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No .bind() or Arrow Functions in JSX Props (react/jsx-no-bind)

A bind call or arrow function in a JSX prop will create a brand new function on every single render. This is bad for performance, as it may cause unnecessary re-renders if a brand new function is passed as a prop to a component that uses reference equality check on the prop to determine if it should update.

Rule Details

The following patterns are considered warnings:

<Foo onClick={this._handleClick.bind(this)}></Foo>
<Foo onClick={() => console.log('Hello!')}></Foo>

The following patterns are not considered warnings:

<Foo onClick={this._handleClick}></Foo>

Rule Options

"react/jsx-no-bind": [<enabled>, {
  "ignoreDOMComponents": <boolean> || false,
  "ignoreRefs": <boolean> || false,
  "allowArrowFunctions": <boolean> || false,
  "allowFunctions": <boolean> || false,
  "allowBind": <boolean> || false
}]

ignoreDOMComponents

When true the following are not considered warnings:

<div onClick={this._handleClick.bind(this) />
<span onClick={() => console.log("Hello!")} />
<button type="button" onClick={function() { alert("1337") }} />

ignoreRefs

When true the following are not considered warnings:

<Foo ref={c => this._div = c} />
<Foo ref={this._refCallback.bind(this)} />

allowArrowFunctions

When true the following is not considered a warning:

<Foo onClick={() => alert("1337")} />

allowFunctions

When true the following is not considered a warning:

<Foo onClick={function () { alert("1337") }} />

allowBind

When true the following is not considered a warning:

<Foo onClick={this._handleClick.bind(this)} />

Protips

Lists of Items

A common use case of bind in render is when rendering a list, to have a separate callback per list item:

var List = createReactClass({
  render() {
    return (
      <ul>
        {this.props.items.map(item =>
          <li key={item.id} onClick={this.props.onItemClick.bind(null, item.id)}>
            ...
          </li>
        )}
      </ul>
    );
  }
});

Rather than doing it this way, pull the repeated section into its own component:

var List = createReactClass({
  render() {
    return (
      <ul>
        {this.props.items.map(item =>
          <ListItem key={item.id} item={item} onItemClick={this.props.onItemClick} />
        )}
      </ul>
    );
  }
});

var ListItem = createReactClass({
  render() {
    return (
      <li onClick={this._onClick}>
        ...
      </li>
    );
  },
  _onClick() {
    this.props.onItemClick(this.props.item.id);
  }
});

This will speed up rendering, as it avoids the need to create new functions (through bind calls) on every render.

ES6 Classes

Unfortunately React ES6 classes do not autobind their methods like components created with the older createReactClass syntax. There are several approaches to binding methods for ES6 classes. A basic approach is to just manually bind the methods in the constructor:

class Foo extends React.Component {
  constructor(...args) {
    super(...args);
    this._onClick = this._onClick.bind(this);
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <div onClick={this._onClick}>
        Hello!
      </div>
    );
  }
  _onClick() {
    // Do whatever you like, referencing "this" as appropriate
  }
}

A more sophisticated approach would be to use something like an autobind ES7 decorator or property initializers.

React Hooks

Functional components are often used alongside hooks, and the most trivial case would occur if your callback is completely independent from your state. In this case, the solution is as simple as moving the callback out of your component:

const onClick = () => {
  console.log("Independent callback");
};
const Button = () => {
  return (
    <button type="button" onClick={onClick}>Label</button>
  );
};

Otherwise, the idiomatic way to avoid redefining callbacks on every render would be to memoize them using the useCallback hook:

const Button = () => {
  const [text, setText] = useState("Before click");
  const onClick = useCallback(() => {
    setText("After click");
  }, [setText]); // Array of dependencies for which the memoization should update
  return (
    <button type="button" onClick={onClick}>{text}</button>
  );
};

When Not To Use It

If you do not use JSX or do not want to enforce that bind or arrow functions are not used in props, then you can disable this rule.

You can’t perform that action at this time.