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Ambari API Reference v1

The Ambari API facilitates the management and monitoring of the resources of an Apache Hadoop cluster. This document describes the resources and syntax used in the Ambari API and is intended for developers who want to integrate with Ambari.

Release Version

Last Updated June 3, 2013; Note that this is the official release of Ambari V1 API. No breaking changes will be introduced to this version of the API.

Authentication

The operations you perform against the Ambari API require authentication. Access to the API requires the use of Basic Authentication. To use Basic Authentication, you need to send the Authorization: Basic header with your requests. For example, this can be handled when using curl and the --user option.

curl --user name:password http://{your.ambari.server}/api/v1/clusters

Note: The authentication method and source is configured at the Ambari Server. Changing and configuring the authentication method and source is not covered in this document.

Monitoring

The Ambari API provides access to monitoring and metrics information of an Apache Hadoop cluster.

GET

Use the GET method to read the properties, metrics and sub-resources of an Ambari resource. Calling the GET method returns the requested resources and produces no side-effects. A response code of 200 indicates that the request was successfully processed with the requested resource included in the response body.

Example

Get the DATANODE component resource for the HDFS service of the cluster named 'c1'.

GET /clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/DATANODE

Response

200 OK
{
    "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/DATANODE",
    "metrics" : {
        "process" : {
          "proc_total" : 697.75,
          "proc_run" : 0.875
        },
        "rpc" : {
            ...
        },
        "ugi" : {
            ...
        },
        "dfs" : {
            "datanode" : {
            ...
            }
        },
        "disk" : {
            ...
        },
        "cpu" : {
            ...
        }
        ...
    },
    "ServiceComponentInfo" : {
        "cluster_name" : "c1",
        "component_name" : "DATANODE",
        "service_name" : "HDFS"
        "state" : "STARTED"
    },
    "host_components" : [
        {
            "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/DATANODE",
            "HostRoles" : {
                "cluster_name" : "c1",
                "component_name" : "DATANODE",
                "host_name" : "host1"
            }
        }
    ]
}

Management

The Ambari API provides for the management of the resources of an Apache Hadoop cluster. This includes the creation, deletion and updating of resources.

POST

The POST method creates a new resource. If a new resource is created then a 201 response code is returned. The code 202 can also be returned to indicate that the instruction was accepted by the server (see asynchronous response).

Example

Create the HDFS service.

POST /clusters/c1/services/HDFS

Response

201 Created

PUT

Use the PUT method to update resources. If an existing resource is modified then a 200 response code is retrurned to indicate successful completion of the request. The response code 202 can also be returned to indicate that the instruction was accepted by the server (see asynchronous response).

Example

Start the HDFS service (update the state of the HDFS service to be ‘STARTED’).

PUT /clusters/c1/services/HDFS/

Body

{
  "ServiceInfo": {
    "state" : "STARTED”
  }
}

Response

The response code 202 indicates that the server has accepted the instruction to update the resource. The body of the response contains the ID and href of the request resource that was created to carry out the instruction (see asynchronous response).

202 Accepted
{
  "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/3",
  "Requests" : {
    "id" : 3,
    "status" : "InProgress"
  } 
}

DELETE

Use the DELETE method to delete a resource. If an existing resource is deleted then a 200 response code is retrurned to indicate successful completion of the request. The response code 202 can also be returned which indicates that the instruction was accepted by the server and the resource was marked for deletion (see asynchronous response).

Example

Delete the cluster named 'c1'.

DELETE /clusters/c1

Response

200 OK

Asynchronous Response

The managment APIs can return a response code of 202 which indicates that the request has been accepted. The body of the response contains the ID and href of the request resource that was created to carry out the instruction.

202 Accepted
{
  "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/6",
  "Requests" : {
    "id" : 6,
    "status" : "InProgress"
  } 
}

The href in the response body can then be used to query the associated request resource and monitor the progress of the request. A request resource has one or more task sub resources. The following example shows how to use partial response to query for task resources of a request resource.

/clusters/c1/requests/6?fields=tasks/Tasks/*   

The returned task resources can be used to determine the status of the request.

{
  "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/6",
  "Requests" : {
    "id" : 6,
    "cluster_name" : "c1"
  },
  "tasks" : [
    {
      "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/6/tasks/32",
      "Tasks" : {
        "exit_code" : 777,
        "stdout" : "default org.apache.hadoop.mapred.CapacityTaskScheduler\nwarning: Dynamic lookup of ...",
        "status" : "IN_PROGRESS",
        "stderr" : "",
        "host_name" : "dev.hortonworks.com",
        "id" : 32,
        "cluster_name" : "c1",
        "attempt_cnt" : 1,
        "request_id" : 6,
        "command" : "START",
        "role" : "NAMENODE",
        "start_time" : 1367240498196,
        "stage_id" : 1
      }
    },
    {
      "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/6/tasks/33",
      "Tasks" : {
        "exit_code" : 999,
        "stdout" : "",
        "status" : "PENDING",
        ...
      }
    },
    {
      "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/6/tasks/31",
      "Tasks" : {
        "exit_code" : 0,
        "stdout" : "warning: Dynamic lookup of $ambari_db_rca_username ...",
        "status" : "COMPLETED",
        ...
      }
    }
  ]
}

Resources

Collection Resources

A collection resource is a set of resources of the same type, rather than any specific resource. For example:

/clusters  

Refers to a collection of clusters

Instance Resources

An instance resource is a single specific resource. For example:

/clusters/c1

Refers to the cluster resource identified by the id "c1"

Types

Resources are grouped into types. This allows the user to query for collections of resources of the same type. Some resource types are composed of subtypes (e.g. services are sub-resources of clusters).

The following is a list of some of the Ambari resource types with descriptions and usage examples.

clusters

Cluster resources represent named Hadoop clusters. Clusters are top level resources.

Cluster Resources

services

Service resources are services of a Hadoop cluster (e.g. HDFS, MapReduce and Ganglia). Service resources are sub-resources of clusters.

Service Resources

components

Component resources are the individual components of a service (e.g. HDFS/NameNode and MapReduce/JobTracker). Components are sub-resources of services.

Component Resources

hosts

Host resources are the host machines that make up a Hadoop cluster. Hosts are top level resources but can also be sub-resources of clusters.

Host Resources

host_components

Host component resources are usages of a component on a particular host. Host components are sub-resources of hosts.

Host Component Resources

configurations

Configuration resources are sets of key/value pairs that configure the services of a Hadoop cluster.

Configuration Resource Overview

config_groups

Config group is type of resource that supports grouping of configuration resources and host resources for a service.

Config Group Overview

requests

Request resources are groups of tasks that were created to carry out an instruction.

Request Resources

tasks

Task resources are the individual tasks that make up a request resource.

Task Resources

request_schedules

A request schedule defines a batch of requests to be executed based on a schedule.

Request Schedule Resources

workflows

Workflow resources are DAGs of MapReduce jobs in a Hadoop cluster.

Workflow Resources

jobs

Job resources represent individual nodes (MapReduce jobs) in a workflow.

Job Resources

taskattempts

Task attempt resources are individual attempts at map or reduce tasks for a job.

Task Attempt Resources

views

Views offer a systematic way to plug-in UI capabilities to surface custom visualization, management and monitoring features in Ambari Web.

View Resources

repository_versions

Repository version resources contain information about available repositories with Hadoop stacks for cluster.

Repository Version Resources

stack_versions

Stack version resources contain relationship between some resource and repository versions.

Stack Version Resources

rolling_upgrades_check

Rolling upgrades check resources store information about successful/unsuccessful checks performed before rolling upgrade.

Rolling Upgrade Check Resources

upgrades

Upgrade Resources

alerts

Alert resources contain the relationships between definitions, history, and the dispatching of outbound notifications. Ambari leverages its own alert framework in order to monitor a service, component, or host and produce notifications to interested parties.

  • Alert Definitions Definitions are the templates that are used to distribute alerts to the appropriate Ambari agents. They govern the type of alert, the threshold values, and the information to be used when notifying a target.

  • Alert Dispatching Dispatching involves creating groups of alert definitions and adding notification targets to those groups.

  • Alert History The current state of an alert and all of its historical events are available for querying.

Partial Response

Used to control which fields are returned by a query. Partial response can be used to restrict which fields are returned and additionally, it allows a query to reach down and return data from sub-resources. The keyword “fields” is used to specify a partial response. Only the fields specified will be returned to the client. To specify sub-elements, use the notation “a/b/c”. Properties, categories and sub-resources can be specified. The wildcard ‘*’ can be used to show all categories, fields and sub-resources for a resource. This can be combined to provide ‘expand’ functionality for sub-components. Some fields are always returned for a resource regardless of the specified partial response fields. These fields are the fields, which uniquely identify the resource. This would be the primary id field of the resource and the foreign keys to the primary id fields of all ancestors of the resource.

Example: Using Partial Response to restrict response to a specific field

GET    /api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE?fields=metrics/disk/disk_total

200 OK
{
    “href”: “.../api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE?fields=metrics/disk/disk_total”,
    “ServiceComponentInfo” : {
        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
        “component_name” : NAMENODE”,
        “service_name” : “HDFS”
    },
    “metrics” : {
        "disk" : {       
            "disk_total" : 100000
        }
    }
}

Example: Using Partial Response to restrict response to specified category

GET    /api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE?fields=metrics/disk

200 OK
{
    “href”: “.../api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE?fields=metrics/disk”,
    “ServiceComponentInfo” : {
        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
        “component_name” : NAMENODE”,
        “service_name” : “HDFS”
    },
    “metrics” : {
        "disk" : {       
            "disk_total" : 100000,
            “disk_free” : 50000,
            “part_max_used” : 1010
        }
    }
}

Example – Using Partial Response to restrict response to multiple fields/categories

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE?fields=metrics/disk/disk_total,metrics/cpu

200 OK
{
    “href”: “.../api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE?fields=metrics/disk/disk_total,metrics/cpu”,
    “ServiceComponentInfo” : {
        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
        “component_name” : NAMENODE”,
        “service_name” : “HDFS”
    },
    “metrics” : {
        "disk" : {       
            "disk_total" : 100000
        },
        “cpu” : {
            “cpu_speed” : 10000000,
            “cpu_num” : 4,
            “cpu_idle” : 999999,
            ...
        }
    }
}

Example – Using Partial Response to restrict response to a sub-resource

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=host_components

200 OK
{
    “href”: “.../api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=host_components”,
    “Hosts” : {
        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
        “host_name” : “host1”
    },
    “host_components”: [
        {
            “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/NAMENODE”
            “HostRoles” : {
                “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                “component_name” : “NAMENODE”,
                “host_name” : “host1”
            }
        },
        {
            “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/DATANODE”
            “HostRoles” : {
                “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                “component_name” : DATANODE”,
                “host_name” : “host1”
            }
        },
        ... 
    ]
}

Example – Using Partial Response to expand a sub-resource one level deep

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=host_components/*

200 OK
{
    “href”: “.../api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=host_components/*”,
    “Hosts” : {
        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
        “host_name” : “host1”
    },
    “host_components”: [
        {
            “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/DATANODE”
            “HostRoles” : {
                “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                “component_name” : DATANODE”,
                “host_name” : “host1”,
                “state” : “RUNNING”,
                ...
            },        
            "host" : {     
                "href" : ".../api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1"  
            },
            “metrics” : {
                "disk" : {       
                    "disk_total" : 100000000,       
                    "disk_free" : 5000000,       
                    "part_max_used" : 10101     
                },
                ...
            },
            "component" : {
                "href" : "http://ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE", 
                “ServiceComponentInfo” : {
                    "cluster_name" : "c1",         
                    "component_name" : "NAMENODE",         
                    "service_name" : "HDFS"       
                }
            }  
        },
        ...
    ]
}

Example – Using Partial Response for multi-level expansion of sub-resources

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=host_components/component/*

200 OK
{
    “href”: “http://ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=host_components/*”,
    “Hosts” : {
        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
        “host_name” : “host1”
        ...
    },
    “host_components”: [
        {
            “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/DATANODE”,
            “HostRoles” : {
                “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                “component_name” : DATANODE”,
                “host_name” : “host1”
            }, 
            "component" : {
                "href" : "http://ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/DATANODE", 
                “ServiceComponentInfo” : {
                    "cluster_name" : "c1",         
                    "component_name" : "DATANODE",         
                    "service_name" : "HDFS"  
                    ...     
                },
                “metrics”: {
                    “dfs”: {
                        “datanode” : {
                            “blocks_written " :  10000,
                            “blocks_read" : 5000,
                            ...
                        }
                    },
                    “disk”: {
                        "disk_total " :  1000000,
                        “disk_free" : 50000,
                        ...
                    },
                    ...     
                }
            }
        },
        {
            “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/NAMENODE”,
            “HostRoles” : {
                “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                “component_name” : NAMENODE”,
                “host_name” : “host1”
            }, 
            "component" : {
                "href" : "http://ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/NAMENODE", 
                “ServiceComponentInfo” : {
                    "cluster_name" : "c1",         
                    "component_name" : "NAMENODE",         
                    "service_name" : "HDFS"       
                },
                “metrics”: {
                    “dfs”: {
                        “namenode” : {
                            “FilesRenamed " :  10,
                            “FilesDeleted" : 5
                            …
                        }
                    },  
                    “disk”: {
                        "disk_total " :  1000000,
                        “disk_free" : 50000,
                        ...
                    }
                },
                ...
            }
        },
        ...
    ]
}

Example: Using Partial Response to expand collection resource instances one level deep

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts?fields=*

200 OK
{
    “href” : “http://ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/?fields=*”,    
    “items”: [ 
        {
            “href” : “http://ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1”,
            “Hosts” : {
                “cluster_name” :  “c1”,
                “host_name” : “host1”
            },
            “metrics”: {
                “process”: {                
                    "proc_total" : 1000,
                    "proc_run" : 1000
                },
                ...
            },
            “host_components”: [
                {
                    “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/NAMENODE”
                    “HostRoles” : {
                        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                        “component_name” : “NAMENODE”,
                        “host_name” : “host1”
                    }
                },
                {
                    “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/DATANODE”
                    “HostRoles” : {
                        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                        “component_name” : DATANODE”,
                        “host_name” : “host1”
                    }
                },
                ...
            },
            ...
        },
        {
            “href” : “http://ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host2”,
            “Hosts” : {
                “cluster_name” :  “c1”,
                “host_name” : “host2”
            },
            “metrics”: {
                “process”: {                
                    "proc_total" : 555,
                    "proc_run" : 55
                },
                ...
            },
            “host_components”: [
                {
                    “href”: “…/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1/host_components/DATANODE”
                    “HostRoles” : {
                        “cluster_name” : “c1”,
                        “component_name” : “DATANODE”,
                        “host_name” : “host2”
                    }
                },
                ...
            ],
            ...
        },
        ...
    ]
}

Additional Partial Response Examples

Example – For each cluster, get cluster name, all hostname’s and all service names

GET   /api/v1/clusters?fields=Clusters/cluster_name,hosts/Hosts/host_name,services/ServiceInfo/service_name

Example - Get all hostname’s for a given component

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components/DATANODE?fields=host_components/HostRoles/host_name

Example - Get all hostname’s and component names for a given service

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS?fields=components/host_components/HostRoles/host_name,
                                              components/host_components/HostRoles/component_name

Query Predicates

Used to limit which data is returned by a query. This is synonymous to the “where” clause in a SQL query. Providing query parameters does not result in any link expansion in the data that is returned, with the exception of the fields used in the predicates. Query predicates can only be applied to collection resources. A predicate consists of at least one relational expression. Predicates with multiple relational expressions also contain logical operators, which connect the relational expressions. Predicates may also use brackets for explicit grouping of expressions.

Relational Query Operators

Operator Example Description
= name=host1 String or numerical EQUALS
!= name!=host1 String or numerical NOT EQUALS
< disk_total<50 Numerical LESS THAN
> disk_total>50 Numerical GREATER THAN
<= disk_total<=50 Numerical LESS THAN OR EQUALS
>= disk_total>=50 Numerical GREATER THAN OR EQUALS

Logical Query Operators

Operator Example Description
| name=host1|name=host2 Logical OR operator
& prop1=foo&prop2=bar Logical AND operator
! !prop<50 Logical NOT operator

Logical Operator Precedence

Standard logical operator precedence rules apply. The above logical operators are listed in order of precedence starting with the lowest priority.

Brackets

Bracket Description
( Opening Bracket
) Closing Bracket

Brackets can be used to provide explicit grouping of expressions. Expressions within brackets have the highest precedence.

Operator Functions

Operator Example Description
in() name.in(foo,bar) IN function. More compact form of name=foo|name=bar.
isEmpty() category.isEmpty() Used to determine if a category contains any properties.

Operator functions behave like relational operators and provide additional functionality. Some operator functions, such as in(), act as binary operators like the above relational operators, where there is a left and right operand. Some operator functions are unary operators, such as isEmpty(), where there is only a single operand.

Query Examples

Example – Get all hosts with “HEALTHY” status that have 2 or more cpu

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts?Hosts/host_status=HEALTHY&Hosts/cpu_count>=2

Example – Get all hosts with less than 2 cpu or host status != HEALTHY

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts?Hosts/cpu_count<2|Hosts/host_status!=HEALTHY

Example – Get all “rhel6” hosts with less than 2 cpu or “centos6” hosts with 3 or more cpu

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts?Hosts/os_type=rhel6&Hosts/cpu_count<2|Hosts/os_type=centos6&Hosts/cpu_count>=3

Example – Get all hosts where either state != “HEALTHY” or last_heartbeat_time < 1360600135905 and rack_info=”default_rack”

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts?(Hosts/host_status!=HEALTHY|Hosts/last_heartbeat_time<1360600135905)
                              &Hosts/rack_info=default_rack

Example – Get hosts with host name of host1 or host2 or host3 using IN operator

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts?Hosts/host_name.in(host1,host2,host3)

Example – Get and expand all HDFS components, which have at least 1 property in the “metrics/jvm” category (combines query and partial response syntax)

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/services/HDFS/components?!metrics/jvm.isEmpty()&fields=*

Example – Update the state of all ‘INSTALLED’ services to be ‘STARTED’

PUT /api/v1/clusters/c1/services?ServiceInfo/state=INSTALLED 
{
  "ServiceInfo": {
    "state" : "STARTED”
  }
}

Batch Requests

Requests can be batched. This allows for multiple bodies to be specified as an array in a single request.

Example – Creating multiple hosts in a single request

POST /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/         

[
  {
    "Hosts" : {
      "cluster_name" : "c1",
      "host_name" : "host1"
    }
  },
  {
    "Hosts" : {
      "cluster_name" : "c1",
      "host_name" : "host2"
    }
  },
  {
    "Hosts" : {
      "cluster_name" : "c1",
      "host_name" : "host3"
    }
  }
]

RequestInfo

RequestInfo allows the user to specify additional properties in the body of a request.

Key Description
query The query string for the request. Useful for overcoming length limits of the URL and for specifying a query string for each element of a batch request.
context The context string. The API client can pass a string context to able to specify what the requests were for (e.g., "HDFS Service Start", "Add Hosts", etc.)

query

The query property allows the user to specify yhe query string as part of the request body. This is sometimes required in the case of a very long query string that causes the request to exceed the limits of the URL.

Example – Specifying the query string in the request body

PUT  /clusters/c1/services

{
  "RequestInfo":{
    "query":"ServiceInfo/state=STARTED&ServiceInfo/service_name=HDFS&…"
  },

  "Body":
  {
    "ServiceInfo": {
      "state" : "INSTALLED"
    }
  }
}

The query property can also be applied to the elements of a batch request.

Example – Specifying the query string in the request body for a batch request

PUT /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts

[
  {
    "RequestInfo":{
      "query":"Hosts/host_name=host1"
    },
    "Body":
    {
      "Hosts": {
        "desired_config": {
          "type": "global",
          "tag": "version50",
          "properties": { "a": "b", "x": "y" }
        }
      }
    }
  },
  {
    "RequestInfo":{
      "query":"Hosts/host_name=host2"
    },
    "Body":
    {
      "Hosts": {
        "desired_config": {
          "type": "global",
          "tag": "version51",
          "properties": { "a": "c", "x": "z" }
        }
      }
    }
  }
]

context

In some cases a request will return a 202 to indicate that the instruction was accepted by the server (see asynchronous response). In these cases the body of the response contains the ID and href of the request resource that was created to carry out the instruction. It may be desirable to attach a context string to the request which will then be assigned to the resulting request response.

In the following example a request is made to stop the HDFS service. Notice that a context is passed as a RequestInfo property.

Example – Specifying the query string in the request body

PUT  /clusters/c1/services

{
  "RequestInfo":{
    "query":"ServiceInfo/state=STARTED&ServiceInfo/service_name=HDFS",
    "context":"Stop HDFS service."
  },

  "Body":
  {
    "ServiceInfo": {
      "state" : "INSTALLED"
    }
  }
}

Response

{
  "href" : "http://your.ambari.server/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/13",
  "Requests" : {
    "id" : 13,
    "status" : "InProgress"
  }
}

When the request resource returned in the above example is queried, the supplied context string is returned as part of the response.

GET api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/13 

Response

{
  "href" : "http://ec2-50-19-183-89.compute-1.amazonaws.com:8080/api/v1/clusters/c1/requests/13",
  "Requests" : {
    "id" : 13,
    "cluster_name" : "c1",
    "request_context" : "Stop HDFS service."
  },
  "tasks" : [
    …
  ]
}

Temporal Metrics

Some metrics have values that are available across a range in time. To query a metric for a range of values, the following partial response syntax is used.

To get temporal data for a single property: ?fields=category/property[start-time,end-time,step]

To get temporal data for all properties in a category: ?fields=category[start-time,end-time,step]

start-time: Required field. The start time for the query in Unix epoch time format. end-time: Optional field, defaults to now. The end time for the query in Unix epoch time format. step: Optional field, defaults to the corresponding metrics system’s default value. If provided, end-time must also be provided. The interval of time between returned data points specified in seconds. The larger the value provided, the fewer data points returned so this can be used to limit how much data is returned for the given time range. This is only used as a suggestion so the result interval may differ from the one specified.

The returned result is a list of data points over the specified time range. Each data point is a value / timestamp pair.

Note: It is important to understand that requesting large amounts of temporal data may result in severe performance degradation. Always request the minimal amount of information necessary. If large amounts of data are required, consider splitting the request up into multiple smaller requests.

Example – Temporal Query for a single property using only start-time

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=metrics/jvm/gcCount[1360610225]


200 OK
{
    “href” : …/api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=metrics/jvm/gcCount[1360610225]”,
    ...
    “metrics”: [
        {
            “jvm”: {
                "gcCount" : [
                    [10, 1360610165],
                    [12, 1360610180],
                    [13, 1360610195],
                    [14, 1360610210],
                    [15, 1360610225]
                ]
            }
        }
    ]
}

Example – Temporal Query for a category using start-time, end-time and step

GET /api/v1/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=metrics/jvm[1360610200,1360610500,100]

200 OK
{
    “href” : …/clusters/c1/hosts/host1?fields=metrics/jvm[1360610200,1360610500,100]”,
    ...
    “metrics”: [
        {
            “jvm”: {
                "gcCount" : [
                    [10, 1360610200],
                    [12, 1360610300],
                    [13, 1360610400],
                    [14, 1360610500]
                ],
                "gcTimeMillis" : [
                    [1000, 1360610200],
                    [2000, 1360610300],
                    [5000, 1360610400],
                    [9500, 1360610500]
                ],
                ...
            }
        }
    ]
}

Pagination

It is possible to divide the resources returned for a request up into pages by specifying a page size and offset.

Parameter Description
page_size The number of resources to be returned for the paged response.
from The starting page resource (inclusive). Valid values are :offset | "start"
to The ending page resource (inclusive). Valid values are :offset | "end"

Note: either from or to can be specified, not both. If neither is specified then 'from=0' is assumed.

The :offset is an integer value that represents an offset (zero based) into the set of resources. For example, 'from=21' means that the first resource of the response page should be the 21st resource of the resource set.

Example - Get a page of 10 request resources starting with the 21st

/api/v1/clusters/cl1/requests?from=21&page_size=10

The "start" keyword indicates the start of the resource set and is equivalent to an offset of 0.

Example - Get a page of 10 request resources from the start

/api/v1/clusters/cl1/requests?from=start&page_size=10

/api/v1/clusters/cl1/requests?from=0&page_size=10

The "end" keyword indicates the end of the set of resources and is equivalent to an offset of -1.

Example - Get the last 10 request resources

/api/v1/clusters/cl1/requests?to=end&page_size=10

/api/v1/clusters/cl1/requests?to=-1&page_size=10

The default ordering of the resources (by the natural ordering of the resource key properties) is implied.

HTTP Return Codes

The following HTTP codes may be returned by the API.

HTTP CODE Description
200 OK
400 Bad Request
401 Unauthorized
403 Forbidden
404 Not Found
500 Internal Server Error

Errors

Example errors responses

404 Not Found
{   
    "status" : 404,   
    "message" : "The requested resource doesn't exist: Cluster not found, clusterName=someInvalidCluster" 
} 

 

400 Bad Request
{   
    "status" : 400,   
    "message" : "The properties [foo] specified in the request or predicate are not supported for the 
                 resource type Cluster."
}
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