Web frontend for PuppetDB
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README.rst

Puppetboard

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Puppetboard is a web interface to PuppetDB aiming to replace the reporting functionality of Puppet Dashboard.

Puppetboard relies on the pypuppetdb library to fetch data from PuppetDB and is built with the help of the Flask microframework.

As of version 0.1.0 and higher, Puppetboard requires PuppetDB 3. Version 0.3.0 has been tested with PuppetDB versions 3 through 5.

At the current time of writing, Puppetboard supports the following Python versions:
  • Python 2.6
  • Python 2.7
  • Python 3.6

View of a node

Installation

Puppetboard is now packaged and available on PyPi.

Production

Puppet module

There is a Puppet module by Spencer Krum that takes care of installing Puppetboard for you.

You can install it with:

puppet module install puppet-puppetboard

Manual

To install it simply issue the following command:

$ pip install puppetboard

This will install Puppetboard and take care of the dependencies. If you do this Puppetboard will be installed in the so called site-packages or dist-packages of your Python distribution.

The complete path on Debian and Ubuntu systems would be /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/lib/dist-packages/puppetboard and on Fedora would be /usr/lib/pythonX.Y/site-packages/puppetboard

where X and Y are replaced by your major and minor python versions.

You will need this path in order to configure your HTTPD and WSGI-capable application server.

Packages

Native packages for your operating system will be provided in the near future.

OS Status  
Debian 6/Squeeze planned Requires Backports
Debian 7/Wheezy planned  
Ubuntu 13.04 planned  
Ubuntu 13.10 planned  
CentOS/RHEL 5 n/a Python 2.4
CentOS/RHEL 6 planned  
OpenSuSE 12/13 available Maintained on OpenSuSE Build Service
SuSE LE 11 SP3 available Maintained on OpenSuSE Build Service
ArchLinux available Maintained by Tim Meusel
OpenBSD available Maintained by Sebastian Reitenbach

Docker Images

A Dockerfile was added to the source-code in the 0.2.0 release. An officially image is planned for the 0.2.x series.

Usage:

$ docker build -t puppetboard .
$ docker run -it -p 9080:80 -v /etc/puppetlabs/puppet/ssl:/etc/puppetlabs/puppet/ssl \
  -e PUPPETDB_HOST=<hostname> \
  -e PUPPETDB_PORT=8081 \
  -e PUPPETDB_SSL_VERIFY=/etc/puppetlabs/puppetdb/ssl/ca.pem \
  -e PUPPETDB_KEY=/etc/puppetlabs/puppetdb/ssl/private.pem \
  -e PUPPETDB_CERT=/etc/puppetlabs/puppetdb/ssl/public.pem \
  -e INVENTORY_FACTS='Hostname,fqdn, IP Address,ipaddress' \
  -e ENABLE_CATALOG=True \
  -e GRAPH_FACTS='architecture,puppetversion,osfamily' \
  puppetboard

Development

If you wish to hack on Puppetboard you should fork/clone the Github repository and then install the requirements through:

$ pip install -r requirements-test.txt

You're advised to do this inside a virtualenv specifically created to work on Puppetboard as to not pollute your global Python installation.

Configuration

The following instructions will help you configure Puppetboard and your HTTPD.

Puppet

Puppetboard is built completely around PuppetDB which means your environment needs to be configured to do that.

In order to get the reports to show up in Puppetboard you need to configure your environment to store those reports in PuppetDB. Have a look at the documentation about this, specifically the Enabling report storage section.

Settings

Puppetboard will look for a file pointed at by the PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS environment variable. The file has to be identical to default_settings.py but should only override the settings you need changed.

You can grab a copy of default_settings.py from the path where pip installed Puppetboard to or by looking in the source checkout.

If you run PuppetDB and Puppetboard on the same machine the default settings provided will be enough to get you started and you won't need a custom settings file.

Assuming your webserver and PuppetDB machine are not identical you will at least have to change the following settings:

  • PUPPETDB_HOST
  • PUPPETDB_PORT

By default PuppetDB requires SSL to be used when a non-local client wants to connect. Therefor you'll also have to supply the following settings:

  • PUPPETDB_SSL_VERIFY = /path/to/ca/keyfile.pem
  • PUPPETDB_KEY = /path/to/private/keyfile.pem
  • PUPPETDB_CERT = /path/to/public/keyfile.crt

For information about how to generate the correct keys please refer to the pypuppetdb documentation. Alternatively is possible to explicitly specify the protocol to be used setting the PUPPETDB_PROTO variable.

Other settings that might be interesting in no particular order:

  • SECRET_KEY: Refer to Flask documentation, section sessions: How to generate good secret keys, to set the value. Defaults to a random 24-char string generated by os.random(24)
  • PUPPETDB_TIMEOUT: Defaults to 20 seconds but you might need to increase this value. It depends on how big the results are when querying PuppetDB. This behaviour will change in a future release when pagination will be introduced.
  • UNRESPONSIVE_HOURS: The amount of hours since the last check-in after which a node is considered unresponsive.
  • LOGLEVEL: A string representing the loglevel. It defaults to 'info' but can be changed to 'warning' or 'critical' for less verbose logging or 'debug' for more information.
  • ENABLE_QUERY: Defaults to True causing a Query tab to show up in the web interface allowing users to write and execute arbitrary queries against a set of endpoints in PuppetDB. Change this to False to disable this.
  • GRAPH_TYPE`: Specify the type of graph to display. Default is pie, other good option is donut. Other choices can be found here: _C3JS_documentation
  • GRAPH_FACTS: A list of fact names to tell PuppetBoard to generate a pie-chart on the fact page. With some fact values being unique per node, like ipaddress, uuid, and serial number, as well as structured facts it was no longer feasible to generate a graph for everything.
  • INVENTORY_FACTS: A list of tuples that serve as the column header and the fact name to search for to create the inventory page. If a fact is not found for a node then undef is printed.
  • ENABLE_CATALOG: If set to True allows the user to view a node's latest catalog. This includes all managed resources, their file-system locations and their relationships, if available. Defaults to False.
  • REFRESH_RATE: Defaults to 30 the number of seconds to wait until the index page is automatically refreshed.
  • DEFAULT_ENVIRONMENT: Defaults to 'production', as the name suggests, load all information filtered by this environment value.
  • REPORTS_COUNT: Defaults to 10 the limit of the number of reports to load on the node or any reports page.
  • OFFLINE_MODE: If set to True load static assets (jquery, semantic-ui, etc) from the local web server instead of a CDN. Defaults to False.
  • DAILY_REPORTS_CHART_ENABLED: Enable the use of daily chart graphs when looking at dashboard and node view.
  • DAILY_REPORTS_CHART_DAYS: Number of days to show history for on the daily report graphs.
  • DISPLAYED_METRICS: Metrics to show when displaying node summary. Example: 'resources.total', 'events.noop'.
  • TABLE_COUNT_SELECTOR: Configure the dropdown to limit number of hosts to show per page.
  • LITTLE_TABLE_COUNT: Default number of reports to show when when looking at a node.
  • NORMAL_TABLE_COUNT: Default number of nodes to show when displaying reports and catalog nodes.
  • LOCALISE_TIMESTAMP: Normalize time based on localserver time.
  • DEV_LISTEN_HOST: For use with dev.py for development. Default is localhost
  • DEV_LISTEN_PORT: For use with dev.py for development. Default is 5000

Puppet Enterprise

Puppet Enterprise maintains a certificate white-list for which certificates are allowed to access data from PuppetDB. This whitelist is maintained in /etc/puppetlabs/puppetdb/certificate-whitelist and you have to add the certificate name to that file.

Afterwards you'll need to restart pe-puppetdb and you should be able to query PuppetDB freely now.

Development

You can run it in development mode by simply executing:

$ python dev.py

Use PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS to change the different settings or patch default_settings.py directly. Take care not to include your local changes on that file when submitting patches for Puppetboard. Place a settings.py file inside the base directory of the git repository that will be used, if the environment variable is not set.

Production

To run Puppetboard in production we provide instructions for the following scenarios:

  • Apache + mod_wsgi
  • Apache + mod_passenger
  • nginx + uwsgi
  • nginx + gunicorn

If you deploy Puppetboard through a different setup we'd welcome a pull request that adds the instructions to this section.

Installation On Linux Distros

Debian Jessie Install.

Apache + mod_wsgi

First we need to create the necessary directories:

$ mkdir -p /var/www/html/puppetboard

Copy Puppetboard's default_settings.py to the newly created puppetboard directory and name the file settings.py. This file will be available at the path Puppetboard was installed, for example: /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/lib/dist-packages/puppetboard/default_settings.py.

Change the settings that need changing to match your environment and delete or comment with a # the rest of the entries.

If you don't need to change any settings you can skip the creation of the settings.py file entirely.

Now create a wsgi.py with the following content in the newly created puppetboard directory:

from __future__ import absolute_import
import os

# Needed if a settings.py file exists
os.environ['PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS'] = '/var/www/html/puppetboard/settings.py'
from puppetboard.app import app as application

Make sure this file is readable by the user the webserver runs as.

Flask requires a static secret_key, see FlaskSession, in order to protect itself from CSRF exploits. The default secret_key in default_settings.py generates a random 24 character string, however this string is re-generated on each request under httpd >= 2.4.

To generate your own secret_key create a python script with the following content and run it once:

import os
os.urandom(24)
'\xfd{H\xe5<\x95\xf9\xe3\x96.5\xd1\x01O<!\xd5\xa2\xa0\x9fR"\xa1\xa8'

Copy the output and add the following to your wsgi.py file:

application.secret_key = '<your secret key>'

The last thing we need to do is configure Apache.

Here is a sample configuration for Debian and Ubuntu:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName puppetboard.example.tld
    WSGIDaemonProcess puppetboard user=www-data group=www-data threads=5
    WSGIScriptAlias / /var/www/html/puppetboard/wsgi.py
    ErrorLog /var/log/apache2/puppetboard.error.log
    CustomLog /var/log/apache2/puppetboard.access.log combined

    Alias /static /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/dist-packages/puppetboard/static
    <Directory /usr/local/lib/pythonX.X/dist-packages/puppetboard/static>
        Satisfy Any
        Allow from all
    </Directory>

    <Directory /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/dist-packages/puppetboard>
        WSGIProcessGroup puppetboard
        WSGIApplicationGroup %{GLOBAL}
        Order deny,allow
        Allow from all
    </Directory>
</VirtualHost>

Here is a sample configuration for Fedora:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName puppetboard.example.tld
    WSGIDaemonProcess puppetboard user=apache group=apache threads=5
    WSGIScriptAlias / /var/www/html/puppetboard/wsgi.py
    ErrorLog logs/puppetboard-error_log
    CustomLog logs/puppetboard-access_log combined

    Alias /static /usr/lib/pythonX.Y/site-packages/puppetboard/static
    <Directory /usr/lib/python2.X/site-packages/puppetboard/static>
        Satisfy Any
        Allow from all
    </Directory>

    <Directory /usr/lib/pythonX.Y/site-packages/puppetboard>
        WSGIProcessGroup puppetboard
        WSGIApplicationGroup %{GLOBAL}
        Require all granted
    </Directory>
</VirtualHost>

Note the directory path, it's the path to where pip installed Puppetboard; X.Y must be replaced with your python version. We also alias the /static path so that Apache will serve the static files like the included CSS and Javascript.

Apache + mod_passenger

It is possible to run Python applications through Passenger. Passenger has supported this since version 3 but it's considered experimental. Since the release of Passenger 4 it's a 'core' feature of the product.

Performance wise it also leaves something to be desired compared to the mod_wsgi powered solution. Application start up is noticeably slower and loading pages takes a fraction longer.

First we need to create the necessary directories:

$ mkdir -p /var/www/puppetboard/{tmp,public}

Copy Puppetboard's default_settings.py to the newly created puppetboard directory and name the file settings.py. This file will be available at the path Puppetboard was installed, for example: /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/lib/dist-packages/puppetboard/default_settings.py.

Change the settings that need changing to match your environment and delete or comment with a # the rest of the entries.

If you don't need to change any settings you can skip the creation of the settings.py file entirely.

Now create a passenger_wsgi.py with the following content in the newly created puppetboard directory:

from __future__ import absolute_import
import os
import logging

logging.basicConfig(filename='/path/to/file/for/logging', level=logging.INFO)

# Needed if a settings.py file exists
os.environ['PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS'] = '/var/www/puppetboard/settings.py'

try:
    from puppetboard.app import app as application
except Exception, inst:
    logging.exception("Error: %s", str(type(inst)))

Unfortunately due to the way Passenger works we also need to configure logging inside passenger_wsgi.py else application start up issues won't be logged.

This means that even though LOGLEVEL might be set in your settings.py this setting will take precedence over it.

Now the only thing left to do is configure Apache:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName puppetboard.example.tld
    DocumentRoot /var/www/puppetboard/public
    ErrorLog /var/log/apache2/puppetboard.error.log
    CustomLog /var/log/apache2/puppetboard.access.log combined

    RackAutoDetect On
    Alias /static /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/dist-packages/puppetboard/static
</VirtualHost>

Note the /static alias path, it's the path to where pip installed Puppetboard. This is needed so that Apache will serve the static files like the included CSS and Javascript.

nginx + uwsgi

A common Python deployment scenario is to use the uwsgi application server (which can also serve rails/rack, PHP, Perl and other applications) and proxy to it through something like nginx or perhaps even HAProxy.

uwsgi has a feature that every instance can run as its own user. In this example we'll use the www-data user but you can create a separate user solely for running Puppetboard and use that instead.

First we need to create the necessary directories:

$ mkdir -p /var/www/puppetboard

Copy Puppetboard's default_settings.py to the newly created puppetboard directory and name the file settings.py. This file will be available at the path Puppetboard was installed, for example: /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/lib/dist-packages/puppetboard/default_settings.py.

Change the settings that need changing to match your environment and delete or comment with a # the rest of the entries.

If you don't need to change any settings you can skip the creation of the settings.py file entirely.

Now create a wsgi.py with the following content in the newly created puppetboard directory:

from __future__ import absolute_import
import os

# Needed if a settings.py file exists
os.environ['PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS'] = '/var/www/puppetboard/settings.py'
from puppetboard.app import app as application

Make sure this file is owned by the user and group the uwsgi instance will run as.

Now we need to start uwsgi:

$ uwsgi --socket :9090 --wsgi-file /var/www/puppetboard/wsgi.py

Feel free to change the port to something other than 9090.

The last thing we need to do is configure nginx to proxy the requests:

upstream puppetboard {
    server 127.0.0.1:9090;
}

server {
    listen      80;
    server_name puppetboard.example.tld;
    charset     utf-8;

    location /static {
        alias /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/dist-packages/puppetboard/static;
    }

    location / {
        uwsgi_pass puppetboard;
        include    /path/to/uwsgi_params/probably/etc/nginx/uwsgi_params;
    }
}

If all went well you should now be able to access to Puppetboard. Note the /static location block to make nginx serve static files like the included CSS and Javascript.

Because nginx natively supports the uwsgi protocol we use uwsgi_pass instead of the traditional proxy_pass.

nginx + gunicorn

You can use gunicorn instead of uwsgi if you prefer, the process doesn't differ too much. As we can't use uwsgi_pass with gunicorn, the nginx configuration file is going to differ a bit:

server {
    listen      80;
    server_name puppetboard.example.tld;
    charset     utf-8;

    location /static {
        alias /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/dist-packages/puppetboard/static;
    }

    location / {
        add_header Access-Control-Allow-Origin *;
        proxy_pass_header Server;
        proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
        proxy_redirect off;
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header X-Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_connect_timeout 10;
        proxy_read_timeout 10;
        proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:9090;
    }
}

Now, for running it with gunicorn:

$ cd /usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/dist-packages/puppetboard
$ gunicorn -b 127.0.0.1:9090 puppetboard.app:app

As we may want to serve in the background, and we need PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS as an environment variable, is recommendable to run this under supervisor. An example supervisor config with basic settings is the following:

[program:puppetboard]
command=gunicorn -b 127.0.0.1:9090 puppetboard.app:app
user=www-data
stdout_logfile=/var/log/supervisor/puppetboard/puppetboard.out
stderr_logfile=/var/log/supervisor/puppetboard/puppetboard.err
environment=PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS="/var/www/puppetboard/settings.py"

For newer systems with systemd (for example CentOS7), you can use the following service file (/usr/lib/systemd/system/gunicorn@.service):

[Unit]
Description=gunicorn daemon for %i
After=network.target

[Service]
ExecStart=/usr/bin/gunicorn --config /etc/sysconfig/gunicorn/%i.conf %i
ExecReload=/bin/kill -s HUP $MAINPID
PrivateTmp=true
User=gunicorn
Group=gunicorn

And the corresponding gunicorn config (/etc/sysconfig/gunicorn/puppetboard.app\:app.conf):

import multiprocessing

bind    = '127.0.0.1:9090'
workers = multiprocessing.cpu_count() * 2 + 1
chdir   = '/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/puppetboard'
raw_env = ['PUPPETBOARD_SETTINGS=/var/www/puppetboard/settings.py', 'http_proxy=']

Security

If you wish to make users authenticate before getting access to Puppetboard you can use one of the following configuration snippets.

Apache

Inside the VirtualHost:

<Location "/">
    AuthType Basic
    AuthName "Puppetboard"
    Require valid-user
    AuthBasicProvider file
    AuthUserFile /path/to/a/file.htpasswd
</Location>

nginx

Inside the location / {} block that has the uwsgi_pass directive:

auth_basic "Puppetboard";
auth_basic_user_file /path/to/a/file.htpasswd;

Getting Help

This project is still very new so it's not inconceivable you'll run into issues.

For bug reports you can file an issue. If you need help with something feel free to hit up the maintainers by e-mail or on IRC. They can usually be found on IRCnet and Freenode and idles in #puppetboard.

There's now also the #puppetboard channel on Freenode where we hang out and answer questions related to pypuppetdb and Puppetboard.

There is also a GoogleGroup to exchange questions and discussions. Please note that this group contains discussions of other Puppet Community projects.

Third party

Some people have already started building things with and around Puppetboard.

Hunter Haugen has provided a Vagrant setup:

Packages

Contributing

We welcome contributions to this project. However, there are a few ground rules contributors should be aware of.

License

This project is licensed under the Apache v2.0 License. As such, your contributions, once accepted, are automatically covered by this license.

Commit messages

Write decent commit messages. Don't use swear words and refrain from uninformative commit messages as 'fixed typo'.

The preferred format of a commit message:

docs/quickstart: Fixed a typo in the Nodes section.

If needed, elaborate further on this commit. Feel free to write a
complete blog post here if that helps us understand what this is
all about.

Fixes #4 and resolves #2.

If you'd like a more elaborate guide on how to write and format your commit messages have a look at this post by Tim Pope.

Examples

vagrant-puppetboard

A vagrant project to show off the puppetboard functionality using the puppetboard puppet module on a puppetserver with puppetdb.

Screenshots

Overview / Index / Homepage

Nodes view, all active nodes

Single node page / overview

Report view

Facts view

Single fact, with graphs

All nodes that have this fact with that value

Metrics view

Single metric

Query view

Error page