Vim plugin that provides additional text objects
Vim script Makefile
Latest commit 050335f Mar 26, 2017 @wellle committed on GitHub Merge pull request #173 from casey/patch-1
Typo: *ar* -> *a&*

README.md

Introduction

Targets.vim is a Vim plugin that adds various text objects to give you more targets to operate on. It expands on the idea of simple commands like di' (delete inside the single quotes around the cursor) to give you more opportunities to craft powerful commands that can be repeated reliably. One major goal is to handle all corner cases correctly.

Examples

The following examples are displayed as three lines each. The top line denotes cursor positions from where the presented command works. The middle line shows the contents of the example line that we're working on. The last line shows the part of the line that the command will operate on.

To change the text in the next pair of parentheses, use the cin) command

cursor position │    .....................
buffer line     │    This is example text (with a pair of parentheses).
selection       │                          └───────── cin) ─────────┘

To delete the item in a comma separated list under the cursor, use da,

cursor position │                                  .........
buffer line     │    Shopping list: oranges, apples, bananas, tomatoes
selection       │                                  └─ da, ─┘

Notice how the selection includes exactly one of the surrounding commas to leave a proper comma separated list behind.

Overview

We distinguish between four kinds of text objects that behave slightly differently:

  • Pair text objects
  • Quote text objects
  • Separator text objects
  • Argument text objects

Pair Text Objects

These text objects are similar to the built in text objects such as i). Supported trigger characters:

  • ( ) b (work on parentheses)
  • { } B (work on curly braces)
  • [ ] (work on square brackets)
  • < > (work on angle brackets)
  • t (work on tags)

Pair text objects work over multiple lines and support seeking. See below for details about seeking.

The following examples will use parentheses, but they all work for each listed trigger character accordingly.

In Pair

i( i) ib i{ i} iB i[ i] i< i> it

  • Select inside of pair characters.
  • This overrides Vim's default text object to allow seeking for the next pair in the current line to the right or left when the cursor is not inside a pair. This behavior is similar to Vim's seeking behavior of di' when not inside of quotes, but it works both ways.
  • Accepts a count to select multiple blocks.
      ............
a ( b ( cccccccc ) d ) e
   │   └── i) ──┘   │
   └───── 2i) ──────┘

A Pair

a( a) ab a{ a} aB a[ a] a< a> at

  • Select a pair including pair characters.
  • Overrides Vim's default text object to allow seeking.
  • Accepts a count.
      ............
a ( b ( cccccccc ) d ) e
  │   └─── a) ───┘   │
  └────── 2a) ───────┘

Inside Pair

I( I) Ib I{ I} IB I[ I] I< I> It

  • Select contents of pair characters.
  • Like inside of parentheses, but exclude whitespace at both ends. Useful for changing contents while preserving spacing.
  • Accepts a count.
      ............
a ( b ( cccccccc ) d ) e
    │   └─ I) ─┘   │
    └──── 2I) ─────┘

Around Pair

A( A) Ab A{ A} AB A[ A] A< A> At

  • Select around pair characters.
  • Like a pair, but include whitespace at one side of the pair. Prefers to select trailing whitespace, falls back to select leading whitespace.
  • Accepts a count.
      ............
a ( b ( cccccccc ) d ) e
  │   └─── A) ────┘   │
  └────── 2A) ────────┘

Next and Last Pair

in( an( In( An( il( al( Il( Al( ...

Work directly on distant pairs without moving there separately.

All the above pair text objects can be shifted to the next pair by including the letter n. The command in) selects inside of the next pair. Use the letter l instead to work on the previous (last) pair. Uses a count to skip multiple pairs. Skipping works over multiple lines.

See our Cheat Sheet for two charts summarizing all pair mappings.

Pair Seek

If any of the normal pair commands (not containing n or l) is executed when the cursor is not positioned inside a pair, it seeks for pairs before or after the cursor by searching for the appropriate delimiter on the current line. This is similar to using the explicit version containing n or l, but in only seeks on the current line.

Quote Text Objects

These text objects are similar to the built in text objects such as i'. Supported trigger characters:

  • ' (work on single quotes)
  • " (work on double quotes)
  • ` (work on back ticks)

These quote text objects try to be smarter than the default ones. They count the quotation marks from the beginning of the line to decide which of these are the beginning of a quote and which ones are the end.

If you type ci" on the , in the example below, it will automatically skip and change world instead of changing , between hello and world.

buffer │ join("hello", "world")
proper │      └─────┘  └─────┘
false  │            └──┘

Quote text objects work over multiple lines and support seeking. See below for details about seeking.

The following examples will use single quotes, but they all work for each mentioned separator character accordingly.

In Quote

i' i" i`

  • Select inside quote.
  • This overrides Vim's default text object to allow seeking in both directions.
  ............
a ' bbbbbbbb ' c ' d ' e
   └── i' ──┘

A Quote

a' a" a`

  • Select a quote.
  • This overrides Vim's default text object to support seeking.
  • Unlike Vim's quote text objects, this incudes no surrounding whitespace.
  ............
a ' bbbbbbbb ' c ' d ' e
  └─── a' ───┘

Inside Quote

I' I" I`

  • Select contents of a quote.
  • Like inside quote, but exclude whitespace at both ends. Useful for changing contents while preserving spacing.
  ............
a ' bbbbbbbb ' c ' d ' e
    └─ I' ─┘

Around Quote

A' A" A`

  • Select around a quote.
  • Like a quote, but include whitespace in one direction. Prefers to select trailing whitespace, falls back to select leading whitespace.
  ............
a ' bbbbbbbb ' c ' d ' e
  └─── A' ────┘

Next and Last Quote

in' In' An' il' Il' Al' iN' IN' AN' iL' IL' AL' ...

Work directly on distant quotes without moving there separately.

All the above pair text objects can be shifted to the next quote by including the letter n. The command in' selects inside of the next single quotes. Use the letter l instead to work on the previous (last) quote. Uses a count to skip multiple quotation characters.

Use uppercase N and L to jump from within one quote into the next proper quote, instead of into the pseudo quote in between. (Using N instead of n is actually just doubling the count to achieve this.)

See our Cheat Sheet for a chart summarizing all quote mappings.

Quote Seek

If any of the normal quote commands (not containing n, l, N or L) is executed when the cursor is not positioned inside a quote, it seeks for quotes before or after the cursor by searching for the appropriate delimiter on the current line. This is similar to using the explicit version containing n or l.

Separator Text Objects

These text objects are based on single separator characters like the comma in one of our examples above. The text between two instances of the separator character can be operated on with these targets.

Supported separators:

, . ; : + - = ~ _ * # / | \ & $

Separator text objects work over multiple lines and support seeking.

The following examples will use commas, but they all work for each listed separator character accordingly.

In Separator

i, i. i; i: i+ i- i= i~ i_ i* i# i/ i| i\ i& i$

  • Select inside separators. Similar to in quote.
      ...........
a , b , cccccccc , d , e
       └── i, ──┘

A Separator

a, a. a; a: a+ a- a= a~ a_ a* a# a/ a| a\ a& a$

  • Select an item in a list separated by the separator character.
  • Includes the leading separator, but excludes the trailing one. This leaves a proper list separated by the separator character after deletion. See the examples above.
      ...........
a , b , cccccccc , d , e
      └─── a, ──┘

Inside Separator

I, I. I; I: I+ I- I= I~ I_ I* I# I/ I| I\ I& I$

  • Select contents between separators.
  • Like inside separators, but exclude whitespace at both ends. Useful for changing contents while preserving spacing.
      ...........
a , b , cccccccc , d , e
        └─ I, ─┘

Around Separator

A, A. A; A: A+ A- A= A~ A_ A* A# A/ A| A\ A& A$

  • Select around a pair of separators.
  • Includes both separators and a surrounding whitespace, similar to a' and A(.
      ...........
a , b , cccccccc , d , e
      └─── A, ────┘

Next and Last Separator

in, an, In, An, il, al, Il, Al, iN, aN, IN, AN, iL, aL, IL, AL, ...

Work directly on distant separators without moving there separately.

All the above separator text objects can be shifted to the next separator by including the letter n. The command in, selects inside of the next commas. Use the letter l instead to work on the previous (last) separators. Uses the count to skip multiple separator characters.

Use uppercase N and L to jump from within one pair of separators into the next distinct pair, instead of into the adjacent one. (Using N instead of n is actually just doubling the count to achieve this.)

See our Cheat Sheet for a chart summarizing all separator mappings.

Separator Seek

Like quote seeking. If any of the normal separator commands (not containing n or l) is executed when the cursor is not positioned inside a pair of separators, it seeks for the separator before or after the cursor. This is similar to using the explicit version containing n or l.

Argument Text Objects

These text objects are similar to separator text objects, but are specialized for arguments surrounded by braces and commas. They also take matching braces into account to capture only valid arguments.

Argument text objects work over multiple lines and support seeking.

In Argument

ia

  • Select inside arguments. Similar to in quote.
  • Accepts a count.
      ...........
a , b ( cccccccc , d ) e
       └── ia ──┘

An Argument

aa

  • Select an argument in a list of arguments.
  • Includes a separator if preset, but excludes surrounding braces. This leaves a proper argument list after deletion.
  • Accepts a count.
      ...........
a , b ( cccccccc , d ) e
        └─── aa ──┘

Inside Argument

Ia

  • Select content of an argument.
  • Like inside separators, but exclude whitespace at both ends. Useful for changing contents while preserving spacing.
  • Accepts a count.
      ...........
a , b ( cccccccc , d ) e
        └─ Ia ─┘

Around Argument

Aa

  • Select around an argument.
  • Includes both delimiters and a surrounding whitespace, similar to a' and A(.
  • Accepts a count.
      ...........
a , b ( cccccccc , d ) e
      └─── Aa ────┘

Next and Last Argument

ina ana Ina Ana ila ala Ila Ala

Work directly on distant arguments without moving there separately.

All the above argument text objects can be shifted to the next argument by including the letter n. The command ina selects inside of the next argument. Use the letter l instead to work on the previous (last) argument. Uses a [count] to skip multiple argument characters. The order is determined by the nearest surrounding argument delimiter.

See our Cheat Sheet for a chart summarizing all argument mappings.

Argument Seek

Like separator seeking. If any of the normal argument commands (not containing n or l) is executed when the cursor is not positioned inside an argument, it seeks for the argument before or after the cursor. This is similar to using the explicit version containing n or l.

Installation

Use your favorite plugin manager.

  • NeoBundle

    NeoBundle 'wellle/targets.vim'
  • Vundle

    Bundle 'wellle/targets.vim'
  • Vim-plug

    Plug 'wellle/targets.vim'
  • Pathogen

    git clone git://github.com/wellle/targets.vim.git ~/.vim/bundle/targets.vim

Settings

Put these variables into your vimrc to customize the mappings described above. The provided examples also indicate the default values.

Available options:

g:targets_aiAI
g:targets_nlNL
g:targets_pairs
g:targets_quotes
g:targets_separators
g:targets_tagTrigger
g:targets_argTrigger
g:targets_argOpening
g:targets_argClosing
g:targets_argSeparator
g:targets_seekRanges
g:targets_jumpRanges

g:targets_aiAI

Default:

let g:targets_aiAI = 'aiAI'

Controls the normal mode operator mode maps that get created for In Pair (i), A Pair (a), Inside Pair (I), and Around Pair (A). Required to be a 4 character long list. Use a space to deactivate a mode.

g:targets_nlNL

Default:

let g:targets_nlNL = 'nlNL'

Controls the keys used in maps for seeking next and last text objects. For example, if you don't wish to use the N and L seeks, and instead wish for n to always search for the next object and N to search for the last, you could set:

let g:targets_nlNL = 'nN  '

Note that two extra spaces are still required on the end, indicating you wish to disable the default functionality of N and L. Required to be a 4 character long list.

g:targets_pairs

Default:

let g:targets_pairs = '()b {}B [] <>'

Defines the space separated list of pair objects you wish to use, along with optional one letter aliases for them.

g:targets_quotes

Default:

let g:targets_quotes = '" '' `'

Defines the space separated list of quoting objects you wish to use. Note that you have to escape the single quote by doubling it. Quote objects can optionally be followed by a single one letter alias. For example, to set d as an alias for double quotes, allowing such commands as cid to be equivalent to ci", you could define:

let g:targets_quotes = '"d '' `'

g:targets_separators

Default:

let g:targets_separators = ', . ; : + - = ~ _ * # / | \ & $'

Defines the space separated list of separator objects you wish to use. Like quote objects, separator objects can optionally be followed by a single one letter alias. To set c as an alias for comma, allowing such commands as dic to be equivalent to di,, you could define:

let g:targets_separators = ',c . ; : + - = ~ _ * # / | \ & $'

g:targets_tagTrigger

Default:

let g:targets_tagTrigger = 't'

Defines the key you need to press to operate on tag text objects.

g:targets_argTrigger

Default:

let g:targets_argTrigger = 'a'

Defines the key you need to press to operate on arguments. To use , as argument trigger, allowing commands as da, to act like daa, use this:

let g:targets_argTrigger = ','

g:targets_argOpening and g:targets_argClosing

Default:

let g:targets_argOpening = '[([]'
let g:targets_argClosing = '[])]'

Defines regular expressions that match the beginning and closing delimiter of an argument list respectively. If you also want to find arguments delimited by curly braces, try this:

let g:targets_argOpening = '[({[]'
let g:targets_argClosing = '[]})]'

g:targets_argSeparator

Default:

let g:targets_argSeparator = ','

Defines a regular expression matching separators in an argument list. If you also want to find arguments separated by semicolon, use this:

let g:targets_argSeparator = '[,;]'

g:targets_seekRanges

Default:

let g:targets_seekRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr rr ll lb ar ab lB Ar aB Ab AB rb al rB Al bb aa bB Aa BB AA'

Defines a priority ordered, space separated list of range types which can be used to customize seeking behavior.

The default setting generally prefers targets around the cursor, with one exception: If the target around the cursor is not contained in the current cursor line, but the next or last target are, then prefer those. Targets beginning or ending on the cursor are preferred over everything else.

Some other useful example settings:

Prefer multiline targets around cursor over distant targets within cursor line:

let g:targets_seekRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr lb ar ab lB Ar aB Ab AB rr ll rb al rB Al bb aa bB Aa BB AA'

Never seek backwards:

let g:targets_seekRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr rr lb ar ab lB Ar aB Ab AB rb rB bb bB BB'

Only seek if next/last targets touch current line:

let g:targets_seekRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr rr ll lb ar ab lB Ar aB Ab AB rb rB al Al'

Only consider targets fully visible on screen:

let g:targets_seekRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr lb ar ab rr rb bb ll al aa'

Only consider targets around cursor:

let g:targets_seekRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr lb ar ab lB Ar aB Ab AB'

Only consider targets fully contained in current line:

let g:targets_seekRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr rr ll'

If you want to build your own, or are just curious what those cryptic letters mean, check out the full documentation in our Cheat Sheet.

g:targets_jumpRanges

Default:

let g:targets_jumpRanges = 'bb bB BB aa Aa AA' ~

Defines an unordered, space separated list of range types which can be used to customize the jumplist behavior (see documentation on seek ranges). It controls whether or not to add the cursor position prior to selecting the text object to the jumplist.

The default setting adds the previous cursor position to the jumplist if the target that was operated on doesn't intersect the cursor line. That means it adds a jumplist entry if the target ends above the cursor line or starts below the cursor line.

Some other useful example settings (or build your own!):

Never add cursor position to jumplist:

let g:targets_jumpRanges = '' ~

Always add cursor position to jumplist:

let g:targets_jumpRanges = 'cr cb cB lc ac Ac lr rr ll lb ar ab lB Ar aB Ab AB rb al rB Al bb aa bB Aa BB AA' ~

Only add to jumplist if cursor was not inside the target:

let g:targets_jumpRanges = 'rr rb rB bb bB BB ll al Al aa Aa AA' ~

Notes

Issues

Todos

Create more mappings to support commands like danw or danp to delete the next word or paragraph.