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Deployment guide

Environment variables for distribution

Two environment variables can be passed to rebar3 when deploying an application on a GRiSP board :

  • IP=X.X.X.X : where X.X.X.X should be replaced by the IPv4 address that will be assigned to the target board.
  • NAME=board_name : where board_name corresponds to the short hostname desired for the node.

A full call to the deploy function of the rebar3 Grisp plugin for an Achlys application could look like :

IP=X.X.X.X NAME=board_name rebar3 grisp deploy -n app_name -v 0.1.0

Test shell deployment

A full call to the command below dynamically assigns the correct local IPv4 address to Partisan and the local short name :

NAME=$(echo hostname -s) PEER_PORT=27000 PEER_IP=$(ifconfig | grep "inet " | grep -m 1 -Fv 127.0.0.1 | awk '{print $2}' | sed 's/\./,/g') IP=$(ifconfig | grep "inet " | grep -m 1 -Fv 127.0.0.1 | awk '{print $2}') rebar3 as test shell --sname achlys --setcookie MyCookie --apps achlys

Once the rebar3 shell is launched, the Partisan configuration can be verified using :

(lasp_peer_service:manager()):myself().

Running multiple shells locally

It can be useful for development and test purposes to launch several shells locally. In that case, the sname and peer_port should be changed to allow Partisan to use the same IP address and hostname for each local node.

The /etc/hosts file

By default, Unix/Linux-based systems do not contain an entry for each address the local host gets associated to when connecting to a network. So trying to clusterize nodes using their hostname will fail each time the network interface is assigned a different IP address.

Workaround 1

To overcome this problem in test/debug environments, it is possible to use names instead of snames i.e. fully qualified names instead of shortnames :

  • With rebar3 : rebar3 --sname achlys --setcookie MyCookie becomes rebar3 --name 'achlys@X.X.X.X' --setcookie MyCookie

  • In pure Erlang : erl -sname achlys -setcookie MyCookie becomes erl -name 'achlys@X.X.X.X' -setcookie MyCookie

with X.X.X.X being the current IP address of the host in both cases.

Workaround 2

If you often use the same IP addresses, for example a home and work/school address, you can also edit the /etc/hosts file directly to add the missing entries.

For example, if your computer always uses the address 192.168.1.2 at home, you can open and terminal and call :

sudo nano /etc/hosts

And add 2 lines such as :

# Home addr/host pair
192.168.1.2	Hostname

# Work addr/host pair
130.104.222.50	Hostname

NOTE : The file is sensitive to subnet masks, and if other entries are present, the address with the highest subnet mask will always be used. If several IPs have equally long masks, the FIRST ONE is used as the file is read line by line.

You will now be able to connect nodes between eachother locally using the short name Hostname when it is actually associated with either of the defined addresses. The final step is to configure the shell target of the Makefile accordingly by replacing :

$(REBAR) as test shell --name '$(GRISPAPP)$(n)@$(IP)'

with :

$(REBAR) as test shell --sname $(GRISPAPP)$(n)

Launching multiple rebar3 shells

Open two terminals at the root folder of the project and call :

make shell n=1 PEER_PORT=27001 in the first one

and then :

make shell n=2 PEER_PORT=27002 in the second one

You should now have two different Achlys nodes running locally :

  • achlys1@yourhostname
  • achlys2@yourhostname

You can clusterize them using the Lasp API that forwards join calls to the Partisan peer service :

  • on node achlys1@yourhostname :

lasp_peer_service:join('achlys2@yourhostname').

NOTE : the single quotes around the node name are required in order to ensure that even names containing characters such as "-" are still treated as atoms. For example :

  • lasp_peer_service:join(achlys2@User-Computer-Name).
  • lasp_peer_service:join(achlys2@192.168.1.1).

will both throw an error, whereas :

  • lasp_peer_service:join('achlys2@User-Computer-Name').
  • lasp_peer_service:join('achlys2@192.168.1.1').

will work correctly.

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