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Add Mike Nicholaides' talk proposals

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1 parent 53ebeb8 commit 9d10ae3c7baabaeda89f9aa2a050a61b8632ab94 @nicholaides nicholaides committed Jun 1, 2013
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+# Securing Your Rails App #
+
+## by Mike Nicholaides ##
+
+### Abstract ###
+
+How can you know if your Rails app is safe? With potential vulnerabilities lurking in your app's code, in gems you depend on, in services you use, and in the Rails source itself, attackers have myriad vectors to gain access to your data, interrupt your service, and damage your reputation.
+
+In this talk, I'll cover the basics of securing your Rails app, evaluating and mitigating the risk inherent in live web applications, and strategies for keeping your app secure as new threats emerge.
+
+### Additional Notes ###
+
+This talk has not been given elsewhere.
+
+I have been a Rails consultant since 2006 and have performed Rails security audits for numerous financial institutions and other organizations with highly sensitive data.
+
+## Social ##
+
+* [Personal Site](http://ablegray.com)
+* [Our Company](http://promptworks.com)
+* [@nicholaides](http://twitter.com/nicholaides)
+* [nicholaides](https://github.com/nicholaides)
+
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+# SOLID and TDD, Sitting in a Tree #
+
+## by Mike Nicholaides ##
+
+### Abstract ###
+
+You’ve heard the claims or know from experience that test-driven development (TDD) produces better code. Perhaps you’ve also heard that to write better code you should be following the SOLID principles. Is there a connection between practicing TDD and writing SOLID code?
+
+In this talk, I’ll use examples gleaned from real life to demonstrate how TDD prompts us to produce code that conforms to the SOLID principles, and how the SOLID principles are where we should turn when our tests are causing us pain. In doing so, we’ll learn what each principle really means and why it’s valuable.
+
+This talk is suitable for developers who are comfortable with testing, but familiarity with SOLID is not necessary.
+
+
+### Additional Notes ###
+
+This talk has not been given elsewhere.
+
+I organize the Code Retreat in Philadelphia where the focus is on learning TDD, communicating with code, and of course, having fun.
+
+## Social ##
+
+* [Personal Site](http://ablegray.com)
+* [Our Company](http://promptworks.com)
+* [@nicholaides](http://twitter.com/nicholaides)
+* [nicholaides](https://github.com/nicholaides)
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+# VIM for Ruby Developers #
+
+## by Mike Nicholaides ##
+
+### Abstract ###
+
+Vim was written in the 70’s. It runs in a terminal window. It has obtuse key commands for even basic operations. Why would any sane developer use Vim?
+
+Surprisingly, the features of Vim that at first seem like weaknesses are actually its strengths. The abstruse key commands, the rudimentary terminal-based display, and its arcane heritage all contribute to its status as an extremely powerful and ubiquitous text editor.
+
+This talk explores these aspects of Vim, focusing particularly on its powerful verb-noun-modifier language for manipulating text, and Ruby code in particular. If you’ve never “gotten” Vim, this talk is for you.
+
+I have been using Vim since it became popular in the Ruby community a few years ago. After a few failed attempts to switch from TextMate, I finally “got” it and I've been using it productively ever since.
+
+
+### Additional Notes ###
+
+I gave this as a lightning talk for Philly.rb.
+
+## Social ##
+
+* [Personal Site](http://ablegray.com)
+* [Our Company](http://promptworks.com)
+* [@nicholaides](http://twitter.com/nicholaides)
+* [nicholaides](https://github.com/nicholaides)
+

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