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API

In these API docs, a higher-order component (HOC) refers to a function that accepts a single React component and returns a new React component.

const EnhancedComponent = hoc(BaseComponent)

This form makes HOCs (sometimes called enhancers) composable:

const composedHoc = compose(hoc1, hoc2, hoc3)

// Same as
const composedHoc = BaseComponent => hoc1(hoc2(hoc3(BaseComponent)))

Most Recompose helpers are functions that return higher-order components:

const hoc = mapProps(ownerProps => childProps)
const EnhancedComponent = hoc(BaseComponent)

// Same as
const EnhancedComponent = mapProps(ownerProps => childProps)(BaseComponent)

Some, like pure, are higher-order components themselves:

const PureComponent = pure(BaseComponent)

TOC

Higher-order components

mapProps()

mapProps(
  propsMapper: (ownerProps: Object) => Object,
): HigherOrderComponent

Accepts a function that maps owner props to a new collection of props that are passed to the base component.

mapProps() pairs well with functional utility libraries like lodash/fp. For example, Recompose does not come with a omitProps() function, but you can easily build one using lodash-fp's omit():

const omitProps = keys => mapProps(props => omit(keys, props))

// Because of currying in lodash-fp, this is the same as
const omitProps = compose(mapProps, omit)

withProps()

withProps(
  createProps: (ownerProps: Object) => Object | Object
): HigherOrderComponent

Like mapProps(), except the newly created props are merged with the owner props.

Instead of a function, you can also pass a props object directly. In this form, it is similar to defaultProps(), except the provided props take precedence over props from the owner.

withPropsOnChange()

withPropsOnChange(
  shouldMapOrKeys: Array<string> | (props: Object, nextProps: Object) => boolean,
  createProps: (ownerProps: Object) => Object
): HigherOrderComponent

Like withProps(), except the new props are only created when one of the owner props specified by shouldMapOrKeys changes. This helps ensure that expensive computations inside createProps() are only executed when necessary.

Instead of an array of prop keys, the first parameter can also be a function that returns a boolean, given the current props and the next props. This allows you to customize when createProps() should be called.

withHandlers()

withHandlers(
  handlerCreators: {
    [handlerName: string]: (props: Object) => Function
  } |
  handlerCreatorsFactory: (initialProps) => {
    [handlerName: string]: (props: Object) => Function
  }
): HigherOrderComponent

Takes an object map of handler creators or a factory function. These are higher-order functions that accept a set of props and return a function handler:

This allows the handler to access the current props via closure, without needing to change its signature.

Handlers are passed to the base component as immutable props, whose identities are preserved across renders. This avoids a common pitfall where functional components create handlers inside the body of the function, which results in a new handler on every render and breaks downstream shouldComponentUpdate() optimizations that rely on prop equality. This is the main reason to use withHandlers to create handlers instead of using mapProps or withProps, which will create new handlers every time when it get updated.

Usage example:

const enhance = compose(
  withState('value', 'updateValue', ''),
  withHandlers({
    onChange: props => event => {
      props.updateValue(event.target.value)
    },
    onSubmit: props => event => {
      event.preventDefault()
      submitForm(props.value)
    }
  })
)

const Form = enhance(({ value, onChange, onSubmit }) =>
  <form onSubmit={onSubmit}>
    <label>Value
      <input type="text" value={value} onChange={onChange} />
    </label>
  </form>
)

defaultProps()

defaultProps(
  props: Object
): HigherOrderComponent

Specifies props to be passed by default to the base component. Similar to withProps(), except the props from the owner take precedence over props provided to the HoC.

Although it has a similar effect, using the defaultProps() HoC is not the same as setting the static defaultProps property directly on the component.

renameProp()

renameProp(
  oldName: string,
  newName: string
): HigherOrderComponent

Renames a single prop.

renameProps()

renameProps(
  nameMap: { [key: string]: string }
): HigherOrderComponent

Renames multiple props, using a map of old prop names to new prop names.

flattenProp()

flattenProp(
  propName: string
): HigherOrderComponent

Flattens a prop so that its fields are spread out into the props object.

const enhance = compose(
  withProps({
    object: { a: 'a', b: 'b' },
    c: 'c'
  }),
  flattenProp('object')
)
const Abc = enhance(BaseComponent)

// Base component receives props: { a: 'a', b: 'b', c: 'c', object: { a: 'a', b: 'b' } }

An example use case for flattenProp() is when receiving fragment data from Relay. Relay fragments are passed as an object of props, which you often want flattened out into its constituent fields:

// The `post` prop is an object with title, author, and content fields
const enhance = flattenProp('post')
const Post = enhance(({ title, content, author }) =>
  <article>
    <h1>{title}</h1>
    <h2>By {author.name}</h2>
    <div>{content}</div>
  </article>
)

withState()

withState(
  stateName: string,
  stateUpdaterName: string,
  initialState: any | (props: Object) => any
): HigherOrderComponent

Passes two additional props to the base component: a state value, and a function to update that state value. The state updater has the following signature:

stateUpdater<T>((prevValue: T) => T, ?callback: Function): void
stateUpdater(newValue: any, ?callback: Function): void

The first form accepts a function which maps the previous state value to a new state value. You'll likely want to use this state updater along with withHandlers() to create specific updater functions. For example, to create a HoC that adds basic counting functionality to a component:

const addCounting = compose(
  withState('counter', 'setCounter', 0),
  withHandlers({
    increment: ({ setCounter }) => () => setCounter(n => n + 1),
    decrement: ({ setCounter }) => () =>  setCounter(n => n - 1),
    reset: ({ setCounter }) => () => setCounter(0)
  })
)

The second form accepts a single value, which is used as the new state.

Both forms accept an optional second parameter, a callback function that will be executed once setState() is completed and the component is re-rendered.

An initial state value is required. It can be either the state value itself, or a function that returns an initial state given the initial props.

withStateHandlers()

withStateHandlers(
  initialState: Object | (props: Object) => any,
  stateUpdaters: {
    [key: string]: (state:Object, props:Object) => (...payload: any[]) => Object
  }
)

Passes state object properties and immutable updater functions in a form of (...payload: any[]) => Object to the base component.

Every state updater function accepts state, props and payload and must return a new state or undefined. The new state is shallowly merged with the previous state. Returning undefined does not cause a component rerender.

Example:

  const Counter = withStateHandlers(
    ({ initialCounter = 0 }) => ({
      counter: initialCounter,
    }),
    {
      incrementOn: ({ counter }) => (value) => ({
        counter: counter + value,
      }),
      decrementOn: ({ counter }) => (value) => ({
        counter: counter - value,
      }),
      resetCounter: (_, { initialCounter = 0 }) => () => ({
        counter: initialCounter,
      }),
    }
  )(
    ({ counter, incrementOn, decrementOn, resetCounter }) =>
      <div>
        <Button onClick={() => incrementOn(2)}>Inc</Button>
        <Button onClick={() => decrementOn(3)}>Dec</Button>
        <Button onClick={resetCounter}>Reset</Button>
      </div>
  )

withReducer()

withReducer<S, A>(
  stateName: string,
  dispatchName: string,
  reducer: (state: S, action: A) => S,
  initialState: S | (ownerProps: Object) => S
): HigherOrderComponent

Similar to withState(), but state updates are applied using a reducer function. A reducer is a function that receives a state and an action, and returns a new state.

Passes two additional props to the base component: a state value, and a dispatch method. The dispatch method has the following signature:

dispatch(action: Object, ?callback: Function): void

It sends an action to the reducer, after which the new state is applied. It also accepts an optional second parameter, a callback function with the new state as its only argument.

branch()

branch(
  test: (props: Object) => boolean,
  left: HigherOrderComponent,
  right: ?HigherOrderComponent
): HigherOrderComponent

Accepts a test function and two higher-order components. The test function is passed the props from the owner. If it returns true, the left higher-order component is applied to BaseComponent; otherwise, the right higher-order component is applied. If the right is not supplied, it will by default render the wrapped component.

renderComponent()

renderComponent(
  Component: ReactClass | ReactFunctionalComponent | string
): HigherOrderComponent

Takes a component and returns a higher-order component version of that component.

This is useful in combination with another helper that expects a higher-order component, like branch():

// `isLoading()` is a function that returns whether or not the component
// is in a loading state
const spinnerWhileLoading = isLoading =>
  branch(
    isLoading,
    renderComponent(Spinner) // `Spinner` is a React component
  )

// Now use the `spinnerWhileLoading()` helper to add a loading spinner to any
// base component
const enhance = spinnerWhileLoading(
  props => !(props.title && props.author && props.content)
)
const Post = enhance(({ title, author, content }) =>
  <article>
    <h1>{title}</h1>
    <h2>By {author.name}</h2>
    <div>{content}</div>
  </article>
)

renderNothing()

renderNothing: HigherOrderComponent

A higher-order component that always renders null.

This is useful in combination with another helper that expects a higher-order component, like branch():

// `hasNoData()` is a function that returns true if the component has
// no data
const hideIfNoData = hasNoData =>
  branch(
    hasNoData,
    renderNothing
  )

// Now use the `hideIfNoData()` helper to hide any base component
const enhance = hideIfNoData(
  props => !(props.title && props.author && props.content)
)
const Post = enhance(({ title, author, content }) =>
  <article>
    <h1>{title}</h1>
    <h2>By {author.name}</h2>
    <div>{content}</div>
  </article>
)

shouldUpdate()

shouldUpdate(
  test: (props: Object, nextProps: Object) => boolean
): HigherOrderComponent

Higher-order component version of shouldComponentUpdate(). The test function accepts both the current props and the next props.

pure()

pure: HigherOrderComponent

Prevents the component from updating unless a prop has changed. Uses shallowEqual() to test for changes.

onlyUpdateForKeys()

onlyUpdateForKeys(
  propKeys: Array<string>
): HigherOrderComponent

Prevents the component from updating unless a prop corresponding to one of the given keys has updated. Uses shallowEqual() to test for changes.

This is a much better optimization than the popular approach of using PureRenderMixin, shouldPureComponentUpdate(), or Recompose's own pure() helper, because those tools compare every prop, whereas onlyUpdateForKeys() only cares about the props that you specify.

Example:

/**
 * If the owner passes unnecessary props (say, an array of comments), it will
 * not lead to wasted render cycles.
 *
 * Goes well with destructuring because it's clear which props the component
 * actually cares about.
 */
const enhance = onlyUpdateForKeys(['title', 'content', 'author'])
const Post = enhance(({ title, content, author }) =>
  <article>
    <h1>{title}</h1>
    <h2>By {author.name}</h2>
    <div>{content}</div>
  </article>
)

onlyUpdateForPropTypes()

onlyUpdateForPropTypes: HigherOrderComponent

Works like onlyUpdateForKeys(), but prop keys are inferred from the propTypes of the base component. Useful in conjunction with setPropTypes().

If the base component does not have any propTypes, the component will never receive any updates. This probably isn't the expected behavior, so a warning is printed to the console.

import PropTypes from 'prop-types'; // You need to import prop-types. See https://facebook.github.io/react/docs/typechecking-with-proptypes.html

const enhance = compose(
  onlyUpdateForPropTypes,
  setPropTypes({
    title: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
    content: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
    author: PropTypes.object.isRequired
  })
)

const Post = enhance(({ title, content, author }) =>
  <article>
    <h1>{title}</h1>
    <h2>By {author.name}</h2>
    <div>{content}</div>
  </article>
)

withContext()

withContext(
  childContextTypes: Object,
  getChildContext: (props: Object) => Object
): HigherOrderComponent

Provides context to the component's children. childContextTypes is an object of React prop types. getChildContext() is a function that returns the child context. Use along with getContext().

getContext()

getContext(
  contextTypes: Object
): HigherOrderComponent

Gets values from context and passes them along as props. Use along with withContext().

lifecycle()

lifecycle(
  spec: Object,
): HigherOrderComponent

A higher-order component version of React.Component(). It supports the entire Component API, except the render() method, which is implemented by default (and overridden if specified; an error will be logged to the console). You should use this helper as an escape hatch, in case you need to access component lifecycle methods.

Any state changes made in a lifecycle method, by using setState, will be propagated to the wrapped component as props.

Example:

const PostsList = ({ posts }) => (
  <ul>{posts.map(p => <li>{p.title}</li>)}</ul>
)

const PostsListWithData = lifecycle({
  componentDidMount() {
    fetchPosts().then(posts => {
      this.setState({ posts });
    })
  }
})(PostsList);

toClass()

toClass: HigherOrderComponent

Takes a function component and wraps it in a class. This can be used as a fallback for libraries that need to add a ref to a component, like Relay.

If the base component is already a class, it returns the given component.

toRenderProps()

toRenderProps(
  hoc: HigherOrderComponent
): ReactFunctionalComponent

Creates a component that accepts a function as a children with the high-order component applied to it.

Example:

const enhance = withProps(({ foo }) => ({ fooPlusOne: foo + 1 }))
const Enhanced = toRenderProps(enhance)

<Enhanced foo={1}>{({ fooPlusOne }) => <h1>{fooPlusOne}</h1>}</Enhanced>
// renders <h1>2</h1>

fromRenderProps()

fromRenderProps(
  RenderPropsComponent: ReactClass | ReactFunctionalComponent,
  propsMapper: (...props: any[]) => Object,
  renderPropName?: string
): HigherOrderComponent

Takes a render props component and a function that maps props to a new collection of props that are passed to the base component.

The default value of third parameter (renderPropName) is children. You can use any prop (e.g., render) for render props component to work.

Check the official documents Render Props for more details.

import { fromRenderProps } from 'recompose';
const { Consumer: ThemeConsumer } = React.createContext({ theme: 'dark' });
const { Consumer: I18NConsumer } = React.createContext({ i18n: 'en' });
const RenderPropsComponent = ({ render, value }) => render({ value: 1 });

const EnhancedApp = compose(
  // Context (Function as Child Components)
  fromRenderProps(ThemeConsumer, ({ theme }) => ({ theme })),
  fromRenderProps(I18NConsumer, ({ i18n }) => ({ locale: i18n })),
  // Render props
  fromRenderProps(RenderPropsComponent, ({ value }) => ({ value }), 'render'),
)(App);

// Same as
const EnhancedApp = () => (
  <ThemeConsumer>
    {({ theme }) => (
      <I18NConsumer>
        {({ i18n }) => (
          <RenderPropsComponent
            render={({ value }) => (
              <App theme={theme} locale={i18n} value={value} />
            )}
          />
        )}
      </I18NConsumer>
    )}
  </ThemeConsumer>
)

Static property helpers

These functions look like higher-order component helpers — they are curried and component-last. However, rather than returning a new component, they mutate the base component by setting or overriding a static property.

setStatic()

setStatic(
  key: string,
  value: any
): HigherOrderComponent

Assigns a value to a static property on the base component.

setPropTypes()

setPropTypes(
  propTypes: Object
): HigherOrderComponent

Assigns to the propTypes property on the base component.

setDisplayName()

setDisplayName(
  displayName: string
): HigherOrderComponent

Assigns to the displayName property on the base component.

Utilities

Recompose also includes some additional helpers that aren't higher-order components, but are still useful.

compose()

compose(...functions: Array<Function>): Function

Use to compose multiple higher-order components into a single higher-order component. This works exactly like the function of the same name in Redux, or lodash's flowRight().

getDisplayName()

getDisplayName(
  component: ReactClass | ReactFunctionalComponent
): string

Returns the display name of a React component. Falls back to 'Component'.

wrapDisplayName()

wrapDisplayName(
  component: ReactClass | ReactFunctionalComponent,
  wrapperName: string
): string

Returns a wrapped version of a React component's display name. For instance, if the display name of component is 'Post', and wrapperName is 'mapProps', the return value is 'mapProps(Post)'. Most Recompose higher-order components use wrapDisplayName().

shallowEqual()

shallowEqual(a: Object, b: Object): boolean

Returns true if objects are shallowly equal.

isClassComponent()

isClassComponent(value: any): boolean

Returns true if the given value is a React component class.

createSink()

createSink(callback: (props: Object) => void): ReactClass

Creates a component that renders nothing (null) but calls a callback when receiving new props.

componentFromProp()

componentFromProp(propName: string): ReactFunctionalComponent

Creates a component that accepts a component as a prop and renders it with the remaining props.

Example:

const enhance = defaultProps({ component: 'button' })
const Button = enhance(componentFromProp('component'))

<Button foo="bar" /> // renders <button foo="bar" />
<Button component="a" foo="bar" />  // renders <a foo="bar" />
<Button component={Link} foo="bar" />  // renders <Link foo="bar" />

nest()

nest(
  ...Components: Array<ReactClass | ReactFunctionalComponent | string>
): ReactClass

Composes components by nesting each one inside the previous. For example:

// Given components A, B, and C
const ABC = nest(A, B, C)
<ABC pass="through">Child</ABC>

// Effectively the same as
<A pass="through">
  <B pass="through">
    <C pass="through">
      Child
    </C>
  </B>
</A>

hoistStatics()

hoistStatics(
  hoc: HigherOrderComponent,
  blacklist: Object
): HigherOrderComponent

Augments a higher-order component so that when used, it copies non-react static properties from the base component to the new component. This is helpful when using Recompose with libraries like Relay.

Note that this only hoists non-react statics. The following static properties will not be hoisted: childContextTypes, contextTypes, defaultProps, displayName, getDefaultProps, mixins, propTypes, and type. The following native static methods will also be ignored: name, length, prototype, caller, arguments, and arity.

You can exclude more static properties by passing them as blacklist object:

hoistStatics(EnhancedComponent, { foo: true })(BaseComponent) // Exclude `foo`

Observable utilities

It turns out that much of the React Component API can be expressed in terms of observables:

  • Instead of setState(), combine multiple streams together.
  • Instead of getInitialState(), use startWith() or concat().
  • Instead of shouldComponentUpdate(), use distinctUntilChanged(), debounce(), etc.

Other benefits include:

  • No distinction between state and props – everything is a stream.
  • No need to worry about unsubscribing from event listeners. Subscriptions are handled for you.
  • Sideways data loading is trivial – just combine the props stream with an external stream.
  • Access to an ecosystem of observable libraries, such as RxJS.

Recompose's observable utilities can be configured to work with any observable or stream-like library. See setObservableConfig() below for details.

componentFromStream()

componentFromStream(
  propsToReactNode: (props$: Observable<object>) => Observable<ReactNode>
): ReactComponent

Creates a React component by mapping an observable stream of props to a stream of React nodes (vdom).

You can think of propsToReactNode as a function f such that

const vdom$ = f(props$)

where props$ is a stream of props and vdom$ is a stream of React nodes. This formulation similar to the popular notion of React views as a function, often communicated as

v = f(d)

Example:

const Counter = componentFromStream(props$ => {
  const { handler: increment, stream: increment$ } = createEventHandler()
  const { handler: decrement, stream: decrement$ } = createEventHandler()
  const count$ = Observable.merge(
      increment$.mapTo(1),
      decrement$.mapTo(-1)
    )
    .startWith(0)
    .scan((count, n) => count + n, 0)

  return props$.combineLatest(
    count$,
    (props, count) =>
      <div {...props}>
        Count: {count}
        <button onClick={increment}>+</button>
        <button onClick={decrement}>-</button>
      </div>
  )
})

componentFromStreamWithConfig()

componentFromStreamWithConfig<Stream>(
  config: {
    fromESObservable<T>: ?(observable: Observable<T>) => Stream<T>,
    toESObservable<T>: ?(stream: Stream<T>) => Observable<T>,
  }
) => (
  propsToReactNode: (props$: Stream<object>) => Stream<ReactNode>
): ReactComponent

Alternative to componentFromStream() that accepts an observable config and returns a customized componentFromStream() which uses the specified observable library. This option is recommended if you want to avoid global state with setObservableConfig().

Note: The following configuration modules are not included in the main export. You must import them individually, as shown in the examples.

RxJS

import rxjsConfig from 'recompose/rxjsObservableConfig'
const componentFromStream = componentFromStreamWithConfig(rxjsConfig)

RxJS 4 (legacy)

import rxjs4Config from 'recompose/rxjs4ObservableConfig'
const componentFromStream = componentFromStreamWithConfig(rxjs4Config)

most

import mostConfig from 'recompose/mostObservableConfig'
const componentFromStream = componentFromStreamWithConfig(mostConfig)

xstream

import xstreamConfig from 'recompose/xstreamObservableConfig'
const componentFromStream = componentFromStreamWithConfig(xstreamConfig)

Bacon

import baconConfig from 'recompose/baconObservableConfig'
const componentFromStream = componentFromStreamWithConfig(baconConfig)

Kefir

import kefirConfig from 'recompose/kefirObservableConfig'
const componentFromStream = componentFromStreamWithConfig(kefirConfig)

Flyd

import flydConfig from 'recompose/flydObservableConfig'
const componentFromStream = componentFromStreamWithConfig(flydConfig)

mapPropsStream()

mapPropsStream(
  ownerPropsToChildProps: (props$: Observable<object>) => Observable<object>,
  BaseComponent: ReactElementType
): ReactComponent

A higher-order component version of componentFromStream() — accepts a function that maps an observable stream of owner props to a stream of child props, rather than directly to a stream of React nodes. The child props are then passed to a base component.

You may want to use this version to interoperate with other Recompose higher-order component helpers.

mapPropsStreamWithConfig()

mapPropsStreamWithConfig<Stream>(
  config: {
    fromESObservable<T>: ?(observable: Observable<T>) => Stream<T>,
    toESObservable<T>: ?(stream: Stream<T>) => Observable<T>,
  },
) => (
  ownerPropsToChildProps: (props$: Stream<object>) => Stream<object>,
  BaseComponent: ReactElementType
): ReactComponent

Alternative to mapPropsStream() that accepts a observable config and returns a customized mapPropsStream() that uses the specified observable library. See componentFromStreamWithConfig() above.

const enhance = mapPropsStream(props$ => {
  const timeElapsed$ = Observable.interval(1000)
  return props$.combineLatest(timeElapsed$, (props, timeElapsed) => ({
    ...props,
    timeElapsed
  }))
})

const Timer = enhance(({ timeElapsed }) =>
  <div>Time elapsed: {timeElapsed}</div>
)

createEventHandler()

createEventHandler<T>(): {
  handler: (value: T) => void,
  stream: Observable<T>
}

Returns an object with properties handler and stream. stream is an observable sequence, and handler is a function that pushes new values onto the sequence. Useful for creating event handlers like onClick.

createEventHandlerWithConfig()

createEventHandlerWithConfig<T>(
  config: {
    fromESObservable<T>: ?(observable: Observable<T>) => Stream<T>,
    toESObservable<T>: ?(stream: Stream<T>) => Observable<T>,
  }
) => (): {
  handler: (value: T) => void,
  stream: Observable<T>
}

Alternative to createEventHandler() that accepts an observable config and returns a customized createEventHandler() that uses the specified observable library. See componentFromStreamWithConfig() above.

setObservableConfig()

setObservableConfig<Stream>({
  fromESObservable<T>: ?(observable: Observable<T>) => Stream<T>,
  toESObservable<T>: ?(stream: Stream<T>) => Observable<T>
})

Note: setObservableConfig() uses global state, and could break apps if used inside a package intended to be shared. See componentFromStreamWithConfig() and mapPropsStreamWithConfig() as alternatives for package authors.

Observables in Recompose are plain objects that conform to the ES Observable proposal. Usually, you'll want to use them alongside an observable library like RxJS so that you have access to its suite of operators. By default, this requires you to convert the observables provided by Recompose before applying any transforms:

mapPropsStream(props$ => {
  const rxjsProps$ = Rx.Observable.from(props$)
  // ...now you can use map, filter, scan, etc.
  return transformedProps$
})

This quickly becomes tedious. Rather than performing this transform for each stream individually, setObservableConfig() sets a global observable transform that is applied automatically.

import Rx from 'rxjs'
import { setObservableConfig } from 'recompose'

setObservableConfig({
  // Converts a plain ES observable to an RxJS 5 observable
  fromESObservable: Rx.Observable.from
})

In addition to fromESObservable, the config object also accepts toESObservable, which converts a stream back into an ES observable. Because RxJS 5 observables already conform to the ES observable spec, toESObservable is not necessary in the above example. However, it is required for libraries like RxJS 4 or xstream, whose streams do not conform to the ES observable spec.

Fortunately, you likely don't need to worry about how to configure Recompose for your favorite stream library, because Recompose provides drop-in configuration for you.

Note: The following configuration modules are not included in the main export. You must import them individually, as shown in the examples.

RxJS

import rxjsconfig from 'recompose/rxjsObservableConfig'
setObservableConfig(rxjsconfig)

RxJS 4 (legacy)

import rxjs4config from 'recompose/rxjs4ObservableConfig'
setObservableConfig(rxjs4config)

most

import mostConfig from 'recompose/mostObservableConfig'
setObservableConfig(mostConfig)

xstream

import xstreamConfig from 'recompose/xstreamObservableConfig'
setObservableConfig(xstreamConfig)

Bacon

import baconConfig from 'recompose/baconObservableConfig'
setObservableConfig(baconConfig)

Kefir

import kefirConfig from 'recompose/kefirObservableConfig'
setObservableConfig(kefirConfig)

Flyd

import flydConfig from 'recompose/flydObservableConfig'
setObservableConfig(flydConfig)