Reviving the original Unreal Tournament on modern systems.
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README.md

Unreal Tournament

This is a continuation of the original Unreal Tournament engine. It is based on several parts from different sources:

This means that what you will find here is not the complete source code to the Unreal Tournament engine. Only some very specific parts have been open-sourced. However, there is plenty to improve on.

The goal is to get Unreal Tournament running smoothly on modern systems.

For now, this project is codenamed Surreal.

Building on Windows

Make sure you have the Windows and DirectX SDKs installed. Also either opt to install the Visual Studio C compilers during the Windows SDK install, or use the compilers from an existing install of Visual Studio.

TODO: Describe how to install GYP on Windows.

Roughly, you will then want to generate the project files and build them. To get any meaningful result, make sure you're building the Release configuration. On the command line, this would look as follows:

gyp --depth=.
msbuild surreal.sln /p:Configuration=Release

Other platforms

Building on other platforms is currently not possible. Care has been taken to make as much of the source compile on Linux and Mac OS X, but there are no compatible binaries to link to.

License situation

A copy of the Artistic License is included in LICENSE.

This license does not apply to the included dependencies SDL, OpenAL Soft, ALURE and MikMod. For their licenses, see documentation found in the individual subdirectories underneath Deps.

All other source code found here effectively uses the Artistic License:

  • The OpenUT project used the Artistic License during its lifetime.

  • No license was included with the 432 source code release. It is assumed both official releases (OpenUT, and the 432 source code) were using the Artistic License.

  • The updated renderers by Chris Dohnal are based on OpenUT source code. The Artistic License applies to this work.

  • Original work done here also uses the Artistic License.