MySQL query string builder for Ruby featuring sanatization and statement chaining.
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README.md

K'bam!

Remember K'bam is still in development - the API will very likely change soon.

Description

K'bam! is MySQL query string builder featuring statement chaining, nesting and sanatization.
K'bam is still in developement but you can test it already. I'd be happy about your feedback.

What it does

it turns this

Kbam.new.from('posts')
    .select('title, author, date, text')
    .limit(10)
    .order('date') 
    .where('author = ?', 'john')

into this

SELECT title, author, date, text 
FROM posts 
WHERE author = 'john' 
ORDER BY date ASC 
LIMIT 10 

For whom is K'bam!?

K'bam! is for those that feel comfortable with raw SQL statements, but don't want to go into the effort of sanatizing every variable and want to enjoy the convenience of random (order) statement chaining.

Features

  • random (order) statement chaining
  • variable sanatization
  • you are not forced to use any defined database structure as required by many ORMs
  • K'bam! is fast and does't constrain you.
  • K'bam! has no uneccassary overhead and provides full access and suport for MySQL through the mysql2 apdater.
  • nested queries
  • K'bam! has rich syntax and alias functions - use it as you like

Install

via ruby gems:

gem install kbam

Kbam relies on the mysql2 gem. You need to have mysql installed on your machine to be able to use kbam. Furthermore, sometimes you'll need to install libmysqlclient-dev to satisfy mysql2 dependencies.
For Linux (apt-get based distros like Ubuntu, Debian...)

sudo apt-get install libmysqlclient-dev

Usage

require 'kbam'

# your database credentials
db_credentials = {
	:host     => 'localhost',
	:database => 'db_name',
	:username => 'root',
	:password => 'Kbam_roX!'
}

#Let K'bam! connect to the database
Kbam.connect(db_credentials)

# Or use a yaml file
# 
# host:     localhost
# database: db_name
# username: root
# password: Kbam_roX!
Kbam.connect('/path/to/database.yml')

# compose your query
comment_query = Kbam.new.from(:comments)
	.order(:created, :desc)
	.where(:user_name, 'leo')
	.limit(10)

# fetch the comments
comments = comment_query.get
# you can also ommit .get
# and just run .each, it will do the same

# count comments 
total_comments = comment_query.total
count_comments = comment_query.count

# print the result
comments.each do |comment|
	puts comment
end

Examples

Nested where

nested_where = Kbam.new.where(:user_name, 'Olympia').and(:id >= 120)

Kbam.new.from(:comments)
	.where("user_name = ?", 'john')
	.or(nested_where)

#=> SELECT * FROM comments
#   WHERE `user_name` = 'john' 
#   OR (`user_name` = 'Olympia' AND `id` >= 120)

Subquery

sub_query = Kbam.new.from(:comments).select(:user_name, :id, :created)

Kbam.new.from(sub_query.as("sub_table"))

#=> SELECT * FROM (
#      SELECT user_name, id, created 
#      FROM comments 
#      LIMIT 1000 
#   ) AS sub_table

Syntax sugar (still experimental)

# you can use >= <= < > in where clauses
# by default sugar is turned off
# to turn it on just type:
Kbam.sugar_please!

# query with sugar ;)
Kbam.new.from(:comments).where(:user_name, 'Olympia').and(:id >= 120)

#=> SELECT * FROM comments WHERE `user_name` = 'Olympia' AND `id` >= 120

Functions

Composing Functions

select

# can take array, single and multiple arguments
.select("fullname AS name", ["age", "birth"])

# or chain it
.select("fullname AS name").select(["age", "birth"])

#=> SELECT fullname AS name, age, birth

# if empty or omitted
#=> SELECT *

where

string = "user_name = ?" # or also: "user_name = ? AND id = ?"
vars = "john"            # can take array, single and multiple arguments

.where(string, vars)

#=> WHERE ... AND user_name = 'john'

Aliases
.and

or_where

.or_where(string, vars)

#=> WHERE ... OR user_name = 'john'

Aliases
.or
.where_or

limit

.limit(10)

#=> LIMIT 10

# default limit 1000

offset

.offset(50)

#=> OFFSET 50

insert / into

Kbam.new
    .insert({:user_name => 'John', age => 68})
    .into(:users)
    .run  # execute the function

#=> INSERT INTO `users` (`user_name`, `age`)
#   VALUES ('John', 68)

ignore

Kbam.new
    .insert({:user_name => 'John', age => 68})
    .ignore
    .into(:users)
    .run

#=> INSERT IGNORE INTO `users` (`user_name`, `age`)
#   VALUES ('John', 68)

query

# run raw sql query
Kbam.new
    .query("SELECT * FROM comments LIMIT ?", 10)
    .execute

Retrieving / executing Functions

get

# retrieves posts
posts = Kbam.new.from("posts").get
#=> 10

# you can also do
.get(:hash), .get(:array), .get(:json)
# hash is default

Aliases
.fetch

run

Kbam.new
    .insert({:user_name => 'John', age => 68})
    .into(:users)
    .run

execute

Kbam.new
    .query("SELECT * FROM comments LIMIT 10")
    .execute

each

# no need to call get before each
Kbam.new.from("posts").each do |post|
	puts post
end
#=> 10

count

# counts only posts in current result set
Kbam.new.from("posts").limit(10).count
#=> 10

Aliases
.length

total

# counts all posts irrespective of the current resultset
Kbam.new.from("posts").limit(10).total
#=> 327

Helper Functions

escape

# escapes string
Kbam.escape(dirty_string)

Aliases
.esc

The reason to build K'bam!

I tried Datamapper, ActiveRecord and Sequel when working on a project. The database requirements for this project were rather simple, but for some reason all these ORMs had trouble with the one or the other MySQL / Databse feature. Either they didn't support the following or to achieve it, it needed a big work around that would have been extremely simple in raw MySQL. And on top - they where often slow.

  • using String as a primary key
  • multiple join tables
  • joining tables not on primary key 'id' and foreign key 'other_table_id'
  • ordering by field of a join table
  • using conditions for a join table
  • nested where statement like WHERE a AND (b OR c)
  • using a MySQL function in a SELECT or WHERE statement
  • renaming fields (using AS)
  • counting entire dataset (using SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS)
  • nested select statements SELECT ... FROM (SELECT ... FROM ...) AS t

##License

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2013 Leopold Burdyl-Strohmann

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.