for the discerning arithmetician
Clojure Java
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README.md

Clojure's numeric tower is useful, but it can put a lot of steps between you and simple arithmetic. Unfortunately, while Clojure will warn you when reflection is required to invoke a function, it will not warn you when reflection is required to perform math. The only reliable way to discover whether you're calling clojure.lang.Number.add(Object, Object) or clojure.lang.Number.add(long, long) is to use a profiler or decompiler.

Or you can just bypass Clojure's math operators altogether.

In the primitive-math namespace, there are equivalents for every arithmetic operator and comparator that will give a reflection warning if it cannot compile down to a simple, predictable, unboxed mathematical operation.

primitive-math> (set! *warn-on-reflection* true)
true
primitive-math> (+ 3 3)
6
primitive-math> (defn adder [x] (+ 1 x))
;; gives a reflection warning
primitive-math> (defn adder [^long x] (+ 1 x))
;; no reflection warning
primitive-math> (+ 3.0 3)
;; gives a reflection warning AND throws an exception

To support operations on both long and double types without any reflection, these operators are defined as macros. This means they cannot be used as higher-order functions:

primitive-math> (apply + [1 2 3])
;; throws a 'cannot take value of macro' exception

In practice, it's usually preferable to import the namespace with a prefix, and use p/+ and p/== operators alongside the normal Clojure functions. However, if in a particular namespace you never need to use higher-order operators, you can call (primitive-math/use-primitive-operators) to swap out the Clojure operators for their primitive equivalents. This can be reversed, using (primitive-math/unuse-primitive-operators).

usage

[primitive-math "0.1.5"]

an exhaustive list of operators

+
-
*
/  ;; aliased as 'div'
inc
dec
rem
==
not==
zero?
<=
>=
<
>
min
max
bool-and
bool-or
bool-not
bool-xor
true?
false?
bit-and
bit-or
bit-xor
bit-not
bit-shift-left   ;; aliased as '<<'
bit-shift-right  ;; aliased as '>>'
bit-unsigned-shift-right  ;; aliased as '>>>'
byte
short
int
float
long
double
byte->ubyte
ubyte->byte
short->ushort
ushort->short
int->uint
uint->int
long->ulong
ulong->long
reverse-short
reverse-int
reverse-long

Full documentation can be found here.

license

Copyright © 2016 Zachary Tellman

Distributed under the MIT License.