Permalink
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Find file
Fetching contributors…
Cannot retrieve contributors at this time
824 lines (522 sloc) 26.3 KB
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Vim Kata - White Belt (Level 1) |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Welcome, young Vim warrior. It is an honor to meet someone such as yourself
who seeks more than a mere grasping of a few concepts along the Vim path. If
you discipline your mind and dedicate yourself to the practice of Vim Kata,
you will learn to edit text like you touch type. You will feel the flow of
the text in you, and around you, and by your will you will bend its shape and
cause it to flow as you see fit. If you continue to apply yourself and repeat
the kata each day, then before long, you will join the few who have become
Masters of Vim.
Each practice session--called a 'kata'--should take about 20 minutes, or a
little more if it is your first time. When you have reduced the time to under
5 minutes, you should move on to the next kata.
You will find the answer to each question marked by a '>'. You should be able
to type the answer exactly and get the correct result. Each answer assumes that
your cursor is positioned on the first character of the line below the question
Tip: Press 'j' to move down.
Tip: To quit this kata at any time, press <ESC>:q! and then press enter.
Pressing <ESC>:q! will discard any changes.
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Ready? Begin! |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
(#) Follow the path from 'o' to 'x':
o-| x-----------|
|-| |-| |----| |
|--| | | |--| | |
|----| |----| |-|
> lljlljhhhjlllllkklljjlllllkhhhkllllljjllkkkhhhhhhhhhhhh
(#) Using 'l' and 'i' keys, insert the missing text in line 1 using line 2 as a guide:
DlbraePrate
Deliberate Practice
> lielliillielllitlli lllliclliic
(#) Using 'h' and 'a' keys, insert the missing text in line 1 using line 2 as a guide
Repttion s Wrtwhil
Repetition is Worthwhile
< $
> aehhhhhahhhhaohhhhaihhhhhhaihhae
(#) Follow the path from 'o' to 'x':
|--------x
| |----------|
| | |------| |
| | | |--| | |
| | | | | | |
| | |-| o | |
| | |-|
|-|
< /o :noh
> kkhhhjjhhkkkllllllljjjjllkkkkkhhhhhhhhhhhjjjjjjhhkkkkkkklllllllll
(#) Using 'A', append each parenthetical word to the end of its line:
(not) Seek
(the) to follow in
(old;) footsteps of men of
(sought.) seek what they
~ Matsu Basho
> A notjA thejA old;jA sought.
(#) Using 'l' and 'i' keys, insert the missing text in line 1 using line 2 as a guide:
A atais Wort a Tousad Eis
A Kata is Worth a Thousand Edits
> lliKlllli llllllllihlllllihlllllinllllidllit
(#) Using 'h' and 'i' keys, insert the missing text in line 1 using line 2 as a guide
Kep t Simle Smart
Keep It Simple Smarty
< $
> ithhhhhhhiphhhhhiIhhie
(#) Follow the words in alphabetical order (touch each FIRST letter):
Alpha Bravo Charlie Mike November
Echo Delta Lima Kilo
Foxtrot India Juliet
Golf Hotel
> wwjbjjwkwkbkw
(#) Follow the words in alphabetical order (touch each FIRST letter):
Foxtrot, "Golf" Hotel... India
Echo Bravo? Alpha Juliet
Delta! Charlie Lima
< /Alpha :noh
> BjBkkWWWjj
(#) Using 'e' and 'a', pluralize the following words:
Canadian Shark Deliver Wedding Discover
> easeaseaseaseas
(#) Using 'w' and 'i', prefix each word with 'pre':
history meditate view disposition pare
> iprewiprewiprewiprewipre
(#) Using :s, prefix each word with 'pre':
history meditate view disposition pare
> :s/\>/pre/g
(#) Delete the following CAPITALIZED words (including any connected punctuation):
NO life EVER grows great UNTIL IT is FOCUSED, DEDICATED AND disciplined.
> dwwdwwwdwdwwdWdwdw
(#) Delete from the '|' to the end of the line:
The weakest of all |weak things is a virtue that has not been tested in the fire.
~ Mark Twain
> 4wD
(#) Delete the following CAPITALIZED words (including any connected punctuation):
NEVER INTERRUPT YOUR ENEMY WHEN he is making a mistake.
~ Napoleon Bonaparte
> d5w
(#) Delete the following CAPITALIZED words (including any connected punctuation):
Never interrupt your enemy WHEN HE IS MAKING A MISTAKE.
~ Napoleon Bonaparte
> 4wD
(#) Delete the entire line without moving the cursor:
We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.
~ Aristotle
< 6W
> dd
(#) Delete all three lines:
I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once,
but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.
~ Bruce Lee
> d3d
(#) Delete the UPPER CASE words:
Never AB CDEF interrupt your GHIJKL MNOP QRS enemy when he TUVWXYZ is making a mistake.
~ Napoleon Bonaparte
> w2dwww3dwwwwdw
(#) Delete every second word, then undo all changes to the line:
A warrior may choose pacifism; others are condemned to it.
> wdwwdwWdwwdwwdwU
(#) Delete every CAPITALIZED word, undo the deletions, then redo them all:
Begin at THE beginning, the KING said, gravely,
and go on till YOU come to the end: then stop.
~ Lewis CAROLL
> wwdwWWdw6Wdw8Wdwuuuu
(#) Delete the middle line and put a copy of it above and below the other two:
(
Middle Line
)
(
Do it again
)
(
Seek not to follow in the footsteps of men of old; seek what they sought.
)
< 2j
> ddpkkP}jjddpkkP}jjddpkkP
(#) Using dd and p, put the following lines in the correct order:
3. and dissolve the principle.
7. ~ Bruce Lee
1. Learn the principle,
4. In short, enter a mold without being caged in it.
2. abide by the principle,
6. Learn, master and achieve!
5. Obey the principle without being bound by it.
> ddjpkkdd5jp3kddkkPjjjddp
(#) Using !sort, put the following lines in the correct order:
3. and dissolve the principle.
7. ~ Bruce Lee
1. Learn the principle,
4. In short, enter a mold without being caged in it.
2. abide by the principle,
6. Learn, master and achieve!
5. Obey the principle without being bound by it.
> V6j:!sort
(#) Using 'r', correct the following typos and spelling mistakes:
Giwe piople a chamce to meke a dIfferense in the worlt.
> llrvllllrelllllllllllrnllllllllralllllllrilllllllrcllllllllllllllrd
(#) Using 'r', follow the path and fill in the missing numbers:
1-2 -7-8 7-8-
| | | |
3- -5
| |
6- -4- -2-1 5
| |
-8-9-1- -3-
> lljjllr4llkkr6lllljjr9jjhhhhr3hhhhr5hhjjr7llllllllr2llllr4kkkkr6kkllllr9
(#) Using 'c' combinations, change the CAPITALIZED words to the word in parentheses:
a CHIMPANZEE in the hand is worth two in the bush
(bird)
keep your STOMACH in the present
(heart)
and your NOSE in the future
(eye)
> wcwbirdjjjwcwheartjjjbcweye
(#) Using 'C', change the CAPITALIZED words up the end of the line:
excellence is our INHERENT RIGHT
(goal)
deliberate practice is what we WATCH OTHER PEOPLE DO
(praise)
we are not our COLLECTION OF TOYS
(thoughts)
may all beings be free from the causes of THOUGHTLESS BEHAVIOR
(suffering)
> wwwCgoaljjjwwwCpraisejjjbbbCthoughtsjjjwwwwwCsuffering
(#) Using 'c' and 't', change the CAPITALIZED words up to a certain character:
may you live a REMARKABLY OSTENTATIOUS, healthy life
(long)
if dict["WORD OR GROUP OF WORDS"] == "definition"
(phrase)
education is a WILDLY POPULAR EXPERIENCE, not an outcome
(process)
with (CRAZY LONG VARIABLE) do
(i)
> wwwwct,longjjjbbbct"phrasejjjwct,processjjjbbbct)i
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Sparring Time! |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
At this point in the lesson, you have done a number of repetitive exercises.
Now, try your hand against several randomly chosen questions that further
stretch your developing muscle memory. Go as fast as you can!
! KataRandom(movement-along-a-path)
! KataRandom(move-and-delete)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 3.4: MORE CHANGES USING c
** The change operator is used with the same motions as delete. **
1. The change operator works in the same way as delete. The format is:
c [number] motion
2. The motions are the same, such as w (word) and $ (end of line).
3. Move to the first line below marked --->.
4. Move the cursor to the first error.
5. Type c$ and type the rest of the line like the second and press <ESC>.
---> The end of this line needs some help to make it like the second.
---> The end of this line needs to be corrected using the c$ command.
NOTE: You can use the Backspace key to correct mistakes while typing.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 3 SUMMARY
1. To put back text that has just been deleted, type p . This puts the
deleted text AFTER the cursor (if a line was deleted it will go on the
line below the cursor).
2. To replace the character under the cursor, type r and then the
character you want to have there.
3. The change operator allows you to change from the cursor to where the
motion takes you. eg. Type ce to change from the cursor to the end of
the word, c$ to change to the end of a line.
4. The format for change is:
c [number] motion
Now go on to the next lesson.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 4.1: CURSOR LOCATION AND FILE STATUS
** Type CTRL-G to show your location in the file and the file status.
Type G to move to a line in the file. **
NOTE: Read this entire lesson before executing any of the steps!!
1. Hold down the Ctrl key and press g . We call this CTRL-G.
A message will appear at the bottom of the page with the filename and the
position in the file. Remember the line number for Step 3.
NOTE: You may see the cursor position in the lower right corner of the screen
This happens when the 'ruler' option is set (see :help 'ruler' )
2. Press G to move you to the bottom of the file.
Type gg to move you to the start of the file.
3. Type the number of the line you were on and then G . This will
return you to the line you were on when you first pressed CTRL-G.
4. If you feel confident to do this, execute steps 1 through 3.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 4.2: THE SEARCH COMMAND
** Type / followed by a phrase to search for the phrase. **
1. In Normal mode type the / character. Notice that it and the cursor
appear at the bottom of the screen as with the : command.
2. Now type 'errroor' <ENTER>. This is the word you want to search for.
3. To search for the same phrase again, simply type n .
To search for the same phrase in the opposite direction, type N .
4. To search for a phrase in the backward direction, use ? instead of / .
5. To go back to where you came from press CTRL-O (Keep Ctrl down while
pressing the letter o). Repeat to go back further. CTRL-I goes forward.
---> "errroor" is not the way to spell error; errroor is an error.
NOTE: When the search reaches the end of the file it will continue at the
start, unless the 'wrapscan' option has been reset.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 4.3: MATCHING PARENTHESES SEARCH
** Type % to find a matching ),], or } . **
1. Place the cursor on any (, [, or { in the line below marked --->.
2. Now type the % character.
3. The cursor will move to the matching parenthesis or bracket.
4. Type % to move the cursor to the other matching bracket.
5. Move the cursor to another (,),[,],{ or } and see what % does.
---> This ( is a test line with ('s, ['s ] and {'s } in it. ))
NOTE: This is very useful in debugging a program with unmatched parentheses!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 4.4: THE SUBSTITUTE COMMAND
** Type :s/old/new/g to substitute 'new' for 'old'. **
1. Move the cursor to the line below marked --->.
2. Type :s/thee/the <ENTER> . Note that this command only changes the
first occurrence of "thee" in the line.
3. Now type :s/thee/the/g . Adding the g flag means to substitute
globally in the line, change all occurrences of "thee" in the line.
---> thee best time to see thee flowers is in thee spring.
4. To change every occurrence of a character string between two lines,
type :#,#s/old/new/g where #,# are the line numbers of the range
of lines where the substitution is to be done.
Type :%s/old/new/g to change every occurrence in the whole file.
Type :%s/old/new/gc to find every occurrence in the whole file,
with a prompt whether to substitute or not.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 4 SUMMARY
1. CTRL-G displays your location in the file and the file status.
G moves to the end of the file.
number G moves to that line number.
gg moves to the first line.
2. Typing / followed by a phrase searches FORWARD for the phrase.
Typing ? followed by a phrase searches BACKWARD for the phrase.
After a search type n to find the next occurrence in the same direction
or N to search in the opposite direction.
CTRL-O takes you back to older positions, CTRL-I to newer positions.
3. Typing % while the cursor is on a (,),[,],{, or } goes to its match.
4. To substitute new for the first old in a line type :s/old/new
To substitute new for all 'old's on a line type :s/old/new/g
To substitute phrases between two line #'s type :#,#s/old/new/g
To substitute all occurrences in the file type :%s/old/new/g
To ask for confirmation each time add 'c' :%s/old/new/gc
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 5.1: HOW TO EXECUTE AN EXTERNAL COMMAND
** Type :! followed by an external command to execute that command. **
1. Type the familiar command : to set the cursor at the bottom of the
screen. This allows you to enter a command-line command.
2. Now type the ! (exclamation point) character. This allows you to
execute any external shell command.
3. As an example type ls following the ! and then hit <ENTER>. This
will show you a listing of your directory, just as if you were at the
shell prompt. Or use :!dir if ls doesn't work.
NOTE: It is possible to execute any external command this way, also with
arguments.
NOTE: All : commands must be finished by hitting <ENTER>
From here on we will not always mention it.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 5.2: MORE ON WRITING FILES
** To save the changes made to the text, type :w FILENAME. **
1. Type :!dir or :!ls to get a listing of your directory.
You already know you must hit <ENTER> after this.
2. Choose a filename that does not exist yet, such as TEST.
3. Now type: :w TEST (where TEST is the filename you chose.)
4. This saves the whole file (the Vim Tutor) under the name TEST.
To verify this, type :!dir or :!ls again to see your directory.
NOTE: If you were to exit Vim and start it again with vim TEST , the file
would be an exact copy of the tutor when you saved it.
5. Now remove the file by typing (MS-DOS): :!del TEST
or (Unix): :!rm TEST
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 5.3: SELECTING TEXT TO WRITE
** To save part of the file, type v motion :w FILENAME **
1. Move the cursor to this line.
2. Press v and move the cursor to the fifth item below. Notice that the
text is highlighted.
3. Press the : character. At the bottom of the screen :'<,'> will appear.
4. Type w TEST , where TEST is a filename that does not exist yet. Verify
that you see :'<,'>w TEST before you press Enter.
5. Vim will write the selected lines to the file TEST. Use :!dir or !ls
to see it. Do not remove it yet! We will use it in the next lesson.
NOTE: Pressing v starts Visual selection. You can move the cursor around
to make the selection bigger or smaller. Then you can use an operator
to do something with the text. For example, d deletes the text.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 5.4: RETRIEVING AND MERGING FILES
** To insert the contents of a file, type :r FILENAME **
1. Place the cursor just above this line.
NOTE: After executing Step 2 you will see text from Lesson 5.3. Then move
DOWN to see this lesson again.
2. Now retrieve your TEST file using the command :r TEST where TEST is
the name of the file you used.
The file you retrieve is placed below the cursor line.
3. To verify that a file was retrieved, cursor back and notice that there
are now two copies of Lesson 5.3, the original and the file version.
NOTE: You can also read the output of an external command. For example,
:r !ls reads the output of the ls command and puts it below the
cursor.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 5 SUMMARY
1. :!command executes an external command.
Some useful examples are:
(MS-DOS) (Unix)
:!dir :!ls - shows a directory listing.
:!del FILENAME :!rm FILENAME - removes file FILENAME.
2. :w FILENAME writes the current Vim file to disk with name FILENAME.
3. v motion :w FILENAME saves the Visually selected lines in file
FILENAME.
4. :r FILENAME retrieves disk file FILENAME and puts it below the
cursor position.
5. :r !dir reads the output of the dir command and puts it below the
cursor position.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 6.1: THE OPEN COMMAND
** Type o to open a line below the cursor and place you in Insert mode. **
1. Move the cursor to the line below marked --->.
2. Type the lowercase letter o to open up a line BELOW the cursor and place
you in Insert mode.
3. Now type some text and press <ESC> to exit Insert mode.
---> After typing o the cursor is placed on the open line in Insert mode.
4. To open up a line ABOVE the cursor, simply type a capital O , rather
than a lowercase o. Try this on the line below.
---> Open up a line above this by typing O while the cursor is on this line.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 6.2: THE APPEND COMMAND
** Type a to insert text AFTER the cursor. **
1. Move the cursor to the start of the line below marked --->.
2. Press e until the cursor is on the end of li .
3. Type an a (lowercase) to append text AFTER the cursor.
4. Complete the word like the line below it. Press <ESC> to exit Insert
mode.
5. Use e to move to the next incomplete word and repeat steps 3 and 4.
---> This li will allow you to pract appendi text to a line.
---> This line will allow you to practice appending text to a line.
NOTE: a, i and A all go to the same Insert mode, the only difference is where
the characters are inserted.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 6.3: ANOTHER WAY TO REPLACE
** Type a capital R to replace more than one character. **
1. Move the cursor to the first line below marked --->. Move the cursor to
the beginning of the first xxx .
2. Now press R and type the number below it in the second line, so that it
replaces the xxx .
3. Press <ESC> to leave Replace mode. Notice that the rest of the line
remains unmodified.
4. Repeat the steps to replace the remaining xxx.
---> Adding 123 to xxx gives you xxx.
---> Adding 123 to 456 gives you 579.
NOTE: Replace mode is like Insert mode, but every typed character deletes an
existing character.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 6.4: COPY AND PASTE TEXT
** Use the y operator to copy text and p to paste it **
1. Go to the line marked with ---> below and place the cursor after "a)".
2. Start Visual mode with v and move the cursor to just before "first".
3. Type y to yank (copy) the highlighted text.
4. Move the cursor to the end of the next line: j$
5. Type p to put (paste) the text. Then type: a second <ESC> .
6. Use Visual mode to select " item.", yank it with y , move to the end of
the next line with j$ and put the text there with p .
---> a) this is the first item.
b)
NOTE: you can also use y as an operator; yw yanks one word.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 6.5: SET OPTION
** Set an option so a search or substitute ignores case **
1. Search for 'ignore' by entering: /ignore <ENTER>
Repeat several times by pressing n .
2. Set the 'ic' (Ignore case) option by entering: :set ic
3. Now search for 'ignore' again by pressing n
Notice that Ignore and IGNORE are now also found.
4. Set the 'hlsearch' and 'incsearch' options: :set hls is
5. Now type the search command again and see what happens: /ignore <ENTER>
6. To disable ignoring case enter: :set noic
NOTE: To remove the highlighting of matches enter: :nohlsearch
NOTE: If you want to ignore case for just one search command, use \c
in the phrase: /ignore\c <ENTER>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 6 SUMMARY
1. Type o to open a line BELOW the cursor and start Insert mode.
Type O to open a line ABOVE the cursor.
2. Type a to insert text AFTER the cursor.
Type A to insert text after the end of the line.
3. The e command moves to the end of a word.
4. The y operator yanks (copies) text, p puts (pastes) it.
5. Typing a capital R enters Replace mode until <ESC> is pressed.
6. Typing ":set xxx" sets the option "xxx". Some options are:
'ic' 'ignorecase' ignore upper/lower case when searching
'is' 'incsearch' show partial matches for a search phrase
'hls' 'hlsearch' highlight all matching phrases
You can either use the long or the short option name.
7. Prepend "no" to switch an option off: :set noic
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 7.1: GETTING HELP
** Use the on-line help system **
Vim has a comprehensive on-line help system. To get started, try one of
these three:
- press the <HELP> key (if you have one)
- press the <F1> key (if you have one)
- type :help <ENTER>
Read the text in the help window to find out how the help works.
Type CTRL-W CTRL-W to jump from one window to another.
Type :q <ENTER> to close the help window.
You can find help on just about any subject, by giving an argument to the
":help" command. Try these (don't forget pressing <ENTER>):
:help w
:help c_CTRL-D
:help insert-index
:help user-manual
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 7.2: CREATE A STARTUP SCRIPT
** Enable Vim features **
Vim has many more features than Vi, but most of them are disabled by
default. To start using more features you have to create a "vimrc" file.
1. Start editing the "vimrc" file. This depends on your system:
:e ~/.vimrc for Unix
:e $VIM/_vimrc for MS-Windows
2. Now read the example "vimrc" file contents:
:r $VIMRUNTIME/vimrc_example.vim
3. Write the file with:
:w
The next time you start Vim it will use syntax highlighting.
You can add all your preferred settings to this "vimrc" file.
For more information type :help vimrc-intro
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 7.3: COMPLETION
** Command line completion with CTRL-D and <TAB> **
1. Make sure Vim is not in compatible mode: :set nocp
2. Look what files exist in the directory: :!ls or :!dir
3. Type the start of a command: :e
4. Press CTRL-D and Vim will show a list of commands that start with "e".
5. Press <TAB> and Vim will complete the command name to ":edit".
6. Now add a space and the start of an existing file name: :edit FIL
7. Press <TAB>. Vim will complete the name (if it is unique).
NOTE: Completion works for many commands. Just try pressing CTRL-D and
<TAB>. It is especially useful for :help .
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lesson 7 SUMMARY
1. Type :help or press <F1> or <Help> to open a help window.
2. Type :help cmd to find help on cmd .
3. Type CTRL-W CTRL-W to jump to another window
4. Type :q to close the help window
5. Create a vimrc startup script to keep your preferred settings.
6. When typing a : command, press CTRL-D to see possible completions.
Press <TAB> to use one completion.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This concludes the Vim Tutor. It was intended to give a brief overview of
the Vim editor, just enough to allow you to use the editor fairly easily.
It is far from complete as Vim has many many more commands. Read the user
manual next: ":help user-manual".
For further reading and studying, this book is recommended:
Vim - Vi Improved - by Steve Oualline
Publisher: New Riders
The first book completely dedicated to Vim. Especially useful for beginners.
There are many examples and pictures.
See http://iccf-holland.org/click5.html
This book is older and more about Vi than Vim, but also recommended:
Learning the Vi Editor - by Linda Lamb
Publisher: O'Reilly & Associates Inc.
It is a good book to get to know almost anything you want to do with Vi.
The sixth edition also includes information on Vim.
This tutorial was written by Michael C. Pierce and Robert K. Ware,
Colorado School of Mines using ideas supplied by Charles Smith,
Colorado State University. E-mail: bware@mines.colorado.edu.
Modified for Vim by Bram Moolenaar.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~