A configurable base stylesheet for all browsers and devices
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Readme.md

Tune-css

A configurable base stylesheet for all browsers and devices.

Tune-css brings the essentials of normalize.css, fluidity and html5 boilerplate together and allows you to configure the defaults they set using sass.

Tune-css also sets vertical-rhythm using the techniques described by Harry Roberts here, and it includes defaults from Adam Morse's Links and Buttons. But these more opinionated styles can easily be removed using the configuration options.

Features

  • Adapts output to browsers, and minimum versions to support.
  • Uses the same browser names/keys as Browserslist.
  • Includes options for more opinionated base styles (vertical rhythm, typescale, margins, etc.).
  • Allows developers to customize the styles applied for normalization*.
  • Allows developers to selectively include normalize/fluidity/h5bp modules.
  • Allows developer to control how length units are converted.

*In some cases, browser-support may require a fixed style, which will override the custom styles provided by the developer.

Coming soon

  • Split modules into elements that can be imported separately
  • Allow including modules dynamically and/or using mixins
  • Include fallbacks for legacy browsers (rem, text-decoration shorthand, colors, etc.)
  • Warn in cases custom styles conflict with browser support (Instead of overriding).
  • Optionally warn for modules that are not included in the output.
  • Advanced normalization of form elements?? (Better to leave default styles seen sparse support?)

Credits

Tune-css started as a fork from John Albin's normalize-scss, a normalize.css port to Sass. It allows more fine-grainded tuning out of the box, tests for browser support more precisely, and adds more opinionated styles.

These additions come mainly from the works of Adam Morse and Harry Roberts.