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vincentbernat l3-hyperv: add a "transparent" additional IP for VM4
This enables to assign an additional IP to a VM without any
configuration on the VM side.
Latest commit 9b0872a Oct 17, 2018
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RR7 l3-hyperv: don't install routes to kernel with Cumulus VX as RR Jul 14, 2017
bird-common l3-hyperv: add a note about "onlink" routes and BIRD Feb 15, 2018
README.md l3-hyperv: use /64 for guests for IPv6 instead of /128 Sep 26, 2018
bird.HV1.conf l3-hyperv: internal IPv4 traffic should use loopback IP Sep 21, 2016
bird.HV2.conf l3-hyperv: internal IPv4 traffic should use loopback IP Sep 21, 2016
bird.HV3.conf l3-hyperv: internal IPv4 traffic should use loopback IP Sep 21, 2016
bird.RR1.conf l3-hyperv: alternatively, use a Juniper VRR as route reflector Sep 29, 2016
bird.RR2.conf l3-hyperv: alternatively, use a Juniper VRR as route reflector Sep 29, 2016
bird.internet.conf l3-hyperv: prefer blackholes to unreachable routes Nov 29, 2016
bird6.HV1.conf l3-hyperv: switch back to ip rules instead of namespaces Aug 15, 2016
bird6.HV2.conf l3-hyperv: switch back to ip rules instead of namespaces Aug 15, 2016
bird6.HV3.conf l3-hyperv: switch back to ip rules instead of namespaces Aug 15, 2016
bird6.RR1.conf l3-hyperv: add some IPv6 (WIP) May 28, 2016
bird6.RR2.conf l3-hyperv: alternatively, use a Juniper VRR as route reflector Sep 29, 2016
bird6.internet.conf l3-hyperv: switch back to ip rules instead of namespaces Aug 15, 2016
gobgpd.private-ipv4.yaml l3-hyperv: use updated GoBGP with proper TTL security support Jul 18, 2017
gobgpd.public-ipv4.yaml l3-hyperv: use updated GoBGP with proper TTL security support Jul 18, 2017
gobgpd.public-ipv6.yaml l3-hyperv: use updated GoBGP with proper TTL security support Jul 18, 2017
junos-RR3.conf l3-hyperv: prefer use of BGP listening on a range rather than TCP MD5 Jun 16, 2017
junos-RR6.conf l3-hyperv: prefer use of BGP listening on a range rather than TCP MD5 Jun 16, 2017
lab.svg l3-hyperv: switch to a full L3 model Jun 13, 2016
quagga-bgpd.RR4.conf l3-hyperv: rename Cumulus RR6 to RR7 Jun 16, 2017
radvd.HV.conf l3-hyperv: use /64 for guests for IPv6 instead of /128 Sep 26, 2018
rt_tables lab-l3-hyperv: restrict the locally usable public routes for HV* Nov 7, 2016
setup l3-hyperv: add a "transparent" additional IP for VM4 Oct 17, 2018

README.md

L3 routing on the hypervisor

The goal of this lab is to demonstrate how an hypervisor could be turned into a router while the VM still think they share some L2 subnet.

The hypervisors distribute routes to VM using BGP (through a pair of route reflectors) on two distinct L2 layers. ARP proxying is used to let the hypervisors answer to ARP requests for VM on other hypervisors

IPv6

This lab is also compatible with IPv6 but there are small drawbacks:

  • BIRD doesn't support correctly IPv6 ECMP routes until 1.6.1. If you have an older version, comment the merge path yes directive in bird-common/rr-client6.conf. This way, only one route gets installed.

  • Hypervisor are not expected to do regular IPv6 traffic (they can do IPv4 for internal use using the private IP addresses). If they do, they'll use a non-loopback IP that would depend on the corresponding interface state.

  • Each guest will get a whole /64. This enables us to not have a proxy for NDP requests and make us compatible with any autoconfiguration mechanism for IPv6.

IPv6 was broken with commit 8c14586fc320 (part of 4.7) and fixed with a435a07f9164 (part of 4.8). RP filtering is also broken by 47b7e7f82802 (part of 4.16). It can be fixed with http://patchwork.ozlabs.org/patch/917128/

Variations

There are various iterations of this lab:

  • 5dfab33b776b will use multiple routing tables and "ip rules" to select the right ones. The drawback of this solution is that it doesn't scale well due to the huge number of ip rules needed.

  • adcd356527fb is using a DHCP relay instead of a local DHCP server

  • 453ea916aec7 is using namespaces to get multiple routing tables. Unfortunately, orchestrators (like libvirt) may not support namespaces and moving an interface manually to another namespace may confuse them (and the information they provide may become inaccurate since there is no unique interface names accross namespaces). Moreover, this requires to run several instances of BIRD (no support for namespaces in BIRD either).

  • d86e9ed65886 makes use of VRF, a recent (4.3+ for IPv4, 4.4+ for IPv6) addition to Linux that provides L3 separation (like a bridge, but for L3). We are back to using multiple routing tables, but the number of ip rules is now constant (4.8+ can even remove the need for specific ip rules). However, the feature is quite recent, has poor performance before 4.8 (7889681f4a6c), integration with Netfilter is still a moving target. Moreover, the DHCP server isn't able to send an answer for some reason (socket not bound to the VRF?).

  • d4ad9a028b51 uses firewall marks instead of VRF. Unfortunately, ARP proxying breaks as it is not possible to put marks for those "internal" requests. Regular reverse path filtering wouldn't work either (but we used the one based on Netfilter).

  • 1a6db390c6ca uses specific IP rules to blackhole non-matching traffic. This is safer as not many things could remove those rules but this is less efficient than using a blackhole route in the routing table, like what is actually done.

  • 106284d7f8b4 uses /128 for IPv6 routes and require the use of an NDP proxy (ndppd).

The current iteration uses multiple routing tables and "ip rules". The scalability issues are avoided by specifying "ip rules" for private traffic (there should be less of them), local traffic and have a catch all for what we assume to be public traffic. This only works with 3.15+ kernels. Before that, the kernel was checking the reachability of the next hop with iif equal to 0 and therefore didn't match any rule. This was changed in kernel commit 6a662719c986. For a version compatible with older kernels, have a look at commit 39b804c1e759. It uses BIRD to make copies of the device routes to the other tables (need BIRD 1.6.2+).

If you wanted to push subnets instead of connected routes, you would also need a 3.15+ for the same reason.

The hypervisor has a local table dedicated for its own use (local-out). This table is built with BIRD (need 1.6.2+, otherwise, use commit 28a0f7758d08). This is both to enable use of several default routes (one public, one private) and to avoid hyperv to use the public interface more than necessary (like contact arbitrary hosts).

It is possible to replace one of the route reflector (RR2) by a Juniper vRR. You need a proper image (at least 15.1) to be placed in images/junos-vrr.img.

Use of BFD and graceful restart

There are some limitations of using BFD with BIRD. If the hypervisors are directly connected to the route reflectors (for example, if the top of the rack switch act as a route reflector), it makes sense to disabled BFD: link failure should be enough to detect the peer is down.

With BIRD, BFD is handled by the same process as BGP. It disables the ability to use BGP graceful restart since the BFD sessions are interrupted at the same time than the BGP session. If you disable BFD, you can enable graceful restart. This can be done by reverting commit 10762d58961c. When disabling BFD, you may want to check that a link down is enough to bring down the BGP session. Otherwise, you will also need to reduce the BGP timers.

However, because of the use of route reflectors, it's difficult to use graceful restart. If a link goes down, the directly connected hypervisor will detect that and invalidate routes, but the other hypervisors (or systems) won't see the link down. The route reflector will keep the route and distribute it. Other systems will happily use the route even if it's invalid.

Route reflector setup

Route reflectors should be carefully configured. Notably, if the same route reflector is used to centralize different paths, a best path selection will be done before reflecting the result and therefore, only one path will be kept. If both paths from H1 to the route reflector are valid but only one path from H2 to the route reflector is currently working, H2 may not receive the working path to H1.

This could be mitigated by using the add-path feature. However, it's safer to ensure that all paths are correctly reflected and the easiest way is to have distinct route reflectors for each path (they can be virtual).

Also, some BGP implementations enable to specify a range for the accepted peers. This is convenient but incompatible with TCP MD5 security (as this feature requires to know all possible sources beforehand). Therefore, this lab doesn't use TCP MD5. See commit c8c3fde5918d for a version using TCP MD5.

ECMP for IPv4

Starting from kernel 3.6 and until kernel 4.4, ECMP for IPv4 is done on a round-robin fashion instead of per-flow. It is likely to cause some out-of-order packets and some flows may even be dropped by some IDS. Flow-based hashing is back only with 4.4. See a nice summary on reddit. When using affected kernels, it is advisable to disable ECMP when installing routes from BIRD, at least for the default route.

Anycast

In the lab, 203.0.113.10 and 2001:db8:cb00:7100:5254:33ff:fe00:100 are anycasted. However, this requires support for RFC 7911 in the route reflectors. BIRD comes with this support, but on JunOS, the support is only available from 15.1 and is really effective with 16.1. Moreover, on a given hypervisor, flows are not anycasted (unless an ECMP route is installed specifically).

Overlay network

A very simple overlay network is setup using VXLAN with unicast. It assumes that no routing is needed (which is the case in our lab). Otherwise, TTL must be increased.

We should use a higher than normal MTU (at least 1550) for underlying interfaces to ensure we can put 1500 bytes in virtual frames. Unfortunately, vde_switch doesn't support large frames. Therefore, we keep the default MTU. This could be changed in src/vde_switch/port.h by increasing from 1504 to something larger in struct packet.

Any other solution can be chosen, notably the use of BGP EVPN. See ../lab-vxlan lab for solutions. All of them should work fine on this topology.

Reducing the number of BGP sessions

It's important that the BGP session with the route reflector goes down when the data path is broken. Each hypervisor maintains 8 BGP sessions (IPv4/IPv6, two possible paths, public/private).

This could be reduced to 4 BGP sessions by using MP-BGP and using one session for both IPv4 and IPv6. This is not done here since BIRD cannot do that (until BIRD 2).

This could also be reduced by using a common session for public/private routes and using communities to put the routes in the right table. However, a clean separation is something nice too.

It is not advisable to reduce the number of sessions by using only one of the data path. There are several reasons:

  • next hop is set to self, the other route wouldn't exist at all (maybe it would be possible to synthetize it and use add-path to announce it)

  • if the used data path is broken, the other path is useless as no announce will go through it

  • if the unused data path is broken, it would still be announced through the working one (no way to detect it is broken with an L2 fabric)

However, this would be possible to only have one BGP session announcing everything by using an internal routing protocol like OSPF, using a loopback as next hop self and using those loopbacks for BGP sessions. However, there is some scalability issues with this solution, notably with the use of BFD (exponential number of BFD sessions have to be established).