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A tool for building Doctrine queries using MongoDB-style query documents

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Installation

$ composer require dbstudios/doctrine-query-document

Basic Usage

Simply create a query builder, and (at minimum) add the from and select statements. These are required in order for the query document to work. You may also add any other clauses (such as where or orderBy clauses) that you would like to have in the resulting query. The query manager will append the query to the existing clauses in the query builder.

<?php
    // $objectManager should be an instance of Doctrine\Common\Persistence\ObjectManager

    $manager = new QueryManager($objectManager);
    $queryBuilder = $objectManager->createQueryBuilder()
        ->from('App\Entity\MyEntity', 'e')
        ->select('e');

    $manager->apply($queryBuilder, [
        'field' => 'value',
        'otherField' => [
            '$gt' => 10,
        ],
    ]);

    echo $queryBuilder->getDQL();

    // SELECT e FROM App\Entity\MyEntity e WHERE field = ?0 AND otherField > ?1

Any values passed in the second argumemnt to apply() will automatically be transformed to positional parameters and will be set as a parameter on the query builder.

Traversing Relationships

Fields on related entities may be queried using dot notation, in the form relationshipField.field. Imagine that your MyEntity class is related to OtherEntity through the field otherEntity.

<?php
    // $objectManager should be an instance of Doctrine\Common\Persistence\ObjectManager

    $manager = new QueryManager($objectManager);
    $queryBuilder = $objectManager->createQueryBuilder()
        ->from('App\Entity\MyEntity', 'e')
        ->select('e');

    $manager->apply($queryBuilder, [
        'otherEntity.field' => 'value',
    ]);

    echo $queryBuilder->getDQL();

    // SELECT e FROM App\Entity\MyEntity e JOIN e.otherEntity join_1 WHERE join_1.field = ?0

Traversing JSON Objects

MySQL 5.7 added support for the JSON type. For any fields whose type is JSON, dot-notated fields will automatically be extracted. Imagine that your MyEntity class has a JSON field named attributes, which looks like this.

{
    "myField": "value"
}

You could query for it like so.

<?php
    // $objectManager should be an instance of Doctrine\Common\Persistence\ObjectManager

    $manager = new QueryManager($objectManager);
    $queryBuilder = $objectManager->createQueryBuilder()
        ->from('App\Entity\MyEntity', 'e')
        ->select('e');

    $manager->apply($queryBuilder, [
        'attributes.myField' => 'value',
    ]);

    echo $queryBuilder->getDQL();

    // SELECT e FROM App\Entity\MyEntity e WHERE JSON_UNQUOTE(JSON_EXTRACT(attributes, '$.myField')) = ?0

Field Mapping

In some cases, it may make sense to map shortened field names to fields on related entities. For example, assume the otherEntity field is a relation that contains a name field.

<?php
    // $objectManager should be an instance of Doctrine\Common\Persistence\ObjectManager

    $manager = new QueryManager($objectManager);
    $queryBuilder = $objectManager->createQueryBuilder()
        ->from('App\Entity\MyEntity', 'e')
        ->select('e');

    $manager->apply($queryBuilder, [
        'otherEntityName' => 'value',
    ]);

Normally, the above example would fail, because MyEntity does not have a otherEntityName field. However, we can alias the field like so.

<?php
    $manager->setMappedField('App\\Entity\\MyEntity', 'otherEntityName', 'otherEntity.name');

    $manager->apply($queryBuilder, [
        'otherEntityName' => 'value',
    ]);

This can also work in reverse, allowing you to query a field that appears to be on a related object (or, more usefully, an array of related objects). For example, assume MyEntity has a one-to-many relationship with MyOtherEntity. MyEntity has a field named otherEntitiesLength, which holds a count of the number of elements in the otherEntities collection.

<?php
    $manager->setMappedField('App\\Entity\\MyEntity', 'otherEntities.length', 'otherEntitiesLength');
    
    $manager->apply($queryBuilder, [
        'otherEntities.length' => [
            '$gte' => 1,
        ],
    ]);

Field Projection

This library ships with a handy utility class that allows you to easily apply projections to result sets.

<?php
    use DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\Projection\Projection;

    // $objectManager should be an instance of Doctrine\Common\Persistence\ObjectManager
    
    $manager = new QueryManager($objectManager);
    $queryBuilder = $objectManager->createQueryBuilder()
        ->from('App\Entity\MyEntity', 'e')
        ->select('e');
    
    $manager->apply($queryBuilder, [
    	'field' => 'value',
    ]);
    
    $projection = new Projection([
    	'id' => true,
    	'field' => true,
    	'otherEntity' => [
    		'id' => true,
    		'someField' => true,
        ],
    ]);
    
    echo json_encode(array_map(function(MyEntity $entity) use ($projection): array {
    	$data = [
            'id' => $entity->getId(),
            'name' => $entity->getName(),
            'field' => $entity->getField(),
        ];
    	
    	if ($projection->isAllowed('otherEntity')) {
    		$other = $entity->getOtherEntity();
    		
    		$data['otherEntity'] = [
    			'id' => $other->getId(),
    			'someField' => $other->getSomeField(),
    			'someOtherField' => $other->getSomeOtherField(),
            ];
    	}
    	
    	return $projection->filter($data);
    }, $queryBuilder->getQuery()->getResult()));
    
    // [{"id": 1, "field": "value", "otherEntity": {"id": 1, "someField": "value"}}, ...]

Projections can also be inverted by supplying false as the value of each node in the constructor argument. If you want to explicitly control the default matching behavior, you can also provide the optional $default argument to the constructor. Otherwise, default matching behavior will be inferred from the first element of the projection: allow if the first element is false (the projection is a deny-list), or deny if the first element is true (the projection is an allow-list).

There's also a static convenience method on Projection that allows you to build the projection object from a flat object of string paths, like so. Like the constructor, you can also pass a second $default argument to explicitly set the default matching behavior of the projection.

<?php
    $input = [
    	'id' => true,
    	'field' => true,
    	'otherEntity.id' => true,
    	'otherEntity.someField' => true,
    ];
    
    $projection = Projection::fromFields($input);

In the above example, the resulting Projection object would be the same as the one in the original example. In some cases, it may be more convenient to supply a flat map of paths, instead of a potentially deep array of paths (i.e. when the projected fields are coming in from an API input).

You can also use the match-all operator "*" to control matching behavior for all fields in a group.

<?php
    $input = [
        'child.*' => false,
        'child.id' => true,
        'child.name' => true,
    ];

    $projection = Projection::fromFields($input);

    assert($projection->isAllowed('someParentField'));
    assert($projection->isAllowed('child'));
    assert($projection->isAllowed('child.id'));
    assert($projection->isAllowed('child.name'));
    assert($projection->isDenied('child.foo'));

Projections can also differentiate between default or explicit allow/deny behavior. For example, consider the following projection.

<?php
    $projection = new Projection([
        'id' => true,
        'name' => false,
    ], true);

    // Both are the "explicit" variants of their respective behavior, since the keys are present in the list.
    assert($projection->isAllowedExplicitly('id'));
    assert($projection->isDeniedExplicitly('name'));
    
    // The Projection is configured to allow by default (the second constructor argument), so fields not present in the
    // list are allowed.
    assert($projection->isAllowed('foo'));

    // However, the default allow behavior is not an explicit allow, as the key is _not_ in the list.
    assert(!$projection->isAllowedExplicitly('foo'));

This can be useful if you have a field that is expensive to compute or serialize, and you only want to include if the projection specifically calls for it to be included.

You can also directly inspect the underlying value that projections use to repesent results using the Projection::query() method, which returns an integer value that describes that result. Additionally, the QueryResult::describe() method can be used to get a plain-english representation of a result for debugging or logging purposes.

<?php
    use DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\Projection\QueryResult;

    $projection = new Projection([
        'id' => true,
    ]);

    $result = $projection->query('id');
    
    assert($result === QueryResult::allow(true));
    assert(QueryResult::isAllow($result));
    assert(QueryResult::isExplicit($result))
    assert(QueryResult::isExplicitAllow($result));

    echo QueryResult::describe($result); // "explicit allow"
    echo QueryResult::describe($projection->query('foo')); // "deny"

A potential "gotcha" when working with projections relates to how the system determines what should and should not be considered "explicit" versus "implicit" when querying a field. Consider the following projection and query.

$projection = new Projection([
    'foo' => [
        '*' => false,
        'bar' => true,
    ]
]);

echo QueryResult::describe($projection->query('foo.bar')); // "explicit allow"
echo QueryResult::describe($projection->query('foo.baz')); // "explicit deny"

// Makes sense so far. But what about querying the parent node?
echo QueryResult::describe($projection->query('foo')); // "explicit allow"

While foo isn't given an allow or deny modifier (has a value of true or false), it does show up as a member of our projection, and should be given the "explicit" flag. Additionally, in order to make queries against child nodes, it is assumed to be "allowed," as it wouldn't make sense for a query to mark foo as denied but still mark foo.bar as allowed: how can a child be allowed when its parent wasn't?

Custom Operators

You can add custom operator classes by implementing DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\OperatorInterface, or by extending DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\Operators\AbstractOperator.

For example, you could implement the $eq symbol using the following class.

<?php
    use DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\OperatorInterface;
    use DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\QueryDocumentInterface;
    use Doctrine\ORM\Query\Expr\Composite;

    class EqualsOperator implements OperatorInterface {
        /**
         * {@inheritdoc}
         */
        public function getKey(): string {
            return 'eq';
        }

        /**
         * {@inheritdoc}
         */
        public function process(QueryDocumentInterface $document, string $key, $value, Composite $parent): void {
            $document->expr()->eq($parent, $key, $value);
        }
    }

In the example above, the getKey() method should return the symbol used by the operator in a query document, without the leading dollar sign. The process() method will be called when the operator is used, and will receive the active query document object, the raw field name that the operator is being called on, the value of the field, and the Doctrine\ORM\Query\Expr\Composite object that the resulting expression should be applied to.

In order to make changes to the query builder, you must use the DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\Expr object returned from QueryDocumentInterface::expr(). Any method that takes a field name will automatically resolve the dot-notated field name (such as relationshipField.field) to an appropriately aliased field name. Values will automatically be changed to posisitional parameters, and will be added to the query builder's parameter list.

You would then need to register your operator with your query manager, like so.

<?php
    // $objectManager should be an instance of Doctrine\Common\Persistence\ObjectManager

    $manager = new QueryManager($objectManager);
    $manager->setOperator(new EqualsOperator());

You may also pass an array of custom operators as the second argument to QueryDocument's constructor.

Built-in Operators

By default, this packages comes with several operators that will be automatically registered with instances of DaybreakStudios\DoctrineQueryDocument\QueryManager. You may choose to skip registering built-in operators when creating your query manager by passing false as the third argument in the constructor.

Since most operators are based on MongoDB's query operators, please see Mongo's documentation for information on using the operators.

Operator Accepted Argument(s) Documentation
$and Array<Query> Link
$or Array<Query> Link
$gt Number Link
$gte Number Link
$lt Number Link
$lte Number Link
$eq Any Link
$neq Any Link
$in Array<Any> Link
$nin Array<Any> Link
$like String A MySQL style LIKE string (Link)
$nlike String A negated MySQL LIKE string (Link)
$exists Boolean Link
$size Number or Operators Link [see below]
$contains Scalar see below
$ncontains Scalar see below

Size Operator

The size operator accepts two different types of values. The first is the same type documented in the MongoDB docs: an integer to match exact equality to.

{
    "field": {
        "$size": 5
    }
}

The second is a more complex form, allowing you to use any other comparison operator to match the collection size.

{
    "collection": {
        "$size": {
            "$gt": 0
        }
    },
    "otherCollection": {
        "$size": {
            "$in": [1, 2, 3]
        }
    }
}

This operator utilizes Doctrine's SIZE DQL function to retrieve the number of elements in a to-many association.

Contains Operator

The $contains operator allows you to test if a collection or JSON array contains a given value.

When used on collection valued associations, Doctrine's MEMBER OF syntax is used to test if the given value is contained in the collection.

{
    "collection": {
        "$contains": 1
    }
}

The $contains operator can also be used on JSON fields, or on fields embedded within JSON fields.

{
    "json.nested.field": {
        "$contains": 1
    }
}

Not Contains Operator

This is the negated form of the $contains operator. Refer to the documentation for $contains for more info.

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A tool for building Doctrine queries using MongoDB-style query documents

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