Project With the onset of AI and autonomous systems replacing jobs previously reserved for humans, how might cognitive wellness and therapeutic practices look like in the future? We present Bisensorial, a wearable technology that uses sound and haptic vibration stimulation to induce calmness. Unlike many other sensory stimulation and mental stat…
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README.md

README.md

BiSensorial

Hack The Brain Dublin 2017 Project https://dublin.sciencegallery.com/page/bisensorial

Hack The Brain Amsterdam 2016 Project

Who

  • Sean Clarke,
  • Agatha Haines,
  • Jack McKay Fletcher,
  • Kim Jansen,
  • Diego Maranan,
  • Ricardo Mutuberria.
  • Special help from Ester

Why

With the onset of AI and autonomous systems replacing jobs previously reserved for humans, how might cognitive wellness and therapeutic practices look like in the future? Can mental discord be treated autonomously? And given that people are different and will therefore need different interventions, how can autonomous, brain-based therapy technologies be tailored to suit the needs of individual users at any given time?

What

We present Bisensorial, a wearable technology that uses sound and haptic vibration stimulation to induce calmness. Unlike many other sensory stimulation and mental state inducing technologies, Bisensorial learns the individual needs of its user.

Using binaural music, vibratory motors, aesthetic and structural materials the stimuli will change and develop over time, to create a personalised experience optimising calmness.

How

Our project builds on the work of Höller et al (2012), who found changes in alpha and beta responses when subjects are exposed to auditory and tactile stimuli, and thus give rise to a wide range of emotional and cognitive responses that can be measured. We take inspiration from research on binaural auditory stimuli, which has been shown to enhance creative thinking, but only if individual differences are taken into account (Reedjik 2013). We also take inspiration from the Feldenkrais Method, which takes advantage of the bilateral symmetry of the human body and gentle touch, to create a highly aware, embodied experience (Höök, 2015), in using a wearable vibrating undergarment. To account for individual differences, we use a genetic algorithm to optimise patterns of sound and tactile vibration to induce calmness.

Refernces

  • Höller, J., et al. 2012. ‘Individual brain-frequency responses to self-selected music.’ Dec. Int J Psychophysiol. 86(3):206-13. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2012.09.005.
  • Höök, K., Ståhl, A., Jonsson, M., Mercurio, J., Karlsson, A., & Johnson, E.-C. B. (2015). Somaesthetic design. Interactions, 22(4), 26–33. http://doi.org/10.1145/2770888
  • Reedjik et al. 2013. ‘The impact of binaural beats on creativity.’ Front Hum Neurosci. 7: 786. 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00786

Other information

This repository was made by specific group members and uploaded to a temporary environment. This temporary environment has been manually transferred to a a more permanent Hack the Brain Github account. If any of the former team members wish to administer this repository and manage the master branch, then they can contact the current administrator of the repository to gain the proper acces privileges to do so.

Video on Project BiSensorial

Video image