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Updated scraps section

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1 parent 6239ee8 commit 99c57addcf912f57501174eafb8c62fcbae6300b @webdestroya committed Mar 13, 2012
Showing with 17 additions and 4 deletions.
  1. +17 −4 chapters/calico.tex
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21 chapters/calico.tex
@@ -22,17 +22,30 @@ \section{Canvas and Grid}
Calico as a drawing tool, is centered on the metaphor of canvases, with the grid acting as the focal point.
It has a mulitude of canvases organized in a grid. [See Figure \ref{fig:grid}]
Users can draw in each of these canvases.
-Each of these canvases can contain sketches, writing, anything that the designer desires.
+Each of these canvases can contain sketches, writings, or anything that the designer desires.
Because these canvases are organized in a grid, users are able to move from one canvas to another in one of two ways: They can switch to a ``grid view'' that gives them an overview of all the cell, or they can use the white navigation tabs located on the side that will allow them to jump to the adjacent canvas.
The gray tabs allow the designer to ``branch off'' and create a copy of the current canvas, but in another cell, so that the two can be easily compared.
\section{Gestures}
+
\section{Scraps}
Scraps in Calico can be thought of as ``scraps of paper'' that one would place on a desk or on a white board.
-Scraps can be easily relocated to different parts of the screen, or even other canvases.
-Scraps can be stacked on top of each other and then treated as a unit or group.
-By treating scraps as if they were pieces of paper, we [make it easy to understand the manipulation], as designers can easily relate Calico to their current design
+Scraps keep their shape -- whatever the designer draws, this shape will be kept throughout the design phase.
+However, scraps are manipulatable in many different ways -- they are stackable, removable, relatable, movable.
+\todo{Add image showing one of these ways}
+In the original version of Calico, all scraps have a ``dot'' that acts as a menu where various actions can be performed on the scrap itself.
+Designers tend to use many different notations when they are designing, and we want designers to be able to sketch in the notations that they are most comfortable with, but we also want to be able to work with their designs.
+Our goal is to be able to interact with the designers so that they are able to manipulate the objects, but we do not want to be intrusive in the way a formal design tool would be.
+
+We created scraps as the answer to allowing the content of a sketched design to become ``active'', while still allowing the designer to be completely free in their design and still able to manipulate their sketches.
+The key is that we leave them in the same shape they were in when they were drawn, but that they become ``active''.
+Anything drawn on top of that scrap automatically comes associated with the original scrap.
+Designers can relate scraps with each other simply by drawing a line from one to the other, which would be converted to a directional arrow, linking the two scraps with each other.
+\todo{Put a picture of a drawing with some arrows and stuff}
+%Scraps can be easily relocated to different parts of the screen, or even other canvases.
+%Scraps can be stacked on top of each other and then treated as a unit or group.
+%By treating scraps as if they were pieces of paper, we [make it easy to understand the manipulation], as designers can easily relate Calico to their current design
\section{Palette}
The palette in Calico provides users with a ``drawer'' that can easily be used to store commonly used shapes and artifacts.

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