Skip to content
Permalink
Browse files

[e] (0) update the 'is this html5' section that describes how the w3c…

… and whatwg specs differ, since i'm clearly going to be adding more to it with these decisions

git-svn-id: http://svn.whatwg.org/webapps@5995 340c8d12-0b0e-0410-8428-c7bf67bfef74
  • Loading branch information
Hixie committed Apr 12, 2011
1 parent 5fa120b commit 210f19ee8654feeb4d3118c40cf25db28f71bc57
Showing with 81 additions and 49 deletions.
  1. +39 −23 index
  2. +42 −26 source
62 index
document, and some of which have only ever been tangentially
related.</p>

<p>This specification actually now defines the next generation of
HTML after HTML5. HTML5 reached Last Call at the WHATWG in October
2009, and shortly after we started working on some experimental new
features that are not as stable as the rest of the
specification. The stability of sections is annotated in the
margin.</p>

<p>The W3C has also been working on HTML in conjunction with the
WHATWG; at the W3C, this document has been split into several parts,
and the occasional informative paragraph or example has been removed
for technical or editorial reasons. For all intents and purposes,
however, the W3C HTML specifications and this specification are
equivalent (and they are in fact all generated from the same source
document). The minor differences are:</p>
<p>This specification, published by the WHATWG and developed in
conjunction with the W3C, defines the core HTML language and some
the infrastructure on which it relies. The W3C also publishes parts
of this specification. One of these parts is called "HTML5".</p>

<p>This specification and the specifications published by the W3C
differ in a small number of ways. The main difference is that the
W3C version does not include some newer features, such as:</p>

<ul class=brief><li>The <code><a href=#peerconnection>PeerConnection</a></code> API and related video-conferencing features.</li> <!--DEVICE-->
<li>The <code title=attr-hyperlink-ping><a href=#ping>ping</a></code> attribute and related <a href=#hyperlink-auditing>hyperlink auditing</a> features.</li> <!--PING-->
<li>The <a href=#webvtt>WebVTT</a> format and some <a href=#text-track>text track</a> API features.</li> <!--TT--> <!--TTVTT-->
<li>Rules for <a href=#atom>converting HTML to Atom</a>.</li> <!--MD-->
<li>The <code title=dom-document-cssElementMap><a href=#dom-document-csselementmap>cssElementMap</a></code> feature for defining <span title="CSS element reference identifier">CSS element reference identifiers</span>.</li> <!--CSSREF-->
</ul><p>This is a result of the specifications having different
development modalities. The WHATWG specification is a continuously
maintained living standard, with maturity managed at a very granular
per-section scale, indicated by markers in the left margin; this is
intended to model the way in which specifications are approached in
practice by implementors and authors alike. The W3C specification
follows a more traditional style, with versioned releases of the
specification, and with maturity management being done only at the
document level; this means that the W3C specification has a version
number (currently "5") and necessarily goes through periods of
"feature freeze" where new features are not added, so that the
specification can as a whole reach a more mature state.</p>

<p>In addition to the above, there are some small differences,
mostly editorial, between the two versions of the specification:</p>

<ul class=brief><li>Instead of this section, the W3C version has a different
paragraph explaining the difference between the W3C and WHATWG
W3C version since the W3C version is published as HTML4 due to <a href="http://www.w3.org/2005/07/pubrules?uimode=filter&amp;uri=#format">W3C
publication policies</a>.</li>

<!--
<li>The W3C version defines conformance for documents in a more
traditional (version-orientated) way, because of <a
href="http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html/2011Mar/0574.html">a
working group decision from March 2011</a>. This specification, in
part driven by its versionless development model, instead uses a
conformance definition that more closely models how specifications
are used in practice.</li>
-->

<li>The W3C version omits a paragraph of implementation advice
because of <a href=http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html/2010Jun/0001.html>a
working group decision from June 2010</a>.</li>
other documents on the matter because of <a href=http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html/2011Mar/0691.html>a
working group decision from March 2011</a>.</li>

</ul><p>Features that are considered part of the next generation of HTML
beyond HTML5 (and that are therefore not included in the W3C version
of HTML5) currently consist of:</p>

<ul class=brief><li>The <code><a href=#peerconnection>PeerConnection</a></code> API and related video-conferencing features.</li> <!--DEVICE-->
<li>The <code title=attr-hyperlink-ping><a href=#ping>ping</a></code> attribute and related <a href=#hyperlink-auditing>hyperlink auditing</a> features.</li> <!--PING-->
<li>The <a href=#webvtt>WebVTT</a> format and some <a href=#text-track>text track</a> API features.</li> <!--TT--> <!--TTVTT-->
<li>Rules for <a href=#atom>converting HTML to Atom</a>.</li> <!--MD-->
<li>The <code title=dom-document-cssElementMap><a href=#dom-document-csselementmap>cssElementMap</a></code> feature for defining <span title="CSS element reference identifier">CSS element reference identifiers</span>.</li> <!--CSSREF-->
</ul><p>Features that are part of HTML (and this specification) but that
are currently published as separate specifications as well, and are
not included in the W3C HTML5 specification, consist of:</p>
68 source
@@ -60,20 +60,38 @@
document, and some of which have only ever been tangentially
related.</p>

<p>This specification actually now defines the next generation of
HTML after HTML5. HTML5 reached Last Call at the WHATWG in October
2009, and shortly after we started working on some experimental new
features that are not as stable as the rest of the
specification. The stability of sections is annotated in the
margin.</p>

<p>The W3C has also been working on HTML in conjunction with the
WHATWG; at the W3C, this document has been split into several parts,
and the occasional informative paragraph or example has been removed
for technical or editorial reasons. For all intents and purposes,
however, the W3C HTML specifications and this specification are
equivalent (and they are in fact all generated from the same source
document). The minor differences are:</p>
<p>This specification, published by the WHATWG and developed in
conjunction with the W3C, defines the core HTML language and some
the infrastructure on which it relies. The W3C also publishes parts
of this specification. One of these parts is called "HTML5".</p>

<p>This specification and the specifications published by the W3C
differ in a small number of ways. The main difference is that the
W3C version does not include some newer features, such as:</p>

<ul class="brief">
<li>The <code>PeerConnection</code> API and related video-conferencing features.</li> <!--DEVICE-->
<li>The <code title="attr-hyperlink-ping">ping</code> attribute and related <span>hyperlink auditing</span> features.</li> <!--PING-->
<li>The <span>WebVTT</span> format and some <span>text track</span> API features.</li> <!--TT--> <!--TTVTT-->
<li>Rules for <a href="#atom">converting HTML to Atom</a>.</li> <!--MD-->
<li>The <code title="dom-document-cssElementMap">cssElementMap</code> feature for defining <span title="CSS element reference identifier">CSS element reference identifiers</span>.</li> <!--CSSREF-->
</ul>

<p>This is a result of the specifications having different
development modalities. The WHATWG specification is a continuously
maintained living standard, with maturity managed at a very granular
per-section scale, indicated by markers in the left margin; this is
intended to model the way in which specifications are approached in
practice by implementors and authors alike. The W3C specification
follows a more traditional style, with versioned releases of the
specification, and with maturity management being done only at the
document level; this means that the W3C specification has a version
number (currently "5") and necessarily goes through periods of
"feature freeze" where new features are not added, so that the
specification can as a whole reach a more mature state.</p>

<p>In addition to the above, there are some small differences,
mostly editorial, between the two versions of the specification:</p>

<ul class="brief">

@@ -89,6 +107,16 @@
href="http://www.w3.org/2005/07/pubrules?uimode=filter&amp;uri=#format">W3C
publication policies</a>.</li>

<!--
<li>The W3C version defines conformance for documents in a more
traditional (version-orientated) way, because of <a
href="http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html/2011Mar/0574.html">a
working group decision from March 2011</a>. This specification, in
part driven by its versionless development model, instead uses a
conformance definition that more closely models how specifications
are used in practice.</li>
-->

<li>The W3C version omits a paragraph of implementation advice
because of <a
href="http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html/2010Jun/0001.html">a
@@ -107,18 +135,6 @@

</ul>

<p>Features that are considered part of the next generation of HTML
beyond HTML5 (and that are therefore not included in the W3C version
of HTML5) currently consist of:</p>

<ul class="brief">
<li>The <code>PeerConnection</code> API and related video-conferencing features.</li> <!--DEVICE-->
<li>The <code title="attr-hyperlink-ping">ping</code> attribute and related <span>hyperlink auditing</span> features.</li> <!--PING-->
<li>The <span>WebVTT</span> format and some <span>text track</span> API features.</li> <!--TT--> <!--TTVTT-->
<li>Rules for <a href="#atom">converting HTML to Atom</a>.</li> <!--MD-->
<li>The <code title="dom-document-cssElementMap">cssElementMap</code> feature for defining <span title="CSS element reference identifier">CSS element reference identifiers</span>.</li> <!--CSSREF-->
</ul>

<p>Features that are part of HTML (and this specification) but that
are currently published as separate specifications as well, and are
not included in the W3C HTML5 specification, consist of:</p>

0 comments on commit 210f19e

Please sign in to comment.