A template for building complex bots for Microsoft Teams - Node.JS version
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Latest commit 1619b28 Sep 28, 2018

README.md

Fastest way to see this project in action

  1. Remix and get the project running on Glitch by simply clicking here:

Remix on Glitch

  1. It will take a few moments for the project to start running. Watch as the project builds/deploys by clicking the "Logs" button on the left. You know it is running when you see something similar to this at the end of the logs:

    Server running successfully
    Endpoint to register in Bot Framework:
    https://incredible-court.glitch.me/api/messages

  2. Using the endpoint given in the logs, register a new bot (or update an existing one) with Bot Framework by using the full endpoint as the bot's "Messaging endpoint". Bot registration is here (open in a new browser tab): https://dev.botframework.com/bots

    NOTE: When you create your bot you will create an App ID and App password - make sure you keep these for later.

  3. Once you have saved your bot and gotten the confirmation that it is created, navigate back to your Glitch project. Open the ".env" file. There, copy/paste your App ID and App password from the step above in the environment variables replacing "NeedToSetThis", e.g.

    MICROSOFT_APP_ID=88888888-1111-2222-3333-999999999999
    MICROSOFT_APP_PASSWORD=abc123abc123abc123abc12
    
  4. With Glitch, file saves happen automatically, and the project is rebuilt seconds after the file is saved. Once you get the confirmation from the logs that your server is running again, press the "Show Live" button at the top. This should open a page with information about your project, verification icons with green vs. red indicators, and a button to Create/Download Manifest file for the project.

  5. Click to Create/Download Manifest taking note of the download location. Once complete, sideload the manifest to a team as described here (open in a new browser tab): https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-teams/sideload

Congratulations!!! You have just created and sideloaded your first Microsoft Teams app! Try adding a configurable tab, at-mentioning your bot by its registered name, or viewing your static tabs.

NOTE: Most of this sample app's functionality will now work. The only limitations are the authentication examples because your app is not registered with AAD nor Visual Studio Team Services.

Steps to run locally

Prerequisites

  • Install Git for windows: https://git-for-windows.github.io/

  • Clone this repo:

    git clone https://github.com/OfficeDev/microsoft-teams-sample-complete-node.git
    
  • Install VSCode: https://code.visualstudio.com/

    • NOTE: When installing, setting "open with" for the file and directory contexts can be helpful
  • Install Node: https://nodejs.org/en/download/

  • Download the npm modules - in the microsoft-teams-bot-template directory run:

    npm install
    
  • (Only needed if wanting to run in Microsoft Teams)
    Install some sort of tunnelling service. These instructions assume you are using ngrok: https://ngrok.com/

  • (Only needed if wanting to run in the Bot Emulator)
    Install the Bot Emulator - click on "Bot Framework Emulator (Mac and Windows)": https://docs.botframework.com/en-us/downloads/#navtitle

    • NOTE: make sure to pin the emulator to your task bar because it can sometimes be difficult to find again

Steps to see the bot running in the Bot Emulator

NOTE: Teams does not work nor render things exactly like the Bot Emulator - this method is meant as just a slightly easier way to see the project's bot running

  1. Open the microsoft-teams-bot-template directory with VSCode

  2. In VSCode go to the debug tab on the left side (looks like a bug), and then at the top click the play button (should be defaulted to running the "Launch - Emulator" configuration)

  3. Once the code is running (bar at the bottom will be orange), connect with the Bot Emulator to the default endpoint, "http://localhost:3978/api/messages", leaving "Microsoft App ID" and "Microsoft App Password" blank

Congratulations!!! You can now chat with the bot in the Bot Emulator!

Steps to see the full app in Microsoft Teams

  1. Begin your tunnelling service to get an https endpoint. For this example ngrok is used. Start an ngrok tunnel with the following command (you'll need the https endpoint for the bot registration):

    ngrok http 3978 --host-header=localhost
    
  2. Register a new bot (or update an existing one) with Bot Framework by using the https endpoint started by ngrok and the extension "/api/messages" as the full endpoint for the bot's "Messaging endpoint". e.g. "https://####abcd.ngrok.io/api/messages" - Bot registration is here (open in a new browser tab): https://dev.botframework.com/bots

    NOTE: When you create your bot you will create an App ID and App password - make sure you keep these for later.

  3. Open the whole project, the microsoft-teams-bot-template directory, with VSCode - navigate to .vscode/launch.json and find the configuration named "Launch - Teams Debug" - here you will need to set three of the environment variables:

    • BASE_URI - gets set to your ngrok's https endpoint
    • MICROSOFT_APP_ID - gets set to your registered bot's app ID
    • MICROSOFT_APP_PASSWORD - gets set to your registered bot's app password
      "BASE_URI": "https://#####abc.ngrok.io"
      "MICROSOFT_APP_ID": "88888888-8888-8888-8888-888888888888"
      "MICROSOFT_APP_PASSWORD": "aaaa22229999dddd0000999"
      

NOTE: making the above changes to the "Launch - Fiddler" configuration and running this configuration will allow the bot's messages to show up in Fiddler. Fiddler must be running, though, for the app to work.

  1. Start your app. Do this by going to the debug tab on the left side of VSCode (looks like a bug) - in the upper left hand corner you will see a dropdown that probably says "Launch - Emulator" - change that to the "Launch - Teams Debug" configuration that you setup (NOTE: certain things can trigger this to revert back to the "Launch - Emulator" configuration, so make sure you are running the correct configuration) - click the play button - the app is running when the bar at the bottom changes to orange

  2. Once the app is running, a manifest file is needed. There are two ways to get this:

    • Easiest - in a browser, navigate to (open in a new browser tab) http://localhost:3978 - this should open a page with information about your project, verification icons with green vs. red indicators, and a button to Create/Download Manifest file for the project. Click to Create/Download Manifest taking note of the download location.

      OR

    • Manual way, but good to know about the manifest file - on the left pane of VSCode, navigate back to the Files Explorer. Navigate to the file, manifest/manifest.json - change:

      • <<REGISTERED_BOT_ID>> (there are 3) change to your registered bot's app ID
      • <<BASE_URI>> (there are 4) change to your https endpoint from ngrok
      • <<BASE_URI_DOMAIN>> (there is 1) change to your https endpoint from ngrok excluding the "https://" part
    • Save the file and zip this file and the bot_blue.png file (located next to it) together to create a manifest.zip file

  3. Once complete, sideload your zipped manifest to a team as described here (open in a new browser tab): https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-teams/sideload

Congratulations!!! You have just created and sideloaded your first Microsoft Teams app! Try adding a configurable tab, at-mentioning your bot by its registered name, or viewing your static tabs.

NOTE: Most of this sample app's functionality will now work. The only limitations are the authentication examples because your app is not registered with AAD nor Visual Studio Team Services.

Overview

This project is meant to help a Teams developer in two ways. First, it is meant to show many examples of how an app can integrate into Teams. Second, it is meant to give a set of patterns, templates, and tools that can be used as a starting point for creating a larger, scalable, more enterprise level bot to work within Teams. Although this project focuses on creating a robust bot, it does include simples examples of tabs as well as examples of how a bot can give links into these tabs.

What it is

At a high level, this project is written in Typescript, built to run a Node server, uses Gulp to run its build steps, runs a Typescript linting tool to keep the code uniform, and uses the BotFramework to handle the bot's requests and responses. This project is designed to be run in VSCode using its debugger in order to leverage breakpoints in Typescript. Most directories will hold a README file which will describe what the files within that directory do.

The easiest way to get started is to follow the steps listed in the "Steps to get started running the Bot Emulator". Once this is complete and running, the easiest way to add your own content is to create a new dialog in src/dialogs by copying one from src/dialogs/examples, change it accordingly, and then instantiate it with the others in the RootDialog.ts.

General Architecture

Most Typescript files that need to be transpiled (and the bulk of the project) reside in the src directory. Most files outside of the src directory are static files used for either configuration or for providing static resources to tabs, e.g. images and html. At build time, Gulp will transpile everything in the src directory and place these transpiled files into a build directory. Gulp will also move a few static files into this new build directory. Because of this, it is recommended that nothing be changed by a developer in the build directory. All changes should be done on the "source" files so rebuilding the project will update the build directory.

The general flow for using this template is to copy/paste/create/build on the example dialogs in the src/dialogs/examples directory, but to put your newly created dialogs outside of the src/dialogs/examples directory (either parallel to the src/dialogs/examples directory or in new directories of your own). In this way, your dialogs do not coexist with the example dialogs so if the time comes to delete the examples, one can simply delete the src/dialogs/examples directory. More information on how to create new dialogs and add to this project can be found in the file src/dialogs/README.md in the "Creating a New Dialog" section.

Files and Directories

  • .vscode

    This directory holds the files used by VSCode to build the project. The launch.json file is where important environment variables will be stored.

  • luis

    This directory holds an example of a json file used to instruct a Luis recognizer for natural language processing.

  • manifest

    This directory holds the skeleton of a manifest.json file that can be altered in order sideload this application into a team.

  • public

    This directory holds static html, image, and javascript files used by the tabs and bot. This is not the only public directory that is used for the tabs, though. This directory holds the html and javascript used for the configuration page of the configurable tab. The main content of the static and configurable tabs is created dynamically by the code in src/tab/TabSetup.ts or comes from the static files placed in build/src/public/exampleDialogs, which are created at build time based upon the typescript dialogs in src/dialogs/examples.

  • src

    This directory holds all of the typescript files, which run the entire application. These files, at build, are transpiled and their transpiled javascript files are placed in the build directory.

  • test

    This is a directory to do two things. First, it acts as a placeholder to give an example of a place to store tests. Second, it is a directory that works to keep the directory hierarchy correct when files are moved into the build directory.

  • gulpfile.js

    This file defines the tasks that Gulp will run to build the project correctly. The task to completely build the project is named "build".

  • tsconfig.json

    This file configures the Typescript transpiling tool.

  • tslint.json

    This file configures the Typescript linting tool.

  • web.config

    This file is a skeleton of a web.config file that can be used to upload this project into an Azure application.

Contributing

This project has adopted the Microsoft Open Source Code of Conduct. For more information see the Code of Conduct FAQ or contact opencode@microsoft.com with any additional questions or comments.