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Clarifying legal status of rubidium42's sounds #4

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Wuzzy2 opened this issue Jan 25, 2021 · 4 comments
Closed

Clarifying legal status of rubidium42's sounds #4

Wuzzy2 opened this issue Jan 25, 2021 · 4 comments

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@Wuzzy2
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@Wuzzy2 Wuzzy2 commented Jan 25, 2021

(This issue is specifically addressed at rubidium42, also known as "Rubidium".)

@rubidium42: It seems that you contributed at least 1 sound to OpenSFX, but from the README it is not exactly clear which sound it was. The license of that work is also not specified.

Can you please tell which sound you contributed and also the license / legal conditions under which you did so? I already asked you in the forums years ago but got no reply. :-(

I ask this because of #2.

@planetmaker
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@planetmaker planetmaker commented Feb 3, 2021

The (early) commit log IMHO clearly indicates which sounds he added from which sources and which he modified to suit the set's needs - documented in src/opensfx.sfo

@FLHerne
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@FLHerne FLHerne commented Feb 3, 2021

As pointed out by @frosch123 on IRC, this ticket seems relevant (although perhaps not helpful for your preferred CC license): https://dev.openttdcoop.org/issues/1364#note-2

I hereby declare that my original work can be relicensed to GPLv2. This includes the readme, changelog, osfx_34.wav, osfx_50.wav and opensfx.psfo.
I furthermore declare that my modifications can be relicensed to GPLv2 as long as the original creator of the samples I edited/mixed are allowing relicensing to GPLv2 as well.

@Wuzzy2
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@Wuzzy2 Wuzzy2 commented Feb 3, 2021

Since we haven't heard back from rubidium yet, I will probably just replace all of the sounds edited by rubidium by taking the sound sources and re-edit them, thus circumventing the license drama. :P
That's a fairly straightforward task that usually only involves cutting off the sounds and fading in and out. The result will probably sound like very similar, players won't notice a difference for those sounds while not being a 1:1 copy of Rubidium's work technically. This is easy for me.

osfx_34.wav and osfx_50.wav are just trivial empty sounds that everyone can generate in Audacity with a few clicks, it is silly to claim copyright on those. I will just slap a CC0 on those, anything else is just silly. But that's kind of a special case here due to triviality.

It's not about my "personal license preferrence". It's about moving to an actually libre license to begin with. Which one we end up exactly, I don't really care deeply, as long it's libre.

As for the readme and text files … Guess we have to roll with GPLv2+ or CDDL (see later posts of Rubidium) for those particular files. I won't throw away the README file just for that. It's going to be fine. I guess a dual licensing would be best, so people can pick and choose.

I guess we'll end up with a license hybrid: CC BY-SA 3.0 for the sounds, GPLv2+ or CDDL for all the text and script files. In any case, the main point is that it's 100% FOSS in the end. CC Sampling Plus must be killed with fire!

BTW, CDDL text is here: https://spdx.org/licenses/CDDL-1.1.html (because it is hard to find)

@Wuzzy2
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@Wuzzy2 Wuzzy2 commented Feb 9, 2021

This issue is no longer relevant due to #13.

@Wuzzy2 Wuzzy2 closed this Feb 9, 2021
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