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[a] (0) More information for authors using images of text.

Affected topics: HTML

git-svn-id: http://svn.whatwg.org/webapps@8191 340c8d12-0b0e-0410-8428-c7bf67bfef74
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Hixie committed Sep 16, 2013
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</div>

<div class=example>

<p>An illuminated manuscript might use graphics for some of its images. The alternative text in
such a situation is just the character that the image represents.</p>

<pre>&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src="initials/o.svg" alt="O"&gt;nce upon a time and a long long time ago, late at
night, when it was dark, over the hills, through the woods, across a great ocean, in a land far
away, in a small house, on a hill, under a full moon...</pre> <!-- The End. -->

</div>

<p>When an image is used to represent a character that cannot otherwise be represented in Unicode,
for example gaiji, itaiji, or new characters such as novel currency symbols, the alternative text
should be a more conventional way of writing the same thing, e.g. using the phonetic hiragana or
katakana to give the character's pronunciation.</p>

<div class=example>

<p>In this example from 1997, a new-fangled currency symbol that looks like a curly E with two
bars in the middle instead of one is represented using an image. The alternative text gives the
character's pronunication.</p>

<pre>&lt;p&gt;Only &lt;img src="euro.png" alt="euro "&gt;5.99!</pre>

</div>

<p>An image should not be used if Unicode characters would serve an identical purpose. Only when
the text cannot be directly represented using Unicode, e.g. because of decorations or because the
character is not in the Unicode character set (as in the case of gaiji), would an image be
appropriate.</p>

<p class=note>If an author is tempted to use an image because their default system font does not
support a given character, then Web Fonts are a better solution than images.</p>



<h6 id=a-graphical-representation-of-some-of-the-surrounding-text><span class=secno>4.8.1.1.6 </span>A graphical representation of some of the surrounding text</h6>
34 index

</div>

<div class=example>

<p>An illuminated manuscript might use graphics for some of its images. The alternative text in
such a situation is just the character that the image represents.</p>

<pre>&lt;p&gt;&lt;img src="initials/o.svg" alt="O"&gt;nce upon a time and a long long time ago, late at
night, when it was dark, over the hills, through the woods, across a great ocean, in a land far
away, in a small house, on a hill, under a full moon...</pre> <!-- The End. -->

</div>

<p>When an image is used to represent a character that cannot otherwise be represented in Unicode,
for example gaiji, itaiji, or new characters such as novel currency symbols, the alternative text
should be a more conventional way of writing the same thing, e.g. using the phonetic hiragana or
katakana to give the character's pronunciation.</p>

<div class=example>

<p>In this example from 1997, a new-fangled currency symbol that looks like a curly E with two
bars in the middle instead of one is represented using an image. The alternative text gives the
character's pronunication.</p>

<pre>&lt;p&gt;Only &lt;img src="euro.png" alt="euro "&gt;5.99!</pre>

</div>

<p>An image should not be used if Unicode characters would serve an identical purpose. Only when
the text cannot be directly represented using Unicode, e.g. because of decorations or because the
character is not in the Unicode character set (as in the case of gaiji), would an image be
appropriate.</p>

<p class=note>If an author is tempted to use an image because their default system font does not
support a given character, then Web Fonts are a better solution than images.</p>



<h6 id=a-graphical-representation-of-some-of-the-surrounding-text><span class=secno>4.8.1.1.6 </span>A graphical representation of some of the surrounding text</h6>
34 source

</div>

<div class="example">

<p>An illuminated manuscript might use graphics for some of its images. The alternative text in
such a situation is just the character that the image represents.</p>

<pre>&lt;p>&lt;img src="initials/o.svg" alt="O">nce upon a time and a long long time ago, late at
night, when it was dark, over the hills, through the woods, across a great ocean, in a land far
away, in a small house, on a hill, under a full moon...</pre> <!-- The End. -->

</div>

<p>When an image is used to represent a character that cannot otherwise be represented in Unicode,
for example gaiji, itaiji, or new characters such as novel currency symbols, the alternative text
should be a more conventional way of writing the same thing, e.g. using the phonetic hiragana or
katakana to give the character's pronunciation.</p>

<div class="example">

<p>In this example from 1997, a new-fangled currency symbol that looks like a curly E with two
bars in the middle instead of one is represented using an image. The alternative text gives the
character's pronunication.</p>

<pre>&lt;p>Only &lt;img src="euro.png" alt="euro ">5.99!</pre>

</div>

<p>An image should not be used if Unicode characters would serve an identical purpose. Only when
the text cannot be directly represented using Unicode, e.g. because of decorations or because the
character is not in the Unicode character set (as in the case of gaiji), would an image be
appropriate.</p>

<p class="note">If an author is tempted to use an image because their default system font does not
support a given character, then Web Fonts are a better solution than images.</p>



<h6>A graphical representation of some of the surrounding text</h6>

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