Skip to content

HTTPS clone URL

Subversion checkout URL

You can clone with HTTPS or Subversion.

Download ZIP
asynchronous networking framework for perl based on nginx
C Ruby Perl Other
tree: 6b451be9f0

Fetching latest commit…

Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time

Failed to load latest commit information.
eg
lib/Nginx
nginx
t
.gitignore
Changes
Engine.xs
LICENSE
MANIFEST
MANIFEST.SKIP
Makefile.PL
README
TODO
ngxe.h
ngxe_bufs.c
ngxe_bufs.h
ngxe_connection.c
ngxe_connection.h
ngxe_debug.h
ngxe_ngx.c
ngxe_ngx.h
ngxe_timer.c
ngxe_timer.h
ngxe_xs.c
ngxe_xs.h
ppport.h

README

NAME
    Nginx::Engine - Asynchronous framework based on nginx

DESCRIPTION
    *** IMPORTANT ***

    This project is no longer supported. It did however help me a lot to
    design and implement decent asynchronous API for nginx.

    New implementation is called nginx-perl and embedded into nginx itself:
    <https://github.com/zzzcpan/nginx-perl>

SYNOPSIS
        use Nginx::Engine;

        # Creating event loop with 4096 connetions
        # and ngxe-error.log as error log.
        ngxe_init("./ngxe-error.log", 4096);

        # Server that accepts new connection, 
        # sends "hi" and closes it.
        ngxe_server('*', 55555, sub {
            ngxe_writer($_[0], 1, 1000, "hi", sub {
                # $_[1] is error and return on error is always required
                # and it's there so you can do some cleanup if you need to.
                return if $_[1];

                ngxe_close($_[0]);
            });
        });

        # Server that reads whatever comes first
        # sends it back and closes connection.  
        # 
        ngxe_server('*', 55555, sub {
            ngxe_writer)$_[0], 0, 5000, '', sub {
                return if $_[1];

                ngxe_close($_[0]);
            });

            ngxe_reader($_[0], NGXE_START, 5000, sub {
                return if $_[1];

                $_[3] = $_[2]; # write_buffer = read_buffer 
                #_[2] = '';    # read_buffer = ''
            
                # writer starts automatically if there is 
                # data in the write buffer after this sub
                # returns
            });
        });

        # Connecting to 127.0.0.1:80 and disconnecting.
        ngxe_client('*', '127.0.0.1', 80, 2000, sub {
            if ($_[1]) {
                warn "$_[1]\n";
                return;
            }

            print "Connected, closing\n";
            ngxe_close($_[0]);
        });

        # Saying "N. Hello, World!" every second
        ngxe_interval_set(1000, sub { 
            print "$_[2]. Hello, $_[1]!\n"; 
            $_[2]++ 
        }, "World", 1);

        # Saying "Hello World!" once after 5000 ms.
        ngxe_timeout_set(5000, sub { 
            print "Hello, $_[1]!"; 
        }, "World");


        # Server that echoes everyhing back to the client.
        ngxe_server('*', 55555, sub {

            ngxe_writer($_[0], 0, 5000, '', sub {
                return if $_[1];

                # write buffer sent and cleared for us 

                # writer stops automatically if there is
                # no data in the write buffer after this sub
                # returns
            });

            ngxe_reader($_[0], NGXE_START, 5000, sub {
                return if $_[1];

                $_[3] = $_[2]; # copying read buffer to the write buffer
                $_[2] = '';    # clearing read buffer

                # writer starts automatically if there is 
                # data in the write buffer after this sub
                # returns
            });

        });

        ngxe_loop;

LIMITATIONS
    fork() won't work properly in XS implementation. You should not use it
    after ngxe_init() at all.

    Perl's signal handling won't work either after ngxe_init(). And there
    are no signal handlers right now.

DEPENDENCIES
    No dependencies. Everything comes with the package.

SUPPORTED OPERATING SYSTEMS
    Any unix or linux with working gcc, sh, perl and nginx should be ok. It
    mostly depends on the ability to build nginx in a way that it can be
    linked as a shared library. If there is a problem you can build nginx
    manually. Configure it without http module and with compiler option,
    that allows it to be linked as a shared library (not required for gcc on
    x86 and -fPIC for gcc on amd64).

    For other systems there is a pure-perl fallback based on "select()".

EXPORT
    The following functions are exported by default:

        ngxe_init

        ngxe_timeout_set
        ngxe_timeout_clear

        ngxe_interval_set
        ngxe_interval_clear

        ngxe_server

        ngxe_client

        ngxe_reader
        ngxe_reader_start
        ngxe_reader_stop
        ngxe_reader_stop_writer_start
        ngxe_reader_timeout

        ngxe_writer
        ngxe_writer_start
        ngxe_writer_stop
        ngxe_writer_stop_reader_start
        ngxe_writer_timeout
        ngxe_writer_buffer_set

        ngxe_close

        ngxe_loop

        NGXE_START

INITIALIZATION
    Before you can do anything you have to initialize the engine by calling
    "ngxe_init()" at the very beginning of your code. You cannot call any
    other fuction before that.

  ngxe_init(ERROR_LOG[, CONNECTIONS])
    Nginx requires error log to start. It is important to log error if some
    system call fails or nginx runs out of some resource, like number of
    connections or open files. You should always use log. But you can leave
    it empty if you want to.

    Number of connections must be less than number of open files and sockets
    per process allowed by the system. You probably would need to tune your
    system anyway to use more then a couple of thousands.

    So, I suggest to start with something like this:

        ngxe_init("./ngxe-error.log", 4096);

TIMER
  ngxe_timeout_set(TIMEOUT, CALLBACK, ...)
    "ngxe_timeout_set" creates new timer event to execute a callback after
    *TIMEOUT* ms. Takes any number of extra arguments after *CALLBACK* and
    stores them internally. *CALLBACK* must be a CODE reference.

    Returns timer identifier which can be used to remove event from the loop
    with "ngxe_timeout_clear".

    First argument passed to the callback is timer identifier and the rest
    are all those extra arguments you set.

        $_[0] - timer
        @_[1..$#_] - extra args

    For example, here is how to say "Hello, World" in 5 seconds, where
    "World" is an extra argument:

        ngxe_timeout_set(5000, sub { print "Hello, $_[1]!"; }, "World");

  ngxe_timeout_clear(TIMER)
    Prevents *TIMER* event from happening, removes from the loop.

INTERVAL
  ngxe_interval_set(TIMEOUT, CALLBACK, ...)
    Ceates new timer event to execute a callback after *TIMEOUT* ms. Resets
    timer every time until "ngxe_interval_clear" is called. Takes any number
    of extra arguments after *CALLBACK* and stores them internally.
    *CALLBACK* must be a CODE reference.

    Returns timer identifier which can be used to remove event from the loop
    with "ngxe_interval_clear".

    First argument passed to the callback is timer identifier and the rest
    are all those extra arguments you set.

        $_[0] - timer
        @_[1..$#_] - extra args

    For example, here is how to say "N. Hello, World" every second, where
    "World" and "N" are extra arguments:

        ngxe_interval_set(1000, sub { 
            print "$_[2]. Hello, $_[1]!\n"; 
            $_[2]++; 
        }, "World", 1);

  ngxe_interval_clear(TIMER)
    Stops interval identified as *TIMER*, removes from the loop.

SERVER
  ngxe_server(BIND_ADDRESS, BIND_PORT, CALLBACK, ...)
    Creates new server connection, binds to the *BIND_ADDRESS*:*BIND_PORT*,
    listens, accept new connections and executes *CALLBACK* on them with
    extra arguments if any. Empty or '*' BIND_ADDRESS will result in using
    INADDR_ANY instead.

    First and second arguments passed to the callback are connection
    identifier and IP address of the remote host. All the rest - extra
    arguments you set.

        $_[0] - connection
        $_[1] - IP address connected
        @_[2..$#_] - extra args

    For example, to accept new connection, print its address and close it
    you need to create server and call "ngxe_close" right inside the
    callback:

        ngxe_server('*', 55555, sub {
            print "$_[1] connected and discarded\n";
            ngxe_close($_[0]);
        });

CLIENT
  ngxe_client(BIND_ADDR, REMOTE_ADDR, REMOTE_PORT, TIMEOUT, CALLBACK, ...)
    Creates new client connection, binds to the *BIND_ADDR*, connects to the
    *REMOTE_ADDR*:*REMOTE_PORT*. And tries to do all of it in *TIMEOUT* ms.
    Executes *CALLBACK* after with any extra arguments.

    Returns connection.

    First argument passed to the callback is connection identifier, second -
    error variable and the rest are extra arguments.

        $_[0] - connection
        $_[1] - error indicator
        @_[2..$#_] - extra args

    If error is set and TRUE than callback must return without any other
    ngxe_* functions beign called on this connection.

    Example, connecting to 127.0.0.1:80 and immediately closing connection:

        ngxe_client('127.0.0.1', '127.0.0.1', 80, 2000, sub {
            if ($_[1]) {
                warn "$_[1]\n";
                return;
            }

            print "Connected, closing\n";
            ngxe_close($_[0]);
        });

    Notice, we are returning from callback on error. This is required
    behaviour.

READER AND WRITER
    Reader is a way to receive data from connection asynchronously. It
    executes callback every time new data arrives. You should do whatever
    you need with the read buffer and clear it afterwards to avoid too much
    memory consumption. If you put some data into the write buffer it will
    stop the reader and start the writer after. You can call
    "ngxe_reader_stop($_[0])" if you need to do something else before you
    can actually respond to the client.

    Writer is a bit different and it will execute a callback only when
    entire write buffer has been sent. Writer clears write buffer for you.
    You can modify it inside the callback and writer will send it again. You
    can achieve streaming this way. Writer is automatically stops itself and
    starts the reader if write buffer is empty after the callback; You can
    call "ngxe_writer_stop($_[0])" if you need to deal with the connection
    later.

    It doen't seem very clear and structured but speed is more important
    here.

    Read and write buffers can be used in both reader and writer. You can
    save references to the read "\$_[2]" or write buffer "\$_[3]" if you
    want to access them later. Or you can use
    "ngxe_writer_buffer_set(CONNECTION, DATA)" to put something into the
    write buffer if you have a connection already stored somewhere.

    And both reader and writer can be recreated to achieve different
    processing schemes and if you can afford to slow things down.

  ngxe_reader(CONN, FLAGS, TIMEOUT, CALLBACK, ...)
    Creates a reader for connection identified as *CONN*. Starts it
    immediately if NGXE_START is given as a flag. If no data has been
    received in *TIMEOUT* ms executes *CALLBACK* with error identifier set
    to timeout. Extra args can be placed after *CALLBACK*, as usual.

    If *TIMEOUT* is set to 0 it is not going to be used at all.

    Returns undef on error.

    First argument paseed to the callback is connection identifier. Second
    is error.variable. Third and 4th are read and write buffers. And the
    fifth argument is an amount of data required for callback. Usefule to
    read data with known length.

        $_[0] - connection
        $_[1] - error indicator
        $_[2] - read buffer
        $_[3] - write buffer
        $_[4] - min length
        @_[5..$#_] - extra args

    If error is set you must return from the subroutine avoiding any ngxe_*
    calls on current connection $_[0].

    For example, let's create server, read a few bytes from new connection
    and close it:

        ngxe_server('*', 55555, sub {
            ngxe_reader($_[0], NGXE_START, 1000, sub {
                if ($_[1]) {
                    return;
                }

                print "got $_[2]\n";
                ngxe_close($_[0]);
            });
        });

  ngxe_reader_start(CONN)
    Starts reader for connection *CONN*.

  ngxe_reader_stop(CONN)
    Stops reader for connection *CONN*.

  ngxe_reader_stop_writer_start(CONN)
    Stops reader and starts writer for connection *CONN*. Saves unnecessary
    perl --> XSUB --> perl transition.

  ngxe_reader_timeout(CONN[, TIMEOUT])
    Returns current timeout for the reader and sets it to *TIMEOUT* if
    specified.

  ngxe_writer(CONN, FLAGS, TIMEOUT, DATA, CALLBACK, ...)
    Creates a writer for connection identified as *CONN*. Starts it
    immediately if NGXE_START is given as a flag. If no data has been send
    in *TIMEOUT* ms executes *CALLBACK* with error flag set to timeout.
    Extra args can be placed after *CALLBACK*, as usual. Puts *DATA* into
    the write buffer.

    If *TIMEOUT* is set to 0 timeout is not going to be used at all.

    Returns undef on error.

    First argument paseed to the callback is connection identifier. Second
    is error.variable. Third and 4th are read and write buffers.

        $_[0] - connection
        $_[1] - error indicator
        $_[2] - read buffer
        $_[3] - write buffer
        @_[4..$#_] - extra args

    If error is set you must return from the subroutine avoiding any ngxe_*
    calls on current connection $_[0].

    For example, let's create server, send a few bytes to new connection and
    close it:

        ngxe_server('*', 55555, sub {
            ngxe_writer($_[0], NGXE_START, 1000, "hi", sub {
                if ($_[1]) {
                    return;
                }

                ngxe_close($_[0]);
            });
        });

  ngxe_writer_start(CONN)
    Starts writer for connection *CONN*.

  ngxe_writer_stop(CONN)
    Stops writer for connection *CONN*

  ngxe_writer_stop_reader_start(CONN)
    Stops writer and starts reader for connection *CONN*. Saves unnecessary
    perl --> XSUB --> perl transition.

  ngxe_writer_timeout(CONN[, TIMEOUT])
    Returns current timeout for the writer and sets it to *TIMEOUT* if
    specified.

  ngxe_writer_buffer_set(CONN, DATA)
    Puts *DATA*.into the write buffer of the connection *CONN* replacing old
    data. Calls "ngxe_writer_start()" afterwards.

CLOSE
  ngxe_close(CONN)
    Destroys reader, writer, closes socket and removes connection from the
    loop.

EXAMPLES
    There are quite a few examples in the examples/ directory.

EXAMPLE: ECHO SERVER
    A bit more complex example involving manipulation with the buffers.

        use Nginx::Engine;

        ngxe_init("", 64);

        ngxe_server("*", 55555, sub {

            ngxe_reader($_[0], 0, 5000, sub { 

                # $_[0] - connection
                # $_[1] - error indicator
                # $_[2] - read buffer
                # $_[3] - write buffer
                # $_[4] - min length
                # @_[5..$#_] -- args, but we didn't set any

                if ($_[1]) {
                    return;
                }

                # copying read buffer to the write buffer
                $_[3] = $_[2];

                # clearing read buffer
                $_[2] = '';

                # calls ngxe_reader_stop_writer_start if write
                # buffers is not empty

            });

            ngxe_writer($_[0], 0, 1000, "", sub {

                # $_[0] - connection
                # $_[1] - error indicator
                # $_[2] - read buffer
                # $_[3] - write buffer
                # @_[4..$#_] -- args, but we didn't set any

                if ($_[1]) {
                    return;
                }

                # calls ngxe_writer_stop_reader_start if there is no
                # more data in the buffer

            });

            ngxe_reader_start($_[0]);
        });

        ngxe_loop;

PITFALLS
    There are a few things you should be aware of before using this project.

    *   There is no proper flow control of events. It is very hard to do
        something more complicated than simple request and response.

    *   Broken EOF handling. Connection is going to be closed on EOF. And no
        "shutdown()" as well.

    *   Unclear handling of buffers and other things in @_.

SEE ALSO
    node.js <http://nodejs.org/>, nginx <http://nginx.org/>, POE, AnyEvent

AUTHOR
    Alexandr Gomoliako <zzz@zzz.org.ua>

LICENSE
    Copyright 2010 Alexandr Gomoliako. All rights reserved.

    FreeBSD License. Take a look at LICENSE and nginx/LICENSE files.

Something went wrong with that request. Please try again.