniture for every room at\nfactory prices, you tnust\n\"BUY OFTHe MAKES?\"\nGeo. C. Flint Co.\n43.45 and 47 WEST 23? ST.\nNEAR BROADWAY.\nCARRIAGE BimUUKW. 2S WEST 24TH ST.\nFactories: 505 to 515 West 32d St.\nSPECIAL MENTION.\nAdvertisement* admitted Into these col\numns are recommended to the readers of\nThe Tribune an thoroughly reliable, and\nhnsinens fan ho done by mail with the\nadvertisers with perfect safety.\nTai2=: mark DEFECTS\nEYEGLASSES\nShould be used to correct.\nHven complicated cases are\ncorrected ty glasses made by\nSPENCER OPTICAL MAN\nUFACTURING CO..\n15 Maiden Lane. N. T. City.\n1 x OKOADWAir.\neHS UHUADWAr,\nT2X SIXTH AVESCI.\nandirons FOR INFORMATION\nFENDERS, OP\nGas Logs, Fire Sets. \u00ab, , OIIDICPTC\nScreens and Antique ALL dUDJ CU I O\nHob Grates, see\n\u25a0tSSL .> TRIBUNE\nFRANK H. GRAF ALMANAC\n(Kepairin^. Repolishing>.\n322 SEVENTH AYE. Price 25 cents.\nTo Complete\nYour Library\nYon need thcTYihiine\no^^ Almanac\n.... 1903 ....\nTT settles all disputes\n*\u25a0 in short order, and\nthis ready reference\ncosts only 25c. Order\nat once from\nTribune Office -N.Y.\nThe Tribune\nUptown Office\nis now located at\n1,364 Broadway\nBetween 36th and 37tn St\u00bb\u00bb\nApril 7. Demerara S. Trinidad 11. Canipano 12, Coma\u00df*\nand Quanta 13. La Guayra 14. Porto Cabello 15. Curacoa\n16. Jacmel 20, Aquin and Aux Cayes --. Port-au-Prince\nand tit Marc 23. to the Holland-America Line, with 21\u00bb\npassengers, mails and mis.-. Arrived at the Bar at 7:30\nSteamer DOTdogne (Br), Kins, Banes April 24, to the\nT'nlted Fruit Company, with fruit. Arrived at the Bar\n* Steamer * Yucatan. Smith, Colon April 2.\".. to the Panama\nRailroad Si Co, with 90 passengers, mails and mdse. Ar\nrived at the Bar at 11:10 a m.\nSteamer Bpi ro (Nor). Iversen. Runaway Bay, Rio Bueno\nand Falmouth.. Ja. April 21. Montep Bay and St .Anns\nBay, 22. to W L Rain bun. with fruit. Arrived at the Bar\na Steamer Fan Juan. Sampson, San Juan April 14. Arroyo\n16 Joboa 17. 'iu.iyanilla 18, Guanlca 20. Mayai?i:-z .1.\niad lla 22 and San Juan 23, to the New-York an 1 Porto\nlUco Sa Co. with mdse. Arrived at th\u00ab Bar at 11:30 p m.\n'Kjth\nSteamer El Pud. Hl\u00dfglna, Galve-ton April 24, to the\nSouthern Pacific Co. with mdfe.\nSteamer El Dia. Mason. New-Orleans April 23, with\nmdfe to :1:< Southern Pacific Co.\nSteamer City of Memphis, Savage. Savannah April 27.\nto the Ocean Ss Co, with paosenzen and mdae.\nSteamer Princess Ann.-. Tapley. Newport News and Nor\nfolk, to the Old Dominion Si Co, with passengers and\n' 'steamer Hector, Keen*. Boston April 29, to F B Dalz\u00bbil\n& Co with m tee. _\nSteamer Chattahoochee, Lewi* Boston, to the Ocean Ss\nCo, with mdae. . __ _\nSteamer Old Dominion. Burton, Boston, to the Joy Ss\nCo, with nulne.\nSandy Hook. N J. April SO, 9:30 p m\u2014 Wind Bouth-\nBOUthwest, fresh breeze; clear.\nSAILED.\nSteamers \u2022 \u25a0\u25a0. ;3r), for Auckland. WvlUngtoa, etc:\nBlucher (Ger). for Hamburg via Plymouth and Cherboura;;\nPretoria (Bri for Bermuda; l.a Gaacogne < r>. for Havrn;\nCtimhal ilin for Valparaiso. CaJlao. etc; Groaaer Kurfurst\n(Ger) for Bremen via Plymouth and ''herbourc; Monterey,\nfor Havana and Mexican ports; Pomeranian (Br>, for\nGlasgow Hamilton, for Norfolk and Newport News; Xl\nDorado for Galveston: Anselma de 1-arrlnaga (Br), for\nriantaiicier; Kansas City, for Savannah; Tresco i\u00dfr>. for\nMatanzas; DaKKry (Nor), for Progreao; Blueflelda. f.r\nBaltimore ; California iHrt, for Norfolk; Onelda. for\nPhiladelphia.\nTHE MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.\nFOREIGN POP.TS.\nBrow Head. April 30\u2014 Passed, steamtrs Chicago City\n(Br), Hunter. New-York for Bristol; Potomac (Br),\nMcDonald. New- York for Avonmouth.\ni.. .-\u25a0 .; April \u25a0(\". I IS p m\u2014 Sailed, steamer Teutonic\n(Br). McKlnstrv (from L.lvf ; \u25a0\u25a0:\u25a0. Now-Vork; 8:30\na m. arrived, steamer Germanic <nr\u00bb, Smith, New-\nYork for Liverpool tar.d proceeded).\nLizard May 1\u201412:10 a m\u2014 Pawed, steamer August* Vic\ntoria (Ger), Kaempff. S m Fork for Plymouth. iTier\nbour\u00ab and Hamburg; April 3\", passed, steamer Ex\n. \u2022 laior !er>, Cmi tin. New-York.\nSwansea April Sailed, steamer Brooklyn City (Br).\nllalley. New- York.\nHamburg April SO, 11 \u2022\u00bb -Arrived, steamer Pennsyl\nvania (Ger>, Splledt, New Tort via Plymouth and\nClierbourg.\nGibraltar. April 30 \u2014 Passed, steamer i\"sJabrta (Dri.\nBridges, Naples via Algiers for New-York: 2s. ar\nrived\", steamer Pontlac (Br), Owen, New-York for\nVenice, etc.\nPalermo. April -\u25a0\"\u25a0' Arrived, steamer Bolivia lHr>, Cover\nlev New\u2014 York.\nVenir* April 27\u2014 Arrived, steamer Powhetan (Br), II\u00abn\n.leii New-York via Algiers and Malta.\nBermuda. April Sailed, iteatm-r TrinlJad (Ht) Fra.'er\nNew-York.\nSAN FRANCISCO STOCKS.\nBan Francisco. April CO.\u2014 Th<\u00bb official olosinjr uo \ntatlons for minim? stocks to-day were as follows:\nAltft \"\u25a0\"\u2022 Justice op\nA,oha on 08} Kentucky (ron 01\nA S\"| in I>a.ly Washington Con... \u25a0,-\nBell er '.*.' 52 Mexican | ,\u2022\u00bb>\nBeft'-i Pelcher... LSOI Occidental <\"on qq\nd v ii , ..... 06 ' 'i ntr i ,*,\nCadeldonU =\u25a0 \\\u00b0.\\ gv\u00abi man Srt\n.-hullente Con *2 <?!\u25a0-*\u201e' \u2022.\u25a0v.v.v.: m\ncorrtience- r:::^i:wl aSc bSv '?^:;:^f:i-:8\non Ca\" .1 Vi \"l ISO B\u00ab'rra Nevada 75\n\u25a0\u2022nn imperial .'\u00ab SfilSlta \u00ab\nCrown Point \u2022\u2022 281 St '\"\u25a0'\"* 1\u00bb\nGould * C\u00abrn- \u25a0 \u2022\u00ab i-r.!h n .v'n n M\nii r. <f A- Korrrosa .. \u25a0\u25a0 I'Uh '\u00b0\" TO\nJulia ....\u2022\u2022. 02| Yellow Jacket \u00ab\nEUROPEAN PRODUCE MARKET,\nIJverfooT Aprti -f' . '''.T'V'V- Vv' t' V \" X - N *? ' r * d\nWestern winlf-r tlrrn. <'S 2\u00bbd; No I .North\"! n \u00bbpiinK. no\nrt..,-k- No l California ft. adv. (,\u00bb gVsd; futures steady;\nMay W 4%d- lu!\\ <i- SHrt. Corn- Spot, American i:i|*ed\nnew'flrm. in'T'ii: \u25a0,:,..: .ii 'mixed old steady. Be l^rl.\nfrturcs rteoily M:.V \u0084- M; \u2022\u2022\u00ab\"*\u2022 \u00bb\u25a0 **\u2022\u00bb{ July; >\u2022 4.1;\nleas\u2014 Canadian quiet, t\u00bb U. i'lour\u2014 2l. U, is fancy\nCLOSES TO-MORROW NIGHT.\nMADISON SQI'ARB GARDEN.\non\u2122? MILITARY TOURNAMENT.\nMannijement Military Athletlo League..\nTO Ml f\u00bb|JT Grand Review of Troops by Major \u00ab\u00bben\nlU-IMlUnl . ra ; Atlna R. \u25a0 hafTo*. commanding De\npartment of th- Eaut. followed by Drill J/,,,* 54 \" c \"\nliuk- of <\"ornw\u00abJMa-\u00ab Own Rifl'!> Canadian Mllltla Music\nRide by 2nd IT. S. Cavalry. Drill by Oth -\"- . S. , Inf \" nt fT-\nGatllng Gun Drill by 2nd Battstr, N. G. > v v -^\"?\nthenlc Drill by Co. C, 1211 Re?. N. r ' \u2022*\u2022' V.. Vr\\U l*7\nIst Naval Hattallon. Drill by U. B. Marines, and Artil\nlery Drill by 27th Battery. U. B. A. m _\nAthletic mala. 7:30 o'clock: Military Programme. 8:45.\nAdmission: .v> cent*. P.fs^nM seats. $1.00. 1 -p 4 > i ._\nEJ'-LAST MATINEB TO-MORROW. 2 P. M.^J\nmil military iirotrramme. and competitive, drills l>-^\npupil? of P\u00ab<kskl!l and New- York Military academies.\nEYES\nARE\nMADE\nTO SEE\nThrough.\nNATURE\nOFTEN\nLEAVES\nEMPIRE THEATRE. Broadway and 40th St.\nJOHN DREW THE HIMMIMi limn\nGARRICK THEATRE. 83th St.. near B'way.\n1-u.t 2 Evgs.. s:ls. L*lt Matinee Saturday. 2:15.\nANNIE RUSSELL in MICE AND MEN\nMonday\u2014 Skipper \u00abfc WALE. STREET.\nCRITERION\" THEATRE. ITway & 44 ui St.\nBras B:30. Matli.-fg Wednesday and Saturday. 2:15.\nCHARLES HAWTREY_ AqS^marl!\nKEW SAVOY THEATRE. S4ih St. & B'way.\nLaM ! Btss.. >>:30. Last Matins Saturday. 2:15.\nHENRY MILLER. &'%\u00a3&\u00a3\u00a3\nMonday\u2014 Ezra Kendall\u2014 TH\u00df VJNKGAR BUYER.\n(.\\lU>i:\\ THEATRE. BUI st. & Madison are.\nEvjr*.. >::\u2022\u00ab' Matine?s T7\u00ab\"<J. .-. Saturday. C:3O.\nTHE 13TH CENTURY CWCPYM A X!\nMORALITY PLAY. t-VknYIVIMIN\nMADISON SQ. THEATRE. 24th St near B\"ws,y.\nEvgs.. \u25a0>:.{'>. Mattn\u00bb\u00bbs Thursday and Saturday.\nGeo.H.Broadhursfs A Fool .\u00bb-^ HSc i^ioney\nGreatest Comedy. A I 001 A >-D 11 15 rIOIICJ\nKnickerbocker Theatre. B'waiy * MM St.\n\u2022 4th Month. At 8 Sharp. Matinee W\u00abd & Sat. at 2.\na^sSSSSMW. BLUE BEARD\nPRI\\( ESS. B'way & 29th. Mats. Thursday * Sat.\nKvgs. THERE AND BACK. | \"Keeps audience laughing\nat 9. HVANS A HOPPER. ! all evening.\"' \u2014 Herald.\n8:20. \"The Man Who Stole the Castle.\"\nHERALD SQUARE THEA.~^S,V^?^ r\nGRACE GEORGE in PRETTY PEGGY\nCJT Tl O \u00bb JLM 2:ls\u2014 Dally\u2014 B:ls.\nJL IV VJ> JLa Urn 215\u2014 Dally\u2014 8:13.\nMcINTYRE I HEATH-NAT. M. WILLS\nAND OTHER ALi^STAK VAUDEVILLE ACTS.\nHarlem /Amelia. Blns;h\u00dfm.T \u25a0 \u00ab:I.V Mat. Sat. 2:15\nOp. House? \"THE FRISKY MRS. JOHNSON.\"\nNext Week\u2014 JOSEPH JEFFERSON In Repertoire.\nUlinn I V HILT, THKA. I>\u00bbT. A\u00ab. & 42d St.\nIII! I KKA I MATISEE EVERY DAY, ase.\n11l U 11 11 HI MISS MILTON.\nWAM^ACK'S. Eves.. 9:15. Mats. Wed. A Sat.. 2:15.\nGEORGE IDE'S WITTY MUSICAL. SUCCESS.\nI Suuan^Sulu\nmatinee j EDMUND RUSSELL\nTO-DAY. I - m HAMLET.\nIRVING PLACE THEATRE. Last week but one.\nKerenczv Operetta Co. Last 3 tim\u00bb\u00bb. \u2666\u2022DIE ri'PPE.\"\n\"Next and last week. \"THE GEISHA.\"\nTJT?r\u00bb ATJIV AY THEATRE. 41st-\u00abt. A B-w\u00bby.\nJLJxvLIiVJLJ WAI Kv.. P. Mats. Wed. 4 Sat.. 2.\nHenry W. Savage Presents the New Musical Comedy.\nPRINCE OF PILSEN\nTO-NIGHT. MYSTIC SHRINE NIGHT.\nRFOISCO 1 HEATRL To-nlKh^iMth Time.\"\nJ\u00ab-F\\TRA MATINEE THURSDAY. MAY 7TH.\nDAVID BELaSCO THt. DARLIMI\nBLAACHU BATES in OF THE GODS.\nMTMM *2 St.. B'way & Tth ay. Er. UST 2 NIGHTS\nVIU I UnlA 8:15. Last Mat. Sat.. 2. LflOltHlUniO\nWalsh- RESURRECTION\nNEXT I DAVID BELASCO will Present\nMONDAY 1 WARFIELD In \"THE AUCTIONEER\"\nWEST END-SHORE ACRES\nBIJOU \u00a35% MARIE CAHILL\nM V a,.Va s tv.2 lP \u2122 NANCY BROWN\nACADEMY Of MISIC. 14th St. A Irvlns: PI.\nW X,|THE SUBURBAN\nPrices 'S-. sf>. 7T>. 1.00. Mats. T\\>d. A Sat.. 1' F.v\u00bb.. \u00ab:15.\nT-v A f V*^ at 8:15. Mattasa Saturday, : 13.\nl/rVL I O OpK* Read's Cotne<ly\nTHE STARBK KS.\nNext Monday. May 4. CECIL. cFOONKR in MT LADT\nPEGGI\" GOBS TO TOWN.\nManhattan Broadway and 33d Street. , Eva.\n\u00a3tltinn<iHlaU 8:20. Mats. Wed. & Sat., 2:13.\nThe Earl of Pawtucket\nAMERICAN BARBARA FRIETCHIE\n\u00a35-42 St- and S At*. Next week RESURRECTION.\nTED MARKS' Btsr Concert Sunday Night\n\u2022J! 1 irt*TlO GRAND CIRCLE. B'way & 50th St.\nmAJtO IIV Evs. at 8. Ma-s fl>d. <fe gat at 2.\nlill-7 Ann r\\~7 I& A Mat.\nWI ZAR D :B 0 F T OZ I j,^\nK!^l\u00abW\u00bbSI\u00bbtfV B'way I BEST SHOW IMOTVJT.\n> ITU Si sa\u00ab Great A\u00abs-30.\n\u00a3\u25a0\u25a0 I II U I 14th St I PRICES USe. and SO\u00ab.\nnnnPTHD'C COMEDY & VAI'D. SHOWS. 26<r. 60c\nPnUl/ IUX O EVERY AFT. & EVE. Res. 75c\nOOrd Bi\u00bbr Ail-Star Cth The\n23, V vaudeville. 3\u00bbv. Cherry Picker*.\nCOth Only A ll?^ tf > \u201e, > v '* k of\n581- Shop Girl. I I^o-- Dig Vnadrrllle,\n14TH ST THEATRE, nr. \u00bbirh ay. Mats. Wed. & Sat.\n-V-i.il- JU rr\u00bbH*MCI\u00bb Tf \" lr BEST Play.\nTllb CUnAnj\u00dfrxM.\\G for office.\n_ nr >ii WORM* IX WAX. \u00bbw Groups.\nEDEN cI>IS M a T o \u00abi Rap H .\nSI (ISEK.I Wonderful Klectrlc Theatre. Aft A EJ\\\u00bb.\nP\\STOR'S, nth St., near 3d Aye. Continuous. 20 and\n30 cents EUNORE SISTERS, CARLETOX & TKRKE.\nJOHN & BERTHA OLEESON.\nMETROPOLITAN JOCKEY CLUB.\nSIX RACES to-UiV AT 2-.no P. M.\nSPECIAL TIME TABLE TO-DAY.\nTrains i'a\\- K. :Utli it. X. V.. via L. I. C. 12.10.\nl'j 40 1.00 (Parlor Cars). 1.10. 1 30. 150 p. m Parlor\ncar on ill trains\nBrooklyn. Flatbunh At* 12.48, 1 .\u00ab>. 1.201 l \u00ab.% P. M.\nlir.lf.r.: Ay* .. 1448. l.\u00bb>\u00ab. 1.2* 1.51\nEast New. V0rk....12.5a. 1.13 1.35. .-\u2022. -\u2022\nAll trolleys try Jam&lca connect \u25a0.\u25a0:\u2022: the t-a<~k\nArtm. to Grand Stand. $2. A.lm. to \"!'M Stand. 7S\u00ab.\nQUARTERLY MEETING OF THE A.MXXI\nCAN INSTITUTE. Mr, Tth. \u00ab P. M.. at 1!) W>3t\n\u00abth c\u00ab. \" HENKT \\vni.\u00abCH. SsCy-\nwinter \u00abiu!\u00bbt K \u00ab 3d- Hop* at London \u2022I'a-.n Coast), firm.\nid 1 1 >\u00ab -1 \u2022 7 \"lli*f \u00bb*\u25a0 extra India m\u00ab-j<> .*2\u00bb 3d. Pork\nfirm prime in\u2014 \u25a0 Western. H\"s \"- 1 Ham* Short cut. U\nto l'\u00ab IT). steady. &*\u00bb\u25a0 Bacons steady: Cumberland rut.\n2tJ to 80 111 Sis; short rth. M \u00ab \u25a0\u2022 *\u2022 *, \u2022\"\u2022\u2666- lon* clear mid\ndle* Itirhi '-\"* \u00ab\u2022\u2022 \u2022''* \u25a0>. 82l \u2022*; lons clear ml-Mle* heavy.\n33 try 40 I* 53\u00bb: short -l-\u00bbr bark* M '<\u25a0 20 M>. S3*; clear\nbelli** 14 to \\A tt>. Hi 6.1. Shoulders\u2014 Square. 11 to IS\nn stead; -\u00bb\u25a0:- M Lard fiulet; prims Western. Jn tierces.\nWs U' American rertnrd. In pails. Il*'.I I *'. flutter\u2014 Good\nl\"nit*.l Vtate* fctea.ly. \"\u2022\u00bb\u2022 ' \u2022 \u2022-\u00ab\u25a0 steady: American finest\nwhite an.l colorad. \u2022\u00ab\u00bb\u2022. Tall\u00a9\" Prim* city ste\u00ab<J>. 21a.\nTurpentine\u2014 -Spirit* steady, 43\u00bb. Koala Common firm.\n.'\u00bb Ml. Petroleum\u2014 Refined qutet. \u00ab**\u25a0\u00bb\u00ab'- Unseed oil ,|,i|l,\n'.'4 M Tallow \u2014 Australian. In I*->n.lon. \u2022\u2022\u2022jr. 3I\u00bb. Cot.\nMassed oil\u2014 Hull refined, upot. quiet. -ilB 741\nLIVERPOL COTTON MARKET.\nLiverpool April \u2022\"<>. \u2666 9 <\u2022 \u2022'\u25a0'\u2022\u25a0' \u25a0 spot In fair de\nmand; prices um*hanice\u00abt; American middling. .'> 544. Th\u00bb\nralra of the day \u00bb'i- 10,\u00bbn.n\u00bb bale*, of which l.Cioo wer*\nfor simulation ap.il exr*>rf. an 1 Included 7i\u00ab' American.\nReceipts. 7mm hales, til American. Futures opened\n\u00bbtendv and closed rjuiet: American middling, g o c. May.\n\u2022V:UVB.Y:i4d; May an.l June. .'. 33d: tune and July. mid:\nJuly and iirnt, .*. SSd August and September. .'\u00ab lid;\nSeptember and October. -1.5it04.A44; October and Novem\nber. 4 .;:., ; November and r>\u00bbc\u00abnb\u00abT 4.0 M; .-amber\nand January. 4.sfid, January and February, 4 K>Qi \u00bb'..\nAmusements.\nThe Turf.\nMeetings.\nAll Eyes\nARE ON ST. LOUS,\nwhere the great Louisiana\nPurchase Exposition is now\nbeing dedicated. The cere\nmonies will be over by next\nSunday. It will, therefore,\npay you to dedicate a portion\nof that day to turning YOIR\nEYES to\nThe\nSunday\nTribune\nA few of its many attrac\ntions are hinted at below.\nManchuria.\nPicturesque views from this rich but\nundeveloped country, of which Russia is\nscheming: to obtain complete possession.\nBreaks Treaties.\nEx-Attach* demonstrates from Russia's\nattitude In Manchuria that treaties *\u00bb-m\nto be \"more honored in the breach than\nIn the observance.\"\nSomaliland.\nDescription of the queer people now at\nwar with England in South Africa, with\npictures showing the method of shipping\nsupplies to the British troops there.\nShot by a Hobo.\nDesperate -war Is bein? waged by the\nPennsylvania Railroad against the tramps\nwho steal rides on freight trains. On- of\nits detectives was recently shot and seri\nously wounded by a tramp. Thrillin;\nstories of some of his fights with them.\nDo Vassar Women Marry?\nTh<? senior class at Va\u00absar was lately\nInterrogated by a woman on this subject.\nSome of their interesting r\u00bbpll\u00bb*. and the\nnarrow \u00abcap\u00bb of a mere man who ques\ntioned one of them.\n\"Tranquility Farm.\"'\nThis beautiful estate, which Is the\nAmerican home of Mrs. W. K. Vander\nbilt, formerly Mrs. is*** M. Rutherfurd.\nillustrated and described.\nThe Slums of Washington.\nOar capital city is described by an ex\npert who has visited slums th\u00ab\u00bb \"world\nover, as carrying off the palm for fright\nful conditions. The appalling state of af\nfairs under the shadow of the V.'hit*\nHouse photographed and descri'D-d.\nBeautiful Statuary.\nNew-York's new Hall of Records will\nbe decorated with handsome statues.\nPhotographs of some of the most attrac\ntive.\n250 th Anniversary.\nHuntlngton, Long Island, is preparing\nto celebrate its 2r^>th anniversary. Presi\ndent Roosevelt and Governor Oil are\nexpected to take part. Mary amusins\nhistorical anecdotes of the town.\nTurtles as Pets.\nThe Los Angeles (Ca!.> Chamber of\nCommerce keeps a number of queer tur\nties as pets. Some stories Told of them\nwhich are hard to believe.\nBilly Whiskers.\nThe Autobiography of a Goat. A Jolly\nstory for boys and girls now running in\nthe \"Little Men and Women's Depart\nment\" of The Sunday Tribune.\nThe Negro Question.\nHow some nf the negroes haw satved\nthis problem hv erectln/jf a cottofi -\nthe South. This m; I ar.i nal\nexclusively by negroes.\nBooker T. Washington.\nAnecdotes of this remarkable colored\nman. for whose old age Andrew Carnegie\nhas so generously provided.\nHarvard Students.\nAn interesting description of the cha\ngrin of the undergraduates at Harvard\nwhose room* were visited during the\nEaster vacation by the faculty in search\nof signboards and other souvenirs which\nthe students had appropriated from the\ntownspeople.\nMount Vernon. N. Y.\nTh* attractive residences and bnsioesa\nenterprises of this hustlinc W>\u00abt:eh<r?ter\ncity Illustrated and tlesi-rit^M.\nLiterary Reviews. Sports of Saturday\nand the Week, Matters of Special Inter\nest to Women, Entertaining Miscellany\nfrom The Tribune's Foreign and Amer\nican Contemporaries, a Page of Humor.\nSpecial Correspondence from London\nand Paris, the \\eira of the World.\n\\i I THIS AND MUCH\nMORL IN THL\nSUNDAY\nTRIBUNL\nOrder it of your Newsdealer or\nsend in your Subscription.\n\u25a0TODAY TRIHI ob* year. *3\u00ab \u2022**\nmonths, 91 1 three month.. BOc.",
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