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A concurrent, object-oriented, functional programming language with a very strong type system. NOTE: Not to be confused with http://atomo-lang.org/ - same author, very different language; this one's dead.
Haskell
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Atomo
Examples
.gitignore
LICENSE
Main.hs
README

README

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      d88888 888                                   
     d88P888 888                                   
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   d88P  888 888   d88""88b 888 "888 "88b d88""88b 
  d88P   888 888   888  888 888  888  888 888  888 
 d8888888888 Y88b. Y88..88P 888  888  888 Y88..88P 
d88P     888  "Y888 "Y88P"  888  888  888  "Y88P"  


Atomo is a programming language written in Haskell and will
eventually target LLVM.

For now it is entirely interpreted, but it seems to work pretty
well.

Unique aspects:
    - Object-oriented
    - Statically-typed
    - Functions can be defined as prefix or infix on-the-fly
    - A very strong and robust type system heavily
      influenced by Haskell. And by influenced I mean I
      ganked it. :) There have been changes to make it fit
      into an OO style, however.
    - Strings are just lists of characters.
    - Python-esque syntax
    - Pattern matching
    - Modular
    - And lastly, fast.

My goal with Atomo is to fill the void between the speed of Java
and the prettiness of Python, with many things heavily influenced
(or, ahem, stolen from) Haskell. I'm making a language I'd want to
code in.

Atomo is designed with flexibility and conciseness in mind. It has a
lot of aspects often seen in functional programming languages, like
pattern matching, a strong and consistent type system, defining
infix functions, static typing, etc.

To learn more, just take a peep at the example file, "example.at"

"But Alex, dynamic typing is all the rage! Why? WHY?!"

Because there are already too many good ones. Writing another
dynamic, object-oriented language doesn't really make any headway
unless it's pretty dang unique. I also prefer static typing for its
tendency towards bug prevention, and it often acts as a form of
self-documentation.

Also, yes, I used an ASCII generator for the "logo" up top.

I'm not that l33t.
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