New issue

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community.

By clicking “Sign up for GitHub”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy statement. We’ll occasionally send you account related emails.

Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account

Hacktoberfest-Friendly Issues #2978

Closed
cjnething opened this Issue Oct 2, 2017 · 16 comments

Comments

Projects
None yet
@cjnething
Contributor

cjnething commented Oct 2, 2017

For all of our Hacktoberfest contributors looking for a great way to get started with the Framework Benchmarks project, this issue is going to be a thread to discuss beginner-friendly tasks in the project.

If you're a beginner contributor: Please feel free to ask any questions you may have on this thread. These can be about the project as a whole, how to find issues, how to create well-organized merge requests, etc.

If you're a veteran contributor: Please comment any issues you think would be a good project for beginners!

Thanks everyone, and Happy Hacktoberfest!

@cjnething

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@cjnething

cjnething Oct 2, 2017

Contributor

Some ideas:

  • Pick the language/framework of your choice, find a dependency that can be upgraded, and upgrade its version
  • Find a part of the project that is unclear or undocumented, and add some clarity to our documentation
Contributor

cjnething commented Oct 2, 2017

Some ideas:

  • Pick the language/framework of your choice, find a dependency that can be upgraded, and upgrade its version
  • Find a part of the project that is unclear or undocumented, and add some clarity to our documentation
@Iqlaas

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@Iqlaas

Iqlaas Oct 2, 2017

Thank you @cjnething . Me a beginner contributor.

Iqlaas commented Oct 2, 2017

Thank you @cjnething . Me a beginner contributor.

@wotta

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@wotta

wotta Oct 2, 2017

@cjnething I see that you use laravel 4.2 to compare but shouldn't it be better to use the latest version ?
If so should I make a new folder named laraver55 or update the existing ?

wotta commented Oct 2, 2017

@cjnething I see that you use laravel 4.2 to compare but shouldn't it be better to use the latest version ?
If so should I make a new folder named laraver55 or update the existing ?

@nbrady-techempower

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@nbrady-techempower

nbrady-techempower Oct 2, 2017

Member

@concept-core Updating the existing test would be preferable. Feel free to open a pull request with changes and ask questions there if you need any help. Thanks!

Member

nbrady-techempower commented Oct 2, 2017

@concept-core Updating the existing test would be preferable. Feel free to open a pull request with changes and ask questions there if you need any help. Thanks!

@wotta

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@wotta

wotta Oct 2, 2017

@nbrady-techempower I will check it out when I am home. Thanks for the answer !

wotta commented Oct 2, 2017

@nbrady-techempower I will check it out when I am home. Thanks for the answer !

@rafaelmilanibarbosa

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@rafaelmilanibarbosa

rafaelmilanibarbosa Oct 6, 2017

@cjnething Hi im a beginner contributor to.

rafaelmilanibarbosa commented Oct 6, 2017

@cjnething Hi im a beginner contributor to.

@aaron-hall-7

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@aaron-hall-7

aaron-hall-7 Oct 16, 2017

Contributor

Submitted PR #2992 to upgrade CakePHP to 2.10.3

Contributor

aaron-hall-7 commented Oct 16, 2017

Submitted PR #2992 to upgrade CakePHP to 2.10.3

@garg000dhruv

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@garg000dhruv

garg000dhruv Oct 19, 2017

@cjnething First-time contributor "to-be" over here. I'd love to help out and will take a look if I can find something.

garg000dhruv commented Oct 19, 2017

@cjnething First-time contributor "to-be" over here. I'd love to help out and will take a look if I can find something.

@eliascolares

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@eliascolares

eliascolares commented Oct 24, 2017

Thanks

@nbrady-techempower

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@nbrady-techempower

nbrady-techempower Nov 9, 2017

Member

Thanks @cjnething for hosting this and thanks everyone for contributing! Take your coats off and stay a while! :)

Member

nbrady-techempower commented Nov 9, 2017

Thanks @cjnething for hosting this and thanks everyone for contributing! Take your coats off and stay a while! :)

@flip111

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@flip111

flip111 Dec 12, 2017

Contributor

Why are languages such as C++ Rust C haskell Go sometimes much slower in the benchmarks than PHP JS Ruby Python? This is so counter intuitive that i don't get these benchmarks at all ...

What about requests/sec, latency, concurrent connections?

Contributor

flip111 commented Dec 12, 2017

Why are languages such as C++ Rust C haskell Go sometimes much slower in the benchmarks than PHP JS Ruby Python? This is so counter intuitive that i don't get these benchmarks at all ...

What about requests/sec, latency, concurrent connections?

@msmith-techempower

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@msmith-techempower

msmith-techempower Dec 12, 2017

Member

Why are languages such as C++ Rust C haskell Go sometimes much slower in the benchmarks than PHP JS Ruby Python? This is so counter intuitive that i don't get these benchmarks at all ...

I can write you a poorly performing application in any language.

Member

msmith-techempower commented Dec 12, 2017

Why are languages such as C++ Rust C haskell Go sometimes much slower in the benchmarks than PHP JS Ruby Python? This is so counter intuitive that i don't get these benchmarks at all ...

I can write you a poorly performing application in any language.

@flip111

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@flip111

flip111 Dec 12, 2017

Contributor

I can write you a poorly performing application in any language.

Sure, i just expected the language to matter more than it does now .. are these frameworks really so poorly written ???

Contributor

flip111 commented Dec 12, 2017

I can write you a poorly performing application in any language.

Sure, i just expected the language to matter more than it does now .. are these frameworks really so poorly written ???

@msmith-techempower

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@msmith-techempower

msmith-techempower Dec 12, 2017

Member

Sure, i just expected the language to matter more than it does now .. are these frameworks really so poorly written ???

I don't know to which tests, in particular, you refer, but the latest benchmarks (and the next round of previews as well as most of the previous runs) have C/C++/Java as the top performers. Go often does well in several tests also.

Rust is a fairly new language and so I would not expect the frameworks to have had the same amount of time to iterate their designs to increase performance, but Tokio seems to be doing very well.

I cannot speak to Haskell; it is Martian to me.

Member

msmith-techempower commented Dec 12, 2017

Sure, i just expected the language to matter more than it does now .. are these frameworks really so poorly written ???

I don't know to which tests, in particular, you refer, but the latest benchmarks (and the next round of previews as well as most of the previous runs) have C/C++/Java as the top performers. Go often does well in several tests also.

Rust is a fairly new language and so I would not expect the frameworks to have had the same amount of time to iterate their designs to increase performance, but Tokio seems to be doing very well.

I cannot speak to Haskell; it is Martian to me.

@flip111

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@flip111

flip111 Dec 13, 2017

Contributor

For example in json serialization there is api star on 6 and falcon on 12. Both python frameworks. Out perform:

  • revel (GO)
  • rouille (rust)
  • wt (C++)
  • cutelyst-pf (C++)
  • play2-scala-anorm-li (Scala)
  • scruffy (Scala)
  • http4s (Scala)
  • octopus (lua) -- did you try luaJIT by the way?
  • akka-http (Scala)
  • echo (Go)
  • libreactor (C)
  • duda i/o (C)
  • nickel (Rust)
  • lapus (lua)
  • iron (rust)
  • cpoll_cppsp (C++)

Similar things going on for other types of benchmarks

Contributor

flip111 commented Dec 13, 2017

For example in json serialization there is api star on 6 and falcon on 12. Both python frameworks. Out perform:

  • revel (GO)
  • rouille (rust)
  • wt (C++)
  • cutelyst-pf (C++)
  • play2-scala-anorm-li (Scala)
  • scruffy (Scala)
  • http4s (Scala)
  • octopus (lua) -- did you try luaJIT by the way?
  • akka-http (Scala)
  • echo (Go)
  • libreactor (C)
  • duda i/o (C)
  • nickel (Rust)
  • lapus (lua)
  • iron (rust)
  • cpoll_cppsp (C++)

Similar things going on for other types of benchmarks

@RX14

This comment has been minimized.

Show comment
Hide comment
@RX14

RX14 Dec 13, 2017

Contributor

@flip111 Those python frameworks probably actually execute extremely little python for each request, they will essentially be benchmarking C code which does the HTTP parsing, network, and JSON. And a tiny amount of plumbing code for all those pieces written in python.

Contributor

RX14 commented Dec 13, 2017

@flip111 Those python frameworks probably actually execute extremely little python for each request, they will essentially be benchmarking C code which does the HTTP parsing, network, and JSON. And a tiny amount of plumbing code for all those pieces written in python.

Sign up for free to join this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in to comment