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Service Wight composes services from providers and transformations located on the class path.
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README.md

Service Wight Maven Central Build Status

Service Wight composes services from providers and filters located on the class path - you can think of it as ServiceLoader on steroids. It also generates service declarations in META-INF/services/ with the help of the @ServiceImplementation annotation.

Service Wight targets Java SE 8 and is covered by the Apache License, Version 2.

Features

  • Generates entries in META-INF/services/.
  • Partitions locatable services into service providers and service filters for some product of any type.
  • Sorts and filters located services based on their priority.
  • Composes located service providers and service filters into custom service providers.
  • Provides transparent access to the located services for...
    • post mortem analysis, e.g. logging, or...
    • overriding the priority based sorting and filtering.

Basic Usage

Dependencies

In Maven:

<dependency>
    <groupId>global.namespace.service-wight</groupId>
    <artifactId>service-wight-core</artifactId>
    <version>0.4.0</version>
</dependency>

Imports

For writing service interfaces:

import java.util.function.*;

For making services locatable:

import global.namespace.service.wight.core.annotation.*;

For using the service locator and its findings:

import global.namespace.service.wight.core.*;

Designing A Locatable Service Provider

A locatable service provider is simply a locatable service which supplies some product. First, the service interface:

@ServiceInterface
public interface Subject extends Supplier<String> { }

Next, the service implementation:

@ServiceImplementation
public class World implements Subject {

    @Override    
    public String get() { return "World"; }
}

Finally, the service location:

Supplier<String> provider = new ServiceLocator().provider(Subject.class);
System.out.println(provider.get());

Not surprisingly, this prints World.

In this example, ServiceLocator works pretty much like ServiceLoader, except for two things:

  1. You don't have to write an entry in META-INF/services/...Subject which references the World class. The processor for the @ServiceImplementation annotation does that for you.
  2. The Subject interface needs to extend the Supplier interface.

The second point may look like a constraint, but it's not: In fact, this design adds a level of indirection which allows you to supply products which ServiceLoader could not locate directly on the classpath - like String in this case.

Adding A Locatable Service Filter

Let's add a salutation for the supplied subject. For this we need a locatable service filter, which is simply a locatable service which transforms some product. First, the service interface:

@ServiceInterface
public interface Salutation extends UnaryOperator<String> { }

Note that the base interface is UnaryOperator this time - not Supplier. A unary operator is simply a function where the input and output parameters have the same type.

Next, the service implementation:

@ServiceImplementation
public class Hello implements Salutation {

    @Override
    public String apply(String subject) { return String.format(Locale.ENGLISH, "Hello %s!", subject); }
}

Finally, the service location:

Supplier<String> provider = new ServiceLocator().provider(Subject.class, Salutation.class);
System.out.println(provider.get());

Note that the provider method now takes two parametes, the first is the service interface for the locatable service provider, Subject, and the second is the service interface for the locatable service filter, Salutation.

The preceding code prints Hello World!, but why? Service Wight composes all service providers and filters it locates on the classpath into a custom provider. In this case, first it locates all Subject implementations (there is only one for now) and sorts them by descending priority. Second, it locates all Salutation implementations (again, there is only one by now) and sorts them by ascending priority. Third, it creates a composite provider which selects the first Subject and applies all Salutations in order.

Overriding The Locatable Service Provider

For overriding the selection of the locatable service provider, you simply need to implement another locatable service provider with a higher priority (the default priority is 0):

@ServiceImplementation(priority = 10)
public class Christian implements Subject {

    @Override
    public String get() { return "Christian"; }
}

Now you can run the service location code again and it will print Hello Christian!, without any changes.

Adding Another Locatable Service Filter

Similar to a locatable service provider, you can add another locatable service filter. Again, the default priority is 0:

@ServiceImplementation(priority = 10)
public final class Smalltalk implements Salutation {

    @Override
    public String apply(String text) { return text + " How do you do?"; }
}

Now you can run the service location code again and it prints Hello Christian! How do you do?.

Conclusion

Service Wight adds a level of indirection to locatable services and partitions them into service providers and service filters at design time. Based on their priority then, providers and filters are selected and sorted for composition into custom providers at runtime. This simple design results in a fairly flexible schema for composing services located on the class path into complex solutions. Leveraging this schema, you can easily design complex plugin architectures where features are encapsulated in plugins which users can compose into their application simply by adding them to the runtime classpath.

Advanced Usage

Overriding The Findings Of The Service Locator

The provider method of the ServiceLocator class actually returns a CompositeProvider, not just a Supplier, so you can write this:

CompositeProvider<String, Subject, Salutation> provider = new ServiceLocator().provider(Subject.class, Salutation.class);
System.out.println(provider.get());

The CompositeProvider class provides access to the list of located service providers and filters by its providers() and filters() properties. You can use these properties to inspect the findings of the service locator. For example, you may want to log the classes and the priorities of the located service providers and filters for post mortem analysis.

You can also create your own CompositeProvider. For example, you may want to override the priority based selection and sorting of service providers and filters. You can do so by calling the providers() and filters() properties, modifying the returned lists and creating a new CompositeProvider from them like this:

List<Subject> subjects = provider.providers();
Collections.reverse(subjects);
List<Salutation> salutations = provider.filters();
Collections.reverse(salutations);
CompositeProvider<String, Subject, Salutation> update = new CompositeProvider<>(subjects, salutations);
System.out.println(update.get());

This prints Hello World How do yo do?!.

Avoiding Dependencies

Maybe you want to avoid a dependency on service-wight-core in your service interfaces? No problem! You can remove the @ServiceInterface annotation at the expense of declaring the service interface in the @ServiceImplementation annotation. So the service interface now looks like this:

public interface Subject extends Supplier<String> { }

Note that there is no more dependency on service-wight-core. The service implementation now looks like this:

@ServiceImplementation(Subject.class)
public class World implements Subject {

    @Override    
    public String get() { return "World"; }
}

The code for the service location remains unchanged:

Supplier<String> provider = new ServiceLocator().provider(Subject.class);
System.out.println(provider.get());

Using The Annotations Standalone

The @ServiceInterface and @ServiceImplementation annotations can be used standalone, i.e. without using the ServiceLocator. This is useful when you don't want your service interfaces to extend Supplier or UnaryOperator for some reason, but you still want some entries in META-INF/services/ to be generated.

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