A SubString manipulation library with multibyte support that extends Stringy
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README.md

A PHP SubString manipulation library with multibyte support that extends Stringy. Offers OO method chaining. Tested and compatible with PHP 5.4+ and HHVM.

This library extends and adds SubString functionality to danielstjules/Stringy you should check it's documentation for methods inherited by SubStringy.

Build Status

Installation

If you're using Composer to manage dependencies, you can include the following in your composer.json file:

{
    "require": {
        "danielstjules/stringy": "^3.1",
        "tcb13/substringy": "^1.0"
    }
}

Then, after running composer update or php composer.phar update, you can load the class using Composer's autoloading:

require 'vendor/autoload.php';

Otherwise, you can simply require the file directly:

require_once 'path/to/SubStringy/src/SubStringy.php';

And in either case, I'd suggest using an alias.

use SubStringy\SubStringy as S;

OO and Chaining

The library offers OO method chaining, as seen below:

use Stringy\Stringy as S;
echo S::create('Fòô     Bàř', 'UTF-8')->collapseWhitespace()->swapCase();  // 'fÒÔ bÀŘ'

Stringy\Stringy has a __toString() method, which returns the current string when the object is used in a string context, ie: (string) S::create('foo') // 'foo'

Use as a Trait

The library also offers the possibility to be used a trait. With this trait you can build your own abstraction of danielstjules/Stringy and combine multiple extensions:

namespace Vendor\YourPackage;

use Stringy\Stringy;
use SubStringy\SubStringyTrait;
use SliceableStringy\SliceableStringyTrait;

class MyStringy extends Stringy
{
    use SubStringyTrait;
    use SliceableStringyTrait;
}

On the example bellow we can use MyStringy to create Stringy objects enhanced with the functionality of both SubStringy and SliceableStringy:

use YourPackage\MyStringy as S;
$sliceableSubstring = S::create('What are your plans today?')->substringAfterFirst('plans ');
echo $sliceableSubstring['4:6'];

Implemented Interfaces

SubStringy\SubStringy implements the IteratorAggregate interface, meaning that foreach can be used with an instance of the class:

$stringy = S::create('Fòô Bàř', 'UTF-8');
foreach ($stringy as $char) {
    echo $char;
}
// 'Fòô Bàř'

It implements the Countable interface, enabling the use of count() to retrieve the number of characters in the string:

$stringy = S::create('Fòô', 'UTF-8');
count($stringy);  // 3

Furthermore, the ArrayAccess interface has been implemented. As a result, isset() can be used to check if a character at a specific index exists. And since Stringy\Stringy is immutable, any call to offsetSet or offsetUnset will throw an exception. offsetGet has been implemented, however, and accepts both positive and negative indexes. Invalid indexes result in an OutOfBoundsException.

$stringy = S::create('Bàř', 'UTF-8');
echo $stringy[2];     // 'ř'
echo $stringy[-2];    // 'à'
isset($stringy[-4]);  // false

$stringy[3];          // OutOfBoundsException
$stringy[2] = 'a';    // Exception

PHP 5.6 Creation

As of PHP 5.6, use function is available for importing functions. SubStringy exposes a namespaced function, SubStringy\create, which emits the same behaviour as SubStringy\SubStringy::create(). If running PHP 5.6, or another runtime that supports the use function syntax, you can take advantage of an even simpler API as seen below:

use function SubStringy\create as s;

// Instead of: S::create('Fòô     Bàř', 'UTF-8')
s('Fòô     Bàř', 'UTF-8')->collapseWhitespace()->swapCase();

Methods

All methods that return a SubStringy object or string do not modify the original. SubStringy objects are immutable.

Since this library extends and adds SubString functionality to danielstjules/Stringy you should check it's documentation (https://github.com/danielstjules/Stringy/blob/master/README.md) for methods that can also be transparently used when working with SubStringy.

Note: If $encoding is not given, it defaults to mb_internal_encoding().

substringAfterFirst

$stringy->substringAfterFirst(string $separator)

Gets the substring after the first occurrence of a separator. If no match is found returns false.

S::create('What are your plans today?')->substringAfterFirst('plans ');

substringAfterLast

$stringy->substringAfterLast(string $separator)

Gets the substring after the last occurrence of a separator. If no match is found returns false.

S::create('This is a String. How cool can a String be after all?')->substringAfterLast('String ');

substringBeforeFirst

$stringy->substringBeforeFirst(string $separator)

Gets the substring before the first occurrence of a separator. If no match is found returns false.

S::create('What are your plans today?')->substringBeforeFirst(' plans');

substringBeforeLast

$stringy->substringBeforeLast(string $separator)

Gets the substring before the last occurrence of a separator. If no match is found returns false.

S::create('What are your plans today? Any plans for tomorrow?')->substringBeforeLast(' plans');

substringBetween

$stringy->substringBetween(string $start, string $end)

Extracts a substring from between two substrings present on the current string.

S::create('What are your plans today?')->substringBetween('your ', ' today');

substringCount

$stringy->substringCount(string $substr)

Count the number of substring occurrences on the current string

S::create('how are you? are you sure you are ok?')->substringCount('are');

Links

The following is a list of libraries that extend Stringy:

Tests

From the project directory, tests can be ran using phpunit

License

Released under the MIT License - see LICENSE.txt for details.