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NOTE: As of March 8, 2017, the paid editing operation is suspended. If and when it is resumed, and the articles in question have not been made by others, the reservations specified below will continue to apply. If the program is disbanded, then people who already started work on the respective articles will receive partial payment.

For more context, see ANI and COIN (permalink).

List of new articles that any interested author can work on. A parenthetical "(reserved)" means that an author has already announced that he or she is working on it. If that author later decides not to continue with it, the page will be returned to the general pool.

Before you begin working on a page, you should see if a page has been created on Wikipedia! On several occasions, a page was created on Wikipedia between the time when a topic was added in this pool and when a worker tried to reserve the page. Watch out for name changes (organizations occasionally rename themselves), similar phrases that mean the same thing, and so forth. A few things to try:

Table of Contents

Draft completion

Some already existing drafts need a little bit cleanup before they can be published and pushed to the world.

New pages

Research methods: recruitment, surveys, etc.

Global (and national/local) health: not specific to any disease

Many of these pages are listed because they are red-linked from Priority-setting in global health.

  • Selective primary healthcare: Expand on the section on the topic and make this its own page.
  • 1988 Riga Conference: Start by reading about Alma Ata, since Riga was a follow-up to that. Also mention Riga in Alma Ata's page.
  • Oregon Health Services Commission: One of the earlier efforts at explicit priority-setting within health. Start by reading the row for it at priority-setting in global health, as well as the references used there.
  • WHO Ad Hoc Committee on Health Research Relating to Future Intervention Options: A WHO committee that did health research prioritization. Start by reading the description from a paper that mentions it (note that the section year in that paper should be 1994, not 1944).
  • Council on Health Research and Development: A council that reviewed health research and development from developing countries.
  • Lives Saved Tool (reserved for Chris): A tool created at Johns Hopkins University.
  • EVIDEM Collaboration: Conducts literature review, "discussions with stakeholders", and multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA).
  • Jeremy Shiffman: A person at the Center for Global Development (see bio) who has written papers about priority-setting.
  • Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project (GRUMP): A population mapping project. Start with this page. Mention its importance in the Malaria Atlas Project (and other applications if they exist). Also make sure to mention GRUMP on the MAP Wikipedia page.
  • WorldPop (reserved for Joey): A population mapping project. History section should mention AfriPop, AsiaPop, and AmeriPop, why they were separate in the beginning, why they were combined into a single project, and so on. Mention its importance in the Malaria Atlas Project and other applications. Also make sure to mention WorldPop on the MAP Wikipedia page.
  • Igor Rudan: A researcher in global health. It's not clear he is notable enough to have a Wikipedia article, so part of your task will be to see if there's enough about him to write a page on/if he meets the notability criteria. Some of his work is linked from the priority-setting in global health page. Also see "Global health metrics needs collaboration and competition" in The Lancet.

Malaria

Note that after initial research, it may turn out for some of these pages that there's not enough yet to justify a Wikipedia page. You will be compensated for initial research and for leaving a partial stub in userspace.

Most of these are selected as red links from Timeline of malaria.

  • Research Initiative on Traditional Antimalarial Methods (RITAM) (reserved for Sebastian): Founded in 1999 as a collaboration between WHO, GIFTS, and Oxford. See some info on the GIFTS page.
  • Multilateral Initiative on Malaria: An alliance of organizations that facilitates research on malaria, established 1997.
  • Global Malaria Control Strategy (reserved for Sebastian): Launched in 1992, confirmed by World Health Assembly in 1993. From the timeline of malaria Wikipedia page: "This new strategy is based largely upon the primary health care approach and requires flexible, cost-effective, sustainable, and decentralized programs based upon disease rather than parasite control, adapted to local conditions and responding to local needs. This approach becomes succesful and has positive impact in a number of countries such as Brazil, China, Solomon Islands, Philippines, Vanuatu, Vietnam, and Thailand. Its success demonstrates that malaria can be controlled by locally and currently available tools."
  • Malaria Foundation International: Founded 1992 to fight against malaria.
  • Abuja Declaration and African Summit on Roll Back Malaria – decide on the canonical title: a conference and accompanying declaration that took place in 2000 to commit to combating malaria. Mention predecessors like Harare Declaration of June 1997. Start with this paper.
Some historical researchers (check for misspellings and existing pages; also check for Wikipedia pages in other languages):

  • Ignace Vinke
  • Marcel Lips
  • Sebastiano Baldi

Philanthropy

The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "History of Philanthropy". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

  • ARNOVA: Start with Open Phil. Note that ARNOVA seems to do work outside of "history of philanthropy", but since Open Phil is funding them for this work, you should do your best to cover this area in particular.

Politics

The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "Criminal Justice Reform". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "Land Use Reform". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

  • Better Boulder: Start with Open Phil and Good Ventures. Make sure to cover YIMBY 2016. The conference website may have changed dramatically, so look on the Internet Archive for older copies. Ask us if you don't know how to do that. Also check out this article.
  • California Renters Legal Advocacy and Education Fund: Start with Open Phil's grant writeup.
  • Seattle for Everyone (reserved for Issa)

Torture

  • Pigeon torture: $25-40: A torture practice in North Korea. Trigger warning.

Welfare in the United States

  • Mickey Leland Memorial Domestic Hunger Relief Act (reserved for Devansh): $50-90, dependong in article quality and length. Maybe even more!
  • Food Assistance for Disaster Relief (reserved for Sean): $40-70, depending on article quality and length. Maybe even more!
  • Nutrition Assistance Block Grants: $40-70, depending on article quality and length. Maybe even more!

Taxation

  • Form 1098 (reserved for Charlie): $30: Want something of comparable quality to Form 1099.
Also, pages on state-level income tax returns. In general, prioritize the most populous states as listed at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_population#States_and_territories . However, note that some states already have their own taxation pages, so be sure to check for those beforehand. Please discuss with Issa or Vipul to get individual price quotes for individual states.

Immigration

  • W visa: $125. A proposed new visa, part of various immigration reform proposals, that would be mostly a replacement for the existing H-2 visas. The high pay is mostly because understanding exactly what the proposals would do requires a deeper understanding of existing immigration law, and the politics of changing it. I'm happy to provide guidance to the person who works on this.
The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "Immigration Policy". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

  • Free Migration Project: Start with Open Phil and maybe this event. There doesn't seem to be a lot of information about this.
  • International Refugee Assistance Project: Start with Open Phil's grant writeup. Lots of recent news coverage, so make sure to get that in your page. Open Phil also recently recommended IRAP as a place to donate to in response to recent events, so mention that too, as well as details like "IRAP is one of the plaintiffs, along with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the National Immigration Law Center, and a Yale Law clinic, in a suit that got a temporary injunction against the recent Executive Order targeting green card holders". See also GUEST POST: The International Refugee Assistance Project though keep in mind that that is not a reliable source (though it can be used as a secondary reference to highlight importance of an issue).
  • Protect the People: Start with Open Phil's grant writeup. The phrase "protect the people" is rather common, so be careful as you look for information.
  • U.S. Association for International Migration (USAIM): Start with Open Phil's grant writeup.

Animal welfare

The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "Farm Animal Welfare". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

  • Brighter Green: Start with Open Phil, Good Ventures, and Devex.
  • Fórum Nacional de Proteção e Defesa Animal: Start with Open Phil. Also watch this page on the ACE website (at the time of this writing, it just says "Status: Considered", but in the future the page might give a full review of the org).
  • People for Animals: Start with Open Phil. Note that there are multiple organizations named "People for Animals"! For this page, we mean the one funded by Open Phil, i.e. the one with the website at peopleforanimalsindia.org.

Global catastrophic risks

The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "Global Catastrophic Risks". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

Scientific research

The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "Scientific Research". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

Books, orgs, and people

  • Chloe Cockburn: $50: She comes from an illustrious family, see e.g. Leslie Cockburn#Personal life for her mother's relatives (which are also her relatives), Olivia Wilde (sister), etc. She is the Program Officer for Criminal Justice Reform at the Open Philanthropy Project, see here, which has overseen $17.7 million in grants in Criminal Justice Reform (See here and here), a lot of it after she joined. Previously, she was at the ACLU, see here and searches for Chloe Cockburn on aclu.org. Also, she has an outdated website but don't use that as a reference (add it in External links).
  • Sheldon Richman: $35: There is already a deleted page on him. You would first need to message the admin who deleted the page to retrieve the existing version. Then work on improving/fixing it, and then republish. Probably not good as a first project. Page needs to survive for at least 30 days after recreation to be eligible for payment.
The following are all organizations that are grantees of the Open Philanthropy Project under "Other areas". As such, your page should include a "Funding" section (or similar) that includes information about the Open Phil grant. See here for an example (note how there is a "Funding" section, and the page incorporates information from Open Phil's grant writeup). A good standard list of sections for an organization is: "History", "Funding", "Publications", "Reception", "See also" (related pages on Wikipedia), "External links" (related pages or further reading outside of Wikipedia), "References".

  • Associated Students of the University of California, Berkeley: Start with Open Phil. Note that ASUC is just the name for the student government at UC Berkeley. Wikipedia already has a small section about it here. So your task will be to expand that into a page, and mention DeCal and Open Phil's grant to support the EA course.
  • MIT Synthetic Neurobiology Group: Start with Open Phil's grant writeup. Note that the group is already briefly mentioned here on Wikipedia.
  • Project Peanut Butter: Start with this user space version and Open Phil.

Laura and John Arnold Foundation grantees

Atlantic Philanthropies grantees

Please double-check for the existence of the page.

Miscellaneous

Improvements to existing pages

Health (global and local)

(nothing public; but get in touch with us if you are interested in stuff to do here)

International development

  • Inter-American Development Bank (poverty reduction section): $5-20: Section is currently empty. Between $5 and $20 for expanding the section, based on how much you expand it, and the quality of your expansion.