Python module to interface with the foursquare API.
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foursquare
tests
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LICENSE.txt
README.rst
setup.py

README.rst

Copyright 2009 John Wiseman
Covered by the MIT License, see LICENSE.txt.

foursquare

This Python module lets you access the foursquare API. It supports unauthenticated access, basic HTTP authentication, and OAuth authorization. This code is based on a similar module for Fire Eagle made by Steve Marshall.

It supports all the v1 foursquare API methods as of 2009-12-17.

This module requires Leah Culver's oauth module, oauth.py.

Foursquare API method names are the same in Python, except for methods like friend/requests, which are translated to names like friend_requests in Python.

All method arguments are keyword arguments, though required arguments come first and are in the order listed by the API documentation.

All methods return the parsed Python equivalent of the JSON response returned by the corresponding API method, if there is a response.

Examples

No authentication:

>>> import foursquare
>>> fs = foursquare.Foursquare()
>>> fs.cities()
{'cities': [{'geolat': 52.378900000000002, 'name': 'Amsterdam', ...}]}

Basic HTTP authentication:

>>> import foursquare
>>> fs = foursquare.Foursquare(foursquare.BasicCredentials(username, password))
>>> fs.switchcity(23)
{'data': {'status': '1', 'message': 'City switched successfully'}}
>>> fs.switchcity(34)
{'data': {'status': '1', 'message': 'City switched successfully'}}
>>> fs.user()
{'user': {'city': {'geolat': 34.0443, 'name': 'Los Angeles', ...}}}

OAuth:

When foursquare added support for the oauth_callback parameter to specify a callback URL, they made oauth_verifier argument a required argument to the access_token method. The oauth_verifier that you need to pass to access_token comes from the URL that foursquare redirects the user to after authorization:

>>> import foursquare
>>> credentials = foursquare.OAuthCredentials(oauth_key, oauth_secret)
>>> fs = foursquare.Foursquare(credentials)
>>> app_token = fs.request_token(oauth_callback='http://myapp.example/')
>>> auth_url = fs.authorize(app_token)

# Go to auth_url and authorize.  Once you've authorized, foursquare
# will redirect you to a URL that looks like this:
#
#   http://myapp.example/?oauth_verifier=1234&oauth_token=abc9
#
# Take the oauth_verifier parameter value and pass it to
# access_token.

>>> oauth_verifier = '1234'
>>> user_token = fs.access_token(app_token, oauth_verifier)
>>> credentials.set_access_token(user_token)
>>> fs.user()
{'user': {'city': {'geolat': 34.0443, 'name': 'Los Angeles', ...}}}

The above is the most correct method according to the OAuth 1.0A spec. But foursquare supports a less stringent mode if you don't pass a oauth_callback argument, in which case you don't need to pass an oauth_verifier to access_token:

>>> import foursquare
>>> credentials = foursquare.OAuthCredentials(oauth_key, oauth_secret)
>>> fs = foursquare.Foursquare(credentials)
>>> app_token = fs.request_token(oauth_callback='http://myapp.example/')
>>> auth_url = fs.authorize(app_token)

# Go to auth_url and authorize.  Once you've authorized, foursquare
# will redirect you to your app's registered callback URL.  You don't
# need that URL; we're going to call the access_token method
# directly.
#
# Note that we're passing an empty string for the oauth_verifier.

>>> user_token = fs.access_token(app_token, '')
>>> credentials.set_access_token(user_token)
>>> fs.user()
{'user': {'city': {'geolat': 34.0443, 'name': 'Los Angeles', ...}}}