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🧨 Explosiv

npm version Size

A fork of the already beautiful Dhow

A simple and powerful JSX Static Site Generator.

Getting started

1. Install it to your development dependencies.

npm i explosiv -D

2. Write your first page.

Explosiv allow you to build static sites written in JSX. To get started, create a file called pages/index.js:

// pages/index.js
export default () => (
  <main>
    <Head>
      <title>Home page</title>
    </Head>
    <h3>This is my home</h3>
    <p>On the internet obviously</p>
  </main>
)

3. Build your static site!

npx explosiv build

Building your site will transform your JSX into static HTML. Your site will be exported into the out/ directory.

An alternate way to use: Install Explosiv globally npm i explosiv -g then run your commands like this: explosiv build

4. Serve your site!

npx explosiv serve

Your site will be ready at http://localhost:3000

There is an article about how Explosiv works.

Public files

Files in public/ will be copied into your build output. However, CSS files will be processed with PostCSS. This means you can create a postcss.config.js file in the root of your directory, and Explosiv will use the plugins you use in that file (you can see this in the TailwindCSS example).

CLI

explosiv build

Build production ready static files

npx explosiv build -i ./pages -d ./out
Option Description Default
-i, --indir Change input directory for your files. ./pages
-o, --outdir Change directory where your temporary development builds are stored. ./out

explosiv dev

Build files, start a development server, & rebuilds static files on each file change.

explosiv dev -i ./pages -d ./__explosiv__ -p 3000
Option Description Default
-i, --indir Change input directory for your files. ./pages
-d, --devdir Change directory where your temporary development builds are stored. ./__explosiv__
-p, --port Change port for HTTP Server process.env.PORT or 3000

Note: explosiv dev doesn't rebuild files when a file changed is in node_modules or in the temporary development directory (devdir).


explosiv serve

Start a simple & static HTTP file server.

explosiv serve -d ./pages -p 3000
Option Description Default
-d, --dir Change input directory for your files. ./pages
-p, --port Change port for HTTP Server process.env.PORT or 3000

API

There is no case we can see you doing require('explosiv'). But, it exports a JSX Runtime, that we uses under the hood to transform your JSX pages into HTML. Functions it export are listed here.

el(tag, props, ...children)

Append a new Element to the DOM. In other words, turn a JSX component into an HTML DOM element.

  • tag {String |Function} tagName of component to create, or a function to create an element.
  • props {Object} A dictionary of HTML attributes.
  • children {Array|String|Fragment|Component}

The prop html sets the innerHTML of the element.

The class and className props all create a class attribute.

The style attribute can be a String or Object. If it is an Object, it will be transformed into a String.


Head({ children, ...props })

Add children to the DOM's <head> element. Available built-in, no need to import it


Fragment({ children, ...props })

Add children to the parent component without creating a new HTML element. Built-in in JSX as <>text</>


Contributing

Feel free to add any features you might find useful. Just open an issue and we can go there. If you find a bug you can also open an issue but please make sure to include details like your system, node version, etc.

Notes

Please read the notes to see Improvements over Dhow, and differences with React.

Usage Cases

There are real-world examples in the examples/ directory

With Fragment tags

// pages/fragment.js
export default () => (
  <main>
    <h3>Hello!</h3>
    <>
      <p>I'm vixalien</p>
      <p>But only on the internet</p>
    </>
  </main>
)

style can either be an Object or String

// pages/style-prop.js
export default () => (
  <main>
    <Head>
      <title>Home page</title>
    </Head>
    <p style="color: blue;">This is my blue paragraph</p>
    <p style={{color: 'blue'}}>This does the same thing</p>
  </main>
)

class and className

The className prop will export a class HTML attribute.

// pages/className-is-same-as-class.js
export default () => (
  <main>
    <Head>
      <title>Home page</title>
    </Head>
    <p class="fancy">This is my fancy paragraph</p>
    <p className="fancy">Another similarly fancy paragraph</p>
  </main>
)

Note that using class is not recommended. Please use className instead.


Using Head

Head will export it's children into the <head> of HTML. Useful for SEO!

// pages/Head.js
export default () => (
  <main>
    <Head>
      <title>Home page</title>
      <meta name="description" content="This is my Internet home"/>
    </Head>
    <h3>This is my home</h3>
    <p>On the internet obviously</p>
  </main>
)

Using getProps

If you export getProps, it will be called at build time to get any data you may require. That data will be passed into the main export of your file.

// pages/onepost.js
export default (data) => (
  <main>
    <Head>
      <title>{data.name}</title>
      <meta name="description" content={data.description}/>
    </Head>
    <h3>Post name: {data.name}</h3>
    <p>Description: {data.description}</p>
    <small>Created: {data.created}</small>
  </main>
)

export getProps = () => {
  return {
    name: 'Post',
    description: 'A Post lol',
    created: 'Yesterday'
  }
}

Using getPaths

If you name your file like [slug].js, (i.e with square brackets) and export getPaths, it will be called at build time to get all possible slugs.

// pages/[posts].js
export default (data) => (
  <main>
    <Head>
      <title>{data.name}</title>
      <meta name="description" content={data.description}/>
    </Head>
    <h3>Post name: {data.name}</h3>
    <p>Description: {data.description}</p>
    <small>Created: {data.created}</small>
  </main>
)

export getProps = (slug) => {
  return somehowGetDataAboutPost(slug);
}

export getPaths = () => {
  return ['post1', 'post2']
}

Using _document.js

If you create a file _document.js in your pages' root (i.e pages/_document.js), it will be used as a wrapper for all your documents. Actual page data will be rendered in the first element with class root or <body/>.

// pages/_document.js
export default () => (
  <>
    <Head>
      <title>All pages will have this title (unless you override it)</title>
      <link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/site-css-maybe.css"/>
      <script src="https://some-analytics.com"/>
    </Head>
    <body>
      <div class="root"/>
    </body>
  </>
)
// pages/index.js
export default () => (
  <main>
    <Head>
      <title>Yes you can override the title!</title>
    </Head>
    <h3>Hello!</h3>
    <p>But only on the internet</p>
  </main>
)

Using postcss.config.js

If you create a file postcss.config.js in your absolute root (i.e ./postcss.config.js), it will be used as a PostCSS config for post-processing your CSS files. This allows you to do things like use autoprefixer or cssnano or

// postcss.config.js
module.exports = {
  plugins: [
    require('autoprefixer'),
    require('cssnano')({
      preset: 'default',
    })
  ],
};
// Our CSS will be auto prefixed now and minified!

You can see a working postcss.config.js in the tailwind example


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