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{productName} Quickstarts

The quickstarts demonstrate {javaVersion} and a few additional technologies from the {productNameFull} stack. They provide small, specific, working examples that can be used as a reference for your own project.

1. Introduction

These quickstarts run on the WildFly application server. The quickstarts are configured to use the correct Maven dependencies and ensure that you test and compile the quickstarts against the correct runtime environment.

Each quickstart folder contains a README.adoc file that describes the quickstart features and provides instructions about how to build and run it. Instructions are provided to build the more readable README.html files.

Make sure you read this entire document before you attempt to work with the quickstarts.

2. System Requirements

The applications these projects produce are designed to be run on {productNameFull} {productVersion} or later.

All you need to build these projects is {buildRequirements}.

3. Use of WILDFLY_HOME and QUICKSTART_HOME Variables

The quickstart README files use the replaceable value WILDFLY_HOME to denote the path to the WildFly server. When you encounter this value in a README file, make sure you replace it with the actual path to your WildFly server.

When you see the replaceable variable QUICKSTART_HOME, replace it with the path to the root directory of all of the quickstarts.

4. Prerequisites

Before you begin, you must perform the following tasks.

  1. Build the WildFly Server (Optional): This step is only required if you plan to run the latest development version of the WildFly server. It is not required if you are running a tagged or released version of the WildFly server.

  2. Build and Install the WildFly BOMs (Optional): This step is only required if you are building a development version of the WildFly server and see dependency issues when you build the quickstarts. It is not required if you are running a tagged or released version of the WildFly server.

  3. Build the Quickstart README.html Files (Required): The quickstart README files are written in AsciiDoc to provide modular, reusable content; however, this makes them difficult to read. For this reason, you must also build the quickstart README.html files from the AsciiDoc source.

4.1. Build the WildFly Server (Optional)

If you have downloaded a tagged or released version of the WildFly server, you can ignore this step. You can simply extract the WildFly server from the compressed file and start the server from that directory.

If you plan to run the development version of the WildFly server, you must first download and build the WildFly server from source.

  1. If you have not yet done so, you must clone WildFly server repository and navigate to it. You might also want to change the remote name from origin to upstream to be consistent with your other repositories.

    $ git clone git@github.com:wildfly/wildfly.git
    $ cd wildfly
    $ git remote rename origin upstream
  2. Verify that your local master branch contains the latest updates.

    $ git fetch upstream
    $ git checkout master
    $ git reset --hard upstream/master
  3. Build the WildFly server using the following command.

    $ mvn clean install -DskipTests -Denforcer.skip=true -Dcheckstyle.skip=true
  4. The WildFly server folder and ZIP files, which are named wildfly-VERSION-SNAPSHOT and wildfly-VERSION-SNAPSHOT.ZIP respectively, are located in the build/target/ directory. You can copy that folder or unzip the file to another location or start the server from that directory.

4.2. Build and Install the WildFly BOMs (Optional)

If you have downloaded and are running a tagged or released version of the quickstarts, you can ignore this step because the required BOMs are already installed in Maven.

If you are using the latest development version of the quickstarts and you are able to successfully build and deploy the quickstarts, you can also ignore this step because the required BOMS are already installed in Maven.

However, if you are using the latest development version of the quickstarts and you see build errors indicating missing dependencies, you must first build the latest WildFly server and then build and install the WildFly BOMs. This installs the latest Maven artifacts that are required by the SNAPSHOT version of the WildFly quickstarts that are still under development.

  1. If you have not yet done so, clone WildFly BOMs repository and navigate to it. You might also want to rename the directory to wildfly-boms to make it clear which BOMs it contains and also change the remote name from origin to upstream to be consistent with your other repositories.

    $ git clone git@github.com:wildfly/boms.git
    $ mv boms wildfly-boms
    $ cd wildfly-boms
    $ git remote rename origin upstream
  2. Verify that your local master branch contains the latest updates.

    $ git fetch upstream
    $ git checkout master
    $ git reset --hard upstream/master
  3. Build the WildFly BOMs using the following command.

    $ mvn clean install
    Note
    If you run into build errors, check with the WildFly team to see if the repositories are temporarily out of sync.
  4. At this point, you can verify that all of the quickstarts build using the following command.

    $ mvn clean install '-Pdefault,!complex-dependencies'

4.3. Build the Quickstart README.html Files (Required)

The quickstart README files are written in AsciiDoc, not only because the language is much more powerful than Markdown, but also also because it is possible to extract common instructions into separate files to be reused across the quickstarts. While this makes them more flexible and easier to maintain, unfortunately, included files do not render in a readable format in GitHub or in most text editors.

The Maven plugin that is used to build and deploy the quickstarts can also generate fully rendered README.html instructions from the README.adoc files.

To build all of the quickstart README.html files, including the root README.html file that contains the table with links to all available quickstarts, navigate to the root folder of the quickstarts and run the following command.

$ mvn clean package -Pdocs
Tip

To build the README.html file for a specific quickstart, navigate to the quickstart directory and run the above command.

If you see errors about missing dependencies, check the prerequisites section to determine whether you need to build the WildFly BOMs that corresponds to the version of the quickstarts that you are using.

5. Suggested Approach to the Quickstarts

We recommend that you approach the quickstarts as follows:

  • Regardless of your level of expertise, we suggest you start with the helloworld quickstart. It is the simplest example and is an easy way to prove the server is configured and running correctly.

  • If you are a beginner or new to JBoss, start with the quickstarts labeled Beginner, then try those marked as Intermediate. When you are comfortable with those, move on to the Advanced quickstarts.

  • Some quickstarts are based upon other quickstarts but have expanded capabilities and functionality. If a prerequisite quickstart is listed, make sure you deploy and test it before looking at the expanded version.

The root folder of each individual quickstart contains a README.html file with detailed instructions on how to build and run the example.

6. Table of Available Quickstarts

The sources for all available quickstarts, which are listed in the following table, can be found here: {githubRepoUrl}.

Each quickstart provides the list of technologies demonstrated by the quickstart and the required experience level needed to build and deploy it. Click on the quickstart link in the table to see more detailed information about how to run it. Some quickstarts require deployment of other quickstarts. This information is noted in the Prerequisites section of the quickstart README.html file.

Note
Some of these quickstarts use the H2 database included with WildFly. It is a lightweight, relational example datasource that is used for examples only. It is not robust or scalable, is not supported, and should NOT be used in a production environment!
Quickstart Name Demonstrated Technologies Description Experience Level Required Prerequisites

bean-validation-custom-constraint

CDI, JPA, BV

The bean-validation-custom-constraint quickstart demonstrates how to use the Bean Validation API to define custom constraints and validators.

Beginner

none

cmt

EJB, CMT, JMS

The cmt quickstart demonstrates Container-Managed Transactions (CMT), showing how to use transactions managed by the container.

Intermediate

none

ee-security

EE Security, Servlet, CDI

The ee-security quickstart demonstrates Jakarta EE security.

Intermediate

none

ejb-security-context-propagation

EJB, Security

The ejb-security-context-propagation quickstart demonstrates how the security context can be propagated to a remote EJB using a remote outbound connection configuration

Advanced

none

ejb-security-programmatic-auth

EJB, Security

The ejb-security-programmatic-auth quickstart demonstrates how to programmatically setup different identities when invoking a remote secured EJB.

Intermediate

none

helloworld

CDI, Servlet

The helloworld quickstart demonstrates the use of CDI and Servlet 3 and is a good starting point to verify {productName} is configured correctly.

Beginner

none

helloworld-mutual-ssl

Mutual TLS, Undertow

The helloworld-mutual-ssl quickstart is a basic example that demonstrates mutual TLS configuration in {productName}

Intermediate

none

helloworld-mutual-ssl-secured

Mutual TLS, Security, Undertow

The helloworld-mutual-ssl-secured quickstart demonstrates securing a Web application using client mutual TLS authentication and role-based access control

Intermediate

none

helloworld-ws

JAX-WS

The helloworld-ws quickstart demonstrates a simple Hello World application, bundled and deployed as a WAR, that uses JAX-WS to say Hello.

Beginner

none

jaxrs-client

JAX-RS

The jaxrs-client quickstart demonstrates JAX-RS Client API, which interacts with a JAX-RS Web service that runs on {productName}.

Beginner

none

jaxrs-jwt

JAX-RS, Security

The jaxrs-jwt quickstart demonstrates a JAX-RS secured application using JSON Web Tokens (JWT) with Elytron.

Intermediate

none

kitchensink

CDI, JSF, JPA, EJB, JAX-RS, BV

The kitchensink quickstart demonstrates a {javaVersion} web-enabled database application using JSF, CDI, EJB, JPA, and Bean Validation.

Intermediate

none

microprofile-config

MicroProfile Config

The microprofile-config quickstart demonstrates the use of the MicroProfile Config specification in {productName}.

Beginner

none

microprofile-health

MicroProfile Health

The microprofile-health quickstart demonstrates the use of the MicroProfile Health specification in {productName}.

Beginner

none

microprofile-jwt

JWT, Security, MicroProfile

The microprofile-jwt quickstart demonstrates the use of the MicroProfile JWT specification in {productName}.

Intermediate

none

microprofile-metrics

MicroProfile Metrics

The microprofile-metrics quickstart demonstrates the use of the MicroProfile Metrics specification use in {productName}.

Beginner

none

microprofile-openapi

MicroProfile OpenAPI

This guide demonstrate how to use the MicroProfile OpenAPI functionality in {productName} to expose an OpenAPI document for a simple REST application.

Beginner

none

microprofile-opentracing

MicroProfile OpenTracing

The microprofile-opentracing quickstart demonstrates the use of the MicroProfile OpenTracing specification in {productName}.

Beginner

none

microprofile-reactive-messaging-kafka

MicroProfile Reactive Messaging

The microprofile-reactive-messaging-kafka quickstart demonstrates the use of the MicroProfile Reactive Messaging specification backed by Apache Kafka in {productName}.

Beginner

none

microprofile-rest-client

MicroProfile REST Client

The microprofile-rest-client quickstart demonstrates the use of the MicroProfile REST Client specification in {productName}.

Beginner

none

numberguess

CDI, JSF

The numberguess quickstart demonstrates the use of CDI (Contexts and Dependency Injection) and JSF (JavaServer Faces) in {productName}.

Beginner

none

security-domain-to-domain

Servlet, EJB, Security

The security-domain-to-domain quickstart demonstrates the propagation of an identity across two different deployments using different security domains.

Advanced

none

servlet-security

Servlet, Security

The servlet-security quickstart demonstrates the use of Jakarta EE declarative security to control access to Servlets and Security in {productName}.

Intermediate

none

temperature-converter

CDI, JSF, SLSB EJB

The temperature-converter quickstart does temperature conversion using an EJB Stateless Session Bean (SLSB), CDI, and a JSF front-end client.

Beginner

none

thread-racing

Batch, CDI, EE Concurrency, JAX-RS, JMS, JPA, JSON, Web Sockets

A thread racing web application that demonstrates technologies introduced or updated in the latest Jakarta EE specification.

Beginner

none

todo-backend

JPA, JAX-RS, OpenShift, Galleon

The todo-backend quickstart demonstrates how to implement a backend that exposes a HTTP API with JAX-RS

Intermediate

none

websocket-hello

WebSocket, CDI, JSF

The websocket-hello quickstart demonstrates how to create a simple WebSocket application.

Beginner

none