A tiny, portable testing library for Scala
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readme.md

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uTest (pronounced micro-test) is a lightweight testing library for Scala. Its key features are:

Contents

Getting Started

Most people coming to uTest will be running tests through SBT. Add the following to your build.sbt and you can immediately begin defining and running tests programmatically.

libraryDependencies += "com.lihaoyi" %% "utest" % "0.4.5" % "test"

testFrameworks += new TestFramework("utest.runner.Framework")

To use it with Scala.js, swap out the libraryDependencies with

libraryDependencies += "com.lihaoyi" %%% "utest" % "0.4.5" % "test"

testFrameworks += new TestFramework("utest.runner.Framework")

Defining and Running a Test Suite

Put this in your src/test/scala/ folder:

package test.utest.examples.examples

import utest._

object HelloTests extends TestSuite{
  val tests = this{
    'test1{
      throw new Exception("test1")
    }
    'test2{
      1
    }
    'test3{
      val a = List[Byte](1, 2)
      a(10)
    }
  }
}

You can then run this via

sbt myproject/test

Which should produce this output:

[info] -----------------------Starting Suite test.utest.examples.HelloTests-----------------------
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests.test1
[info]      		java.lang.Exception: test1
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests.test2		Success
[info] 1
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests.test3
[info]      		java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: 10
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests		Success
[info] -----------------------------------Results-----------------------------------
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests		Success
[info]     test1		Failure('java.lang.Exception: test1')
[info]     test2		Success
[info]          1
[info]     test3		Failure('java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: 10')
[info] Failures:
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests.test1
[info]      		java.lang.Exception: test1
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests$$anonfun$4$$anonfun$apply$1.apply(HelloTests.scala:8)
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests$$anonfun$4$$anonfun$apply$1.apply(HelloTests.scala:6)
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests.test3
[info]      		java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: 10
[info] scala.collection.LinearSeqOptimized$class.apply(LinearSeqOptimized.scala:51)
[info] scala.collection.immutable.List.apply(List.scala:83)
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests$$anonfun$4$$anonfun$apply$3.apply(HelloTests.scala:15)
[info] test.utest.examples.HelloTests$$anonfun$4$$anonfun$apply$3.apply(HelloTests.scala:6)
[info] Tests: 4
[info] Passed: 2
[info] Failed: 2
[error] Failed tests:
[error] 	test.utest.examples.HelloTests
[error] (utestJVM/test:testOnly) sbt.TestsFailedException: Tests unsuccessful
[error] Total time: 1 s, completed Mar 12, 2016 5:24:54 PM

At first the tests are run one at a time; after they've all completed, a summary is printed, followed by the stack traces for any tests which failed. You can configure the test suite to change how these things are printed.

Nesting Tests

Note that tests within the suite can nested within each other, but only directly. E.g. you cannot define tests within if-statements or for-loops. uTest relies on the test structure to be statically known at compile time. They can be nested arbitrarily deep:

package test.utest.examples

import utest._

object NestedTests extends TestSuite{
  val tests =  this{
    val x = 1
    'outer{
      val y = x + 1
      'inner{
        val z = y + 1
        'innerest{
          assert(
            x == 1,
            y == 2,
            z == 3
          )
          (x, y, z)
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

Which when run prints:

[info] -----------------Starting Suite test.utest.examples.NestedTests-----------------
[info] test.utest.examples.NestedTests.outer.inner.innerest		Success
[info] (1,2,3)
[info] test.utest.examples.NestedTests.outer.inner		Success
[info] test.utest.examples.NestedTests.outer		Success
[info] test.utest.examples.NestedTests		Success
[info] -----------------------------------Results-----------------------------------
[info] test.utest.examples.NestedTests		Success
[info]     outer		Success
[info]         inner		Success
[info]             innerest		Success
[info]                     (1,2,3)
[info]
[info] Tests: 4
[info] Passed: 4
[info] Failed: 0

As you can see, the various three are nested within each other.

Sharing Setup Fixtures

You can use the nested of tests to group related tests together, and have them share common initialization code or fixtures by defining them in the enclosing test:

package test.utest.examples

import utest._

object SharedSetupTests extends TestSuite{
  val tests = this{
    var x = 0
    'A{
      x += 1
      'X{
        x += 2
        assert(x == 3)
        x
      }
      'Y{
        x += 3
        assert(x == 4)
        x
      }
    }
    'B{
      x += 4
      'Z{
        x += 5
        assert(x == 9)
        x
      }
    }
  }
}

Here, we are sharing the initialization of the variable x between all the various sub-tests in the same folder.

Despite being shared lexically, these helpers are re-created for each test that is run, so if they contain mutable state (e.g. mutable collections, or vars) you do not need to worry about the mutations from multiple tests interfering with each other. This gives lets you concisely share common setup code between related tests in the same grouping, while avoiding interference between tests due to mutation of shared fixtures. If you want the fixtures to really-truly be shared between individual tests, define it outside the this{} block:

package test.utest.examples

import utest._

object SharedFixturesTests extends TestSuite{
  var x = 0
  val tests = this{
    'A{
      x += 1
      'X{
        x += 2
        assert(x == 4)
        x
      }
      'Y{
        x += 3
        assert(x == 8)
        x
      }
    }
    'B{
      x += 4
      'Z{
        x += 5
        assert(x == 21)
        x
      }
    }
  }
}

And you'll see that the changes to x are being shared between the invocations of all the tests: A increments it by 1, X by 1 then 2, to 4, Y by 1 and 3 to 8, and so on. This allows you to avoid doing work repeatedly initializing things, but you need to be careful the tests aren't mutating shared state that could interfere! For more detail on this and other things related to test execution, see below.

Other Ways of Naming tests

uTest also allows you to use strings to define test keys, if you wish to make your test names longer and more descriptive:

"test with spaces"-{
  throw new Exception("test1")
}
'test2-run(1)

Note that you can also use the 'symbol-... syntax, if your tests are concise and you want to make them really concise. The "string"-{...}, 'symbol{...} and 'symbol-... syntaxes are all entirely equivalent.

The last way of defining tests is with the utest.* symbol, e.g.

import utest._

val test = TestSuite{
  'test1{
    throw new Exception("test1")
  }
  'test2{
    * - {1 == 1}
    * - {2 == 2}
    * - {3 == 3}
  }
  'test3{
    val a = List[Byte](1, 2)
    a(10)
  }
}

Tests defined using the * symbol are give the numerical names "0", "1", "2", etc.. This is handy if you have a very large number of very simple test cases (perhaps you've delegated the heavy lifting to a helper function), but still want to be able to run them separately.

Asynchronous Tests

val tests = this {
  "testSuccess" - {
    Future {
      assert(true)
    }
  }
  "testFail" - {
    Future {
      assert(false)
    }
  }
  "normalSuccess" - {
    assert(true)
  }
  "normalFail" - {
    assert(false)
  }
}

tests.runAsync().map {    results =>
  assert(results.toSeq(0).value.isSuccess) // root
  assert(results.toSeq(1).value.isSuccess) // testSuccess
  assert(results.toSeq(2).value.isFailure) // testFail
  assert(results.toSeq(3).value.isSuccess) // normalSuccess
}

You can have tests which return (have a last expression being) a Future[T] instead of a normal value. You can run the suite using .runAsync to return a Future of the results, or you can continue using .run which will wait for all the futures to complete before returning.

In Scala.js, calling .run on a test suite with futures in it throws an error instead of waiting, since you cannot wait in Scala.js.

When running the test suites from SBT, you do not need worry about any of this run vs runAsync stuff: the test runner will handle it for you and provide the correct results.

Macro Asserts

val x = 1
val y = "2"
assert(
  x > 0,
  x == y
)

// utest.AssertionError: x == y
// x: Int = 1
// y: String = 2

uTest comes with a macro-powered asserts that provide useful debugging information in the error message. These take one or more boolean expressions, and when they fail, will print out the names, types and values of any local variables used in the expression that failed. This makes it much easier to see what's going on than Scala's default assert, which gives you the stack trace and nothing else.

uTest also wraps any exceptions thrown within the assert, to help trace what went wrong:

val x = 1L
val y = 0L
assert(x / y == 10)

// utest.AssertionError: assert(x / y == 10)
// caused by: java.lang.ArithmeticException: / by zero
// x: Long = 1
// y: Long = 0

The origin exception is stored as the cause of the utest.AssertionError, so the original stack trace is still available for you to inspect.

Arrow Asserts

1 ==> 1 // passes
Array(1, 2, 3) ==> Array(1, 2, 3) // passes
try{
  1 ==> 2 // throws
}catch{case e: java.lang.AssertionError =>
  e
}

You can use a ==> b as a shorthand for assert(a == b). This results in pretty code you can easily copy-paste into documentation.

Intercept

val e = intercept[MatchError]{
  (0: Any) match { case _: String => }
}
println(e)

// scala.MatchError: 0 (of class java.lang.Integer)

intercept allows you to verify that a block raises an exception. This exception is caught and returned so you can perform further validation on it, e.g. checking that the message is what you expect. If the block does not raise one, an AssertionError is raised.

As with assert, intercept adds debugging information to the error messages if the intercept fails or throws an unexpected Exception.

Eventually and Continually

val x = Seq(12)
eventually(x == Nil)

// utest.AssertionError: eventually(x == Nil)
// x: Seq[Int] = List(12)

In addition to a macro-powered assert, uTest also provides macro-powered versions of eventually and continually. These are used to test asynchronous concurrent operations:

  • eventually(tests: Boolean*): ensure that the boolean values of tests all become true at least once within a certain period of time.
  • continually(tests: Boolean*): ensure that the boolean values of tests all remain true and never become false within a certain period of time.

These are implemented via a retry-loop, with a default retry interval of 0.1 second and retries up to a total of 1 second. If you want to change this behavior, you can shadow the implicit values retryInterval and retryMax, for example this:

implicit val retryMax = RetryMax(300.millis)
implicit val retryInterval = RetryInterval(50.millis)

Would set the retry-loop to happen every 50ms up to a max of 300ms.

Together, these two operations allow you to easily test asynchronous operations. You can use them to help verify Liveness properties (that condition must eventually be met) and Safety properties (that a condition is never met)

As with assert, eventually and continually add debugging information to the error messages if they fail.

Assert Match

assertMatch(Seq(1, 2, 3)){case Seq(1, 2) =>}
// AssertionError: Matching failed Seq(1, 2, 3)

assertMatch is a convenient way of checking that a value matches a particular shape, using Scala's pattern matching syntax. This includes support for use of | or _ or if-guards within the pattern match. This gives you additional flexibility over a traditional assert(a == Seq(1, 2)), as you can use _ as a wildcard e.g. using assertMatch(a){case Seq(1, _)=>} to match any 2-item Seq whose first item is 1.

As with assert, assertMatch adds debugging information to the error messages if the value fails to match or throws an unexpected Exception while evaluating.

Compile Error

compileError("true * false")
// CompileError.Type("value * is not a member of Boolean")

compileError("(}")
// CompileError.Parse("')' expected but '}' found.")

compileError is a macro that can be used to assert that a fragment of code (given as a literal String) fails to compile.

  • If the code compiles successfully, compileError will fail the compilation run with a message.
  • If the code fails to compile, compileError will return an instance of CompileError, one of CompileError.Type(pos: String, msgs: String*) or CompileError.Parse(pos: String, msgs: String*) to represent typechecker errors or parser errors

In general, compileError works similarly to intercept, except it does its checks (that a snippet of code fails) and errors (if it doesn't fail) at compile-time rather than run-time. If the code fails as expected, the failure message is propagated to runtime in the form of a CompileError object. You can then do whatever additional checks you want on the failure message, such as verifying that the failure message contains some string you expect to be there.

The compileError macro compiles the given string in the local scope and context. This means that you can refer to variables in the enclosing scope, i.e. the following example will fail to compile because the variable x exists.

val x = 0

compileError("x + x"),
// [error] compileError check failed to have a compilation error

The returned CompileError object also has a handy .check method, which takes a position-string indicating where the error is expected to occur, as well as zero-or-more messages which are expected to be part of the final error message. This is used as follows:

    compileError("true * false").check(
      """
    compileError("true * false").check(
                       ^
      """,
      "value * is not a member of Boolean"
    )

Note that the position-string needs to exactly match the line of code the compile-error occured on. This includes any whitespace on the left, as well as any unrelated code or comments sharing the same line as the compileError expression.

Test Utilities

uTest provides a range of test utilities that aren't strictly necessary, but aim to make your writing of tests much more convenient and DRY.

TestPath

package test.utest.examples

import utest._

object TestPathTests extends TestSuite{
  val tests = this{
    'testPath{
      'foo {
        assert(implicitly[utest.framework.TestPath].value == Seq("testPath", "foo"))
      }
    }
  }
}

uTest exposes the path to the current test to the body of the test via the utest.framework.TestPath implicit. This can be used to

One example is the Fastparse test suite, which uses the name of the test to provide the repository that it needs to clone and parse:

def checkRepo(filter: String => Boolean = _ => true)
             (implicit testPath: utest.framework.TestPath) = {
  val url = "https://github.com/" + testPath.value.last
  import sys.process._
  val name = url.split("/").last
  if (!Files.exists(Paths.get("target", "repos", name))){
    println("CLONING")
    Seq("git", "clone", url, "target/repos/"+name, "--depth", "1").!
  }
  checkDir("target/repos/"+name, filter)
}

"lihaoyi/fastparse" - checkRepo()
"scala-js/scala-js" - checkRepo()
"scalaz/scalaz" - checkRepo()
"milessabin/shapeless" - checkRepo()
"akka/akka"- checkRepo()
"lift/framework" - checkRepo()
"playframework/playframework" - checkRepo()
"PredictionIO/PredictionIO" - checkRepo()
"apache/spark" - checkRepo()

This allows us to keep the tests DRY - avoiding having to repeat the name of the repo in the name of the test for every test we define - as well as ensuring that they always stay in sync.

If you need additional metadata such as line-numbers or file-paths or class or package names, you can use the SourceCode library's implicits to pull them in for you.

Local Retries

object LocalRetryTests extends utest.TestSuite{
  val flaky = new FlakyThing
  def tests = this{
    'hello - retry(3){
      flaky.run
    }
  }
}

You can wrap individual tests, or even individual expressions, in a retry block to make them retry a number of times before failing. That is very useful for dealing with small points of flakiness within your test suite. A retry block simply retries its body up to the specified number of times; the first run that doesn't throw an exception returns the value returned by that run.

You can also use Suite Retries if you want to configure retries more globally across your test suite.

Configuring uTest

uTest allows for some basic configuration:

Output Formatting

You can control how the output of tests gets printed via overriding methods on the TestSuite object:

/**
 * Override this to control how individual test results get pretty-printed 
 * while a test run is in progress; return `None` to print nothing 
 */
def formatSingle(path: Seq[String], r: Result): Option[String]
/**
 * Override this to control how the entire suite gets pretty-printed; return
 * `None` to print nothing.
 */
def format(results: Tree[Result]): Option[String]

/**
 * Controls how many characters are printed for any test results before or 
 * the contents of variables in failed assertions before it gets truncated
 */
def utestTruncateLength: Int
/**
 * Whether output gets printed in color
 */*
def formatColor: Boolean

Note that you can override these on every TestSuite individually, to configure them differently for each set of tests if you want. If you want to share your configuration across every test, pull these into a custom MyTestSuite class extending TestSuite and have your test suites extend from MyTestSuite instead.

Suite Retries

You can mix in the TestSuite.Retries trait and define the utestRetryCount int to enable test-level retries for all tests within a suite:

object SuiteRetryTests extends TestSuite with TestSuite.Retries{
  override val utestRetryCount = 3
  val flaky = new FlakyThing
  def tests = this{
    'hello{
      flaky.run
    }
  }
}

You can also use Local Retries if you want to only retry within specific tests or expressions instead of throughout the entire suite.

Test Wrapping

uTest exposes the utestWrap function that you can override on any test suite:

def utestWrap(runBody: => concurrent.Future[Any])
               (implicit ec: ExecutionContext): concurrent.Future[Any]

This is a flexible function that wraps every test call; you can use it to perform initialization before evaluating runBody, or to perform cleanup after the completion of runBody via runBody.onComplete, or even to perform retries by executing runBody multiple times. If you want to perform messy before/after logic around every individual test, override utestWrap.

runBody is a future to support asynchronous testing, which is the only way to test things like Ajax calls in Scala.js

Per-Run Setup/Teardown

If you need to perform some action (initialize a database, cleanup the filesystem, etc.) not just per-test but per-run, you can do that by defining a custom utest.runner.Framework and overriding the setup and teardown methods:

class CustomFramework extends utest.runner.Framework{
  override def setup() = {
    println("Setting up CustomFramework")
  }
  override def teardown() = {
    println("Tearing down CustomFramework")
  }
}

And then telling SBT to run tests using the custom framework:

testFrameworks += new TestFramework("test.utest.CustomFramework"),

This is handy for setup/teardown that is necessary but too expensive to do before/after every single test, which would be the case if you used Test Wrapping to do it.

Execution Model

val test = TestSuite{
  var x = 0
  'A{
    x += 1
    'X{
      x += 2
      assert(x == 3)
    }
    'Y{
      x += 3
      assert(x == 4)
    }
  }
  'B{
    x += 4
    'Z{
      x += 5
      assert(x == 9)
    }
  }
}

val results = test.run()
println(results.leaves.count(_.value.isSuccess)) // 3

The example above demonstrates a subtlety of how uTest suites are run: despite all the tests being able to refer to the same lexically-scoped value x, each tests modifications to x happen entirely independently of the others, allowing all three of the leaf-tests to pass. This allows you to easily place re-usable fixtures anywhere convenient within the test tree.

If you want to create a shared resource that is lazily initialized when needed in one of the tests and used throughout them, simply make it a lazy val outside the TestSuite{ ... } block.

Test-discovery is done entirely at compile-time by the TestSuite{ ... } macro, and is independent of execution of the tests:

val tests = TestSuite{
  timesRun += 1
  'A{
    assert(false)
    'B{
      'C{
        1
      }
    }
  }
}

// listing tests B and C works despite failure of A
println(tests.toSeq.map(_.name)) // Seq(_, A, B, C)

As you can see, even though the assert(false) comes before the declaration of tests B and C, these tests are still listable and inspectable because they were registered at compile time using the TestSuite{ ... } macro.

Having a clean separation between test-discovery and test-execution is generally considered to be a good thing, and uTest's execution model strictly enforces this by doing test-discovery at compile-time. Thus, you can always inspect the test hierarchy without having to execute arbitrary test code. At the same time, uTest preserves all the convenience of sharing common setup code via lexical scoping, while avoiding the pitfall of shared-state between tests, giving you the best of both worlds in terms of convenience and isolation.

SBT Command-line Interface

sbt> test

Runs all tests in your project. Tests are defined in any class inheriting from TestSuite, e.g.:

package HelloTests


object HelloTestsuite extends TestSuite{
  val tests = this{
    'hello{
      'world{
        val x = 1
        val y = 2
        assert(x != y)
        (x, y)
      }
    }
    'test2{
      val a = 1
      val b = 2
      assert(a == b)
    }
  }
}

If you want to only run a particular test file:


sbt> test-only -- HelloTests.HelloTestsuite

Or even a particular test within a particular file

sbt> test-only -- HelloTests.HelloTestsuite.hello
sbt> test-only -- HelloTests.HelloTestsuite.hello.world
sbt> test-only -- HelloTests.HelloTestsuite.test2

The total number of tests includes the non-leaf tests like hello and HelloTestsuite. Also, the tests which return a value (like world) have that value printed out inside the Success() tag: this is handy for doing a visual sanity-check at the end of the run to make sure the tests are doing what you think they are

ScalaJS

uTest is completely compatible with ScalaJS: the above sections on defining a test suite, asserts and the test-running API all work unchanged under ScalaJS, with minor differences:

  • ScalaJS does not support parallelism, and as such only single-threaded ExecutionContexts like utest.ExecutionContext.runNow or scala.scalajs.concurrent.JSExecutionContext.runNow work. When run via SBT, --parallel has no effect.
  • eventually and continually are not supported, as they rely on a blocking retry-loop whereas you can't block in ScalaJS

Apart from these differences, there should be no problem compiling uTest TestSuites via ScalaJS and running them using Rhino or in the browser.

Why uTest

uTest began as an attempt to port ScalaTest and Specs2 to ScalaJS. After struggling with that, I realized that both ScalaTest and Specs2 were going to be difficult to port to ScalaJS for a few reasons:

If you don't believe that uTest is much smaller than the alternatives, let the jars speak for themselves:

Sizes.png

uTest tries to provide most of what you want as a developer, while leaving out all the unnecessary functionality that ScalaTest and Specs2 provide:

  • Fluent English-like code: matchers like shouldBe or should not be or mustbe_== don't really add anything, and it doesn't really matter whether you name each test block using should, when, can, must, feature("...") or it should "..." These add nothing and clutter up the API and code base. You certainly don't need 8 different sets of them.
  • Legacy code, like ScalaTests time package, now obsolete with the introduction of scala.concurrent.duration.
  • Such a a rich command-line interface: with a simple API, any user who wants to do heavy customization of the test running can simply do it in code, and writing a small amount of Scala with a trivial command-line runner will likely be easier than wrestling with mountains of command-line configuration flags to try to make the runner do what you want.

While improving on the basic things that matters

  • Better macro-asserts which are both more-useful and more-simply-implemented than those provided by ScalaTest
  • Compile-time test registration, which allows completely separating test-discovery and execution.
  • A simpler, straightforward API that makes using uTest as a library much easier.
  • Raw size: at less than 1000 lines of code, uTest is 1/400th the size of ScalaTest and 1/50th the size of Specs2, and with almost no dependencies. Its small size means that you can trivially use uTest as a library within a larger application without worrying about it significantly increasing the size of your packaged artifacts, or pulling in weird dependencies.

Development Tips

To run all the test on the entire matrix of Scala versions (2.10.4 and 2.11.0) and backends (JVM and JS), simply run:

sbt +test

You can also use more targeted commands e.g. utestJS/test which would only re-test the Javascript backend under scala 2.10.4.

To publish use

sbt +publishSigned

Changelog

0.4.5

  • Catch Fatal exceptions like ClassCasts in Scala.JS.

0.4.4

  • Scala 2.12 support

0.4.3

0.4.2

  • Move errors into utest.* from utest.framework.*
  • Removed acyclic hack variable

0.4.1

  • Fix usage of by-name function calls within tests #55

0.4.0

  • foo: @Show annotation lets you tell uTest to print out arbitrary expressions within the test suite when things fail, in addition to the default of local variables

  • You can use a ==> b to assert equality within a test suite, in a form that's pretty enough to use as documentation

  • compileError now properly passes when an expression would fail to compile due to @compileTimeOnly annotations

  • Configuring uTest has been overhauled.

  • Scala 2.12.0-M3 support

  • Fix some warnings appearing when the -Ydead-code flag is used

  • Added TestPath implicit to make the path to the current test available for usage inside the test body or helpers.

0.3.1

  • Published for Scala.js 0.6.1

0.3.0

  • Published for Scala.js 0.6.0
  • Removed JsCrossBuild now that Scala.js supports cross-building via crossProject
  • compileTimeOnly has been re-introduced, so invalid use of test DSL should fail with nice errors
  • Removed --throw flag in favor of "native" SBT error reporting

0.2.4

  • Added support for asynchronous tests which return a Future.

0.2.3

  • Updated to work against ScalaJS 0.5.4

0.2.2

  • Introduced CompileError.check(pos: String, msgs: String*) to simplify the common pattern of checking that the error occurs in the right place and with the message you expect.
  • Changed the file layout expected by JsCrossBuild, to expect the shared files to be in js/shared/ and jvm/shared/, rather than in shared/. This is typically achieved via symlinks, and should make the cross-build play much more nicely with IDEs.

0.2.1

  • Fix bug in utestJsSettings pulling in the wrong version of uTest

0.2.0

  • Introduced the compileError macro to allow testing of compilation errors.
  • Stack traces are now only shown for the user code, with the uTest/SBT internal stack trace ignored, making them much less spammy and noisy.
  • Introduced the * symbol, which can be used in place of a test name to get sequentially numbered test names.

0.1.9

  • ScalaJS version is now built against ScalaJS 0.5.3
  • Fixed linking errors in ScalaJS version, to allow proper operation of the new optimization

0.1.8

  • Fixed bug causing local-defs in assert macro to fail

0.1.7

  • Extracted out utestJvmSettings and utestJsSettings for use outside the JsCrossBuild plugin, for people who don't want to use the plugin.

0.1.6

  • Print paths of failing tests after completion to make C&P-ing re-runs more convenient