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Roast is a command line tool and a Ruby extension that you can include into your Ruby and Rails projects that will push information to your Campfire room. There are two simple ways that you can use Roast. PLEASE NOTE: this gem in its current state does not have unit tests, does not account for timeouts, and other common bad situations. Future releases will account for all of this, but for now: user beware.


Installation is very simple.

  sudo gem install kdaigle-roast

Configuration Setup

First, you need to setup a roast.yml file in your home directory. This is how roast will know where and how it can connect to your Campfire room(s).

  default: development

     domain: samplesubdomain
     username: theuser
     password: hispassword
     room: "Development"
     ssl: true

Most of these examples are pretty self explanatory, but the basics are that you can setup multiple rooms/domains like the “development” room. There is also a default option at the top of the page. This should reference one of the rooms further in the file. This is required to use Roast in Ruby or in the shell currently.

Via the Command Line

From the UNIX-based command line:

roast “This message should go to Campfire.”

Or you can pipe information to Roast:

tail -1000 log/development.log | roast
ifconfig | roast

The command line also takes a few options:

-r room_name
You can specify which room to use from your config file
Let the commands be verbose

Via Ruby, Rails, and Console

Or you can use it from the console or application. You can call the roast method on any object:

require ‘rubygems’
require ‘roast’
Model.find(:first).roast # => #<Model id: 1, name: dog>
“This is just a test”.roast # => This is just a test
“This is a test to the other room”.roast(:room => “other”) # => This is post the message to the room specified as other

Special Thanks

Special thanks to the Tinder gem for really making this possible.

Copyright © 2009 Kyle Daigle. See LICENSE for details.

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