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User and Programmers Guide

This guide explains how to use the API to manage XACML-based access control policies and provide authorization decisions based on such policies and the context of a given access request.

If you have been using a previous version of AuthzForce, check the release notes to know what is changed and what is new.

Background and Detail

This User and Programmers Guide applies to the reference implementation of the Authorization PDP GE which is part of FIWARE Security Architecture. Please find more information about this Generic Enabler in the following Open Specification.

User Guide

Since the Authorization PDP is a Generic Enabler which provides backend functionality to other applications (e.g. Generic Enablers or end user facing applications) and security administrators, we do not distinguish between the User and Programmers Guide. Please refer to the Programmers Guide section for more information.

Programmer Guide

AuthzForce provides the following APIs:

  • PDP API (PDP = Policy Decision Point in the XACML terminology): provides an API for getting authorization decisions computed by a XACML-compliant access control engine;
  • PAP API (PAP = Policy Administration Point in XACML terminology): provides API for managing XACML policies to be handled by the Authorization Service PDP.

The full API (RESTful) is described by a document written in the Web Application Description Language format (WADL) and associated XML schema files available in Authzforce rest-api-model project files.

XACML is the main international OASIS standard for access control language and request-response formats, that addresses most use cases of access control. AuthzForce supports the full core XACML 3.0 language; therefore it allows to enforce generic and complex access control policies.

General recommendations for developers

In all the sample XML outputs shown in the next sections, the XML namespace prefix of any API response element, such as the XACML Response element, might vary from an AuthzForce run time to another, but it is always the same XML element as the prefix is always mapped to the same namespace, such as urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:core:schema:wd-17 (XACML 3.0 namespace) for the XACML Response. Therefore, any valid (namespace-aware) XML parser will handle it equally, no matter the namespace prefix. Beware of that XML namespace-prefix mapping issue if you are parsing XML manually.

We strongly recommend developers to use XML-schema-aware software with XML schema validation enabled for all XML processing. This will make troubleshooting easier, and save you a lot of trouble. You can find the XML schemas and an example of Java client code with schema validation in the Authzforce rest-api-model project files.

Attribute-Based Access Control

AuthzForce provides Attribute-Based Access Control. To understand what is meant by attribute in the context of access control, below is the list of standard categories of attributes identified by the XACML standard:

  • Subject attributes: the subject is an actor (human, program, device, etc.) requesting access to a resource; attributes may be user ID, Organization, Role, Clearance, etc. In fact, XACML enables you to be more specific about the type of subject, e.g. intermediary subject, requesting machine, etc.
  • Resource attributes: the resource is a passive entity (from the access control perspective) on which subject requests to act upon (e.g. data but also human, device, application, etc.); resource attributes may be resource ID, URL, classification, etc.
  • Action attributes: the action is the action that the subject requests to perform on the resource (e.g. create, read, delete); attributes may be action ID, parameter A, parameter B, etc.
  • Environment attributes: anything else, e.g. current time, CPU load of the PEP/PDP, global threat level, etc.

If this is not enough, XACML enables you to make your own attribute categories as well.

Product info API

You can get product information (name, version...) with following HTTP request:

  • Method: GET

  • Path: /version

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

Domain Management API

The API allows AuthzForce application administrators or administration interfaces to create domains for the users, and remove domains once they are no longer used. This part of the API is described in the section :ref:`adminGuideDomainAdmin`.

The API is provided over HTTP in order to comply with the test assertions urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:http:client and urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:http:server of REST Profile of XACML v3.0 Version 1.0.

Each AuthzForce domain represents an independent RESTful XACML system, in the context of the REST Profile of XACML v3.0 Version 1.0.

End-users may retrieve the domain's resource content as follows:

  • Method: GET

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example, this request gets the resource for domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ

GET /domains/iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ
HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

If the domain exists, the response goes:

If a domain with such ID does not exist, an error 404 is returned.

Therefore, in the context of the REST Profile of XACML v3.0 Version 1.0, the location of the single entry point of a domain-specific RESTful XACML system is /domains/{domainId}, and you may get the link to the PDP from the response for the GET request to this entry point location, looking for the link relation http://docs.oasis-open.org/ns/xacml/relation/pdp. In this respect, we comply with test assertions urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:home:documentation, urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:home:status and urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:home:pdp of the REST Profile of XACML v3.0 Version 1.0.

The API also allows users to update certain properties of the domain allocated to them:

  • An externalId (optional) for the domain, which users/clients can modify and more easily use as reference, as opposed to the unique and read-only domain ID assigned by the API - once and for all - when the domain is created;
  • A description of the domain (optional).

You may retrieve the current domain properties as follows:

  • Method: GET

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/properties

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example, this request gets the properties of domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ. In this case, there is no specific property, which is the case by default:

GET /domains/iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ/properties
HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

The response goes:

You may update the domain properties as follows:

  • Method: PUT

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/properties

  • Headers:

    • Content-Type: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
  • Body: new properties.

For example, this request sets the externalId property to my-domain-123:

The response is the new properties.

As a result, the domain's external ID my-domain-123 points to the domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ. Clients may only rely on the externalId under their control to recover the API-defined domain ID, before they begin to use other API operations that require the API-defined domain ID. Indeed, clients may look up the API-defined ID corresponding to a given externalId as follows:

GET /domains?externalId=my-domain-123
HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

The response gives the corresponding domain ID in a link href attribute:

Policy Administration API

The PAP is used by policy administrators to manage the policy repository from which the PDP loads the enforced policies. The PAP supports multi-tenancy in the form of generic administration domains that are separate from each other. Each policy administrator (except the Superadmin) is in fact a domain administrator, insofar as he is allowed to manage the policy for one or more specific domains. Domains are typically used to support isolation of tenants (one domain per tenant).

Adding and updating Policies

The PAP provides a RESTful API for adding and updating policies to a specific domain. HTTP requests to this API must be formatted as follows:

  • Method: POST

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/policies

  • Headers:

    • Content-Type: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
  • Body: XACML PolicySet as defined in the XACML 3.0 schema.

Example of request given below:

The HTTP response status is 200 with a link to manage the new policy, if the request was successful. The link is made of the policy ID and version separated by '/'.

Response:

To update a policy, you add a new version of the policy, i.e. you send the same request as above, but with a higher Version value.

WARNING: after you add/update a policy, it is not necessarily used, i.e.evaluated, by the PDP. The PDP starts the evaluation with the root policy specified in the Policy Decision (PDP) Properties. Therefore, only this root policy and any other one referenced (directly or indirectly) by this root policy is applicable. See the section Policy Decision (PDP) Properties to learn how to verify applicable policies and change the root policy.

WARNING: Although AuthzForce Server supports application/json media type as well for sending/getting policies in JSON format, it is still experimental for various reasons. One of which is a strong limitation that you should be much aware before using it for complex XACML policies: XML schema type definitions using a repeated``choice`` (between different element types) or a polymorphic sequence with maxOccurs > 1 are not handled properly in JSON, at least not in any standard way or without significant customization of JSON processing. For example of such polymorphic sequence, an XACML Apply element may contain multiple Expression elements in a sequence, and an Expression may be an Apply again, or an AttributeValue, or an AttributeDesignator, or a VariableReference, etc. For example of repeated choice, a XACML PolicySet may contain P1, then PS1, then P2, then PS2, where P stands for XACML Policy and PS for XACML PolicySet. With the well-known simple conventions like the one used by AuthzForce Server for XML-to-JSON mapping, this is mapped to two separate JSON arrays, one for Policy element(s) ([P1, P2]) and one for PolicySet element(s) ([PS1, PS2]). Therefore, the originally intended evaluation order is lost! It gets even worse if you use PolicySetIdReference element(s) as well (PolicyIdReference is out of the question since not supported by the API). Of course, there are solutions such as adding a wrapping JSON object with a key called PolicyOrPolicySetOrPolicySetIdReference with an array as value where each item must have a type information to inform the consumer whether it is a Policy, PolicySet or PolicySetIdReference. This kind of solution is used in JAXB for instance to map XML to Java model (except the array is replaced by a Java collection). Like in JAXB to Java, this introduces some extra complexity to JSON processing that makes the JSON alternative lose much of its appeal compared to XML. In short, you should not use JSON for policies either mixing XACML Policy, PolicySet or PolicySetIdReference elements within the same PolicySet; or Expressions within the same Apply.

Getting Policies and Policy Versions

Once added to the domain as shown previously, you can get the policy by its ID as follows:

  • Method: GET

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/policies/{policyId}

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example:

GET /domains/iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ/pap/policies/P1 HTTP/1.1 Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

The response is the list of links to the versions of the policy P1 available in the domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ:

As the href values are telling you, you may get a specific version of the policy as follows:

  • Method: GET

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/policies/{policyId}/{version}

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example:

GET /domains/iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ/pap/policies/P1/1.0 HTTP/1.1 Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

The response is the policy document (XACML PolicySet) in this version.

You may use the special keyword latest as version here to get the latest version of a given policy; e.g. URL path /domains/iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ/pap/policies/P1/latest points to the latest version of the policy P1 in domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ.

Last but not least, you may get all policies in the domain as follows:

  • Method: GET

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/policies

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example:

Removing Policies and Policy Versions

You may remove a policy version from the domain as follows:

  • Method: DELETE

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/policies/{policyId}/{version}

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example:

DELETE /domains/iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ/pap/policies/P1/1.0 HTTP/1.1 Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

The response is the removed policy document (XACML PolicySet) in this version.

You may remove a policy, i.e. all versions of a policy from the domain as follows:

  • Method: DELETE

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/policies/{policyId}

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example:

DELETE /domains/iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ/pap/policies/P1 HTTP/1.1 Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

The response is the list of links to all the removed versions of the policy, similar to the the GET request on the same URL.

Re-usable Policies (e.g. for Hierarchical RBAC)

The PAP API supports policies that have references to other policies existing in the domain. This allows to include/reuse a given policy from multiple policies, or multiple parts of the same policy, by means of XACML <PolicySetIdReference> elements. One major application of this is Hierarchical RBAC. You can refer to the XACML v3.0 Core and Hierarchical Role Based Access Control (RBAC) Profile specification for how to achieve hierarchical RBAC with <PolicySetIdReference> elements.

For example, I want to define a role Employee and a role Manager derived from Employee. In other words, permissions of an Employee are included in the permissions of a Manager. In order to create this role hierarchy, we first add the Employee's Permission PolicySet:

Then we add the role-based hierarchical policy defining the Employee role and the Manager role, both with a reference (<PolicySetIdReference>) to the Employee's Permission PolicySet added previously. The Manager role has one policy more, so more permissions:

You may add more policies for more roles as you wish. Once you are satisfied with your role hierarchy, you may apply your new RBAC policy by updating the domain's root policy reference (this may not be necessary if you reused the same root policy ID as before, in which case your policy is already active by now):

The policy is now enforced by the PDP as described in the next section.

Policy Repository (PRP) Properties

Administrators (global or domain-specific) may configure the policy repository with the following properties:

  • maxPolicyCount: optional, stricly positive integer that indicates the maximum number of policies on a domain, no limit if undefined.
  • maxVersionCountPerPolicy: optional, stricly positive integer that indicates the maximum number of versions per policy, no limit if undefined.
  • versionRollingEnabled: boolean, true if and only if policy versions should be rolled over, i.e. when maxVersionCountPerPolicy has been reached, oldest versions are automatically removed to make place.

For example, below is a HTTP GET request and response for the policy repository properties of domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ:

The HTTP PUT request to update the properties has a body that is similar to the GET response:

The response format is the same as for the GET request.

Policy Decision (PDP) Properties

Administrators (global or domain-specific) may configure the PDP engine with the following properties:

  • rootPolicyRefExpression: reference - in the form of a XACML PolicySetIdReference - to the root policy. The root policy is the policy from which the PDP starts the evaluation. A policy matching this reference must exist on the domain, therefore it must have been added in the way described in Adding and updating Policies. If there is no specific Version in the reference, the latest matching policy version is selected.
  • feature elements: enable particular PDP features. Each feature has an ID, type and enabled flag saying whether the feature is enabled or not.

Supported PDP features (IDs) by type:

  • Type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:core: PDP core engine features (as opposed to other types related to PDP extensions ).

    • urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:core:strict-attribute-issuer-match: strict matching of attribute Issuer values in XACML Requests against corresponding attribute designators' Issuer values in policies. This means that an <AttributeDesignator> without Issuer only matches request Attributes without Issuer (and same AttributeId, Category...). This mode is not fully compliant with XACML 3.0 Core specifcation of AttributeDesignator (§5.29), in the case that the Issuer is indeed not present on a AttributeDesignator, but it may perform better and is recommended when all AttributeDesignators have an Issuer. Reminder: XACML 3.0 Core specifcation of AttributeDesignator (§5.29) says: If the Issuer is not present in the attribute designator, then the matching of the attribute to the named attribute SHALL be governed by AttributeId and DataType attributes alone.
    • urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:core:xpath-eval: enables support for XACML AttributeSelectors and datatype urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:data-type:xpathExpression. If this feature is disabled, only standard XACML 3.0 Core datatypes marked M, i.e. mandatory, are supported. Since xpathExpression is optional in the standard, it is therefore not supported unless this feature is enabled. This feature is experimental and may have a negative impact on performance. Use with caution.
  • Type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:request-preproc: XACML (Individual) Request preprocessor (Individual means that even if the XACML Multiple Decision Profile is active, the request preprocessor applies to each Individual Decision Request as defined in the Profile). As a convention, request preprocessor IDs with suffix -lax allow multivalued attributes in form of duplicate Attribute elements (with same meta-data) in the same Attributes element of a Request, in order to accept multivalued attributes in conformance with XACML 3.0 Core specification of Multivalued attributes (§7.3.3). Request preprocessor IDs with suffix -strict do not allow this behavior, i.e. multivalued attributes must be formed by grouping all AttributeValue elements in the same Attribute element (instead of duplicate Attribute elements), therefore they do not fully comply with XACML 3.0 Core specification of Multivalued attributes (§7.3.3). However, they perform usually better than their -lax counterparts since it simplifies the Request and allows parsing optimizations by the PDP. Below is an example of Request that would not be accepted by a -strict request preprocessor because of duplicate Attribute:

    Below is the equivalent of the previous Request in a form that is accepted by a -strict request preprocessor (no duplicate Attribute):

    Available request preprocessor IDs:

    • urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:request-preproc:default-lax and urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:request-preproc:default-strict: supports only XACML Request elements marked as mandatory in XACML 3.0 Core specification (§10.2.1) (in particular, no support for Multiple Decision Profile);
    • urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:request-preproc:multiple:repeated-attribute-categories-lax and urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:request-preproc:multiple:repeated-attribute-categories-strict: Provides the functionality identified by urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:multiple:repeated-attribute-categories in XACML v3.0 Multiple Decision Profile Version 1.0 (§3.3)

    Only one request preprocessor may be enabled at at time.

  • Types urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:data-type and urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:function: PDP extensions providing non-core XACML data types and functions respectively, i.e. not specified in XACML 3.0 Core standard §10.2.7 and §10.2.8 respectively. More information in next section PDP Extensions.

Follow the example of request/response below to get the current PDP properties in domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ:

As you can see, the GET response provides extra information such as:

  • lastModifiedTime: the last time the PDP was reloaded (due to a change of root policy for instance);
  • applicablePolicies: the actual root policy (rootPolicyRef element) version selected for evaluation according to the rootPolicyRefExpression, and any policy referenced from it ((refPolicyRef elements) directly or indirectly via PolicySetIdReference.

The HTTP PUT request to update the PDP properties goes as follows:

This example sets the root policy reference to the latest version of the policy with PolicySetId = 'root' that must exist in the domain (see Adding and updating Policies), and enables support for the XACML Multiple Decision profile with repeated attribute categories (urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:multiple:repeated-attribute-categories). Notice that only one feature element in the request although it is not the only one PDP feature. In this case, the API assumes that all features missing from the request must be disabled. Therefore, it is only necessary to send the enabled features in the request.

PDP Extensions

Non-core (not defined in XACML 3.0 Core standard) PDP behavior and features may be implemented by various types of extensions, particularly to support specific XACML Profiles:

  • Attribute Datatypes: to support extra XACML datatypes, e.g. from DLP/NAC Profile;
  • Functions: to support extra XACML functions, e.g. from DLP/NAC Profile;
  • Attribute Providers: to customize the way attribute value are retrieved outside the PEP's Request.
  • Request filter: to customize the processing of individual decision requests;
  • Result filter: to customize the processing of XACML Results in Response;
  • Combining algorithms: to add custom policy or rule combining algorithms.
Attribute Datatype extensions

The XACML 3.0 Core standard allows to use extra attribute data types not defined in the standard. Before you can use such datatypes in Authzforce API, you must implement and provide it as an Attribute Datatype extension, or get it from a third party as such; and then you deploy it on Authzforce server and enable it on a specific domain. The AuthzForce project also provides a separate Datatype extension example for documentation and testing purposes. If you wish to make your own Attribute Datatype extension, read on the next section. If you wish to test the example provided by AuthzForce or if you have another one ready for use, you may jump to the section Integrating an Attribute Datatype extension into AuthzForce Server.

Making an Attribute Datatype extension

The steps to make your own Attribute Datatype extension for AuthzForce go as follows:

  1. Create a Maven project with jar packaging type and following Maven dependency:

  2. Create your attribute datatype factory and value instance class (as in the Factory design pattern). The factory class must be public, and implement interface org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.value.DatatypeFactory<AV>, where AV stands for your AttributeValue Implementation Class, i.e. the concrete attribute value implementation class; and the factory class must have a public no-argument constructor or no constructor.

    To facilitate the implementation process, instead of implementing this DatatypeFactory interface directly, you should extend one of the following DatatypeFactory sub-classes when it applies:

    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.value.SimpleValue.StringContentOnlyFactory<AV>: to be extended for implementing text-only primitive datatypes (equivalent to simple XML types). You may use AuthzForce TestDNSNameWithPortValue class (used for AuthzForce unit tests) as an example. This example provides a test implementation of datatype dnsName-value defined in XACML Data Loss Prevention / Network Access Control (DLP/NAC) Profile Version 1.0. In this example, the static nested class Factory is the one extending org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.value.SimpleValue.StringContentOnlyFactory<TestDNSNameWithPortValue>. Such a class has a factory method (TestDNSNameWithPortValue getInstance(String val)) that takes a string argument corresponding to the text in the XACML AttributeValue (which must not contain any XML element or attribute).
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.value.SimpleValue.Factory<AV>: to be extended for implementing primitive XACML datatypes with XML attributes (equivalent to complex XML types with simple content). An example of such datatype is xpathExpression which requires an XML attribute named XPathCategory. Note that the datatype xpathExpression is natively supported but enabled only if feature urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:core:xpath-eval is enabled, as mentioned in section Policy Decision (PDP) Properties.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.value.BaseDatatypeFactory<AV>: to be extended for implementing structured attributes (XACML 3.0 Core, §8.2) (equivalent to complex XML types with complex content). You may use AuthzForce TestXACMLPolicyAttributeValue class (used for AuthzForce unit tests) as an example. In this example, the static nested class Factory is the one extending org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.value.BaseDatatypeFactory<TestXACMLPolicyAttributeValue>. Such a class has a factory method TestXACMLPolicyAttributeValue getInstance(List<Serializable> content, Map<QName, String> otherAttributes, ...) that creates an instance of your AttributeValue Implementation Class, i.e. TestXACMLPolicyAttributeValue in this case. where the argument otherAttributes represents the XML attributes and argument content the mixed content of a XACML AttributeValue parsed by JAXB.
  3. When your implementation class is ready, create a text file org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.PdpExtension in folder src/main/resources/META-INF/services (you have to create the folder first) and put the fully qualified name of your implementation class on the first line of this file, like in the example from Authzforce source code.

  4. Run Maven package to produce a JAR from the Maven project.

Now you have an Attribute Datatype extension ready for integration into AuthzForce Server, as explained in the next section.

Integrating an Attribute Datatype extension into AuthzForce Server

This section assumes you have an Attribute Datatype extension in form of a JAR, typically produced by the process described in the previous section. You may use AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR if you only wish to test the examples in this documentation. This JAR is available on Maven Central.

The steps to integrate the extension into the AuthzForce Server go as follows:

  1. Make the JAR - and any extra dependency - visible from the AuthzForce webapp in Tomcat. One way to do it consists to copy the JAR (e.g. authzforce-ce-core-pdp-testutils-10.1.0.jar in our example) into /opt/authzforce-ce-server/webapp/WEB-INF/lib. For other ways, please refer to Tomcat HowTo.
  2. Finally, restart Tomcat to apply changes.
Enabling an Attribute Datatype extension on a domain

Once you have deployed the extension on Authzforce, following previous instructions, you are ready to enable it on a specific domain's PDP by updating the PDP properties with an enabled feature of type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:data-type and value equal to the ID returned by the method getId() of the extension's factory implementation class. The following example enables the datatype dnsName-value (defined in DLP/NAC profile) on the PDP, provided that the AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR has been deployed (see previous section):

Function Extensions

The XACML 3.0 Core standard allows to use extra functions not defined in the standard. Before you can use such functions in Authzforce API, you must implement and provide it as an Function extension, or get it from a third party as such; and then you deploy it on Authzforce server and enable it on a specific domain. The AuthzForce project also provides a separate Function extension example for documentation and testing purposes. If you wish to make your own Function extension, read on the next section. If you wish to test the example provided by AuthzForce or if you have another one ready for use, you may jump to the section Integrating a Function extension into AuthzForce Server.

Making a Function extension

The steps to make your own Function extension go as follows:

  1. Create a Maven project with jar packaging type and following Maven dependency:

  2. If you want to implement one/some/all of the equivalent of XACML 3.0 standard bag functions (§A.3.10) or set functions (§A.3.11) for a new attribute datatype (provided by an Attribute Datatype extension), create a Java class either extending class org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.BaseFunctionSet or, as second resort, implementing interface org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.FunctionSet, and, in either case, use org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.FirstOrderBagFunctions#getFunctions(DatatypeFactory<AV>) to create all the bag functions from the new attribute datatype factory.

    Else create a Java class either extending class org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.BaseFunction or, as second resort, implementing interface org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.Function; this class must have a public no-argument constructor or no constructor. Instead of implementing this Function interface directly, you should extend one of the following Function sub-classes when it applies:

    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.ComparisonFunction: to be extended for implementing comparison functions type-greater-than, type-greater-than-or-equal, type-less-than and type-less-than-or-equal. Examples from XACML 3.0 Core standard: see §A.3.6 and §A.3.8.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.EqualTypeMatchFunction: to be extended for implementing match functions with two parameters of same type`. Examples from XACML 3.0 Core standard: equality functions in §A.3.1, x500name-match, string-starts-with. You may use AuthzForce TestDNSNameValueEqualFunction class (used for AuthzForce unit tests) as an example. This example provides a test implementation of function dnsName-value-equal defined in XACML Data Loss Prevention / Network Access Control (DLP/NAC) Profile Version 1.0.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.NonEqualTypeMatchFunction: to be extended for implementing match functions with two parameters of different type. Examples from XACML 3.0 Core standard: rfc822Name-match, anyURI-starts-with, dnsName-regexp-match.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.HigherOrderBagFunction: to be extended for implementing higher-order bag functions. Examples from XACML 3.0 Core standard are functions in §A.3.12.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.FirstOrderFunction.SingleParameterTyped: to be extended for implementing first-order functions having all parameters of the same type, when previous cases do not apply. Examples from XACML 3.0 Core standard are logical and, or or not in §A.3.5.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.FirstOrderFunction.MultiParameterTyped: to be extended for implementing first-order functions having at least two different types of parameters, when previous cases do not apply. Examples from XACML 3.0 Core standard are logical n-of and *-substring functions.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.func.FirstOrderFunction.BaseFunction: to be extended for implementing functions when none of the previous cases apply.
  3. When your implementation class is ready, create a text file org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.PdpExtension in folder src/main/resources/META-INF/services (you have to create the folder first) and put the fully qualified name of your implementation class on the first line of this file, like in the example from Authzforce source code.

  4. Run Maven package to produce a JAR from the Maven project.

Now you have a Function extension ready for integration into AuthzForce Server, as explained in the next section.

Integrating a Function extension into AuthzForce Server

This section assumes you have a Function extension in form of a JAR, typically produced by the process described in the previous section. You may use AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR if you only wish to test the examples in this documentation. This JAR is available on Maven Central.

The steps to integrate the extension into the AuthzForce Server go as follows:

  1. Make the JAR - and any extra dependency - visible from the AuthzForce webapp in Tomcat. One way to do it consists to copy the JAR (e.g. authzforce-ce-core-5.0.2-tests.jar in our example) into /opt/authzforce-ce-server/webapp/WEB-INF/lib. For other ways, please refer to Tomcat HowTo.
  2. Finally, restart Tomcat to apply changes.
Enabling a Function extension on a domain

Once you have deployed the extension on Authzforce, following previous instructions, you are ready to enable it on a specific domain's PDP by updating the PDP properties with an enabled feature of type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:function-set if the extension extends BaseFunctionSet class or implements directly its superinterface FunctionSet; else use the feature type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:function, and value equal to the ID returned by the method getId() of the extension implementation class. The following example enables the function dnsName-value-equal and required datatype dnsName-value (defined in DLP/NAC profile) on the PDP, provided that the AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR has been deployed (see previous section):

Combining Algorithm Extensions

The XACML 3.0 Core standard allows to use extra policy/rule combining algorithms not defined in the standard. Before you can use such algorithms in Authzforce API, you must implement and provide it as an Combining Algorithm extension, or get it from a third party as such; and then you deploy it on Authzforce server and enable it on a specific domain. The AuthzForce project also provides a separate Combining Algorithm extension example for documentation and testing purposes. If you wish to make your own Combining Algorithm extension, read on the next section. If you wish to test the example provided by AuthzForce or if you have another one ready for use, you may jump to the section Integrating a Combining Algorithm extension into AuthzForce Server.

Making a Combining Algorithm extension

The steps to make your own Combining Algorithm extension go as follows:

  1. Create a Maven project with jar packaging type and following Maven dependency:

  2. Create the Java implementation class, either extending class org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.combining.BaseCombiningAlg<D> or, as second resort, implementing interface org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.combining.CombiningAlg<D>, where the type parameter D represents the type of elements combined by the algorithm implementation (policy or rule), more precisely D must be one of the following:

    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.Decidable (recommended option) for a policy/rule combining algorithm implementation, i.e. combining policies and rules equally. For example, although the XACML standard specifies two distinct identifiers for the policy combining version and rule combining version of the deny-unless-permit algorithm, the normative algorithm specification in pseudo-code is the same, and is actually implemented by one single Java class in AuthzForce. We strongly recommend this type parameter for your implementation as it makes it more generic and maximizes its reuse.
    • org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.policy.PolicyEvaluator for a policy-only combining algorithm, e.g. the XACML Core standard only-one-applicable algorithm, or the on-permit-apply-second policy combining algorithm from XACML 3.0 Additional Combining Algorithms Profile Version 1.0. You may use AuthzForce TestOnPermitApplySecondCombiningAlg class (used for AuthzForce unit tests) as an example of implementation for this algorithm.

    This class must have a public no-argument constructor or no constructor.

  3. When your implementation class is ready, create a text file org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.PdpExtension in folder src/main/resources/META-INF/services (you have to create the folder first) and put the fully qualified name of your implementation class on the first line of this file, like in the example from Authzforce source code.

  4. Run Maven package to produce a JAR from the Maven project.

Now you have a Combining Algorithm extension ready for integration into AuthzForce Server, as explained in the next section.

Integrating a Combining Algorithm extension into AuthzForce Server

This section assumes you have a Combining Algorithm extension in form of a JAR, typically produced by the process described in the previous section. You may use AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR if you only wish to test the examples in this documentation. This JAR is available on Maven Central.

The steps to integrate the extension into the AuthzForce Server go as follows:

  1. Make the JAR - and any extra dependency - visible from the AuthzForce webapp in Tomcat. One way to do it consists to copy the JAR (e.g. authzforce-ce-core-5.0.2-tests.jar in our example) into /opt/authzforce-ce-server/webapp/WEB-INF/lib. For other ways, please refer to Tomcat HowTo.
  2. Finally, restart Tomcat to apply changes.
Enabling a Combining Algorithm extension on a domain

Once you have deployed the extension on Authzforce, following previous instructions, you are ready to enable it on a specific domain's PDP by updating the PDP properties with an enabled feature of type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:combining-algorithm. The following example enables the combining algorithm on-permit-apply-second on the PDP, provided that the AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR has been deployed (see previous section):

Request Filter Extensions

With AuthzForce Request Filter extensions, you can customize the way XACML <Request> elements are processed before they are evaluated by the PDP against policies. Before you can use such extensions in Authzforce API, you must implement one or get it from a third party as such; and then you deploy it on Authzforce server and enable it on a specific domain. Beware that AuthzForce already provides a Request Filter implementing the functionality identified by urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:multiple:repeated-attribute-categories in XACML v3.0 Multiple Decision Profile Version 1.0 (§3.3). More information in section Policy Decision (PDP) Properties. If you wish to make your own Request Filter extension, read on the next section. If you wish to test the example provided by AuthzForce or if you have another one ready for use, you may jump to the section Integrating a Request Filter extension into AuthzForce Server.

Making a Request Filter extension

The steps to make your own Request Filter extension for AuthzForce go as follows:

  1. Create a Maven project with jar packaging type and following Maven dependency:
  2. Create a Java class implementing interface org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.RequestFilter.Factory. This class must have a public no-argument constructor or no constructor. This factory class's main goal is to create instances of org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.RequestFilter. As the latter is an interface, you need a concrete subclass for your implementation. Instead of implementing the interface RequestFilter directly to do so, you should extend class org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.BaseRequestFilter to facilitate the process whenever possible. You may use AuthzForce DefaultRequestFilter.LaxFilterFactory (resp. DefaultRequestFilter.StrictFilterFactory) class as an example for -lax (resp. -strict) request preprocessor. This class implements the minimal XACML 3.0 Core-compliant request preprocessor identified by urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:request-preproc:default-lax (resp. urn:ow2:authzforce:feature:pdp:request-preproc:default-strict). For more information on this request preprocessor and -lax versus -strict, please refer to section Policy Decision (PDP) Properties.
  3. When your implementation class is ready, create a text file org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.PdpExtension in folder src/main/resources/META-INF/services (you have to create the folder first) and put the fully qualified name of your implementation class on the first line of this file, like in the example from Authzforce source code.
  4. Run Maven package to produce a JAR from the Maven project.

Now you have a Request Filter extension ready for integration into AuthzForce Server, as explained in the next section.

Integrating a Request Filter extension into AuthzForce Server

This section assumes you have a Request Filter extension in form of a JAR, typically produced by the process described in the previous section. The steps to integrate the extension into the AuthzForce Server go as follows:

  1. Make the JAR - and any extra dependency - visible from the AuthzForce webapp in Tomcat. One way to do it consists to copy the JAR (e.g. authzforce-ce-core-5.0.2-tests.jar in our example) into /opt/authzforce-ce-server/webapp/WEB-INF/lib. For other ways, please refer to Tomcat HowTo.
  2. Finally, restart Tomcat to apply changes.
Enabling a Request Filter extension on a domain

Once you have deployed the extension on Authzforce, following previous instructions, you are ready to enable it on a specific domain's PDP by updating the PDP properties with an enabled feature of type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:request-preproc and value equal to the ID returned by the method getId() of the extension's factory implementation class. Please refer to Policy Decision (PDP) Properties for examples.

Result Filter Extensions

With AuthzForce Result Filter extensions, you can customize the way the PDP's decision <Result> elements are processed before making the final XACML <Response> returned to the client, e.g. PEPs. Before you can use such extensions in Authzforce API, you must implement one or get it from a third party as such; and then you deploy it on Authzforce server and enable it on a specific domain. The AuthzForce project also provides a separate Result Filter extension example for documentation and testing purposes. If you wish to make your own Result Filter extension, read on the next section. If you wish to test the example provided by AuthzForce or if you have another one ready for use, you may jump to the section Integrating a Result Filter extension into AuthzForce Server.

Making a Result Filter extension

The steps to make your own Result Filter extension go as follows:

  1. Create a Maven project with jar packaging type and following Maven dependency:
  2. Create a Java implementation class implementing interface org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.DecisionResultFilter. This class must have a public no-argument constructor or no constructor. You may use AuthzForce TestCombinedDecisionResultFilter class (used for AuthzForce unit tests) as an example. This example provides a test implementation of feature urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:multiple:combined-decision from XACML v3.0 Multiple Decision Profile Version 1.0.
  3. When your implementation class is ready, create a text file org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.PdpExtension in folder src/main/resources/META-INF/services (you have to create the folder first) and put the fully qualified name of your implementation class on the first line of this file, like in the example from Authzforce source code.
  4. Run Maven package to produce a JAR from the Maven project.

Now you have a Result Filter extension ready for integration into AuthzForce Server, as explained in the next section.

Integrating a Result Filter extension into AuthzForce Server

This section assumes you have a Combining Algorithm extension in form of a JAR, typically produced by the process described in the previous section. You may use AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR if you only wish to test the examples in this documentation. This JAR is available on Maven Central.

The steps to integrate the extension into the AuthzForce Server go as follows:

  1. Make the JAR - and any extra dependency - visible from the AuthzForce webapp in Tomcat. One way to do it consists to copy the JAR (e.g. authzforce-ce-core-5.0.2-tests.jar in our example) into /opt/authzforce-ce-server/webapp/WEB-INF/lib. For other ways, please refer to Tomcat HowTo.
  2. Finally, restart Tomcat to apply changes.
Enabling a Result Filter extension on a domain

Once you have deployed the extension on Authzforce, following previous instructions, you are ready to enable it on a specific domain's PDP by updating the PDP properties with an enabled feature of type urn:ow2:authzforce:feature-type:pdp:result-postproc. The following example enables Authzforce combined decision result postprocessor (implementing the feature urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:multiple:combined-decision from XACML v3.0 Multiple Decision Profile Version 1.0 for testing) on the PDP, provided that the AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR has been deployed (see previous section):

Attribute Providers

The API allows to manage PDP attribute providers. These are PDP extensions that enable the PDP to get attributes from other sources than PEPs' requests. Such sources may be remote services, databases, etc. The AuthzForce Server distribution does not provide attribute providers out of the box, but allows you to plug in custom-made one(s) from your own invention or from third parties. The AuthzForce project also provides a separate Attribute Provider example, for testing and documentation purposes only. If you wish to make your own attribute provider, read on the next section. If you wish to test the example provided by AuthzForce or have another one ready for use, you may jump to the section Integrating an Attribute Provider into AuthzForce Server.

Making an Attribute Provider

The steps to make your own PDP Attribute Provider extension for AuthzForce go as follows:

  1. Create a Maven project with jar packaging type.
  2. Create an XML schema file with .xsd extension in the src/main/resources folder of your Maven project. Make sure this filename is potentially unique on a Java classpath, like your usual Java class names. One way to make sure is to use a filename prefix following the same conventions as the Java package naming conventions. In this schema file, define an XML type for your attribute provider configuration format. This type must extend AbstractAttributeProvider from namespace http://authzforce.github.io/xmlns/pdp/ext/3. You may use the schema of AuthzForce Test Attribute Provider (used for AuthzForce unit tests only) as an example. In this example, the XSD filename is org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.testutil.ext.xsd and the defined XML type extending AbstractAttributeProvider is TestAttributeProvider.
  3. Copy the files bindings.xjb and catalog.xml from Authzforce source code into the src/main/jaxb folder (you have to create this folder first) of your Maven project.
  4. Add the following Maven dependency and build plugin configuration to your Maven POM:
  5. Run Maven generate-sources. This will generate the JAXB-annotated class(es) from the XML schema into the folder target/generated-sources/xjc, one of which corresponds to your attribute provider XML type defined in the second step, therefore has the same name and also extends org.ow2.authzforce.xmlns.pdp.ext.AbstractAttributeProvider class corresponding to AbstractAttributeProvider type in the XML schema. For example, in the case of the Authzforce Test Attribute Provider aforementioned, the corresponding generated class is org.ow2.authzforce.core.xmlns.test.TestAttributeProvider. In your case and in general, we will refer to it as your Attribute Provider Model Class.
  6. Create your Attribute Provider factory and concrete implementation class (as in the Factory design pattern). The factory class must be public, and extend org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.CloseableAttributeProviderModule.FactoryBuilder<APM>, where APM stands for your Attribute Provider Model Class; and the factory class must have a public no-argument constructor or no constructor. You may use org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.testutil.ext.TestAttributeProvider class (used for AuthzForce unit tests only) as an example. In this example, the static nested class Factory is the one extending CloseableDesignatedAttributeProvider.FactoryBuilder<org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.testutil.ext.xmlns.TestAttributeProvider>. Such a class has a factory method getInstance(APM configuration) (getInstance(TestAttributeProvider conf) in the example) that, from an instance of your APM representing the XML input (org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.testutil.ext.xmlns.TestAttributeProvider in the example), creates an instance of your Attribute Provider implementation class (org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.testutil.ext.TestAttributeProviderModule in the example, which is a different class from the APM class, different package!). Indeed, your Attribute Provider implementation class must implement the interface CloseableDesignatedAttributeProvider (package org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api). To facilitate the implementation process, instead of implementing this interface directly, you should extend BaseDesignatedAttributeProvider (same package) in your implementation class, whenever possible. This class already implements the required interface. There are cases where it is not possible; for instance, since BaseDesignatedAttributeProvider is an abstract class, if your implementation needs to extend another abstract class, you have no choice but to implement the interface directly, because a Java class cannot extend multiple abstract classes. In any case, as mandated by the interface, your implementation class must implement the method get(attributeGUID, attributeDatatype, context)) in charge of actually retrieving the extra attributes (TestAttributeProvider#get(...) in the example). The attributeGUID identifies an XACML attribute category, ID and Issuer that the PDP is requesting from your attribute provider; the attributeDatatype is the expected attribute datatype; and context is the request context, including the content from the current XACML Request and possibly extra attributes retrieved so far by other Attribute Providers.
  7. When your implementation class is ready, create a file org.ow2.authzforce.core.pdp.api.PdpExtension in folder src/main/resources/META-INF/services (you have to create the folder first) and put the fully qualified name of your implementation class on the first line of this file, like in the example from Authzforce source code.
  8. Run Maven package to produce a JAR from the Maven project.

Now you have an Attribute Provider extension ready for integration into AuthzForce Server, as explained in the next section.

Integrating an Attribute Provider into AuthzForce Server

This section assumes you have an Attribute Provider extension in form of a JAR, typically produced by the process in the previous section. You may use AuthzForce PDP Core Tests JAR if you only wish to test the examples in this documentation. This JAR is available on Maven Central.

The steps to integrate the extension into the AuthzForce Server go as follows:

  1. Make the JAR - and any extra dependency - visible from the AuthzForce webapp in Tomcat. One way to do it consists to copy the JAR (e.g. authzforce-ce-core-pdp-testutils-10.1.0.jar in our example) into /opt/authzforce-ce-server/webapp/WEB-INF/lib. For other ways, please refer to Tomcat HowTo.
  2. Import your attribute provider XML schema in the XML schema file /opt/authzforce-ce-server/conf/authzforce-ext.xsd, using namespace only (no schemaLocation), like in the example from Authzforce code with this schema import for AuthzForce TestAttributeProvider:
  3. Add a uri element to XML catalog file /opt/authzforce-ce-server/conf/catalog.xml, with your attribute Provider XML namespace as name attribute value, and, the location of your XML schema file within the JAR, as uri attribute value, prefixed by classpath:. For example, in the sample XML catalog from Authzforce source code, we add the following line for AuthzForce TestAttributeProvider:
  4. Finally, restart Tomcat to apply changes.
Managing attribute providers configuration

Once you have deployed a new attribute provider extension on Authzforce, following previous instructions, you are ready to use it on a domain:

  • Method: PUT

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/attribute.providers

  • Headers:

    • Content-Type: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
  • Body: new attribute providers.

For example, this request instantiates a specific TestAttributeProvider configuration on domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ (as mentioned in the previous section, TestAttributeProvider is merely an example for testing and documentation purposes, it is not available in a default installation of Authzforce):

The response is the new attribute provider configuration from the request.

In this second example, we disable all PDP attribute providers of domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ by sending an empty element:

Finally, you may get the current attribute providers anytime as follows:

  • Method: GET

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pap/attribute.providers

  • Headers:

    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8

For example, this request gets the PDP attribute providers of domain iMnxv7sDEeWFwqVFFMDLTQ:

Policy Decision API

The PDP API returns an authorization decision based on the currently enforced policy, access control attributes provided in the request and possibly other attributes resolved by the PDP itself. The Authorization decision is typically Permit or Deny. The PDP is able to resolve extra attributes not provided directly in the request, such as the current date/time (environment attribute).

The PDP provides an HTTP RESTful API for requesting authorization decisions, that complies with test assertions urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:pdp:xacml:status, urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:pdp:xacml:body and urn:oasis:names:tc:xacml:3.0:profile:rest:assertion:pdp:xacml:invalid of REST Profile of XACML v3.0 Version 1.0.

The HTTP request must be formatted as follows:

  • Method: POST

  • Path: /domains/{domainId}/pdp

  • Headers:

    • Content-Type: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
    • Accept: application/xml; charset=UTF-8
  • Body: XACML Request as defined in the XACML 3.0 schema.

The HTTP response body is a XACML Response as defined in the XACML 3.0 schema.

Example of request given below:

Response:

If the XACML request was invalid (invalid format), an error 400 is returned.

Fast Infoset

Fast Infoset is an ITU-T/ISO standard for representing XML (XML Information Set to be accurate) using binary encodings, designed for use cases to provide smaller encoding sizes and faster processing than a W3C XML representation as text. The open source Fast Infoset project provide some performance results and more information about the standardisation status. There are several use cases at the origin of Fast Infoset. A major one comes from the Web3D consortium that is responsible for open standards in real-time 3D communication, and that adopted Fast Infoset for the serialization and compression of X3D documents. X3D is a standard for representing 3D scenes and objects using XML.

AuthzForce Server API offers experimental support for Fast Infoset (use with caution). This feature is disabled by default and needs to be enabled explicitly by the administrator as told in the :ref:`adminGuideFastInfoset`. When it is enabled, provided that your API client supports Fast Infoset as well, you may use Fast Infoset on the server API by replacing the media type application/xml with application/fastinfoset in your API request headers (Accept/Content-Type).

Integration with the IdM and PEP Proxy GEs (e.g. for OAuth)

AuthzForce integrates with the Identity Management (KeyRock) and PEP Proxy GE (Wilma) reference implementations. For an overview of the main interactions, please refer to the Basic and Advanced sections of Wilma programmer guide.

After you installed and configured KeyRock, to connect it to Authzforce, you modify the properties with names prefixed by ACCESS_CONTROL_ in the configuration file fiware-idm/horizon/openstack_dashboard/local/local_settings.py (example on KeyRock Github repository) according to your AuthzForce instance properties. For example:

WARNING: If you are using KeyRock v5.3.0 or older, you also have to change the content of IDM's template file openstack_dashboard/templates/access_control/policy_properties.xacml to this (basically the only change consists to remove the ns2 namespace prefix):

Then restart the IdM to apply changes, and go to IdM web interface, and check that the permissions and roles are well configured for your application. You may have to 'trigger' the policy generation in IdM by going to your application > Manage roles and click Save to trigger the XACML generation. More information in KeyRock installation and administration guide.

Then, after you installed and configured Wilma, to connect it to Authzforce, you modify the settings in config.azf object of configuration file config.js (example) according to your AuthzForce instance properties. More information in Wilma installation and administration guide.

Software Libraries for clients of AuthzForce or other Authorization PDP GEis

The full API (RESTful) is described by a document written in the Web Application Description Language format (WADL) and associated XML schema files available in Authzforce rest-api-model project files. Therefore, you can use any WADL-supporting REST framework for clients; for instance in Java: Jersey, Apache CXF. From that, you can use WADL-to-code generators to generate your client code. For example in Java, 'wadl2java' tools allow to generate code for JAX-RS compatible frameworks such as Apache CXF and Jersey. Actually, we can provide a CXF-based Java library created with this tool to facilitate the development of clients.

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