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INSTALLpc.txt - Installation of Vim on PC
This file contains instructions for compiling Vim. If you already have an
executable version of Vim, you don't need this.
You can find the latest here: https://github.com/vim/vim-win32-installer
This page also has links to install support for interfaces such as Perl,
Python, Lua, etc.
The file "feature.h" can be edited to match your preferences. You can skip
this, then you will get the default behavior as is documented, which should
be fine for most people.
This document assumes that you are building Vim for Win32 or later (Windows
XP/2003/Vista/7/8/10). There are also instructions for pre-XP systems, but
they might no longer work.
The recommended way is to build a 32 bit Vim, also on 64 bit systems. You can
build a 64 bit Vim if you like, the executable will be bigger and Vim won't be
any faster, but you can edit files larger than 2 Gbyte.
Contents:
1. Microsoft Visual C++
2. Using MSYS2 with MinGW
3. Using MinGW
4. Cygwin
5. Borland
6. Cross compiling for Win32 from a Linux machine
7. Building with Python support
8. Building with Python3 support
9. Building with Racket or MzScheme support
10. Building with Lua support
11. Building with Perl support
12. Building with Ruby support
13. Building with Tcl support
14. Building with Terminal support
15. Building with DirectX (DirectWrite) support
16. Windows 3.1
17. MS-DOS
18. Installing after building from sources
The currently recommended way (that means it has been verified to work) is
using the "Visual Studio Community 2015" installation. This includes the SDK
needed to target Windows XP. But not older Windows versions (95, 98), see
|msvc-2008-express| below for that
1. Microsoft Visual C++
=======================
We do not provide download links, since Microsoft keeps changing them. You
can search for "Visual Studio Community 2015", for example. You will need to
create a Microsoft account (it's free).
When installing "Visual Studio Community 2015 with Update 3" make sure to
select "custom" and check "Windows XP Support for C++" and all checkboxes
under "Universal Windows App Development Tools"
Visual Studio
-------------
Building with Visual Studio (VS 98, VS .NET, VS .NET 2003, VS 2005, VS 2008,
VS2010, VS2012, VS2013 and VS2015) is straightforward. (These instructions
should also work for VS 4 and VS 5.)
Using VS C++ 2008 Express is recommended if you need the binary to run on
Windows 95 or 97, see |msvc-2008-express| below.
To build Vim from the command line with MSVC, use Make_mvc.mak.
Visual Studio installed a batch file called vcvars32.bat, which you must
run to set up paths for nmake and MSVC.
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak console Win32 SDK or Microsoft Visual C++
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak GUI=yes GUI Microsoft Visual C++
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak OLE=yes OLE Microsoft Visual C++
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak PERL=C:\Perl PYTHON=C:\Python etc.
Perl, Python, etc.
Make_mvc.mak allows a Vim to be built with various different features and
debug support. Debugging with MS Devstudio is provided by Make_dvc.mak.
For a description of the use of Make_dvc.mak, look in Make_mvc.mak.
For compiling Gvim with IME support on far-east Windows, add IME=yes
to the parameters you pass to Make_mvc.mak.
To build Vim from within the Visual Studio IDE, open the Make_ivc.mak project.
(Note: Make_ivc.mak is not as rich as Make_mvc.mak, which allows for
far more configuration.) Make_ivc.mak can also be built with nmake.
nmake -f Make_ivc.mak CFG="Vim - Win32 Release gvim"
GUI Microsoft Visual C++ 4.x or later
nmake -f Make_ivc.mak CFG="Vim - Win32 Release gvim OLE"
OLE Microsoft Visual C++ 4.x or later
See the specific files for comments and options.
These files have been supplied by George V. Reilly, Ben Singer, Ken Scott and
Ron Aaron; they have been tested.
Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition *msvc-2008-express*
-------------------------------
Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition can be downloaded for free from:
http://www.microsoft.com/express/downloads/
This includes the IDE and the debugger.
To set the environment execute the msvc2008.bat script. You can then build
Vim with Make_mvc.mak.
For building 64 bit binaries you also need to install the SDK:
"Microsoft Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1"
You don't need the examples and documentation.
If you get an error that Win32.mak can't be found, you have to set the
variable SDK_INCLUDE_DIR. For example, on Windows 10, installation of MSVC
puts include files in the following directory:
set SDK_INCLUDE_DIR=C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v6.0A\Include
Visual C++ 2010 Express Edition *msvc-2010-express*
-------------------------------
Visual C++ 2010 Express Edition can be downloaded for free from:
http://www.microsoft.com/express/vc/Default.aspx
This includes the IDE and the debugger.
To set the environment execute the msvc2010.bat script. You can then build
Vim with Make_mvc.mak.
Targeting Windows XP with MSVC 2012 and later *new-msvc-windows-xp*
---------------------------------------------
Beginning with Visual C++ 2012, Microsoft changed the behavior of LINK.EXE
so that it targets Windows 6.0 (Vista) by default. In order to override
this, the target Windows version number needs to be passed to LINK like
follows:
LINK ... /subsystem:console,5.01
Make_mvc.mak now supports a macro SUBSYSTEM_VER to pass the Windows version.
Use lines like follows to target Windows XP x86 (assuming using Visual C++
2012 under 64-bit Windows):
set WinSdk71=%ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.1A
set INCLUDE=%WinSdk71%\Include;%INCLUDE%
set LIB=%WinSdk71%\Lib;%LIB%
set CL=/D_USING_V110_SDK71_
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak ... WINVER=0x0501 SUBSYSTEM_VER=5.01
To target Windows XP x64 instead of x86, you need to change the settings of
LIB and SUBSYSTEM_VER:
...
set LIB=%WinSdk71%\Lib\x64;%LIB%
...
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak ... WINVER=0x0501 SUBSYSTEM_VER=5.02
If you use Visual C++ 2015 (either Express or Community Edition), executing
msvc2015.bat will set them automatically. For x86 builds run this without
options:
msvc2015
For x64 builds run this with the "x86_amd64" option:
msvc2015 x86_amd64
This enables x86_x64 cross compiler. This works on any editions including
Express edition.
If you use Community (or Professional) edition, you can enable the x64 native
compiler by using the "x64" option:
msvc2015 x64
The following Visual C++ team blog can serve as a reference page:
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2012/10/08/windows-xp-targeting-with-c-in-visual-studio-2012.aspx
OLDER VERSIONS
The minimal supported version is Windows XP. Building with older compilers
might still work, but these instructions might be outdated.
If you need the executable to run on Windows 98 or ME, use the 2003 one
|msvc-2003-toolkit|.
Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 *msvc-2003-toolkit*
-----------------------
You could download the Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 from
http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/
Unfortunately this URL is no longer valid. Unofficial downloads appear to be
available from links mentioned on these pages (use at your own risk):
http://www.filewatcher.com/m/VCToolkitSetup.exe.32952488.0.0.html
http://feargame.net/wiki/index.php?title=Building_Source_with_the_VC2003_Toolkit
This contains the command-line tools (compiler, linker, CRT headers,
and libraries) for Visual Studio .NET 2003, but not the Visual Studio IDE.
To compile and debug Vim with the VC2003 Toolkit, you will also need
|ms-platform-sdk|, |dotnet-1.1-redist|, |dotnet-1.1-sdk|,
and |windbg-download|.
It's easier to download Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition, |msvc-2008-express|,
which is freely available in perpetuity.
The free Code::Blocks IDE works with the VC2003 Toolkit, as described at
http://wiki.codeblocks.org/index.php?title=Integrating_Microsoft_Visual_Toolkit_2003_with_Code::Blocks_IDE
(This site also takes you through configuring a number of other
free C compilers for Win32.)
To compile Vim using the VC2003 Toolkit and Make_mvc.mak, you must first
execute the following commands in a cmd.exe window (the msvcsetup.bat batch
file can be used):
set PATH=%SystemRoot%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v1.1.4322;%PATH%
call "%VCToolkitInstallDir%vcvars32.bat"
set MSVCVer=7.1
call "%ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Platform SDK\SetEnv.Cmd"
set LIB=%ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2003\Vc7\lib;%LIB%
Now you can build Vim with Make_mvc.mak.
Getting the Windows Platform SDK *ms-platform-sdk*
You will also need a copy of the Windows Platform SDK. Specifically, you need
the Windows Core SDK subset of the Platform SDK, which contains the Windows
headers and libraries. You need to search for it, Microsoft keeps changing
the URL.
Getting the .NET Framework 1.1 Runtime *dotnet-1.1-redist*
You need the .NET Framework 1.1 Redistributable Package from
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=262d25e3-f589-4842-8157-034d1e7cf3a3
or from Windows Update:
http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com/
This is needed to install |dotnet-1.1-sdk|. It also contains cvtres.exe,
which is needed to link Vim.
Getting the .NET Framework 1.1 SDK *dotnet-1.1-sdk*
You need the .NET Framework 1.1 SDK from
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=9b3a2ca6-3647-4070-9f41-a333c6b9181d
This contains some additional libraries needed to compile Vim,
such as msvcrt.lib. You must install |dotnet-1.1-redist| before
installing the .NET 1.1 SDK.
Getting the WinDbg debugger *windbg-download*
The Debugging Tools for Windows can be downloaded from
http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devtools/debugging/default.mspx
This includes the WinDbg debugger, which you will want if you ever need
to debug Vim itself. An earlier version of the Debugging Tools
is also available through the Platform SDK, |ms-platform-sdk|.
Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition *msvc-2005-express*
-------------------------------
Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition can be downloaded for free from:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualC/default.aspx
This includes the IDE and the debugger. You will also need
|ms-platform-sdk|. You can build Vim with Make_mvc.mak.
Instructions for integrating the Platform SDK into VC Express:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualc/usingpsdk/default.aspx
2. MSYS2 with MinGW
===================
2.1. Setup the basic msys2 environment
Go to the official page of MSYS2: https://www.msys2.org
Download an installer:
* msys2-x86_64-YYYYMMDD.exe for 64-bit Windows
(Even if you want to build 32-bit Vim)
* msys2-i686-YYYYMMDD.exe for 32-bit Windows
Execute the installer and follow the instructions to update basic packages.
At the end keep the checkbox checked to run msys2 now. If needed, you can
open the window from the start menu, MSYS2 64 bit / MSYS2 MSYS.
Execute:
$ pacman -Syu
And restart MSYS2 console (select "MSYS2 MSYS" icon from the Start Menu).
Then execute:
$ pacman -Su
If pacman complains that `catgets` and `libcatgets` conflict with another
package, select `y` to remove them.
2.2. Install additional packages for building Vim
The following package groups are required for building Vim:
* base-devel
* mingw-w64-i686-toolchain (for building 32-bit Vim)
* mingw-w64-x86_64-toolchain (for building 64-bit Vim)
(These groups also include some useful packages which are not used by Vim.)
Use the following command to install them:
$ pacman -S base-devel mingw-w64-i686-toolchain mingw-w64-x86_64-toolchain
Or you can use the `pacboy` command to avoid long package names:
$ pacboy -S base-devel: toolchain:m
The suffix ":" means that it disables the package name translation.
The suffix ":m" means both i686 and x86_64. You can also use the ":i" suffix
to install only i686, and the ":x" suffix to install only x86_64.
(See `pacboy help` for the help.)
See also the pacman page in ArchWiki for the general usage of pacman:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/pacman
MSYS2 has its own git package, and you can also install it via pacman:
$ pacman -S git
2.3. Keep the build environment up-to-date
After you have installed the build environment, you may want to keep it
up-to-date (E.g. always use the latest GCC).
In that case, you just need to execute the command:
$ pacman -Syu
2.4. Build Vim
Select one of the following icon from the Start Menu:
* MSYS2 MinGW 32-bit (To build 32-bit versions of Vim)
* MSYS2 MinGW 64-bit (To build 64-bit versions of Vim)
Go to the source directory of Vim, then execute the make command. E.g.:
make -f Make_ming.mak
make -f Make_ming.mak GUI=no
make -f Make_ming.mak GUI=no DEBUG=yes
NOTE: you can't execute vim.exe in the MSYS2 console, open a normal Windows
console for that. You need to set $PATH to be able to build there, e.g.:
set PATH=c:\msys64\mingw32\bin;c:\msys64\usr\bin;%PATH%
This command is in msys32.bat. Or for the 64 bit compiler use msys64.bat:
set PATH=c:\msys64\mingw64\bin;c:\msys64\usr\bin;%PATH%
If you have msys64 in another location you will need to adjust the paths for
that.
3. MinGW
========
(written by Ron Aaron: <ronaharon@yahoo.com>)
This is about how to produce a Win32 binary of gvim with MinGW.
First, you need to get the 'mingw32' compiler, which is free for the download
at:
http://www.mingw.org/
or you can use 'MinGW-w64' compiler.
http://mingw-w64.sourceforge.net/
Or a compiler provided on msys2:
https://msys2.github.io/
Once you have downloaded the compiler binaries, unpack them on your hard disk
somewhere, and put them on your PATH. If you are on Win95/98 you can edit
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file with a line like:
set PATH=C:\MinGW\bin;%PATH%
or on NT/2000/XP, go to the Control Panel, (Performance and Maintenance),
System, Advanced, and edit the environment from there. If you use msys2
compilers, set your installed paths (normally one of the following):
C:\msys32\mingw32\bin (32-bit msys2, targeting 32-bit builds)
C:\msys64\mingw32\bin (64-bit msys2, targeting 32-bit builds)
C:\msys64\mingw64\bin (64-bit msys2, targeting 64-bit builds)
Test if gcc is on your path. From a CMD (or COMMAND on '95/98) window:
C:\> gcc --version
gcc (GCC) 4.8.1
C:\> mingw32-make --version
GNU Make 3.82.90 (...etc...)
Now you are ready to rock 'n' roll. Unpack the vim sources (look on
www.vim.org for exactly which version of the vim files you need).
Change directory to 'vim\src':
C:\> cd vim\src
C:\VIM\SRC>
and you type:
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak gvim.exe
After churning for a while, you will end up with 'gvim.exe' in the 'vim\src'
directory.
You should not need to do *any* editing of any files to get vim compiled this
way. If, for some reason, you want the console-mode-only version of vim (this
is NOT recommended on Win32, especially on '95/'98!!!), you can use:
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak GUI=no vim.exe
If you are dismayed by how big the EXE is, I strongly recommend you get 'UPX'
(also free!) and compress the file (typical compression is 50%). UPX can be
found at
http://www.upx.org/
As of 2011, UPX still does not support compressing 64-bit EXE's; if you have
built a 64-bit vim then an alternative to UPX is 'MPRESS'. MPRESS can be found
at:
http://www.matcode.com/mpress.htm
ADDITION: NLS support with MinGW
(by Eduardo F. Amatria <eferna1@platea.pntic.mec.es>)
If you want National Language Support, read the file src/po/README_mingw.txt.
You need to uncomment lines in Make_ming.mak to have NLS defined.
4. Cygwin
=========
Use Make_cyg.mak with Cygwin's GCC. See
http://users.skynet.be/antoine.mechelynck/vim/compile.htm
With Cygnus gcc you should use the Unix Makefile instead (you need to get the
Unix archive then). Then you get a Cygwin application (feels like Vim is
running on Unix), while with Make_cyg.mak you get a Windows application (like
with the other makefiles).
5. Borland
===========
Use Make_bc5.mak with Borland C++ 5.x. See
http://users.skynet.be/antoine.mechelynck/vim/compile.htm
6. Cross compiling for Win32 from a Linux machine
=================================================
[Update of 1) needs to be verified]
If you like, you can compile the 'mingw' Win32 version from the comfort of
your Linux (or other unix) box. To do this, you need to follow a few steps:
1) Install the mingw32 cross-compiler. See
http://www.mingw.org/wiki/LinuxCrossMinGW
http://www.libsdl.org/extras/win32/cross/README.txt
2) Get and unpack both the Unix sources and the extra archive
3) in 'Make_cyg_ming.mak', set 'CROSS' to 'yes' instead of 'no'.
Make further changes to 'Make_cyg_ming.mak' and 'Make_ming.mak' as you
wish. If your cross-compiler prefix differs from the predefined value,
set 'CROSS_COMPILE' corresponding.
4) make -f Make_ming.mak gvim.exe
Now you have created the Windows binary from your Linux box! Have fun...
7. Building with Python support
===============================
For building with MSVC 2008 the "Windows Installer" from www.python.org
works fine.
When building, you need to set the following variables at least:
PYTHON: Where Python is installed. E.g. C:\Python27
DYNAMIC_PYTHON: Whether dynamic linking is used. Usually, set to yes.
PYTHON_VER: Python version. E.g. 27 for Python 2.7.X.
E.g. When using MSVC (as one line):
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak
PYTHON=C:\Python27 DYNAMIC_PYTHON=yes PYTHON_VER=27
(rest written by Ron Aaron: <ronaharon@yahoo.com>)
Building with the mingw32 compiler, and the ActiveState ActivePython:
http://www.ActiveState.com/Products/ActivePython/
After installing the ActivePython, you will have to create a 'mingw32'
'libpython20.a' to link with:
cd $PYTHON/libs
pexports python20.dll > python20.def
dlltool -d python20.def -l libpython20.a
Once that is done, edit the 'Make_ming.mak' so the PYTHON variable points to
the root of the Python installation (C:\Python20, for example). If you are
cross-compiling on Linux with the mingw32 setup, you need to also convert all
the 'Include' files to *unix* line-endings. This bash command will do it
easily:
for fil in *.h ; do vim -e -c 'set ff=unix|w|q' $fil
Now just do:
make -f Make_ming.mak gvim.exe
And if you use msys2 to build python support (as one line):
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak PYTHON=c:/msys64/mingw64
PYTHON_HOME=c:/msys64/mingw64
PYTHONINC=-Ic:/msys64/mingw64/include/python2.7
DYNAMIC_PYTHON=yes
PYTHON_VER=27
DYNAMIC_PYTHON_DLL=libpython2.7.dll
STATIC_STDCPLUS=yes
(This is for 64-bit builds. For 32-bit builds, replace mingw64 with mingw32.)
You will end up with a Python-enabled, Win32 version. Enjoy!
8. Building with Python3 support
================================
For building with MSVC 2008 the "Windows Installer" from www.python.org
works fine. Python 3.6 is recommended.
When building, you need to set the following variables at least:
PYTHON3: Where Python3 is installed. E.g. C:\Python36
DYNAMIC_PYTHON3: Whether dynamic linking is used. Usually, set to yes.
PYTHON3_VER: Python3 version. E.g. 36 for Python 3.6.X.
E.g. When using MSVC (as one line):
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak
PYTHON3=C:\Python36 DYNAMIC_PYTHON3=yes PYTHON3_VER=36
When using msys2 and link with Python3 bundled with msys2 (as one line):
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak PYTHON3=c:/msys64/mingw64
PYTHON3_HOME=c:/msys64/mingw64
PYTHON3INC=-Ic:/msys64/mingw64/include/python3.6m
DYNAMIC_PYTHON3=yes
PYTHON3_VER=36
DYNAMIC_PYTHON3_DLL=libpython3.6m.dll
STATIC_STDCPLUS=yes
(This is for 64-bit builds. For 32-bit builds, replace mingw64 with mingw32.)
9. Building with Racket or MzScheme support
========================================
1) Building with Racket support (newest)
MzScheme and PLT Scheme names have been rebranded as Racket. Vim with Racket
support can be built with either MSVC or MinGW (or Cygwin).
Get it from https://download.racket-lang.org/
Copy lib/libracket{version}.dll to your Windows system directory. The system
directory depends on your Windows bitness and Vim bitness:
32-bit Vim on 32-bit Windows: C:\Windows\System32
32-bit Vim on 64-bit Windows: C:\Windows\SysWOW64
64-bit Vim on 64-bit Windows: C:\Windows\System32
For building you need to set the following variables:
MZSCHEME: Where Racket is installed.
E.g. C:\Program Files (x86)\Racket
DYNAMIC_MZSCHEME: Whether dynamic linking is used. Usually, set to yes.
MZSCHEME_VER: Racket DLL version which is used for the file name.
See below for a list of MZSCHEME_VER.
The DLL can be found under the lib directory. E.g.
C:\Program Files (x86)\Racket\lib\libracket3m_XXXXXX.dll
MZSCHEME_COLLECTS: (Optional) Path of the collects directory used at
runtime. Default: $(MZSCHEME)\collects
User can override this with the PLTCOLLECTS environment
variable.
List of MZSCHEME_VER (incomplete):
Racket ver. | MZSCHEME_VER
==========================
6.3 | 3m_9z0ds0
6.6 | 3m_a0solc
6.8 | 3m_a1zjsw
6.10 | 3m_a36fs8
E.g. When using MSVC (as one line):
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak
MZSCHEME="C:\Program Files (x86)\Racket" DYNAMIC_MZSCHEME=yes
MZSCHEME_VER=3m_9z0ds0
Or when using MinGW (as one line):
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak
MZSCHEME='C:/Program\ Files\ (x86)/Racket' DYNAMIC_MZSCHEME=yes
MZSCHEME_VER=3m_9z0ds0
Spaces should be escaped with '\'.
2) Building with MzScheme support (older)
(written by Sergey Khorev <sergey.khorev@gmail.com>)
Vim with MzScheme (http://www.plt-scheme.org/software/mzscheme) support can
be built with either MSVC, or MinGW, or Cygwin. Supported versions are 205 and
above (including 299 and 30x series).
The MSVC build is quite straightforward. Simply invoke (in one line)
nmake -fMake_mvc.mak MZSCHEME=<Path-to-MzScheme>
[MZSCHEME_VER=<MzScheme-version>] [DYNAMIC_MZSCHEME=<yes or no>]
where <MzScheme-version> is the last seven characters from MzScheme dll name
(libmzschXXXXXXX.dll).
If DYNAMIC_MZSCHEME=yes, resulting executable will not depend on MzScheme
DLL's, but will load them in runtime on demand.
Building dynamic MzScheme support on MinGW and Cygwin is similar. Take into
account that <Path-to-MzScheme> should contain slashes rather than backslashes
(e.g. d:/Develop/MzScheme)
"Static" MzScheme support (Vim executable will depend on MzScheme DLLs
explicitly) on MinGW and Cygwin requires additional step.
libmzschXXXXXXX.dll and libmzgcXXXXXXX.dll should be copied from
%WINDOWS%\System32 to other location (either build directory, some temporary
dir or even MzScheme home).
Pass that path as MZSCHEME_DLLS parameter for Make. E.g.,
make -f Make_cyg.mak MZSCHEME=d:/Develop/MzScheme MZSCHEME_VER=209_000
MZSCHEME_DLLS=c:/Temp DYNAMIC_MZSCHEME=no
After a successful build, these dlls can be freely removed, leaving them in
%WINDOWS%\System32 only.
10. Building with Lua support
============================
Vim with Lua support can be built with either MSVC or MinGW (or maybe Cygwin).
You can use binaries from LuaBinaries: http://luabinaries.sourceforge.net/
This also applies to when you get a Vim executable and don't build yourself,
do the part up to "Build".
1) Download and install LuaBinaries
Go to the Download page of LuaBinaries:
http://luabinaries.sourceforge.net/download.html
Download lua-X.Y.Z_Win32_dllw4_lib.zip for x86 or
lua-X.Y.Z_Win64_dllw4_lib.zip for x64. You can use them both for MSVC and
MinGW.
Unpack it to a working directory. E.g. C:\projects\lua53.
Lua's header files will be installed under the include directory.
Copy luaXY.dll to your Windows system directory. The system directory depends
on your Windows bitness and Vim bitness:
32-bit Vim on 32-bit Windows: C:\Windows\System32
32-bit Vim on 64-bit Windows: C:\Windows\SysWOW64
64-bit Vim on 64-bit Windows: C:\Windows\System32
Or another option is copying luaXY.dll to the directory where gvim.exe
(or vim.exe) is.
2) Build
You need to set LUA, DYNAMIC_LUA and LUA_VER.
LUA: Where Lua's header files are installed. E.g. C:\projects\lua53.
DYNAMIC_LUA: Whether dynamic linking is used. Set to yes.
LUA_VER: Lua version. E.g. 53 for Lua 5.3.X.
E.g. When using MSVC (as one line):
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak
LUA=C:\projects\lua53 DYNAMIC_LUA=yes LUA_VER=53
Or when using MinGW (as one line):
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak
LUA=C:/projects/lua53 DYNAMIC_LUA=yes LUA_VER=53
Or when using Cygwin (as one line) (untested):
make -f Make_cyg.mak
LUA=/cygdrive/c/projects/lua53 DYNAMIC_LUA=yes LUA_VER=53
11. Building with Perl support
==============================
Vim with Perl support can be built with either MSVC or MinGW (or Cygwin).
You can use binaries from ActiveState (ActivePerl) or Strawberry Perl.
http://www.activestate.com/activeperl
http://strawberryperl.com/
When building, you need to set the following variables:
PERL: Where perl is installed. E.g. C:\Perl, C:\Strawberry\perl
DYNAMIC_PERL: Whether dynamic linking is used. Usually, set to yes.
PERL_VER: Perl version. E.g. 522 for Perl 5.22.X.
E.g. When using MSVC (as one line):
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak
PERL=C:\Perl DYNAMIC_PERL=yes PERL_VER=522
Or when using MinGW (as one line):
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak
PERL=C:/Perl DYNAMIC_PERL=yes PERL_VER=522
12. Building with Ruby support
==============================
Vim with Ruby support can be built with either MSVC or MinGW (or Cygwin).
Ruby doesn't provide the official Windows binaries. The most widely used
Windows binaries might be RubyInstaller. Currently Ruby 2.4 is recommended.
http://rubyinstaller.org/
If you use MinGW you can easily build with RubyInstaller, but if you use MSVC
you need some tricks described below.
(Another binary distribution is ActiveScriptRuby:
http://www.artonx.org/data/asr/)
When building, you need to set the following variables at least:
RUBY: Where ruby is installed. E.g. C:\Ruby24
DYNAMIC_RUBY: Whether dynamic linking is used. Usually, set to yes.
RUBY_VER: Ruby version. E.g. 24 for Ruby 2.4.X.
RUBY_API_VER_LONG: Ruby API version in a long format.
E.g. 2.4.0 for Ruby 2.4.X.
Ruby version vs. Ruby API version:
Ruby ver. | Ruby API ver.
=========================
1.8.X | 1.8
1.9.[1-3] | 1.9.1
2.0.0 | 2.0.0
2.X.Y | 2.X.0
(Ruby 1.9.0 is excluded from the table because it is an unstable version.)
A) Using MSVC
If you want to link with ruby, normally you must use the same compiler as
which was used to build the ruby binary. RubyInstaller is built with MinGW,
so normally you cannot use MSVC for building Vim if you want to link with
RubyInstaller. If you use a different compiler, there are mainly two problems:
config.h and Ruby's DLL name. Here are the steps for working around them:
1) Download and Install RubyInstaller.
You can install RubyInstaller with the default options and directory.
E.g.:
C:\Ruby24 (32-bit) or C:\Ruby24-x64 (64-bit)
Ruby 2.4.X is used in this example.
2) Download Ruby 2.4.X's source code and generate config.h:
cd C:\projects
git clone https://github.com/ruby/ruby.git -b ruby_2_4
cd ruby
win32\configure.bat
nmake .config.h.time
Note that ruby_2_4 is the branch name for Ruby 2.4.X's source code.
There is no need to build whole Ruby, just config.h is needed.
If you use 32-bit MSVC 2015, the config.h is generated in the
.ext\include\i386-mswin32_140 directory.
If you use 64-bit MSVC 2015, the config.h is generated in the
.ext\include\x64-mswin64_140 directory.
3) Install the generated config.h.
For 32-bit version:
xcopy /s .ext\include C:\Ruby24\include\ruby-2.4.0
For 64-bit version:
xcopy /s .ext\include C:\Ruby24-x64\include\ruby-2.4.0
Note that 2.4.0 is Ruby API version of Ruby 2.4.X.
You may need to close the console and reopen it to pick up the new $PATH.
4) Build Vim. Note that you need to adjust some variables (as one line):
For 32-bit version:
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak
RUBY=C:\Ruby24 DYNAMIC_RUBY=yes RUBY_VER=24 RUBY_API_VER_LONG=2.4.0
RUBY_MSVCRT_NAME=msvcrt
WINVER=0x501
For 64-bit version, replace RUBY=C:\Ruby24 with RUBY=C:\Ruby24-x64.
If you set WINVER explicitly, it must be set to >=0x500, when building
with Ruby 2.1 or later. (Default is 0x501.)
When using this trick, you also need to set RUBY_MSVCRT_NAME to msvcrt
which is used for the Ruby's DLL name.
B) Using MinGW
Using MinGW is easier than using MSVC when linking with RubyInstaller.
After you install RubyInstaller, just type this (as one line):
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak
RUBY=C:/Ruby24 DYNAMIC_RUBY=yes RUBY_VER=24 RUBY_API_VER_LONG=2.4.0
WINVER=0x501
For 64-bit version, replace RUBY=C:/Ruby24 with RUBY=C:/Ruby24-x64.
If you set WINVER explicitly, it must be set to >=0x500, when building with
Ruby 2.1 or later. (Default is 0x501.)
13. Building with Tcl support
=============================
Vim with Tcl support can be built with either MSVC or MinGW (or Cygwin).
You can use binaries from ActiveState (ActiveTcl).
http://www.activestate.com/activetcl
For MSVC 2015 use version 8.6.6 or later.
When building, you need to set the following variables:
TCL: Where tcl is installed. E.g. C:\Tcl86
DYNAMIC_TCL: Whether dynamic linking is used. Usually, set to yes.
TCL_VER: Tcl version in a short format. E.g. 86 for Tcl 8.6.X.
TCL_VER_LONG: Tcl version in a long format. E.g. 8.6 for Tcl 8.6.X.
Sometimes the Tcl dll name changes. E.g. ActiveTcl 8.6.4 comes with tcl86.dll,
but ActiveTcl 8.6.6 comes with tcl86t.dll. You can set the dll name by setting
the TCL_DLL variable:
TCL_DLL=tcl86t.dll
E.g. When using MSVC (as one line):
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak
TCL=C:\Tcl86 DYNAMIC_TCL=yes TCL_VER=86 TCL_VER_LONG=8.6
Or when using MinGW (as one line):
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak
TCL=C:/Tcl86 DYNAMIC_TCL=yes TCL_VER=86 TCL_VER_LONG=8.6
14. Building with Terminal support
==================================
Vim with Terminal support can be built with either MSVC, MinGW or Cygwin.
This uses the included libvterm and winpty. No extra header files or
libraries are needed for building. Just set TERMINAL to yes.
E.g. When using MSVC:
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak TERMINAL=yes
Or when using MinGW:
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak TERMINAL=yes
15. Building with DirectX (DirectWrite) support
===============================================
Vim with DirectX (DirectWrite) support can be built with either MSVC or MinGW.
This requires dwrite_2.h and some other header files which come with Windows
SDK 8.1 or later (or MinGW-w64), if you want to enable color emoji support.
This also requires MBYTE=yes which is enabled by default.
A) Using MSVC
If you use MSVC 2013 or later, Windows SDK 8.1 or later is used by default.
You just need to specify DIRECTX=yes:
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak DIRECTX=yes
If you use MSVC 2012 or earlier, the required header files are not available
by default. However, you can use the header files from newer SDKs with older
compilers. E.g.:
set "INCLUDE=%INCLUDE%;C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\8.1\Include\um"
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak DIRECTX=yes
If you don't need color emoji support, only dwrite.h is required. You can use
older compilers (e.g. VC2010) without Windows SDK 8.1. E.g.:
nmake -f Make_mvc.mak DIRECTX=yes COLOR_EMOJI=no
B) Using MinGW-w64
Just set DIRECTX to yes:
mingw32-make -f Make_ming.mak DIRECTX=yes
16. Windows 3.1x
================
The Windows 3.1x support was removed in patch 7.4.1364.
17. MS-DOS
==========
The MS-DOS support was removed in patch 7.4.1399. Only very old Vim versions
work on MS-DOS because of the limited amount of memory available.
18. Installing after building from sources
==========================================
[provided by Michael Soyka, updated by Ken Takata]
After you've built the Vim binaries as described above, you're ready to
install Vim on your system. However, if you've obtained the Vim sources
using Git, Mercurial or by downloading them as a unix tar file, you must
first create a "vim80" directory. If you instead downloaded the sources as
zip files, you can skip this setup as the zip archives already have the
correct directory structure.
A. Create a Vim "runtime" subdirectory named "vim80"
-----------------------------------------------------
If you obtained your Vim sources as zip files, you can skip this step.
Otherwise, continue reading.
Go to the directory that contains the Vim "src" and "runtime"
directories and create a new subdirectory named "vim80".
Copy the "runtime" files into "vim80":
copy runtime\* vim80
B. Copy the new binaries into the "vim80" directory
----------------------------------------------------
Regardless of how you installed the Vim sources, you need to copy the
new binaries you created above into "vim80":
copy src\*.exe vim80
copy src\tee\tee.exe vim80
copy src\xxd\xxd.exe vim80
To install the "Edit with Vim" popup menu, you need both 32-bit and 64-bit
versions of gvimext.dll. They should be copied to "vim80\GvimExt32" and
"vim80\GvimExt64" respectively.
First, build the 32-bit version, then:
mkdir vim80\GvimExt32
copy src\GvimExt\gvimext.dll vim80\GvimExt32
Next, clean the 32-bit version and build the 64-bit version, then:
mkdir vim80\GvimExt64
copy src\GvimExt\gvimext.dll vim80\GvimExt64
C. Copy gettext and iconv DLLs into the "vim80" directory
----------------------------------------------------------
Get gettext and iconv DLLs from the following site:
https://github.com/mlocati/gettext-iconv-windows/releases
Both 64- and 32-bit versions are needed.
Download the files gettextX.X.X.X-iconvX.XX-shared-{32,64}.zip, extract
DLLs and place them as follows:
vim80\
| libintl-8.dll
| libiconv-2.dll
| libgcc_s_sjlj-1.dll (only for 32-bit)
|
+ GvimExt32\
| libintl-8.dll
| libiconv-2.dll
| libgcc_s_sjlj-1.dll
|
` GvimExt64\
libintl-8.dll
libiconv-2.dll
The DLLs in the "vim80" should be the same bitness with the (g)vim.exe.
D. Move the "vim80" directory into the Vim installation subdirectory
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Move the "vim80" subdirectory into the subdirectory where you want Vim
to be installed. Typically, this subdirectory will be named "vim".
If you already have a "vim80" subdirectory in "vim", delete it first
by running its uninstal.exe program.
E. Install Vim
---------------
"cd" to your Vim installation subdirectory "vim\vim80" and run the
"install.exe" program. It will ask you a number of questions about
how you would like to have your Vim setup. Among these are:
- You can tell it to write a "_vimrc" file with your preferences in the
parent directory.
- It can also install an "Edit with Vim" entry in the Windows Explorer
popup menu.
- You can have it create batch files, so that you can run Vim from the
console or in a shell. You can select one of the directories in your
PATH or add the directory to PATH using the Windows Control Panel.
- Create entries for Vim on the desktop and in the Start menu.
Happy Vimming!