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fixed documentation a bit

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1 parent 222994d commit 3f440d21fa3847ab30a940013ceffb99ae3497b9 @JPMoresmau committed Feb 18, 2011
@@ -23,6 +23,7 @@ Fixes:
- When launching GHCi, only hidden packages are added via -package
- When running a haskell file with the "launch the selected ressource or active editor", if an existing launch configuration exists, it it reused.
- When an existing launch configuration is found for a ressource, update executable to be the current executable for the delegate
+ - Documentation has been updated to not say things that are now totally wrong :-)
Features:
- Interface to cabal install via contextual action on project
@@ -60,6 +61,8 @@ Features:
- Occurrences shown in current files (based on lexer, so internal functions with the same name will be highlighted too)
+ - Set Cabal flags values in Project preferences.
+
Internal:
Upgrade notes:
@@ -1,178 +1,162 @@
-<h2>A quick start guide to Haskell programming with Eclipse</h2>
-
-<p>This document shows how you would create and run the 'Hello World'
-application in Eclipse with Haskell support. It also explains some of the
-main user interface elements in Eclipse. The focus is on helping
-developers who are not familiar with Eclipse to quickly get started
-with it as an IDE that supports Haskell development.</p>
-
-<p>
- <ul><li>
- More information about how to use Eclipse can be found in the
- <b>Workbench User Guide</b> which is included in the Eclipse
- Help.
- </li><li>
- For more information about Haskell go to <a href="http://haskell.org">
- http://haskell.org</a>.
- </li><li>
- Note that you need an installation of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC)
- on your system. (See
- <a href="http://haskell.org/ghc">http://haskell.org/ghc</a>.) If you don't,
- you can still work with Haskell sources (and run them in HUGS), but you
- won't see any syntax errors etc., and there will be no executable
- automatically built from the sources.
- </li></ul>
-</p>
-
-<p><b>Note:</b> This is work in progress, which means that some of the features
-described here may not yet be in place.</p>
-
-<h3><a name="preparations">Preparations</a></h3>
-
-<ul>
- <li><p><b>Open the Haskell Perspective</b>
- <p>
- Eclipse makes use of a concept called <b><i>Perspectives</i></b>.
- Everything in the workspace is seen from such a Perspective. When you
- start Eclipse for the first time, the most basic of all Perspectives is
- open: the <i>Resource Perspective</i>, which handles just some basic
- file management and text editing. By openening the Haskell perspective,
- you activate everything that is Haskell-aware.
- </p>
- <ul><li><p>
- Select from the menu: <b>Window &gt; Open Perspective &gt; Haskell</b>.
- (You can also open the Haskell Perspective from a link on the
- <b>Welcome</b> page.)
- </p></li></ul>
- <p>
- Seen from the Haskell Perspective, a file is not just a file, but (if it
- has the correct extension) a Haskell source file, which means that you
- can open it with the Haskell source editor, you can compile it and run
- it with a Haskell interpreter (like HUGS) or as (e.g. with GHC)
- compiled and linked executable. The Perspective contains also some
- <b><i>Views</i></b>, which provide Haskell-specific information about
- the file which is currently opened in the editor (<b>Outline View</b>)
- or about the last build process (in the <b>Console View</b>).
- </p>
- <p>
- You can switch and close Perspectives at any time from the vertical
- toolbar at the left of the workbench. If you have closed a Perspective
- or a View, you can re-open it from the menu <b>Window &gt; Open
- Perspective</b> or <b>Show View</b>.
- </p>
- </li>
- <li><p><b><a name="haskellProject">Create a new Haskell project</a></b></p>
- <p>
- The workspace is organized into <i><b>Projects</b></i> (roughly:
- directories within the workspace directory).
- </p>
-
- <ul><li><p>
- Create a new project by selecting <b>File &gt; New &gt; Project</b> from
- the menu, expanding the <b>Functional programming</b> icon, then choosing
- <b>Haskell Project</b>. Specify a project name and hit <b>OK</b>.
- </p></li></ul>
-
- <p>
- A Haskell project has some properties:
- <ul>
- <li><b>source folder</b> (where the compiler expects the sources)</li>
- <li><b>output folder</b> (used by the compiler for object files)</li>
- <li><b>binaries folder</b> (where the target executable is put)</li>
- <li><b>target binary name</b> (the name of the executable produced
- by the compiler and linker).</li>
- </ul>
- </p>
- <p>
- When the project has been created, you will see the respective folders,
- which are created by the <b>New Project</b> wizard. You can configure
- these settings on the <b>Preference Page</b> for that wizard.
- </p>
- </li>
-</ul>
-
-<h3><a name="createSource">Create and edit source files</a></h3>
-
- <p>
- Add source files to the project source folder.
- </p>
-
- <ul><li><p>
- Files can be created either from the menu (<b>File &gt; New</b>), or from
- the context menu you get when you right-click the project in the
- <i>Project Explorer</i> View).
- </p></li>
-
- <li><p>
- For the 'Hello world' program, create a new file named
- <code>Main.hs</code>.
- </p></li></ul>
-
- <p>
- If you give the files a Haskell-specific extension (like <code>.hs</code>
- or <code>.lhs</code> (for literate Haskell), you can open the files with
- the <i><b>Haskell source code editor</b></i> from the Project Explorer
- view.</p>
- </p>
-
- <ul><li><p>
- Right-click the file and choose <b>Open with &gt;Haskell editor</b>.
- Type some code.
- </p></li></ul>
-
- <p>You can configure the editor in the main <i><b>Preferences Dialog</b></i>:
- Select <b>Window &gt; Preferences</b> from the menu and choose the
- <b>Functional Programming</b> section.</p>
-
-<ul>
- <li><p>
- Enter the code for your 'Hello world', e.g.
- <table width="50%"><tr><td bgcolor="#d0d0d0"><pre><code>
- <b>module</b> Main <b>where</b>
-
- main = putStr "Hello world!"
- <code></pre><td><tr></table>
- </p></li>
-
- <li><p>
- <b>Save</b>. This will trigger the auto building, and you will see compiler
- errors (if there were errors in the build) in the <b><i>Problems
- View</i></b>. If no errors have occured, the compiled object files and
- the linked executable should be in their respective folders. Auto building
- works incrementally, that is, only changed resources are built when you
- save again.
- </p></li>
-</ul>
-
-<h3><a name="run">Run the application</a></h3>
-
- <p>
- You can launch the compiled executable of your Haskell programs from within
- the IDE.
- </p>
-
- <ul><li>
- Select <b>Run As &gt; Haskell Application</b> from the menu <b>Run</b> (or
- from the lauching icon that looks like a white triangle in a green circle).
- You can also right-click the executable in the Project Explorer view
- and choose <b>Run &gt; Haskell Application</b> from the popup menu.
- </li></ul>
-
- <p>
- Running a program creates a new <b>Launch configuration</b> for that
- program. You can re-run a lauch configuration from the <b>Run</b> menu.
- Clicking the Run-icon re-launches always the last launched configuration.
- </p>
-
- <p>
- If you choose <b>Run ...</b> from the menu, you get a dialog where you
- can edit launch configurations. For example, you may want to add parameters
- to the program launch.
- </p>
-
- <p>
- Console input and output are handled by the <b>Console View</b> (at the
- bottom left of the workbench). You should see the 'Hello world' output
- appear there, and if your program takes console input, the Console View
- is where you can type in while developing.
- </p>
+<h2>A quick start guide to Haskell programming with Eclipse</h2>
+
+<p>This document shows how you would create and run the 'Hello World'
+application in Eclipse with Haskell support. It also explains some of the
+main user interface elements in Eclipse. The focus is on helping
+developers who are not familiar with Eclipse to quickly get started
+with it as an IDE that supports Haskell development.</p>
+
+<p>
+ <ul><li>
+ More information about how to use Eclipse can be found in the
+ <b>Workbench User Guide</b> which is included in the Eclipse
+ Help.
+ </li><li>
+ For more information about Haskell go to <a href="http://haskell.org">
+ http://haskell.org</a>.
+ </li></ul>
+</p>
+
+<p><b>Note:</b> This is work in progress, which means that some of the features
+described here may not yet be in place.</p>
+
+<h3><a name="preparations">Preparations</a></h3>
+
+<ul>
+ <li><p><b>Open the Haskell Perspective</b>
+ <p>
+ Eclipse makes use of a concept called <b><i>Perspectives</i></b>.
+ Everything in the workspace is seen from such a Perspective. When you
+ start Eclipse for the first time, the most basic of all Perspectives is
+ open: the <i>Resource Perspective</i>, which handles just some basic
+ file management and text editing. By openening the Haskell perspective,
+ you activate everything that is Haskell-aware.
+ </p>
+ <ul><li><p>
+ Select from the menu: <b>Window &gt; Open Perspective &gt; Haskell</b>.
+ (You can also open the Haskell Perspective from a link on the
+ <b>Welcome</b> page.)
+ </p></li></ul>
+ <p>
+ Seen from the Haskell Perspective, a file is not just a file, but (if it
+ has the correct extension) a Haskell source file, which means that you
+ can open it with the Haskell source editor, you can compile it and run
+ it with a Haskell interpreter (like HUGS) or as (e.g. with GHC)
+ compiled and linked executable. The Perspective contains also some
+ <b><i>Views</i></b>, which provide Haskell-specific information about
+ the file which is currently opened in the editor (<b>Outline View</b>)
+ or about the last build process (in the <b>Console View</b>).
+ </p>
+ <p>
+ You can switch and close Perspectives at any time from the vertical
+ toolbar at the left of the workbench. If you have closed a Perspective
+ or a View, you can re-open it from the menu <b>Window &gt; Open
+ Perspective</b> or <b>Show View</b>.
+ </p>
+ </li>
+ <li><p><b><a name="haskellProject">Create a new Haskell project</a></b></p>
+ <p>
+ The workspace is organized into <i><b>Projects</b></i> (roughly:
+ directories within the workspace directory).
+ </p>
+
+ <ul><li><p>
+ Create a new project by selecting <b>File &gt; New &gt; Project</b> from
+ the menu, expanding the <b>Haskell</b> icon, then choosing
+ <b>Haskell Project</b>. Specify a project name and hit <b>OK</b>.
+ </p></li>
+ <li><p>Specify a project name</p></li>
+ <li><p>Specify where you want the project to reside (default is inside your workspace</p></li>
+ <li><p>Specify some initial components to be created for you. The New Project wizard will auto generate a cabal file that will contain a reference to each component you select. You can choose to create an executable, a library, or both.</p></li>
+ </ul>
+ </li>
+</ul>
+
+<h3><a name="createSource">Create and edit source files</a></h3>
+
+ <p>
+ Add source files to the project source folder.
+ </p>
+
+ <p>If you have selected "executable" in the new project wizard page, a
+ <code>Main.hs</code> file should have been created for you.
+ Otherwise you can create a new Haskell module from the menu (<b>File &gt; New &gt; Haskell &gt; Haskell Module</b>).
+ The second page of the wizard lets you choose in which component the module will be present. You can have a project with several components, and not all modules are present in all components.
+ </p>
+
+ <p>
+ If you give the files a Haskell-specific extension (like <code>.hs</code>
+ or <code>.lhs</code> (for literate Haskell), you can open the files with
+ the <i><b>Haskell source code editor</b></i> from the Project Explorer
+ view.</p>
+ </p>
+
+ <ul><li><p>
+ Right-click the file and choose <b>Open with &gt;Haskell editor</b>.
+ Type some code.
+ </p></li></ul>
+
+ <p>You can configure the editor in the main <i><b>Preferences Dialog</b></i>:
+ Select <b>Window &gt; Preferences</b> from the menu and choose the
+ <b>General &gt; Editors &gt; Text Editors</b> section.</p>
+
+<ul>
+ <li><p>
+ Enter the code for your 'Hello world', e.g.
+ <table width="50%"><tr><td bgcolor="#d0d0d0"><pre><code>
+ <b>module</b> Main <b>where</b>
+
+ main = putStr "Hello world!"
+ <code></pre><td><tr></table>
+ </p></li>
+
+ <li><p>
+ <b>Save</b>. This will trigger the auto building, and you will see compiler
+ errors (if there were errors in the build) in the <b><i>Problems
+ View</i></b>. If no errors have occurred, the compiled object files and
+ the linked executable should be in their respective folders. Auto building
+ works incrementally, that is, only changed resources are built when you
+ save again.
+ </p></li>
+</ul>
+
+<h3><a name="run">Run the application</a></h3>
+
+ <p>
+ You can launch the compiled executable of your Haskell programs from within
+ the IDE.
+ </p>
+
+ <ul><li>
+ Select <b>Run As &gt; Haskell Application</b> from the contexual <b>Run</b> menu on the project.
+ This is only available if your project contains executable modules and if it has been built by Scion.
+ </li></ul>
+
+ <p>
+ Running a program creates a new <b>Launch configuration</b> for that
+ program. You can re-run a lauch configuration from the <b>Run</b> menu.
+ Clicking the Run-icon re-launches always the last launched configuration.
+ </p>
+
+ <p>
+ If you choose <b>Run ...</b> from the menu, you get a dialog where you
+ can edit launch configurations. For example, you may want to add parameters
+ to the program launch.
+ </p>
+
+ <p>
+ Console input and output are handled by the <b>Console View</b> (at the
+ bottom left of the workbench). You should see the 'Hello world' output
+ appear there, and if your program takes console input, the Console View
+ is where you can type in while developing.
+ </p>
+
+ <h3><a name="run">Run a module in the interpreter</a></h3>
+
+ <p>You can right click on any Haskell module and choose <b>Run GHCi session</b>. This will open GHCi, the GHC interpreter, in a Eclipse console, and load all the required modules.</p>
+
+ <p>You can type in that console and have a full interactive session, modifying your modules in the Eclipse editors and running code in the console</p>
+
+ <p>The launch configuration options for interpreter sessions let you configure some automation features, like automatically reloading modules that you've saved in the editor.</p>
+
+
@@ -0,0 +1,32 @@
+<h2>Installation steps</h2>
+<p>If you see this, you have successfully installed the eclipseFP plugins.
+However there may still be some configuration steps to be done before you can use the plugins fully.</p>
+
+<h3>GHC configuration</h3>
+<p>
+EclipseFP requires GHC to compile Haskell source files.
+We recommend installing the <a href="http://hackage.haskell.org/platform/">Haskell Platform</a> that comes with all required libraries bundled in a installer for your platform.
+You can configure GHC by opening the Eclipse Preferences and going to <b>Haskell &gt; Haskell implementations</b>. If a GHC is in your PATH you should see it in the list. Otherwise you can manually add a GHC installation.
+</p>
+
+<h3>Cabal configuration</h3>
+<p>
+EclipseFP also requires a working Cabal. <a href="http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Cabal">Cabal</a> is a build management tool for Haskell. Similarly, the Haskell Platform contains a version of Cabal compatible with the GHC it ships with.
+You can configure Cabal in the Eclipse Preferences under <b>Haskell &gt; Scion and Cabal</b>. By default EclipseFP will have looked in your PATH and use any Cabal installation it can find there.
+</p>
+
+<h3>Scion configuration</h3>
+<p>
+Scion is a Haskell program that uses GHC and Cabal to give a consistent API to manage and build Haskell projects. EclipseFP uses Scion for a lot of operations.
+It comes with a version of Scion in source form, that should get built automatically once GHC and Cabal have been set up.
+The Eclipse Preferences page under <b>Haskell &gt; Scion and Cabal</b> allows you to change settings if required.
+We recommend to stick to default setting (built-in server through Standard Stream/Pipe) unless you feel adventurous!
+</p>
+
+<h3>Problems building Scion</h3>
+<p>
+It may happen that Scion does not build successfully when you start EclipseFP.
+The build process dumps its outputs and errors into a Console in the Console View of Eclipse. Please check this file for errors.
+Often, the build fails due to some libraries conflict. Please run <b>cabal update</b> before restarting EclipseFP.
+This will ensure your Cabal knows about the latest versions of libraries available on Hackage.
+</p>
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