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Latest Version on Packagist Build Status Total Downloads PHP from Packagist GitHub license

Table of Contents

Overview

A Laravel package that simplifies running code and commands when installing or updating your web app.

Installation

Requirements

The package has been developed and tested to work with the following minimum requirements:

  • PHP 7.2
  • Laravel 6

Install the Package

You can install the package via Composer:

composer require ashallendesign/laravel-executor

Usage

Creating an Executor

Creating a New Executor

To create a new Executor, you can use the following command:

php artisan make:executor YourExecutorNameHere

The above command would create an Executor named YourExecutorNameHere that can be found in the app/Executor folder.

Creating an Executor with a Command

Generally, Executors are expected to be run within a console. So, when creating a new Executor, if you intend for it to be run in the console, you can use the following command:

php artisan make:executor YourExecutorNameHere -c

The command above will create the exact same boilerplate for your new Executor as the command in Creating a New Executor. However, it will create a new command in your app/Commands folder named RunYourExecutorNameHereExecutor. This means that you won't need a new command manually to run your executor.

Learn more in Running via the Console to find out how to run the Executor inside the commands.

Updating an Executor

Adding an Artisan Command

To run an Artisan command via your Executor class, you can add the runArtisan() method to your Executor's run() method. For example, the code below shows how you could set the Executor to run the built-in Laravel php artisan cache:clear command:

<?php

namespace App\Executor;

use AshAllenDesign\LaravelExecutor\Classes\Executor;

class AppUpdate extends Executor
{
    public function run(): Executor
    {
        return $this->runArtisan('cache:clear');
    }
}

In some cases, you may want to run a command that requires your input. For example, you might have a command that creates a new user in the database and need you to input some details. In this case, you can pass true as the second parameter to the ->runArtisan() method to specify that it is an interactive command.

To determine the process timeout for the command, you can also pass a time in seconds as the third parameter to the ->runArtisan() method.

Adding a Command

To run a command (that can't be run with Artisan) via your Executor class, you can add the runExternal() method to your Executor's run() method. For example, the code below shows how you could set the Executor to run the built-in Composer composer install command:

<?php

namespace App\Executor;

use AshAllenDesign\LaravelExecutor\Classes\Executor;

class AppUpdate extends Executor
{
    public function run(): Executor
    {
        return $this->runExternal('composer install');
    }
}

In some cases, you may want to run a command that requires your input. For example, you might have a command that creates a new user in the database and need you to input some details. In this case, you can pass true as the second parameter to the ->runExternal() method to specify that it is an interactive command.

To determine the process timeout for the command, you can also pass a time in seconds as the third parameter to the ->runExternal() method.

Adding a Closure

Sometimes you might want to run some code that doesn't necessarily fit into an existing command. In this case, you can add a closure to your Executor instead. The example below shows how to pass a simple closure to your Executor class:

<?php

namespace App\Executor;

use AshAllenDesign\LaravelExecutor\Classes\Executor;

class AppUpdate extends Executor
{
    public function run(): Executor
    {
        return $this->runClosure(function () {
            return 'I am running inside a closure.';
        });
    }
}

Adding Desktop Notifications

If you are running your Executor via the console, you may want to display desktop notifications between some steps. To display a desktop notification you can use either ->simpleDesktopNotification() or ->desktopNotification().

By using ->simpleDesktopNotification() you can pass just a title and body that should be displayed. The example below shows how to create a simple desktop notification:

<?php

namespace App\Executor;

use AshAllenDesign\LaravelExecutor\Classes\Executor;

class AppUpdate extends Executor
{
    public function run(): Executor
    {
        return $this->simpleDesktopNotification('Notification title', 'Notification body');
    }
}

If you want to customise your notification, you can use ->desktopNotification() and pass a Joli\JoliNotif\Notification object as the parameter. For more information on building these types of notifications, check out the Joli\JoliNotif documentation here.

You can also add the ->completeNotification() to your Executor so that a desktop notification can be displayed once all the code inside the class has been run.

Pinging a URL

If you're using your Executor for updating your application on a live server, you might want to ping a URL when it's finished. This could be useful for sending a webhook to alert you that the scripts have run successfully. To ping a URL, you can simply use the ->ping() method.

The example below shows how to ping a website:

<?php

namespace App\Executor;

use AshAllenDesign\LaravelExecutor\Classes\Executor;

class AppUpdate extends Executor
{
    public function run(): Executor
    {
        return $this->ping('https://ashallendesign.co.uk/executor-webhook-route');
    }
}

If you want to send headers in your ping(), you can pass them as a second parameter. This can be useful for if you want to add a signature to your webhook requests to assert that they've been sent from an authorised sender.

The example below shows how to ping a website with headers:

<?php

namespace App\Executor;

use AshAllenDesign\LaravelExecutor\Classes\Executor;

class AppUpdate extends Executor
{
    public function run(): Executor
    {
        return $this->ping('https://ashallendesign.co.uk/executor-webhook-route', [
            'X-Webhook-Signature' => 'secret-signature-to-go-here'
        ]);
    }
}

Running the Executors

Running via the Console

As mentioned above, Executors are mainly intended for being run from within the console. This makes them ideal for adding to deploy scripts; such as the ones that can be found one Laravel Forge and Runcloud.

If you created a command at the same time as the Executor class by using the command above found in Creating an Executor with a Command, your command will already have been given a signature. The signature is created by converting the Executor's classname into kebab case. For example, an Executor with the name AppInstall will be given the command signature of executor:app-install.

The example below shows how a command (that has been unaltered) can be run the AppInstall Executor:

php artisan executor:app-install

Note: To register the command with your Laravel application, you will want to add the command class name to the $commands array in your app/Console/Kernel.php file.

Running manually

There may be times when you want to run an Executor class outside of the command line. To do this, you simply need to call the ->run() method on your class. The example below shows how to manually run an Executor named AppInstall:

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use App\Executor\AppInstall;

class Controller
{
    public function index()
    {
        (new AppInstall())->run();
    }
}

Examples

The example below shows how to create an Executor class that can be run after pulling a new branch of project down from a remote repository:

<?php

namespace App\Executor;

use AshAllenDesign\LaravelExecutor\Classes\Executor;

class AppUpdate extends Executor
{
    public function run(): Executor
    {
        return $this->simpleDesktopNotification('Starting Executor', 'Starting the AppUpdate Executor.')
                    ->runExternal('composer install')
                    ->runArtisan('migrate')
                    ->runArtisan('cache:clear')
                    ->completeNotification();
    }
}

Assuming that the above Executor class is still using the default command signature, each time the branch is pulled down, the following command could be run: php artisan executor:app-update.

The image below shows how a simple Executor command could be run. It's only executing composer du -o but demonstrates how Laravel Executor can provide feedback with real-time output and desktop notifications.

Security

If you find any security related issues, please contact me directly at mail@ashallendesign.co.uk to report it.

Contribution

If you wish to make any changes or improvements to the package, feel free to make a pull request.

Note: A contribution guide will be added soon.

Credits

Changelog

Check the CHANGELOG to get more information about the latest changes.

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see License File for more information.

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Configurable code that can be run when installing and updating your web app.

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