JavaScript caching framework for client side caching in the browser using localStorage - gracefully degrades when the browser doesn't support localStorage.
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README.rst

locache

JavaScript framework for client side caching in the browser using DOM Storage with expiring values. With a memcache inspired API usage is very simple. Locache has no dependencies and is very small.

locache gracefully degrades when the browser doesn't support localStorage. Usually this will be IE6 or IE7, you wont get any errors, but caching attempts will be silently dropped and lookups will always appear to be a cache miss.

When and why?

Locache.js isn't a replacement for cache headers, and won't replace real server side caching. However, locache can be used to help speed up pages By caching results from APIs that you can't control or by caching complex structures created in JavaScript to avoid recreating. This works well with Models in backbone or rendered templates for example.

Setting, getting and removing values

Values can be stored one at a time as shown below, these values will never expire and will only be removed when you (or the browser) removes them.

locache.set("my_key", "my_value")

locache.get("my_key")
// my_value

locache.remove("my_key")

When you store an object, that's what you'll get back. For example, a number:

locache.set("counter", 1)
typeof locache.get("counter")
// number

Storing complex objects isn't a problem too. Just make sure they are JSON serializable.

locache.set('user', {
    'name': "Dougal Matthews",
    'alias': d0ugal
})

var result = locache.get('user')

//{
//    'name': "Dougal Matthews",
//    'alias': d0ugal
//}

You can also perform batch operations.

locache.setMany({
    'name': 'locache',
    'language': 'JavaScript'
})

locache.getMany(['name', 'language'])
// ['locache', 'JavaScript']

locache.removeMany(['name', 'language'])

Setting values that expire

seconds = 5;
locache.set("key", "value", seconds);

// After 5 seconds this will return null.
locache.get("key");

Incrementing and decrementing? Sure.

locache.incr("counter")
// 1
locache.incr("counter")
// 2
locache.decr("counter")
// 1
locache.decr("counter")
// 0
locache.decr("counter")
// -1

Flushing the cache

Use the following to clear only the locache values stored in localStorage.

locache.flush()

Performing cleanup

Since localStorage doesn't support expiring values, they will still be left around. This may or may not be a problem for you. If you want to make sure they are cleaned up, use the following method on page load, or with a setTimeout loop.

locache.cleanup()