Skip to content

Placeholders

Stefan Bodewig edited this page Jan 24, 2019 · 2 revisions

Placeholders are used to specify exceptional requirements in the control XML document for use during equality comparison.

For example: you have a program that produces (test) XML documents like

<message>
  <id>12345</id>
  <content>Hello</content>
</message>

or

<message>
  <id>67890</id>
  <content>Hello</content>
</message>

All the produced XML documents have the same structure and data, except for the /message/id element's value which is randomly generated by the program. To test the program output is as expected, you need to ignore the /message/id element's value.

The traditional way of doing it is using NodeFilter, but it seems not very intuitive.

Since XMLUnit 2.6.0, a placeholder feature has been introduced, so you can do it by defining the control document to be

<message>
  <id>${xmlunit.ignore}</id>
  <content>Hello</content>
</message>

and use below code to test the program output

String control = <the above>;
String test0 = <the program output>;
Diff diff = DiffBuilder.compare(control).withTest(test)
    .withDifferenceEvaluator(new PlaceholderDifferenceEvaluator()).build();
assertFalse(diff.hasDifferences());

With placeholder, the exceptional comparison requirements can be embedded in the control document, giving you a good visual experience, and make the comparison Java code simple and reusable.

For the same example, more strict requirement on the /message/id element's value could potentially be achieved by something like

<message>
  <id>${xmlunit.isNumber}</id>
  <content>Hello</content>
</message>

or

<message>
  <id>${xmlunit.matchesRegex(\d{5})}</id>
  <content>Hello</content>
</message>

Currently, only ${xmlunit.ignore} is implemented, and it is applicable to text nodes and attribute values only. Refer to the unit tests for more details.

You can’t perform that action at this time.