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ClusterDeployment.Spec.Provisioning.ManifestsSecretRef
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Table of Contents generated with DocToc

Using Hive

Cluster Provisioning

Cluster provisioning begins when a caller creates a ClusterDeployment CR, which is the core Hive resource used to control the lifecycle of a cluster and the Hive API entrypoint.

Hive comes with an optional hiveutil binary to assist creating the ClusterDeployment and its dependencies. See the hiveutil documentation for more information.

DNS

Native

For clouds where there is support for automated IP allocation and DNS configuration, (Alibaba Cloud, AWS, Azure, IBM Cloud and GCP) an OpenShift installation requires a live and functioning DNS zone in the cloud account into which you will be installing the new cluster(s). For example if you own example.com, you could create a hive.example.com subdomain in Route53, and ensure that you have made the appropriate NS entries under example.com to delegate to the Route53 zone. When creating a new cluster, the installer will make future DNS entries under hive.example.com as needed for the cluster(s).

Managed DNS

In addition to the default OpenShift DNS support, Hive offers a DNS feature called Managed DNS. With Managed DNS, Hive can automatically create delegated zones for approved base domains. For example, if hive.example.com exists and is specified as your managed domain, you can specify a base domain of cluster1.hive.example.com on your ClusterDeployment, and Hive will create this zone for you, add forwarding records in the base domain, wait for it to resolve, and then proceed with installation. Read here for more details.

Non-native

For other platforms/clouds (OpenStack, oVirt, and VSphere), there is presently no native DNS auto-configuration available. This requires some up-front DNS configuration before a cluster can be installed. It will typically be necessary to reserve virtual IPs (VIPs) that will be used for the cluster's management (eg api.mycluster.hive.example.com) and for the cluster's default ingress routes (eg \*.apps.mycluster.hive.example.com). Each platform/cloud's configuration will have its own system for alocating or reserving these IPs. Once the IPs are reserved, DNS entries must be published as A records (or simply making local host entries to manage the DNS-to-IP translations on the host(s) running Hive) so that the cluster's API endpoint will be accessible to Hive.

oVirt

In addition to reserving IPs for the API and ingress for the cluster, installing pre-4.6 versions of OpenShift onto oVirt requires providing an additional DNS IP for the internal DNS server operated by the cluster. This value must be populated into the Secret containing the install-config.yaml information.

Pull Secret

OpenShift installation requires a pull secret obtained from try.openshift.com. You can specify an individual pull secret for each cluster Hive creates, or you can use a global pull secret that will be used by all of the clusters Hive creates.

oc create secret generic mycluster-pull-secret --from-file=.dockerconfigjson=/path/to/pull-secret --type=kubernetes.io/dockerconfigjson --namespace mynamespace
apiVersion: v1
data:
  .dockerconfigjson: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-pull-secret
  namespace: mynamespace
type: kubernetes.io/dockerconfigjson

When a global pull secret is defined in the hive namespace and a ClusterDeployment-specific pull secret is specified, the registry authentication in both secrets will be merged and used by the new OpenShift cluster. When a registry exists in both pull secrets, precedence will be given to the contents of the cluster-specific pull secret.

The global pull secret must live in the hive namespace and is referenced in the HiveConfig.

oc create secret generic global-pull-secret --from-file=.dockerconfigjson=/path/to/pull-secret --type=kubernetes.io/dockerconfigjson --namespace hive
apiVersion: v1
data:
  .dockerconfigjson: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: global-pull-secret
  namespace: hive
type: kubernetes.io/dockerconfigjson
oc edit hiveconfig hive
spec:
  globalPullSecretRef:
    name: global-pull-secret

OpenShift Version

Hive needs to know what version of OpenShift to install. A Hive cluster represents available versions via the ClusterImageSet resource, and there can be multiple ClusterImageSets available. Each ClusterImageSet references an OpenShift release image. A ClusterDeployment references a ClusterImageSet via the spec.provisioning.imageSetRef property.

Alternatively, you can specify an individual OpenShift release image in the ClusterDeployment spec.provisioning.releaseImage property.

An example ClusterImageSet:

apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
kind: ClusterImageSet
metadata:
  name: openshift-v4.3.0
spec:
  releaseImage: quay.io/openshift-release-dev/ocp-release:4.3.0-x86_64

Cloud credentials

Hive requires credentials to the cloud account into which it will install OpenShift clusters. Refer to the installer documentation for required level of permissions for each cloud.

Alibaba Cloud

Create a secret containing your Alibaba access credentials:

apiVersion: v1
stringData:
  alibaba_cloud_access_key_id: REDACTED
  alibaba_cloud_access_key_secret: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-alibabacloud-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque
Alibaba Cloud Credential Manifests

Alibaba Cloud credential secrets must be provided as manifests for installation. Follow instructions for using ccoctl to create Alibaba Cloud RAM users and place manifests generated from running ccoctl alibabacloud create-ram-users within a secret that will be referenced by the ClusterDeployment.

Create a manifests secret containing secrets generated by ccoctl:

oc create secret generic mycluster-manifests -n mynamespace --from-file=<manifests directory>

AWS

Create a secret containing your AWS access key and secret access key:

oc create secret generic <mycluster>-aws-creds -n hive --from-literal=aws_access_key_id=<AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID> --from-literal=aws_secret_access_key=<AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>

Take care when using the yaml below, you need to use base64 to encode the data values.

apiVersion: v1
data:
  aws_access_key_id: REDACTED
  aws_secret_access_key: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-aws-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

Azure

Create a secret containing your Azure service principal:

apiVersion: v1
data:
  osServicePrincipal.json: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-azure-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

GCP

Create a secret containing your GCP service account key:

apiVersion: v1
data:
  osServiceAccount.json: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-gcp-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

IBM Cloud

Create a secret containing your IBM Cloud API key:

apiVersion: v1
stringData:
  ibmcloud_api_key: IBMCLOUDAPIKEY
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-ibm-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque
IBM Cloud Credential Manifests

IBM Cloud credential secrets must be provided as manifests for installation. Follow instructions for using ccoctl to generate IBM Cloud service IDs and place manifests generated from running ccoctl ibmcloud create-service-id within a secret that will be referenced by the ClusterDeployment.

Create a manifests secret containing secrets generated by ccoctl:

oc create secret generic mycluster-manifests -n mynamespace --from-file=<manifests directory>

oVirt

Create a secret containing your oVirt credentials information:

apiVersion: v1
stringData:
  ovirt-config.yaml: |
    ovirt_url: https://ovirt.example.com/ovirt-engine/api
    ovirt_username: admin@internal
    ovirt_password: secretpassword
    ovirt_ca_bundle: |-
      -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
      CA BUNDLE DATA HERE
      -----END CERTIFICATE-----
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-ovirt-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

Create a secret containing your oVirt CA certificate:

apiVersion: v1
stringData:
  .cacert: |
    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    CA BUNDLE DATA HERE
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-ovirt-certs
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

vSphere

Create a secret containing your vSphere credentials information:

apiVersion: v1
stringData:
  password: vsphereuser
  username: secretpassword
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-vsphere-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

OpenStack

Create a secret containing your OpenStack clouds.yaml file:

apiVersion: v1
data:
  clouds.yaml: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-openstack-creds
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

SSH Key Pair

(Optional) Hive uses the provided ssh key pair to ssh into the machines in the remote cluster. Hive connects via ssh to gather logs in the event of an installation failure. The ssh key pair is optional, but neither the user nor Hive will be able to ssh into the machines if it is not supplied.

Create a Kubernetes secret containing a ssh key pair in PEM format (typically generated with ssh-keygen -m PEM)

apiVersion: v1
data:
  ssh-privatekey: REDACTED
  ssh-publickey: REDACTED
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mycluster-ssh-key
  namespace: mynamespace
type: Opaque

InstallConfig

The OpenShift installer InstallConfig must be stored in a secret and referenced in the ClusterDeployment. This allows Hive to more easily support installing multiple versions of OpenShift.

Example install-config.yaml for AWS:

apiVersion: v1
baseDomain: hive.example.com
compute:
- name: worker
  platform:
    aws:
      rootVolume:
        iops: 100
        size: 22
        type: gp2
      type: m4.xlarge
  replicas: 3
controlPlane:
  name: master
  platform:
    aws:
      rootVolume:
        iops: 100
        size: 22
        type: gp2
      type: m4.xlarge
metadata:
  name: mycluster
networking:
  clusterNetwork:
  - cidr: 10.128.0.0/14
    hostPrefix: 23
  machineCIDR: 10.0.0.0/16
  networkType: OpenShiftSDN
  serviceNetwork:
  - 172.30.0.0/16
platform:
  aws:
    region: us-east-1
pullSecret: REDACTED
sshKey: REDACTED
oc create secret generic mycluster-install-config --from-file=install-config.yaml=./install-config.yaml

For Alibaba Cloud, replace the contents of compute.platform and controlPlane.platform. Note that type is any valid Alibaba Cloud ECS instance type. type may be omitted to use OpenShift installation defaults.

  alibabacloud:
    instanceType: ecs.g6.xlarge

and populate the top-level platform fields with the appropriate information:

platform:
  alibabacloud:
    region: cn-hanghou

and ensure that the top-level credentialsMode field has been set to Manual.

credentialsMode: Manual

For Azure, replace the contents of compute.platform and controlPlane.platform with:

    azure:
      osDisk:
        diskSizeGB: 128
      type: Standard_D2s_v3

and replace the contents of platform with:

  azure:
    cloudName: AzurePublicCloud
    baseDomainResourceGroupName: my-bdrgn
    region: centralus

Note: cloudName specifies the Azure Cloud in which to create the cluster e.g. AzurePublicCloud or AzureUSGovernmentCloud.

For GCP, replace the contents of compute.platform and controlPlane.platform with:

    gcp:
      type: n1-standard-4

and replace the contents of platform with:

  gcp:
    projectID: myproject
    region: us-east1

For IBM Cloud, replace the contents of compute.platform and controlPlane.platform. Note that type is any valid IBM Cloud instance type. type may be omitted to use OpenShift installation defaults.

  ibmcloud:
    type: bx2-4x16

and populate the top-level platform fields with the appropriate information:

platform:
  ibmcloud:
    region: us-east

and ensure that the top-level credentialsMode field has been set to Manual.

credentialsMode: Manual

For oVirt, ensure the compute and controlPlane fields are empty.

controlPlane:
compute:

and populate the top-level platform fields with the appropriate information:

platform:
  ovirt:
    api_vip: 192.168.1.10
    dns_vip: 192.168.1.11  # only need dns_vip for pre-4.6 clusters
    ingress_vip: 192.168.1.12
    ovirt_cluster_id: 00000000-ovirt-uuid
    ovirt_network_name: ovirt-network-name
    ovirt_storage_domain_id: 00000000-storage-domain-uuid

For vSphere, ensure the compute and controlPlane fields are empty.

controlPlane:
compute:

and populate the top-level platform fields with the appropriate information:

platform:
  vsphere:
    apiVIP: 192.168.1.10
    cluster: devel
    datacenter: dc1
    defaultDatastore: ds1
    folder: /dc1/vm/CLUSTER_NAME
    ingressVIP: 192.168.1.11
    network: "VM Network"
    password: secretpassword
    username: vsphereuser
    vCenter: vcenter.example.com

For Openstack, replace the contents of compute.platform with:

  openstack:
    type: m1.large

Note: Use an instance type that meets the minimum requirement for the version of OpenShift being installed.

and replace the contents of controlPlane.platform with:

  openstack:
    type: ci.m4.xlarge

Note: Use an instance type that meets the minimum requirement for the version of OpenShift being installed.

and replace the contents of platform with:

  openstack:
    cloud: mycloud
    computeFlavor: m1.large
    externalNetwork: openstack_network_name
    lbFloatingIP: 10.0.111.158

ClusterDeployment

Cluster provisioning begins when a ClusterDeployment is created.

Note that some parts are duplicated with the InstallConfig.

An example ClusterDeployment for AWS:

apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
kind: ClusterDeployment
metadata:
  name: mycluster
  namespace: mynamespace
spec:
  baseDomain: hive.example.com
  clusterName: mycluster
  platform:
    aws:
      credentialsSecretRef:
        name: mycluster-aws-creds
      region: us-east-1
  provisioning:
    imageSetRef:
      name: openshift-v4.3.0
    installConfigSecretRef:
      name: mycluster-install-config
    sshPrivateKeySecretRef:
      name: mycluster-ssh-key
  pullSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-pull-secret

For Alibaba Cloud, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

alibabcloud:
  credentialsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-alibabacloud-creds
  region: cn-hangzhou

and add a manifests secret reference to spec.provisioning:

provisioning:
  manifestsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-manifests

For Azure, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

azure:
  baseDomainResourceGroupName: my-bdrgn
  credentialsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-azure-creds
  cloudName: AzurePublicCloud
  region: centralus

Note: cloudName specifies the Azure Cloud in which to create the cluster e.g. AzurePublicCloud or AzureUSGovernmentCloud.

For GCP, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

gcp:
  credentialsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-gcp-creds
  region: us-east1

For IBM Cloud, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

ibmcloud:
  credentialsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-ibm-creds
  region: us-east

and add a manifests secret reference to spec.provisioning:

provisioning:
  manifestsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-manifests

For oVirt, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

ovirt:
  certificatesSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-ovirt-certs
  credentialsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-ovirt-creds
  ovirt_cluster_id: 00000000-ovirt-uuid
  ovirt_network_name: ovirt-network-name
  storage_domain_id: 00000000-storage-domain-uuid

And create a Secret that holds the CA certificate data for the oVirt environment:

oc create secret generic mycluster-ovirt-certs -n mynamespace --from-file=.cacert=$OVIRT_CA_CERT_FILENAME

For vSphere, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

vsphere:
  certificatesSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-vsphere-certs
  cluster: devel
  credentialsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-vsphere-creds
  datacenter: dc1
  defaultDatastore: ds1
  folder: /dc1/vm/CLUSTER_NAME
  network: "VM Network"
  vCenter: vsphere.example.com

For OpenStack, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

openstack:
  cloud: mycloud
  credentialsSecretRef:
    name: mycluster-openstack-creds

Machine Pools

MachinePool is a YAML configuration by which you can create and scale worker nodes on a deployed cluster. A MachinePool will create MachineSet resources on the deployed cluster. If supported on your cloud, those MachineSets will automatically span all AZs, or you can specify an explicit list.

To manage MachinePools Day 2, you need to define these as well. The definition of the worker pool should mostly match what was specified in InstallConfig to prevent replacement of all worker nodes.

InstallConfig is limited to the one worker pool, but Hive can sync additional machine pools Day 2.

apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
kind: MachinePool
metadata:
  name: mycluster-worker
  namespace: mynamespace
spec:
  clusterDeploymentRef:
    name: mycluster
  name: worker
  platform:
    aws:
      rootVolume:
        iops: 100
        size: 22
        type: gp2
      type: m4.xlarge
  replicas: 3

For Alibaba Cloud, replace the contents of spec.platform. Note that type is any valid Alibaba Cloud ECS instance type. type may be omitted to use OpenShift installation defaults.

alibabacloud:
  type: ecs.g6.xlarge

For Azure, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

azure:
  osDisk:
    diskSizeGB: 128
  type: Standard_D2s_v3

For GCP, replace the contents of spec.platform with:

gcp:
  type: n1-standard-4

WARNING: Due to some naming restrictions on various components in GCP, Hive will restrict you to a max of 35 MachinePools (including the original worker pool created by default). We are left with only a single character to differentiate the machines and nodes from a pool, and 'm' is already reserved for the master hosts, leaving us with a-z (minus m) and 0-9 for a total of 35. Hive will automatically create a MachinePoolNameLease for GCP MachinePools to grab one of the available characters until none are left, at which point your MachinePool will not be provisioned.

For IBM Cloud, replace the contents of spec.platform. Note that type is any valid IBM Cloud instance type. type may be omitted to use OpenShift installation defaults.

ibmcloud:
  type: bx2-4x16

For oVirt, replace the contents of spec.platform with the settings you want for the instances:

ovirt:
  cpu:
    cores: 2
    sockets: 1
  memoryMB: 8174
  osDisk:
    sizeGB: 120

For vSphere, replace the contents of spec.platform with the settings you want for the instances:

vsphere:
  coresPerSocket: 1
  cpus: 2
  memoryMB: 8192
  osDisk:
    diskSizeGB: 120

For OpenStack, replace the contents of spec.platform with the settings you want for the instances:

openstack:
  rootVolume:
    size: 10
    type: ceph
  flavor: m1.large

Configuring Availability Zones

The desired Availability Zones (AZ) to create new worker nodes in can be specified in the MachinePool YAML (spec.platform.<provider>.zones), for example:

apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
kind: MachinePool
metadata:
  name: mycluster-worker
  namespace: mynamespace
spec:
  clusterDeploymentRef:
    name: mycluster
  name: worker
  platform:
    aws:
      rootVolume:
        iops: 100
        size: 22
        type: gp2
      type: m4.xlarge
      zones:
        - us-east-1a
        - us-east-1b
  replicas: 3

If the Availability Zones are not configured in the MachinePool, then all of the AZs in the region will be used and a MachineSet resource will be created for each AZ (only relevant for public cloud providers).

Auto-scaling

MachinePools can be configured to auto-scale the number of worker nodes as needed based on resource utilization of the deployed cluster (this feature creates a ClusterAutoscaler resource in the deployed cluster).

apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
kind: MachinePool
metadata:
  name: mycluster-worker
  namespace: mynamespace
spec:
  clusterDeploymentRef:
    name: mycluster
  name: worker
  platform:
    aws:
      rootVolume:
        iops: 100
        size: 22
        type: gp2
      type: m4.xlarge
  autoscaling:
    minReplicas: 3
    maxReplicas: 6

The number of minimum replicas must be equivalent to the number of configured Availability Zones.

The spec.replicas and spec.autoscaling configurations cannot be configured simultaneously.

The spec.autoscaling.maxReplicas is an optional field. If it is not configured, then nodes will be auto-scaled without restriction based on resource utilization needs.

Integration with Horizontal Pod Autoscalers

A MachinePool configured to auto-scaling mode creates a ClusterAutoscaler on the deployed cluster. ClusterAutoscalers can co-exist and work with Horiztonal Pod Autoscalers to ensure that there are enough available nodes to meet the auto-scaled pod replica count requirements. See excerpt from OpenShift documentation:

The horizontal pod autoscaler (HPA) and the cluster autoscaler modify cluster resources in different ways. The HPA changes the deployment’s or replica set’s number of replicas based on the current CPU load. If the load increases, the HPA creates new replicas, regardless of the amount of resources available to the cluster. If there are not enough resources, the cluster autoscaler adds resources so that the HPA-created pods can run. If the load decreases, the HPA stops some replicas. If this action causes some nodes to be underutilized or completely empty, the cluster autoscaler deletes the unnecessary nodes.

Create Cluster on Bare Metal

Hive supports bare metal provisioning as provided by openshift-install

At present this feature requires a separate pre-existing libvirt provisioning host to run the bootstrap node. This host will require very specific network configuration that far exceeds the scope of Hive documentation. See Bare Metal Platform Customization for more information.

Bare metal provisioning with one hypervisor host per cluster

Bare metal provisioning with a shared hypervisor host

To provision bare metal clusters with Hive:

Create a Secret containing a bare metal enabled InstallConfig. This InstallConfig must contain a libvirtURI property pointing to the provisioning host.

Create a Secret containing the SSH private key that can connect to your libvirt provisioning host, without a passphrase.

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: provisioning-host-ssh-private-key
  namespace: mynamespace
stringData:
  ssh-privatekey: |-
    -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
   REDACTED
    -----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
type: Opaque

Create a ConfigMap for manifests to inject into the installer, containing a nested ConfigMap for metal3 config.

NOTE: This will no longer be required as of OpenShift 4.4+.

kind: ConfigMap
apiVersion: v1
metadata:
  name: my-baremetal-cluster-install-manifests
  namespace: mynamespace
data:
  99_metal3-config.yaml: |
    kind: ConfigMap
    apiVersion: v1
    metadata:
      name: metal3-config
      namespace: openshift-machine-api
    data:
      http_port: "6180"
      provisioning_interface: "enp1s0"
      provisioning_ip: "172.22.0.3/24"
      dhcp_range: "172.22.0.10,172.22.0.100"
      deploy_kernel_url: "http://172.22.0.3:6180/images/ironic-python-agent.kernel"
      deploy_ramdisk_url: "http://172.22.0.3:6180/images/ironic-python-agent.initramfs"
      ironic_endpoint: "http://172.22.0.3:6385/v1/"
      ironic_inspector_endpoint: "http://172.22.0.3:5050/v1/"
      cache_url: "http://192.168.111.1/images"
      rhcos_image_url: "https://releases-art-rhcos.svc.ci.openshift.org/art/storage/releases/rhcos-4.3/43.81.201911192044.0/x86_64/rhcos-43.81.201911192044.0-openstack.x86_64.qcow2.gz"

Create a ClusterDeployment, note the libvirtSSHPrivateKeySecretRef and sshKnownHosts for bare metal:

apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
kind: ClusterDeployment
metadata:
  name: my-baremetal-cluster
  namespace: mynamespace
  annotations:
    hive.openshift.io/try-install-once: "true"
spec:
  baseDomain: test.example.com
  clusterName: my-baremetal-cluster
  controlPlaneConfig:
    servingCertificates: {}
  platform:
    baremetal:
      libvirtSSHPrivateKeySecretRef:
        name: provisioning-host-ssh-private-key
  provisioning:
    installConfigSecretRef:
      name: my-baremetal-cluster-install-config
    sshPrivateKeySecretRef:
      name: my-baremetal-hosts-ssh-private-key
    manifestsSecretRef:
      name: my-baremetal-cluster-install-manifests
    imageSetRef:
      name: my-clusterimageset
    sshKnownHosts:
    # SSH known host info for the libvirt provisioning server to avoid a prompt during non-interactive install:
    - "10.1.8.90 ecdsa-sha2-nistp256 AAAAE2VjZHNhLXNoYTItbmlzdHAyNTYAAAAIbmlzdHAyNTYAAABBBKWjJRzeUVuZs4yxSy4eu45xiANFIIbwE3e1aPzGD58x/NX7Yf+S8eFKq4RrsfSaK2hVJyJjvVIhUsU9z2sBJP8="
  pullSecretRef:
    name: my-baremetal-cluster-pull-secret

There is not presently support for MachinePool management on bare metal clusters. The pools defined in your InstallConfig are authoritative.

There is not presently support for "deprovisioning" a bare metal cluster, as such deleting a bare metal ClusterDeployment has no impact on the running cluster, it is simply removed from Hive and the systems would remain running. This may change in the future.

Monitor the Install Job

  • Get the namespace in which your cluster deployment was created
  • Get the install pod name
    oc get pods -l "hive.openshift.io/job-type=provision,hive.openshift.io/cluster-deployment-name=${CLUSTER_NAME}" -o jsonpath='{.items[0].metadata.name}'
  • Run following command to watch the cluster deployment
    oc logs -f <install-pod-name> -c hive
    Alternatively, you can watch the summarized output of the installer using
    oc exec -c hive <install-pod-name> -- tail -f /tmp/openshift-install-console.log

In the event of installation failures, please see Troubleshooting.

Saving Logs for Failed Provisions

Hive can be configured as follows to upload logs to an AWS S3 bucket when provisioning fails.

  1. Create an S3 bucket. The bucket must be accessible from the environment from which your cluster will be provisioned, using credentials you will specify (below). Take note of the name of the bucket and the region in which you created it.
  2. Create a credentials secret. This secret will need to exist in the target namespace of your hive deployment (HiveConfig.spec.targetNamespace, default hive), and contain AWS credentials sufficient to write to your bucket. The secret should data contain base64-encoded values for "aws_access_key_id" and "aws_secret_access_key". (You may wish to reuse the secret from your cluster deployment.)
  3. Create an SSH private key secret. The secret data must contain a key called ssh-privatekey whose value is the base64-encoded contents of the private key file corresponding to the public key in your install config. Create this secret in the namespace of your ClusterDeployment.
  4. Tell HiveConfig where to find your bucket. Under .spec.failedProvisionConfig.aws, add the bucket name, the reference to the AWS credentials secret, and the region. For example:
    spec:
      failedProvisionConfig:
        aws:
          bucket: failed-provision-logs
          credentialsSecretRef:
            name: test-retry-aws-creds
          region: us-east-1
  5. Ensure your ClusterDeployment is configured with your SSH private key secret. Reference the SSH private key secret in your ClusterDeployment's `.spec.provisioning.sshPrivateKeySecretRef. For example:
    spec:
      provisioning:
        sshPrivateKeySecretRef:
          name: mycluster-ssh-key
    (If using hiveutil, you can provide the key pair from your file system via --ssh-private-key-file and --ssh-public-key-file.)

The troubleshooting doc provides more information about extracting and processing the logs.

Cluster Admin Kubeconfig

Once the cluster is provisioned, the admin kubeconfig will be stored in a secret. You can use this with:

./hack/get-kubeconfig.sh ${CLUSTER_NAME} > ${CLUSTER_NAME}.kubeconfig
export KUBECONFIG=${CLUSTER_NAME}.kubeconfig
oc get nodes

Access the Web Console

  • Get the webconsole URL

    oc get cd ${CLUSTER_NAME} -o jsonpath='{ .status.webConsoleURL }'
    
  • Retrieve the password for kubeadmin user

    oc extract secret/$(oc get cd ${CLUSTER_NAME} -o jsonpath='{.spec.clusterMetadata.adminPasswordSecretRef.name}') --to=-
    

Managed DNS

Hive can optionally create delegated DNS zones for each cluster.

NOTE: This feature only works for provisioning to AWS, GCP, and Azure.

To use this feature:

  1. Manually create a DNS zone for your "root" domain (i.e. hive.example.com in the example below) and ensure your DNS is operational.

  2. Create a secret in the "hive" namespace with your cloud credentials with permissions to manage the root zone.

    • AWS
      apiVersion: v1
      data:
        aws_access_key_id: REDACTED
        aws_secret_access_key: REDACTED
      kind: Secret
      metadata:
        name: route53-aws-creds
      type: Opaque
      The following AWS IAM permissions should be associated with these credentials:
      route53:ChangeResourceRecordSets
      route53:ChangeTagsForResource
      route53:CreateHostedZone
      route53:DeleteHostedZone
      route53:GetHostedZone
      route53:ListHostedZonesByName
      route53:ListResourceRecordSets
      route53:ListTagsForResource
      tag:GetResources
      
    • GCP
      apiVersion: v1
      data:
        osServiceAccount.json: REDACTED
      kind: Secret
      metadata:
        name: gcp-creds
      type: Opaque
    • Azure Service principal needs DNS Zone Contributor role on DNS zone resource.
      apiVersion: v1
      data:
        osServicePrincipal.json: REDACTED
      kind: Secret
      metadata:
        name: azure-creds
      type: Opaque
  3. Update your HiveConfig to enable externalDNS and set the list of managed domains:

    • AWS
      apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
      kind: HiveConfig
      metadata:
        name: hive
      spec:
        managedDomains:
        - aws:
            credentialsSecretRef:
              name: route53-aws-creds
          domains:
          - hive.example.com
    • GCP
      apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
      kind: HiveConfig
      metadata:
        name: hive
      spec:
        managedDomains:
        - gcp:
            credentialsSecretRef:
              name: gcp-creds
          domains:
          - hive.example.com
    • Azure
      apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
      kind: HiveConfig
      metadata:
        name: hive
      spec:
        managedDomains:
        - azure:
            credentialsSecretRef:
              name: azure-creds
          domains:
          - hive.example.com
  4. Specify which domains Hive is allowed to manage by adding them to the .spec.managedDomains[].domains list. When specifying manageDNS: true in a ClusterDeployment, the ClusterDeployment's baseDomain must be a direct child of one of these domains, otherwise the ClusterDeployment creation will result in a validation error. The baseDomain must also be unique to that cluster and must not be used in any other ClusterDeployment, including on separate Hive instances.

    As such, a domain may exist in the .spec.managedDomains[].domains list in multiple Hive instances. Note that the specified credentials must be valid to add and remove NS record entries for all domains listed in .spec.managedDomains[].domains.

You can now create clusters with manageDNS enabled and a basedomain of mydomain.hive.example.com.

bin/hiveutil create-cluster --base-domain=mydomain.hive.example.com mycluster --manage-dns

Hive will then:

  1. Create a mydomain.hive.example.com DNS zone.
  2. Create NS records in the hive.example.com to forward DNS to the new mydomain.hive.example.com DNS zone.
  3. Wait for the SOA record for the new domain to be resolvable, indicating that DNS is functioning.
  4. Launch the install, which will create DNS entries for the new cluster ("*.apps.mycluster.mydomain.hive.example.com", "api.mycluster.mydomain.hive.example.com", etc) in the new mydomain.hive.example.com DNS zone.

Cluster Adoption

It is possible to adopt cluster deployments into Hive. To do so you will need to create a ClusterDeployment with Spec.Installed set to True, no Spec.Provisioning section, and include the following:

  • cluster INFRAID (obtained from oc get infrastructure cluster -o json | jq .status.infrastructureName)
  • cluster ID (obtained from oc get clusterversion version -o json | jq .spec.clusterID)
  • reference to a properly formatted admin kubeconfig Secret: oc create secret generic mycluster-admin-kubeconfig --from-file=kubeconfig=/tmp/admin.kubeconfig
  • Spec.Platform.YourCloudProvider for your cluster, most importantly region and a properly formatted credentials Secret

Use Spec.PreserveOnDelete = true if you do not want Hive to deprovision resources when the ClusterDeployment is deleted.

Example Adoption ClusterDeployment

apiVersion: hive.openshift.io/v1
kind: ClusterDeployment
metadata:
  name: my-gcp-cluster
  namespace: hive
spec:
  baseDomain: gcp.example.com
  clusterMetadata:
    adminKubeconfigSecretRef:
      name: my-gcp-cluster-admin-kubeconfig
    clusterID: 61010205-c91d-44c9-8394-3e1790bd76f3
    infraID: my-gcp-cluster-wsvdn
  clusterName: my-gcp-cluster
  installed: true
  platform:
    gcp:
      credentialsSecretRef:
        name: my-gcp-creds
      region: us-east1
  pullSecretRef:
    name: pull-secret

Adopting with hiveutil

hiveutil is a development focused CLI tool which can be built from the hive repo. To adopt a cluster specify the following flags:

bin/hiveutil create-cluster --base-domain=example.com mycluster --adopt --adopt-admin-kubeconfig=/path/to/cluster/admin/kubeconfig --adopt-infra-id=[INFRAID] --adopt-cluster-id=[CLUSTERID]

Configuration Management

SyncSet

Hive offers two CRDs for applying configuration in a cluster once it is installed: SyncSet for config destined for specific clusters in a specific namespace, and SelectorSyncSet for config destined for any cluster matching a label selector.

For more information please see the SyncSet documentation.

Scaling ClusterSync

The clustersync controller is designed to scale horizontally, so increasing the number of clustersync controller replicas will scale the number of clustersync pods running, thereby increasing the number of simultaneous clusters getting syncsets applied to them.

In order to scale the clustersync controller, a section like the following should be added to HiveConfig:

spec:
  controllersConfig:
    controllers:
    - config:
        replicas: 3
      name: clustersync

Identity Provider Management

Hive offers explicit API support for configuring identity providers in the OpenShift clusters it provisions. This is technically powered by the above SyncSet mechanism, but is provided directly in the API to support configuring per cluster identity providers, merged with global identity providers, all of which must land in the same object in the cluster.

For more information please see the SyncIdentityProvider documentation.

Cluster Deprovisioning

oc delete clusterdeployment ${CLUSTER_NAME} --wait=false

Deleting a ClusterDeployment will create a ClusterDeprovision resource, which in turn will launch a pod to attempt to delete all cloud resources created for and by the cluster. This is done by scanning the cloud provider for resources tagged with the cluster's generated InfraID. (i.e. kubernetes.io/cluster/mycluster-fcp4z=owned) Once all resources have been deleted the pod will terminate, finalizers will be removed, and the ClusterDeployment and dependent objects will be removed. The deprovision process is powered by vendoring the same code from the OpenShift installer used for openshift-install cluster destroy.